open password protected pdf using c# : How to insert text in pdf using preview Library software component asp.net winforms html mvc abs-guide56-part1843

Coprocesses use file descriptors. File descriptors enable processes and pipes to communicate.
#!/bin/bash4
# A coprocess communicates with a while-read loop.
coproc { cat mx_data.txt; sleep 2; }
                        ^^^^^^^
# Try running this without "sleep 2" and see what happens.
while read -u ${COPROC[0]} line    #  ${COPROC[0]} is the
do                                 #+ file descriptor of the coprocess.
echo "$line" | sed -e 's/line/NOT-ORIGINAL-TEXT/'
done
kill $COPROC_PID                   #  No longer need the coprocess,
#+ so kill its PID.
But, be careful!
#!/bin/bash4
echo; echo
a=aaa
b=bbb
c=ccc
coproc echo "one two three"
while read -u ${COPROC[0]} a b c;  #  Note that this loop
do                                 #+ runs in a subshell.
echo "Inside while-read loop: ";
echo "a = $a"; echo "b = $b"; echo "c = $c"
echo "coproc file descriptor: ${COPROC[0]}"
done 
# a = one
# b = two
# c = three
# So far, so good, but ...
echo "-----------------"
echo "Outside while-read loop: "
echo "a = $a"  # a =
echo "b = $b"  # b =
echo "c = $c"  # c =
echo "coproc file descriptor: ${COPROC[0]}"
echo
 The coproc is still running, but ...
#+ it still doesn't enable the parent process
#+ to "inherit" variables from the child process, the while-read loop.
 Compare this to the "badread.sh" script.
The coprocess is asynchronous, and this might cause a problem. It may terminate
before another process has finished communicating with it.
#!/bin/bash4
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 37. Bash, versions 2, 3, and 4
555
How to insert text in pdf using preview - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to insert text into a pdf file; how to add text to a pdf file in preview
How to insert text in pdf using preview - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to input text in a pdf; add editable text box to pdf
coproc cpname { for i in {0..10}; do echo "index = $i"; done; }
#      ^^^^^^ This is a *named* coprocess.
read -u ${cpname[0]}
echo $REPLY         #  index = 0
echo ${COPROC[0]}   #+ No output ... the coprocess timed out
#  after the first loop iteration.
# However, George Dimitriu has a partial fix.
coproc cpname { for i in {0..10}; do echo "index = $i"; done; sleep 1;
echo hi > myo; cat - >> myo; }
#       ^^^^^ This is a *named* coprocess.
echo "I am main"$'\04' >&${cpname[1]}
myfd=${cpname[0]}
echo myfd=$myfd
### while read -u $myfd
### do
###   echo $REPLY;
### done
echo $cpname_PID
#  Run this with and without the commented-out while-loop, and it is
#+ apparent that each process, the executing shell and the coprocess,
#+ waits for the other to finish writing in its own write-enabled pipe.
The new mapfile builtin makes it possible to load an array with the contents of a text file without
using a loop or command substitution.
#!/bin/bash4
mapfile Arr1 < $0
# Same result as     Arr1=( $(cat $0) )
echo "${Arr1[@]}"  # Copies this entire script out to stdout.
echo "--"; echo
# But, not the same as   read -a   !!!
read -a Arr2 < $0
echo "${Arr2[@]}"  # Reads only first line of script into the array.
exit
• 
The read builtin got a minor facelift. The -t timeout option now accepts (decimal) fractional values
[132] and the -i option permits preloading the edit buffer. [133] Unfortunately, these enhancements
are still a work in progress and not (yet) usable in scripts.
• 
Parameter substitution gets case-modification operators.
#!/bin/bash4
var=veryMixedUpVariable
echo ${var}            # veryMixedUpVariable
echo ${var^}           # VeryMixedUpVariable
        *              First char --> uppercase.
echo ${var^^}          # VERYMIXEDUPVARIABLE
        **             All chars  --> uppercase.
echo ${var,}           # veryMixedUpVariable
• 
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 37. Bash, versions 2, 3, and 4
556
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word. Overview for How to Use XDoc.Word to preview document content without loading
how to insert text in pdf using preview; add text to pdf in preview
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint. Overview for How to Use XDoc.PowerPoint to preview document content without
add text to pdf file online; how to add a text box to a pdf
        *              First char --> lowercase.
echo ${var,,}          # verymixedupvariable
        **             All chars  --> lowercase.
The declare builtin now accepts the -l lowercase and -c capitalize options.
#!/bin/bash4
declare -l var1            # Will change to lowercase
var1=MixedCaseVARIABLE
echo "$var1"               # mixedcasevariable
# Same effect as             echo $var1 | tr A-Z a-z
declare -c var2            # Changes only initial char to uppercase.
var2=originally_lowercase
echo "$var2"               # Originally_lowercase
# NOT the same effect as     echo $var2 | tr a-z A-Z
• 
Brace expansion has more options.
Increment/decrement, specified in the final term within braces.
#!/bin/bash4
echo {40..60..2}
# 40 42 44 46 48 50 52 54 56 58 60
# All the even numbers, between 40 and 60.
echo {60..40..2}
# 60 58 56 54 52 50 48 46 44 42 40
# All the even numbers, between 40 and 60, counting backwards.
# In effect, a decrement.
echo {60..40..-2}
# The same output. The minus sign is not necessary.
# But, what about letters and symbols?
echo {X..d}
# X Y Z [  ] ^ _ ` a b c d
# Does not echo the \ which escapes a space.
Zero-padding, specified in the first term within braces, prefixes each term in the output with the same
number of zeroes.
bash4$ echo {010..15}
010 011 012 013 014 015
bash4$ echo {000..10}
000 001 002 003 004 005 006 007 008 009 010
• 
Substring extraction on positional parameters now starts with $0 as the zero-index. (This corrects an
inconsistency in the treatment of positional parameters.)
#!/bin/bash
# show-params.bash
# Requires version 4+ of Bash.
# Invoke this scripts with at least one positional parameter.
• 
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 37. Bash, versions 2, 3, and 4
557
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
toolkit allows developers to specify where they want to insert (blank) PDF last page or after any desired page of current PDF document) using C# .NET
adding text to pdf form; how to add text box in pdf file
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Supported PDF Processing Features by Using RasterEdge WinForms Viewer for C#.NET. Overview. Highlight PDF text. • Add text to PDF document in preview.
how to insert text into a pdf with acrobat; adding text to a pdf document
E_BADPARAMS=99
if [ -z "$1" ]
then
echo "Usage $0 param1 ..."
exit $E_BADPARAMS
fi
echo ${@:0}
# bash3 show-params.bash4 one two three
# one two three
# bash4 show-params.bash4 one two three
# show-params.bash4 one two three
# $0                $1  $2  $3
The new ** globbing operator matches filenames and directories recursively.
#!/bin/bash4
# filelist.bash4
shopt -s globstar  # Must enable globstar, otherwise ** doesn't work.
# The globstar shell option is new to version 4 of Bash.
echo "Using *"; echo
for filename in *
do
echo "$filename"
done   # Lists only files in current directory ($PWD).
echo; echo "--------------"; echo
echo "Using **"
for filename in **
do
echo "$filename"
done   # Lists complete file tree, recursively.
exit
Using *
allmyfiles
filelist.bash4
--------------
Using **
allmyfiles
allmyfiles/file.index.txt
allmyfiles/my_music
allmyfiles/my_music/me-singing-60s-folksongs.ogg
allmyfiles/my_music/me-singing-opera.ogg
allmyfiles/my_music/piano-lesson.1.ogg
allmyfiles/my_pictures
allmyfiles/my_pictures/at-beach-with-Jade.png
allmyfiles/my_pictures/picnic-with-Melissa.png
filelist.bash4
• 
The new $BASHPID internal variable.
• 
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 37. Bash, versions 2, 3, and 4
558
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Features about PDF Processing Features by Using RasterEdge WPF Viewer for C#.NET. Overview. Add text to PDF document. • Insert text box to PDF file.
how to insert text into a pdf using reader; add text to pdf
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Excel. Overview for How to Use XDoc.Excel to preview document content without loading
add text boxes to pdf document; adding text to pdf online
There is a new builtin error-handling function named command_not_found_handle.
#!/bin/bash4
command_not_found_handle ()
{ # Accepts implicit parameters.
echo "The following command is not valid: \""$1\"""
echo "With the following argument(s): \""$2\"" \""$3\"""   # $4, $5 ...
} # $1, $2, etc. are not explicitly passed to the function.
bad_command arg1 arg2
# The following command is not valid: "bad_command"
# With the following argument(s): "arg1" "arg2"
• 
Editorial comment
Associative arrays? Coprocesses? Whatever happened to the lean and mean Bash we have come to know
and love? Could it be suffering from (horrors!) "feature creep"? Or perhaps even Korn shell envy?
Note to Chet Ramey: Please add only essential features in future Bash releases -- perhaps for-each loops and
support for multi-dimensional arrays. [134] Most Bash users won't need, won't use, and likely won't greatly
appreciate complex "features" like built-in debuggers, Perl interfaces, and bolt-on rocket boosters.
37.3.1. Bash, version 4.1
Version 4.1 of Bash, released in May, 2010, was primarily a bugfix update.
The printf command now accepts a -v option for setting array indices.
• 
Within double brackets, the > and < string comparison operators now conform to the locale. Since the
locale setting may affect the sorting order of string expressions, this has side-effects on comparison
tests within [[ ... ]] expressions.
• 
The read builtin now takes a -N option (read -N chars), which causes the read to terminate after
chars characters.
Example 37-8. Reading N characters
#!/bin/bash
# Requires Bash version -ge 4.1 ...
num_chars=61
read -N $num_chars var < $0   # Read first 61 characters of script!
echo "$var"
exit
####### Output of Script #######
#!/bin/bash
# Requires Bash version -ge 4.1 ...
num_chars=61
• 
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 37. Bash, versions 2, 3, and 4
559
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo from RasterEdge.com, this C#.NET PDF image adding Using this C# .NET image adding library control for PDF
adding text field to pdf; adding text to pdf document
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Insert Image to PDF Page Using VB. inputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
how to add text to a pdf file in reader; how to add text fields to pdf
Here documents embedded in  $( ... ) command substitution constructs may terminate with a
simple ).
Example 37-9. Using a here document to set a variable
#!/bin/bash
# here-commsub.sh
# Requires Bash version -ge 4.1 ...
multi_line_var=$( cat <<ENDxxx
------------------------------
This is line 1 of the variable
This is line 2 of the variable
This is line 3 of the variable
------------------------------
ENDxxx)
 Rather than what Bash 4.0 requires:
#+ that the terminating limit string and
#+ the terminating close-parenthesis be on separate lines.
# ENDxxx
# )
echo "$multi_line_var"
 Bash still emits a warning, though.
 warning: here-document at line 10 delimited
#+ by end-of-file (wanted `ENDxxx')
• 
37.3.2. Bash, version 4.2
Version 4.2 of Bash, released in February, 2011, contains a number of new features and enhancements, in
addition to bugfixes.
Bash now supports the the \u and \U Unicode escape.
Unicode is a cross-platform standard for encoding into numerical values letters and graphic
symbols. This permits representing and displaying characters in foreign alphabets and unusual fonts.
echo -e '\u2630'   # Horizontal triple bar character.
# Equivalent to the more roundabout:
echo -e "\xE2\x98\xB0"
# Recognized by earlier Bash versions.
echo -e '\u220F'   # PI (Greek letter and mathematical symbol)
echo -e '\u0416'   # Capital "ZHE" (Cyrillic letter)
echo -e '\u2708'   # Airplane (Dingbat font) symbol
echo -e '\u2622'   # Radioactivity trefoil
echo -e "The amplifier circuit requires a 100 \u2126 pull-up resistor."
• 
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 37. Bash, versions 2, 3, and 4
560
unicode_var='\u2640'
echo -e $unicode_var      # Female symbol
printf "$unicode_var \n"  # Female symbol, with newline
 And for something a bit more elaborate . . .
 We can store Unicode symbols in an associative array,
#+ then retrieve them by name.
 Run this in a gnome-terminal or a terminal with a large, bold font
#+ for better legibility.
declare -A symbol  # Associative array.
symbol[script_E]='\u2130'
symbol[script_F]='\u2131'
symbol[script_J]='\u2110'
symbol[script_M]='\u2133'
symbol[Rx]='\u211E'
symbol[TEL]='\u2121'
symbol[FAX]='\u213B'
symbol[care_of]='\u2105'
symbol[account]='\u2100'
symbol[trademark]='\u2122'
echo -ne "${symbol[script_E]}   "
echo -ne "${symbol[script_F]}   "
echo -ne "${symbol[script_J]}   "
echo -ne "${symbol[script_M]}   "
echo -ne "${symbol[Rx]}   "
echo -ne "${symbol[TEL]}   "
echo -ne "${symbol[FAX]}   "
echo -ne "${symbol[care_of]}   "
echo -ne "${symbol[account]}   "
echo -ne "${symbol[trademark]}   "
echo
The above example uses the $' ... ' string-expansion construct.
When the lastpipe shell option is set, the last command in a pipe doesn't run in a subshell.
Example 37-10. Piping input to a read
#!/bin/bash
# lastpipe-option.sh
line=''                   # Null value.
echo "\$line = "$line""   # $line =
echo
shopt -s lastpipe         # Error on Bash version -lt 4.2.
echo "Exit status of attempting to set \"lastpipe\" option is $?"
    1 if Bash version -lt 4.2, 0 otherwise.
echo
• 
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 37. Bash, versions 2, 3, and 4
561
head -1 $0 | read line    # Pipe the first line of the script to read.
           ^^^^^^^^^      Not in a subshell!!!
echo "\$line = "$line""
# Older Bash releases       $line =
# Bash version 4.2          $line = #!/bin/bash
This option offers possible "fixups" for these example scripts: Example 34-3 and Example 15-8.
Negative array indices permit counting backwards from the end of an array.
Example 37-11. Negative array indices
#!/bin/bash
# neg-array.sh
# Requires Bash, version -ge 4.2.
array=( zero one two three four five )   # Six-element array.
        0    1   2    3    4    5
       -6   -5  -4   -3   -2   -1
# Negative array indices now permitted.
echo ${array[-1]}   # five
echo ${array[-2]}   # four
# ...
echo ${array[-6]}   # zero
# Negative array indices count backward from the last element+1.
# But, you cannot index past the beginning of the array.
echo ${array[-7]}   # array: bad array subscript
# So, what is this new feature good for?
echo "The last element in the array is "${array[-1]}""
# Which is quite a bit more straightforward than:
echo "The last element in the array is "${array[${#array[*]}-1]}""
echo
# And ...
index=0
let "neg_element_count = 0 - ${#array[*]}"
# Number of elements, converted to a negative number.
while [ $index -gt $neg_element_count ]; do
((index--)); echo -n "${array[index]} "
done  # Lists the elements in the array, backwards.
# We have just simulated the "tac" command on this array.
echo
# See also neg-offset.sh.
• 
Substring extraction uses a negative length parameter to specify an offset from the end of the target
string.
Example 37-12. Negative parameter in string-extraction construct
#!/bin/bash
# Bash, version -ge 4.2
# Negative length-index in substring extraction.
• 
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 37. Bash, versions 2, 3, and 4
562
# Important: It changes the interpretation of this construct!
stringZ=abcABC123ABCabc
echo ${stringZ}                              # abcABC123ABCabc
                  Position within string:    0123456789.....
echo ${stringZ:2:3}                          #   cAB
 Count 2 chars forward from string beginning, and extract 3 chars.
 ${string:position:length}
 So far, nothing new, but now ...
# abcABC123ABCabc
                  Position within string:    0123....6543210
echo ${stringZ:3:-6}                         #    ABC123
               ^
 Index 3 chars forward from beginning and 6 chars backward from end,
#+ and extract everything in between.
 ${string:offset-from-front:offset-from-end}
 When the "length" parameter is negative, 
#+ it serves as an offset-from-end parameter.
 See also neg-array.sh.
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Chapter 37. Bash, versions 2, 3, and 4
563
Chapter 38. Endnotes
38.1. Author's Note
doce ut discas
(Teach, that you yourself may learn.)
How did I come to write a scripting book? It's a strange tale. It seems that a few years back I needed to learn
shell scripting -- and what better way to do that than to read a good book on the subject? I was looking to buy
a tutorial and reference covering all aspects of the subject. I was looking for a book that would take difficult
concepts, turn them inside out, and explain them in excruciating detail, with well-commented examples. [135]
In fact, I was looking for this very book, or something very much like it. Unfortunately, it didn't exist, and if I
wanted it, I'd have to write it. And so, here we are, folks.
That reminds me of the apocryphal story about a mad professor. Crazy as a loon, the fellow was. At the sight
of a book, any book -- at the library, at a bookstore, anywhere -- he would become totally obsessed with the
idea that he could have written it, should have written it -- and done a better job of it to boot. He would
thereupon rush home and proceed to do just that, write a book with the very same title. When he died some
years later, he allegedly had several thousand books to his credit, probably putting even Asimov to shame.
The books might not have been any good, who knows, but does that really matter? Here's a fellow who lived
his dream, even if he was obsessed by it, driven by it . . . and somehow I can't help admiring the old coot.
38.2. About the Author
Who is this guy anyhow?
The author claims no credentials or special qualifications, [136] other than a compulsion to write. [137]
This book is somewhat of a departure from his other major work,  HOW-2 Meet Women: The Shy Man's
Guide to Relationships. He has also written the Software-Building HOWTO. Of late, he has been trying his
(heavy) hand at fiction: Dave Dawson Over Berlin (First Installment) Dave Dawson Over Berlin (Second
Installment) and Dave Dawson Over Berlin (Third Installment) . He also has a few Instructables (here, here,
here, here, here, here, and here to his (dis)credit.
A Linux user since 1995 (Slackware 2.2, kernel 1.2.1), the author has emitted a few software truffles,
including the cruft one-time pad encryption utility, the mcalc mortgage calculator, the judge Scrabble®
adjudicator, the yawl word gaming list package, and the Quacky anagramming gaming package. He got off to
a rather shaky start in the computer game -- programming FORTRAN IV on a CDC 3800 (on paper coding
pads, with occasional forays on a keypunch machine and a Friden Flexowriter) -- and is not the least bit
nostalgic for those days.
Living in an out-of-the-way community with wife and orange tabby, he cherishes human frailty, especially his
own. [138]
Chapter 38. Endnotes
564
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested