open password protected pdf using c# : Add text boxes to a pdf application Library utility html asp.net wpf visual studio abs-guide5-part1836

echo "============="
echo "VERTICAL TABS"
echo -e "\v\v\v\v"   # Prints 4 vertical tabs.
echo "=============="
echo "QUOTATION MARK"
echo -e "\042"       # Prints " (quote, octal ASCII character 42).
echo "=============="
# The $'\X' construct makes the -e option unnecessary.
echo; echo "NEWLINE and (maybe) BEEP"
echo $'\n'           # Newline.
echo $'\a'           # Alert (beep).
# May only flash, not beep, depending on terminal.
# We have seen $'\nnn" string expansion, and now . . .
# =================================================================== #
# Version 2 of Bash introduced the $'\nnn' string expansion construct.
# =================================================================== #
echo "Introducing the \$\' ... \' string-expansion construct . . . "
echo ". . . featuring more quotation marks."
echo $'\t \042 \t'   # Quote (") framed by tabs.
# Note that  '\nnn' is an octal value.
# It also works with hexadecimal values, in an $'\xhhh' construct.
echo $'\t \x22 \t'  # Quote (") framed by tabs.
# Thank you, Greg Keraunen, for pointing this out.
# Earlier Bash versions allowed '\x022'.
echo
# Assigning ASCII characters to a variable.
# ----------------------------------------
quote=$'\042'        # " assigned to a variable.
echo "$quote Quoted string $quote and this lies outside the quotes."
echo
# Concatenating ASCII chars in a variable.
triple_underline=$'\137\137\137'  # 137 is octal ASCII code for '_'.
echo "$triple_underline UNDERLINE $triple_underline"
echo
ABC=$'\101\102\103\010'           # 101, 102, 103 are octal A, B, C.
echo $ABC
echo
escape=$'\033'                    # 033 is octal for escape.
echo "\"escape\" echoes as $escape"
                                  no visible output.
echo
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 5. Quoting
45
Add text boxes to a pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to insert text box in pdf document; add text to a pdf document
Add text boxes to a pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add text to a pdf file; how to add text box in pdf file
exit 0
A more elaborate example:
Example 5-3. Detecting key-presses
#!/bin/bash
# Author: Sigurd Solaas, 20 Apr 2011
# Used in ABS Guide with permission.
# Requires version 4.2+ of Bash.
key="no value yet"
while true; do
clear
echo "Bash Extra Keys Demo. Keys to try:"
echo
echo "* Insert, Delete, Home, End, Page_Up and Page_Down"
echo "* The four arrow keys"
echo "* Tab, enter, escape, and space key"
echo "* The letter and number keys, etc."
echo
echo "    d = show date/time"
echo "    q = quit"
echo "================================"
echo
# Convert the separate home-key to home-key_num_7:
if [ "$key" = $'\x1b\x4f\x48' ]; then
key=$'\x1b\x5b\x31\x7e'
#   Quoted string-expansion construct. 
fi
# Convert the separate end-key to end-key_num_1.
if [ "$key" = $'\x1b\x4f\x46' ]; then
key=$'\x1b\x5b\x34\x7e'
fi
case "$key" in
$'\x1b\x5b\x32\x7e')  # Insert
echo Insert Key
;;
$'\x1b\x5b\x33\x7e')  # Delete
echo Delete Key
;;
$'\x1b\x5b\x31\x7e')  # Home_key_num_7
echo Home Key
;;
$'\x1b\x5b\x34\x7e')  # End_key_num_1
echo End Key
;;
$'\x1b\x5b\x35\x7e')  # Page_Up
echo Page_Up
;;
$'\x1b\x5b\x36\x7e')  # Page_Down
echo Page_Down
;;
$'\x1b\x5b\x41')  # Up_arrow
echo Up arrow
;;
$'\x1b\x5b\x42')  # Down_arrow
echo Down arrow
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 5. Quoting
46
VB.NET Image: Professional Form Processing and Recognition SDK in
reading (OMR) helpful for check/mark sense boxes and intelligent The form format and annotation text can all be your forms before using form printing add-on.
add text pdf acrobat professional; add text to pdf document online
.NET JPEG 2000 SDK | Encode & Decode JPEG 2000 Images
Available as an add-on for RaterEdge .NET Imaging SDK; Support for any 32 Support metadata encoding and decoding, including IPTC, XMP, XML Box, UUID Boxes, etc.
how to insert text into a pdf using reader; how to insert text box on pdf
;;
$'\x1b\x5b\x43')  # Right_arrow
echo Right arrow
;;
$'\x1b\x5b\x44')  # Left_arrow
echo Left arrow
;;
$'\x09')  # Tab
echo Tab Key
;;
$'\x0a')  # Enter
echo Enter Key
;;
$'\x1b')  # Escape
echo Escape Key
;;
$'\x20')  # Space
echo Space Key
;;
d)
date
;;
q)
echo Time to quit...
echo
exit 0
;;
*)
echo You pressed: \'"$key"\'
;;
esac
echo
echo "================================"
unset K1 K2 K3
read -s -N1 -p "Press a key: "
K1="$REPLY"
read -s -N2 -t 0.001
K2="$REPLY"
read -s -N1 -t 0.001
K3="$REPLY"
key="$K1$K2$K3"
done
exit $?
See also Example 37-1.
\"
gives the quote its literal meaning
echo "Hello"                     # Hello
echo "\"Hello\" ... he said."    # "Hello" ... he said.
\$
gives the dollar sign its literal meaning (variable name following \$ will not be referenced)
echo "\$variable01"           # $variable01
echo "The book cost \$7.98."  # The book cost $7.98.
\\
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 5. Quoting
47
gives the backslash its literal meaning
echo "\\"  # Results in \
# Whereas . . .
echo "\"   # Invokes secondary prompt from the command-line.
# In a script, gives an error message.
# However . . .
echo '\'   # Results in \
The behavior of \ depends on whether it is escaped, strong-quoted, weak-quoted, or appearing within
command substitution or a here document.
 Simple escaping and quoting
echo \z               #  z
echo \\z              # \z
echo '\z'             # \z
echo '\\z'            # \\z
echo "\z"             # \z
echo "\\z"            # \z
 Command substitution
echo `echo \z`        #  z
echo `echo \\z`       #  z
echo `echo \\\z`      # \z
echo `echo \\\\z`     # \z
echo `echo \\\\\\z`   # \z
echo `echo \\\\\\\z`  # \\z
echo `echo "\z"`      # \z
echo `echo "\\z"`     # \z
# Here document
cat <<EOF              
\z                      
EOF                   # \z
cat <<EOF              
\\z                     
EOF                   # \z
# These examples supplied by Stéphane Chazelas.
Elements of a string assigned to a variable may be escaped, but the escape character alone may not be
assigned to a variable.
variable=\
echo "$variable"
# Will not work - gives an error message:
# test.sh: : command not found
# A "naked" escape cannot safely be assigned to a variable.
#
#  What actually happens here is that the "\" escapes the newline and
#+ the effect is        variable=echo "$variable"
#+                      invalid variable assignment
variable=\
23skidoo
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 5. Quoting
48
echo "$variable"        #  23skidoo
#  This works, since the second line
#+ is a valid variable assignment.
variable=\ 
#        \^    escape followed by space
echo "$variable"        # space
variable=\\
echo "$variable"        # \
variable=\\\
echo "$variable"
# Will not work - gives an error message:
# test.sh: \: command not found
#
#  First escape escapes second one, but the third one is left "naked",
#+ with same result as first instance, above.
variable=\\\\
echo "$variable"        # \\
# Second and fourth escapes escaped.
# This is o.k.
Escaping a space can prevent word splitting in a command's argument list.
file_list="/bin/cat /bin/gzip /bin/more /usr/bin/less /usr/bin/emacs-20.7"
# List of files as argument(s) to a command.
# Add two files to the list, and list all.
ls -l /usr/X11R6/bin/xsetroot /sbin/dump $file_list
echo "-------------------------------------------------------------------------"
# What happens if we escape a couple of spaces?
ls -l /usr/X11R6/bin/xsetroot\ /sbin/dump\ $file_list
# Error: the first three files concatenated into a single argument to 'ls -l'
       because the two escaped spaces prevent argument (word) splitting.
The escape also provides a means of writing a multi-line command. Normally, each separate line constitutes a
different command, but an escape at the end of a line escapes the newline character, and the command
sequence continues on to the next line.
(cd /source/directory && tar cf - . ) | \
(cd /dest/directory && tar xpvf -)
# Repeating Alan Cox's directory tree copy command,
# but split into two lines for increased legibility.
# As an alternative:
tar cf - -C /source/directory . |
tar xpvf - -C /dest/directory
# See note below.
# (Thanks, Stéphane Chazelas.)
If a script line ends with a |, a pipe character, then a \, an escape, is not strictly necessary. It is, however,
good programming practice to always escape the end of a line of code that continues to the following
line.
echo "foo
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 5. Quoting
49
bar" 
#foo
#bar
echo
echo 'foo
bar'    # No difference yet.
#foo
#bar
echo
echo foo\
bar     # Newline escaped.
#foobar
echo
echo "foo\
bar"     # Same here, as \ still interpreted as escape within weak quotes.
#foobar
echo
echo 'foo\
bar'     # Escape character \ taken literally because of strong quoting.
#foo\
#bar
# Examples suggested by Stéphane Chazelas.
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 5. Quoting
50
Chapter 6. Exit and Exit Status
... there are dark corners in the Bourne shell, and
people use all of them.
--Chet Ramey
The exit command terminates a script, just as in a C program. It can also return a value, which is available to
the script's parent process.
Every command returns an exit status (sometimes referred to as a return status or exit code).  A successful
command returns a 0, while an unsuccessful one returns a non-zero value that usually can be interpreted as an
error code. Well-behaved UNIX commands, programs, and utilities return a 0 exit code upon successful
completion, though there are some exceptions.
Likewise, functions within a script and the script itself return an exit status. The last command executed in the
function or script determines the exit status. Within a script, an exit nnn command may be used to deliver
an nnn exit status to the shell (nnn must be an integer in the 0 - 255 range).
When a script ends with an exit that has no parameter, the exit status of the script is the exit status of the
last command executed in the script (previous to the exit).
#!/bin/bash
COMMAND_1
. . .
COMMAND_LAST
# Will exit with status of last command.
exit
The equivalent of a bare exit is exit $? or even just omitting the exit.
#!/bin/bash
COMMAND_1
. . .
COMMAND_LAST
# Will exit with status of last command.
exit $?
#!/bin/bash
COMMAND1
. . . 
COMMAND_LAST
Chapter 6. Exit and Exit Status
51
# Will exit with status of last command.
$? reads the exit status of the last command executed. After a function returns, $? gives the exit status of the
last command executed in the function. This is Bash's way of giving functions a "return value." [32]
Following the execution of a pipe, a $? gives the exit status of the last command executed.
After a script terminates, a $? from the command-line gives the exit status of the script, that is, the last
command executed in the script, which is, by convention, 0 on success or an integer in the range 1 - 255 on
error.
Example 6-1. exit / exit status
#!/bin/bash
echo hello
echo $?    # Exit status 0 returned because command executed successfully.
lskdf      # Unrecognized command.
echo $?    # Non-zero exit status returned -- command failed to execute.
echo
exit 113   # Will return 113 to shell.
# To verify this, type "echo $?" after script terminates.
 By convention, an 'exit 0' indicates success,
#+ while a non-zero exit value means an error or anomalous condition.
 See the "Exit Codes With Special Meanings" appendix.
$? is especially useful for testing the result of a command in a script (see Example 16-35 and Example 16-20).
The !, the logical not qualifier, reverses the outcome of a test or command, and this affects its exit status.
Example 6-2. Negating a condition using !
true    # The "true" builtin.
echo "exit status of \"true\" = $?"     # 0
! true
echo "exit status of \"! true\" = $?"   # 1
# Note that the "!" needs a space between it and the command.
#    !true   leads to a "command not found" error
#
# The '!' operator prefixing a command invokes the Bash history mechanism.
true
!true
# No error this time, but no negation either.
# It just repeats the previous command (true).
# =========================================================== #
# Preceding a _pipe_ with ! inverts the exit status returned.
ls | bogus_command     # bash: bogus_command: command not found
echo $?                # 127
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 6. Exit and Exit Status
52
! ls | bogus_command   # bash: bogus_command: command not found
echo $?                # 0
# Note that the ! does not change the execution of the pipe.
# Only the exit status changes.
# =========================================================== #
# Thanks, Stéphane Chazelas and Kristopher Newsome.
Certain exit status codes have reserved meanings and should not be user-specified in a script.
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 6. Exit and Exit Status
53
Chapter 7. Tests
Every reasonably complete programming language can test for a condition, then act according to the result of
the test. Bash has the test command, various bracket and parenthesis operators, and the if/then construct.
7.1. Test Constructs
An if/then construct tests whether the exit status of a list of commands is 0 (since 0 means "success"
by UNIX convention), and if so, executes one or more commands.
• 
There exists a dedicated command called [ (left bracket special character). It is a synonym for test,
and a builtin for efficiency reasons. This command considers its arguments as comparison expressions
or file tests and returns an exit status corresponding to the result of the comparison (0 for true, 1 for
false).
• 
With version 2.02, Bash introduced the [[ ... ]] extended test command, which performs comparisons
in a manner more familiar to programmers from other languages. Note that [[ is a keyword, not a
command.
Bash sees [[ $a -lt $b ]] as a single element, which returns an exit status.
• 
The (( ... )) and let ... constructs return an exit status, according to whether the arithmetic expressions
they evaluate expand to a non-zero value. These arithmetic-expansion constructs may therefore be
used to perform arithmetic comparisons.
(( 0 && 1 ))                 # Logical AND
echo $?     # 1     ***
# And so ...
let "num = (( 0 && 1 ))"
echo $num   # 0
# But ...
let "num = (( 0 && 1 ))"
echo $?     # 1     ***
(( 200 || 11 ))              # Logical OR
echo $?     # 0     ***
# ...
let "num = (( 200 || 11 ))"
echo $num   # 1
let "num = (( 200 || 11 ))"
echo $?     # 0     ***
(( 200 | 11 ))               # Bitwise OR
echo $?                      # 0     ***
# ...
let "num = (( 200 | 11 ))"
echo $num                    # 203
let "num = (( 200 | 11 ))"
echo $?                      # 0     ***
# The "let" construct returns the same exit status
#+ as the double-parentheses arithmetic expansion.
• 
Chapter 7. Tests
54
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested