open password protected pdf using c# : Adding text to a pdf in reader software application dll winforms windows web page web forms abs-guide60-part1848

_..___..__
+++
The following script is by Mark Moraes of the University of Toronto. See the file Moraes-COPYRIGHT for
permissions and restrictions. This file is included in the combined HTML/source tarball of the ABS Guide.
Example A-12. behead: Removing mail and news message headers
#! /bin/sh
 Strips off the header from a mail/News message i.e. till the first
#+ empty line.
 Author: Mark Moraes, University of Toronto
# ==> These comments added by author of this document.
if [ $# -eq 0 ]; then
# ==> If no command-line args present, then works on file redirected to stdin.
sed -e '1,/^$/d' -e '/^[        ]*$/d'
# --> Delete empty lines and all lines until 
# --> first one beginning with white space.
else
# ==> If command-line args present, then work on files named.
for i do
sed -e '1,/^$/d' -e '/^[        ]*$/d' $i
# --> Ditto, as above.
done
fi
exit
# ==> Exercise: Add error checking and other options.
# ==>
# ==> Note that the small sed script repeats, except for the arg passed.
# ==> Does it make sense to embed it in a function? Why or why not?
/*
* Copyright University of Toronto 1988, 1989.
* Written by Mark Moraes
*
* Permission is granted to anyone to use this software for any purpose on
* any computer system, and to alter it and redistribute it freely, subject
* to the following restrictions:
*
* 1. The author and the University of Toronto are not responsible 
   for the consequences of use of this software, no matter how awful, 
   even if they arise from flaws in it.
*
* 2. The origin of this software must not be misrepresented, either by
   explicit claim or by omission.  Since few users ever read sources,
   credits must appear in the documentation.
*
* 3. Altered versions must be plainly marked as such, and must not be
   misrepresented as being the original software.  Since few users
   ever read sources, credits must appear in the documentation.
*
* 4. This notice may not be removed or altered.
*/
+
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Appendix A. Contributed Scripts
595
Adding text to a pdf in reader - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text fields to a pdf document; add text to pdf in preview
Adding text to a pdf in reader - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add text field to pdf; adding text to pdf document
Antek Sawicki contributed the following script, which makes very clever use of the parameter substitution
operators discussed in Section 10.2.
Example A-13. password: Generating random 8-character passwords
#!/bin/bash
#
#
 Random password generator for Bash 2.x +
#+ by Antek Sawicki <tenox@tenox.tc>,
#+ who generously gave usage permission to the ABS Guide author.
#
# ==> Comments added by document author ==>
MATRIX="0123456789ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz"
# ==> Password will consist of alphanumeric characters.
LENGTH="8"
# ==> May change 'LENGTH' for longer password.
while [ "${n:=1}" -le "$LENGTH" ]
# ==> Recall that := is "default substitution" operator.
# ==> So, if 'n' has not been initialized, set it to 1.
do
PASS="$PASS${MATRIX:$(($RANDOM%${#MATRIX})):1}"
# ==> Very clever, but tricky.
# ==> Starting from the innermost nesting...
# ==> ${#MATRIX} returns length of array MATRIX.
# ==> $RANDOM%${#MATRIX} returns random number between 1
# ==> and [length of MATRIX] - 1.
# ==> ${MATRIX:$(($RANDOM%${#MATRIX})):1}
# ==> returns expansion of MATRIX at random position, by length 1. 
# ==> See {var:pos:len} parameter substitution in Chapter 9.
# ==> and the associated examples.
# ==> PASS=... simply pastes this result onto previous PASS (concatenation).
# ==> To visualize this more clearly, uncomment the following line
#                 echo "$PASS"
# ==> to see PASS being built up,
# ==> one character at a time, each iteration of the loop.
let n+=1
# ==> Increment 'n' for next pass.
done
echo "$PASS"      # ==> Or, redirect to a file, as desired.
exit 0
+
James R. Van Zandt contributed this script which uses named pipes and, in his words, "really exercises
quoting and escaping."
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Appendix A. Contributed Scripts
596
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
C# source code for adding or removing annotation from PDF Support to take notes on adobe PDF file without Support to add text, text box, text field and crop
adding text to pdf file; how to insert text box in pdf document
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Others. Provide VB.NET Users with Solution of Adding Text Box to PDF Page in VB.NET Project.
add text field pdf; how to insert text into a pdf with acrobat
Example A-14. fifo: Making daily backups, using named pipes
#!/bin/bash
# ==> Script by James R. Van Zandt, and used here with his permission.
# ==> Comments added by author of this document.
HERE=`uname -n`    # ==> hostname
THERE=bilbo
echo "starting remote backup to $THERE at `date +%r`"
# ==> `date +%r` returns time in 12-hour format, i.e. "08:08:34 PM".
# make sure /pipe really is a pipe and not a plain file
rm -rf /pipe
mkfifo /pipe       # ==> Create a "named pipe", named "/pipe" ...
# ==> 'su xyz' runs commands as user "xyz".
# ==> 'ssh' invokes secure shell (remote login client).
su xyz -c "ssh $THERE \"cat > /home/xyz/backup/${HERE}-daily.tar.gz\" < /pipe"&
cd /
tar -czf - bin boot dev etc home info lib man root sbin share usr var > /pipe
# ==> Uses named pipe, /pipe, to communicate between processes:
# ==> 'tar/gzip' writes to /pipe and 'ssh' reads from /pipe.
# ==> The end result is this backs up the main directories, from / on down.
# ==>  What are the advantages of a "named pipe" in this situation,
# ==>+ as opposed to an "anonymous pipe", with |?
# ==>  Will an anonymous pipe even work here?
# ==>  Is it necessary to delete the pipe before exiting the script?
# ==>  How could that be done?
exit 0
+
Stéphane Chazelas used the following script to demonstrate generating prime numbers without arrays.
Example A-15. Generating prime numbers using the modulo operator
#!/bin/bash
# primes.sh: Generate prime numbers, without using arrays.
# Script contributed by Stephane Chazelas.
 This does *not* use the classic "Sieve of Eratosthenes" algorithm,
#+ but instead the more intuitive method of testing each candidate number
#+ for factors (divisors), using the "%" modulo operator.
LIMIT=1000                    # Primes, 2 ... 1000.
Primes()
{
(( n = $1 + 1 ))             # Bump to next integer.
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Appendix A. Contributed Scripts
597
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Provide .NET SDK library for adding text box to PDF document in .NET WinForms application. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
adding text fields to a pdf; add text to pdf document online
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references:
how to add text to a pdf file in reader; add editable text box to pdf
shift                        # Next parameter in list.
 echo "_n=$n i=$i_"
if (( n == LIMIT ))
then echo $*
return
fi
for i; do                    # "i" set to "@", previous values of $n.
  echo "-n=$n i=$i-"
(( i * i > n )) && break   # Optimization.
(( n % i )) && continue    # Sift out non-primes using modulo operator.
Primes $n $@               # Recursion inside loop.
return
done
Primes $n $@ $n            #  Recursion outside loop.
 Successively accumulate
#+ positional parameters.
 "$@" is the accumulating list of primes.
}
Primes 1
exit $?
# Pipe output of the script to 'fmt' for prettier printing.
 Uncomment lines 16 and 24 to help figure out what is going on.
 Compare the speed of this algorithm for generating primes
#+ with the Sieve of Eratosthenes (ex68.sh).
 Exercise: Rewrite this script without recursion.
+
Rick Boivie's revision of Jordi Sanfeliu's tree script.
Example A-16. tree: Displaying a directory tree
#!/bin/bash
# tree.sh
 Written by Rick Boivie.
 Used with permission.
 This is a revised and simplified version of a script
#+ by Jordi Sanfeliu (the original author), and patched by Ian Kjos.
 This script replaces the earlier version used in
#+ previous releases of the Advanced Bash Scripting Guide.
 Copyright (c) 2002, by Jordi Sanfeliu, Rick Boivie, and Ian Kjos.
# ==> Comments added by the author of this document.
search () {
for dir in `echo *`
 ==> `echo *` lists all the files in current working directory,
#+ ==> without line breaks.
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Appendix A. Contributed Scripts
598
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Support adding protection features to PDF file by adding password, digital signatures and redaction feature. Various of PDF text and images processing features
how to add text field to pdf form; adding text to pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Others. Professional VB.NET Solution for Adding Text Annotation to PDF Page in VB.NET.
add text pdf file acrobat; how to insert text box in pdf file
 ==> Similar effect to for dir in *
 ==> but "dir in `echo *`" will not handle filenames with blanks.
do
if [ -d "$dir" ] ; then # ==> If it is a directory (-d)...
zz=0                    # ==> Temp variable, keeping track of
    directory level.
while [ $zz != $1 ]     # Keep track of inner nested loop.
do
echo -n "| "        # ==> Display vertical connector symbol,
# ==> with 2 spaces & no line feed
    in order to indent.
zz=`expr $zz + 1`   # ==> Increment zz.
done
if [ -L "$dir" ] ; then # ==> If directory is a symbolic link...
echo "+---$dir" `ls -l $dir | sed 's/^.*'$dir' //'`
# ==> Display horiz. connector and list directory name, but...
# ==> delete date/time part of long listing.
else
echo "+---$dir"       # ==> Display horizontal connector symbol...
# ==> and print directory name.
numdirs=`expr $numdirs + 1` # ==> Increment directory count.
if cd "$dir" ; then         # ==> If can move to subdirectory...
search `expr $1 + 1`      # with recursion ;-)
# ==> Function calls itself.
cd ..
fi
fi
fi
done
}
if [ $# != 0 ] ; then
cd $1   # Move to indicated directory.
#else   # stay in current directory
fi
echo "Initial directory = `pwd`"
numdirs=0
search 0
echo "Total directories = $numdirs"
exit 0
Patsie's version of a directory tree script.
Example A-17. tree2: Alternate directory tree script
#!/bin/bash
# tree2.sh
# Lightly modified/reformatted by ABS Guide author.
# Included in ABS Guide with permission of script author (thanks!).
## Recursive file/dirsize checking script, by Patsie
##
## This script builds a list of files/directories and their size (du -akx)
## and processes this list to a human readable tree shape
## The 'du -akx' is only as good as the permissions the owner has.
## So preferably run as root* to get the best results, or use only on
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Appendix A. Contributed Scripts
599
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF reader installed. technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc
how to add text to pdf document; how to insert pdf into email text
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
By using reliable APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel
how to add text to a pdf in acrobat; adding text to pdf reader
## directories for which you have read permissions. Anything you can't
## read is not in the list.
#* ABS Guide author advises caution when running scripts as root!
##########  THIS IS CONFIGURABLE  ##########
TOP=5                   # Top 5 biggest (sub)directories.
MAXRECURS=5             # Max 5 subdirectories/recursions deep.
E_BL=80                 # Blank line already returned.
E_DIR=81                # Directory not specified.
##########  DON'T CHANGE ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE  ##########
PID=$$                            # Our own process ID.
SELF=`basename $0`                # Our own program name.
TMP="/tmp/${SELF}.${PID}.tmp"     # Temporary 'du' result.
# Convert number to dotted thousand.
function dot { echo "            $*" |
sed -e :a -e 's/\(.*[0-9]\)\([0-9]\{3\}\)/\1,\2/;ta' |
tail -c 12; }
# Usage: tree <recursion> <indent prefix> <min size> <directory>
function tree {
recurs="$1"           # How deep nested are we?
prefix="$2"           # What do we display before file/dirname?
minsize="$3"          # What is the minumum file/dirsize?
dirname="$4"          # Which directory are we checking?
# Get ($TOP) biggest subdirs/subfiles from TMP file.
LIST=`egrep "[[:space:]]${dirname}/[^/]*$" "$TMP" |
awk '{if($1>'$minsize') print;}' | sort -nr | head -$TOP`
[ -z "$LIST" ] && return        # Empty list, then go back.
cnt=0
num=`echo "$LIST" | wc -l`      # How many entries in the list.
## Main loop
echo "$LIST" | while read size name; do
((cnt+=1))                    # Count entry number.
bname=`basename "$name"`      # We only need a basename of the entry.
[ -d "$name" ] && bname="$bname/"
# If it's a directory, append a slash.
echo "`dot $size`$prefix +-$bname"
# Display the result.
#  Call ourself recursively if it's a directory
#+ and we're not nested too deep ($MAXRECURS).
#  The recursion goes up: $((recurs+1))
#  The prefix gets a space if it's the last entry,
#+ or a pipe if there are more entries.
#  The minimum file/dirsize becomes
#+ a tenth of his parent: $((size/10)).
# Last argument is the full directory name to check.
if [ -d "$name" -a $recurs -lt $MAXRECURS ]; then
[ $cnt -lt $num ] \
|| (tree $((recurs+1)) "$prefix  " $((size/10)) "$name") \
&& (tree $((recurs+1)) "$prefix |" $((size/10)) "$name")
fi
done
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Appendix A. Contributed Scripts
600
[ $? -eq 0 ] && echo "           $prefix"
# Every time we jump back add a 'blank' line.
return $E_BL
# We return 80 to tell we added a blank line already.
}
###                ###
###  main program  ###
###                ###
rootdir="$@"
[ -d "$rootdir" ] ||
{ echo "$SELF: Usage: $SELF <directory>" >&2; exit $E_DIR; }
# We should be called with a directory name.
echo "Building inventory list, please wait ..."
# Show "please wait" message.
du -akx "$rootdir" 1>"$TMP" 2>/dev/null
# Build a temporary list of all files/dirs and their size.
size=`tail -1 "$TMP" | awk '{print $1}'`
# What is our rootdirectory's size?
echo "`dot $size` $rootdir"
# Display rootdirectory's entry.
tree 0 "" 0 "$rootdir"
# Display the tree below our rootdirectory.
rm "$TMP" 2>/dev/null
# Clean up TMP file.
exit $?
Noah Friedman permitted use of his string function script. It essentially reproduces some of the C-library
string manipulation functions.
Example A-18. string functions: C-style string functions
#!/bin/bash
# string.bash --- bash emulation of string(3) library routines
# Author: Noah Friedman <friedman@prep.ai.mit.edu>
# ==>     Used with his kind permission in this document.
# Created: 1992-07-01
# Last modified: 1993-09-29
# Public domain
# Conversion to bash v2 syntax done by Chet Ramey
# Commentary:
# Code:
#:docstring strcat:
# Usage: strcat s1 s2
#
# Strcat appends the value of variable s2 to variable s1. 
#
# Example:
   a="foo"
   b="bar"
   strcat a b
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Appendix A. Contributed Scripts
601
   echo $a
   => foobar
#
#:end docstring:
###;;;autoload   ==> Autoloading of function commented out.
function strcat ()
{
local s1_val s2_val
s1_val=${!1}                        # indirect variable expansion
s2_val=${!2}
eval "$1"=\'"${s1_val}${s2_val}"\'
# ==> eval $1='${s1_val}${s2_val}' avoids problems,
# ==> if one of the variables contains a single quote.
}
#:docstring strncat:
# Usage: strncat s1 s2 $n
# Line strcat, but strncat appends a maximum of n characters from the value
# of variable s2.  It copies fewer if the value of variabl s2 is shorter
# than n characters.  Echoes result on stdout.
#
# Example:
   a=foo
   b=barbaz
   strncat a b 3
   echo $a
   => foobar
#
#:end docstring:
###;;;autoload
function strncat ()
{
local s1="$1"
local s2="$2"
local -i n="$3"
local s1_val s2_val
s1_val=${!s1}                       # ==> indirect variable expansion
s2_val=${!s2}
if [ ${#s2_val} -gt ${n} ]; then
s2_val=${s2_val:0:$n}            # ==> substring extraction
fi
eval "$s1"=\'"${s1_val}${s2_val}"\'
# ==> eval $1='${s1_val}${s2_val}' avoids problems,
# ==> if one of the variables contains a single quote.
}
#:docstring strcmp:
# Usage: strcmp $s1 $s2
#
# Strcmp compares its arguments and returns an integer less than, equal to,
# or greater than zero, depending on whether string s1 is lexicographically
# less than, equal to, or greater than string s2.
#:end docstring:
###;;;autoload
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Appendix A. Contributed Scripts
602
function strcmp ()
{
[ "$1" = "$2" ] && return 0
[ "${1}" '<' "${2}" ] > /dev/null && return -1
return 1
}
#:docstring strncmp:
# Usage: strncmp $s1 $s2 $n
# Like strcmp, but makes the comparison by examining a maximum of n
# characters (n less than or equal to zero yields equality).
#:end docstring:
###;;;autoload
function strncmp ()
{
if [ -z "${3}" -o "${3}" -le "0" ]; then
return 0
fi
if [ ${3} -ge ${#1} -a ${3} -ge ${#2} ]; then
strcmp "$1" "$2"
return $?
else
s1=${1:0:$3}
s2=${2:0:$3}
strcmp $s1 $s2
return $?
fi
}
#:docstring strlen:
# Usage: strlen s
#
# Strlen returns the number of characters in string literal s.
#:end docstring:
###;;;autoload
function strlen ()
{
eval echo "\${#${1}}"
# ==> Returns the length of the value of the variable
# ==> whose name is passed as an argument.
}
#:docstring strspn:
# Usage: strspn $s1 $s2
# Strspn returns the length of the maximum initial segment of string s1,
# which consists entirely of characters from string s2.
#:end docstring:
###;;;autoload
function strspn ()
{
# Unsetting IFS allows whitespace to be handled as normal chars. 
local IFS=
local result="${1%%[!${2}]*}"
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Appendix A. Contributed Scripts
603
echo ${#result}
}
#:docstring strcspn:
# Usage: strcspn $s1 $s2
#
# Strcspn returns the length of the maximum initial segment of string s1,
# which consists entirely of characters not from string s2.
#:end docstring:
###;;;autoload
function strcspn ()
{
# Unsetting IFS allows whitspace to be handled as normal chars. 
local IFS=
local result="${1%%[${2}]*}"
echo ${#result}
}
#:docstring strstr:
# Usage: strstr s1 s2
# Strstr echoes a substring starting at the first occurrence of string s2 in
# string s1, or nothing if s2 does not occur in the string.  If s2 points to
# a string of zero length, strstr echoes s1.
#:end docstring:
###;;;autoload
function strstr ()
{
# if s2 points to a string of zero length, strstr echoes s1
[ ${#2} -eq 0 ] && { echo "$1" ; return 0; }
# strstr echoes nothing if s2 does not occur in s1
case "$1" in
*$2*) ;;
*) return 1;;
esac
# use the pattern matching code to strip off the match and everything
# following it
first=${1/$2*/}
# then strip off the first unmatched portion of the string
echo "${1##$first}"
}
#:docstring strtok:
# Usage: strtok s1 s2
#
# Strtok considers the string s1 to consist of a sequence of zero or more
# text tokens separated by spans of one or more characters from the
# separator string s2.  The first call (with a non-empty string s1
# specified) echoes a string consisting of the first token on stdout. The
# function keeps track of its position in the string s1 between separate
# calls, so that subsequent calls made with the first argument an empty
# string will work through the string immediately following that token.  In
# this way subsequent calls will work through the string s1 until no tokens
# remain.  The separator string s2 may be different from call to call.
# When no token remains in s1, an empty value is echoed on stdout.
#:end docstring:
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Appendix A. Contributed Scripts
604
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested