open password protected pdf using c# : Add text to pdf online SDK software API .net windows winforms sharepoint abs-guide80-part1870

Example 16-48
12. 
Example A-1
13. 
Example 16-14
14. 
Example 16-12
15. 
Example A-10
16. 
Example 19-12
17. 
Example 16-19
18. 
Example A-29
19. 
Example A-31
20. 
Example A-24
21. 
Example A-43
22. 
Example A-55
23. 
For a more extensive treatment of sed, refer to the pertinent references in the Bibliography.
C.2. Awk
Awk [143] is a full-featured text processing language with a syntax reminiscent of C. While it possesses an
extensive set of operators and capabilities, we will cover only a few of these here - the ones most useful in
shell scripts.
Awk breaks each line of input passed to it into  fields. By default, a field is a string of consecutive characters
delimited by whitespace, though there are options for changing this. Awk parses and operates on each separate
field. This makes it ideal for handling structured text files -- especially tables -- data organized into consistent
chunks, such as rows and columns.
Strong quoting and curly brackets enclose blocks of awk code within a shell script.
# $1 is field #1, $2 is field #2, etc.
echo one two | awk '{print $1}'
# one
echo one two | awk '{print $2}'
# two
# But what is field #0 ($0)?
echo one two | awk '{print $0}'
# one two
# All the fields!
awk '{print $3}' $filename
# Prints field #3 of file $filename to stdout.
awk '{print $1 $5 $6}' $filename
# Prints fields #1, #5, and #6 of file $filename.
awk '{print $0}' $filename
# Prints the entire file!
# Same effect as:   cat $filename . . . or . . . sed '' $filename
We have just seen the awk print command in action. The only other feature of awk we need to deal with here
is variables. Awk handles variables similarly to shell scripts, though a bit more flexibly.
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Appendix C. A Sed and Awk Micro-Primer
795
Add text to pdf online - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text fields to pdf acrobat; how to add text to a pdf file in acrobat
Add text to pdf online - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text box in pdf document; how to add text fields to a pdf
{ total += ${column_number} }
This adds the value of column_number to the running total of total>. Finally, to print "total", there is an
END command block, executed after the script has processed all its input.
END { print total }
Corresponding to the END, there is a BEGIN, for a code block to be performed before awk starts processing
its input.
The following example illustrates how awk can add text-parsing tools to a shell script.
Example C-1. Counting Letter Occurrences
#! /bin/sh
# letter-count2.sh: Counting letter occurrences in a text file.
#
# Script by nyal [nyal@voila.fr].
# Used in ABS Guide with permission.
# Recommented and reformatted by ABS Guide author.
# Version 1.1: Modified to work with gawk 3.1.3.
             (Will still work with earlier versions.)
INIT_TAB_AWK=""
# Parameter to initialize awk script.
count_case=0
FILE_PARSE=$1
E_PARAMERR=85
usage()
{
echo "Usage: letter-count.sh file letters" 2>&1
# For example:   ./letter-count2.sh filename.txt a b c
exit $E_PARAMERR  # Too few arguments passed to script.
}
if [ ! -f "$1" ] ; then
echo "$1: No such file." 2>&1
usage                 # Print usage message and exit.
fi 
if [ -z "$2" ] ; then
echo "$2: No letters specified." 2>&1
usage
fi 
shift                      # Letters specified.
for letter in `echo $@`    # For each one . . .
do
INIT_TAB_AWK="$INIT_TAB_AWK tab_search[${count_case}] = \
\"$letter\"; final_tab[${count_case}] = 0; " 
# Pass as parameter to awk script below.
count_case=`expr $count_case + 1`
done
# DEBUG:
# echo $INIT_TAB_AWK;
cat $FILE_PARSE |
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Appendix C. A Sed and Awk Micro-Primer
796
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
how to add a text box in a pdf file; add text to a pdf document
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
Online Visual Basic .NET class source code for quick evaluation. With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from
adding text to a pdf in acrobat; adding text field to pdf
# Pipe the target file to the following awk script.
# ---------------------------------------------------------------------
# Earlier version of script:
# awk -v tab_search=0 -v final_tab=0 -v tab=0 -v \
# nb_letter=0 -v chara=0 -v chara2=0 \
awk \
"BEGIN { $INIT_TAB_AWK } \
{ split(\$0, tab, \"\"); \
for (chara in tab) \
{ for (chara2 in tab_search) \
{ if (tab_search[chara2] == tab[chara]) { final_tab[chara2]++ } } } } \
END { for (chara in final_tab) \
{ print tab_search[chara] \" => \" final_tab[chara] } }"
# ---------------------------------------------------------------------
 Nothing all that complicated, just . . .
#+ for-loops, if-tests, and a couple of specialized functions.
exit $?
# Compare this script to letter-count.sh.
For simpler examples of awk within shell scripts, see:
Example 15-14
1. 
Example 20-8
2. 
Example 16-32
3. 
Example 36-5
4. 
Example 28-2
5. 
Example 15-20
6. 
Example 29-3
7. 
Example 29-4
8. 
Example 11-3
9. 
Example 16-61
10. 
Example 9-16
11. 
Example 16-4
12. 
Example 10-6
13. 
Example 36-19
14. 
Example 11-9
15. 
Example 36-4
16. 
Example 16-53
17. 
Example T-3
18. 
That's all the awk we'll cover here, folks, but there's lots more to learn. See the appropriate references in the
Bibliography.
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Appendix C. A Sed and Awk Micro-Primer
797
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
how to add text to a pdf document; add text pdf reader
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
add text pdf file; how to add text box in pdf file
Appendix D. Parsing and Managing Pathnames
Emmanual Rouat contributed the following example of parsing and transforming filenames and, in particular,
pathnames. It draws heavily on the functionality of sed.
#!/usr/bin/env bash
#-----------------------------------------------------------
# Management of PATH, LD_LIBRARY_PATH, MANPATH variables...
# By Emmanuel Rouat <no-email>
# (Inspired by the bash documentation 'pathfuncs' and on
# discussions found on stackoverflow:
# http://stackoverflow.com/questions/370047/
# http://stackoverflow.com/questions/273909/#346860 )
# Last modified: Sat Sep 22 12:01:55 CEST 2012
#
# The following functions handle spaces correctly.
# These functions belong in .bash_profile rather than in
# .bashrc, I guess.
#
# The modular aspect of these functions should make it easy
# to expand them to handle path substitutions instead
# of path removal etc....
#
# See http://www.catonmat.net/blog/awk-one-liners-explained-part-two/
# (item 43) for an explanation of the 'duplicate-entries' removal
# (it's a nice trick!)
#-----------------------------------------------------------
# Show $@ (usually PATH) as list.
function p_show() { local p="$@" && for p; do [[ ${!p} ]] &&
echo -e ${!p//:/\\n}; done }
# Filter out empty lines, multiple/trailing slashes, and duplicate entries.
function p_filter()
{ awk '/^[ \t]*$/ {next} {sub(/\/+$/, "");gsub(/\/+/, "/")}!x[$0]++' ;}
# Rebuild list of items into ':' separated word (PATH-like).
function p_build() { paste -sd: ;}
# Clean $1 (typically PATH) and rebuild it
function p_clean()
{ local p=${1} && eval ${p}='$(p_show ${p} | p_filter | p_build)' ;}
# Remove $1 from $2 (found on stackoverflow, with modifications).
function p_rm()
{ local d=$(echo $1 | p_filter) p=${2} &&
eval ${p}='$(p_show ${p} | p_filter | grep -xv "${d}" | p_build)' ;}
 Same as previous, but filters on a pattern (dangerous...
#+ don't use 'bin' or '/' as pattern!).
function p_rmpat()
{ local d=$(echo $1 | p_filter) p=${2} && eval ${p}='$(p_show ${p} |
p_filter | grep -v "${d}" | p_build)' ;}
# Delete $1 from $2 and append it cleanly.
function p_append()
{ local d=$(echo $1 | p_filter) p=${2} && p_rm "${d}" ${p} &&
eval ${p}='$(p_show ${p} d | p_build)' ;}
# Delete $1 from $2 and prepend it cleanly.
Appendix D. Parsing and Managing Pathnames
798
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Create PDF Online. Convert PDF Online. WPF PDF Viewer. View PDF in WPF. Annotate PDF in Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work
adding text to pdf online; how to add text to pdf
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
View PDF Online. Annotate PDF Online. Create PDF Online. Convert PDF Online. WPF PDF Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work
add text pdf file acrobat; adding text fields to a pdf
function p_prepend()
{ local d=$(echo $1 | p_filter) p=${2} && p_rm "${d}" ${p} &&
eval ${p}='$(p_show d ${p} | p_build)' ;}
# Some tests:
echo
MYPATH="/bin:/usr/bin/:/bin://bin/"
p_append "/project//my project/bin" MYPATH
echo "Append '/project//my project/bin' to '/bin:/usr/bin/:/bin://bin/'"
echo "(result should be: /bin:/usr/bin:/project/my project/bin)"
echo $MYPATH
echo
MYOTHERPATH="/bin:/usr/bin/:/bin:/project//my project/bin"
p_prepend "/project//my project/bin" MYOTHERPATH
echo "Prepend '/project//my project/bin' \
to '/bin:/usr/bin/:/bin:/project//my project/bin/'"
echo "(result should be: /project/my project/bin:/bin:/usr/bin)"
echo $MYOTHERPATH
echo
p_prepend "/project//my project/bin" FOOPATH  # FOOPATH doesn't exist.
echo "Prepend '/project//my project/bin' to an unset variable"
echo "(result should be: /project/my project/bin)"
echo $FOOPATH
echo
BARPATH="/a:/b/://b c://a:/my local pub"
p_clean BARPATH
echo "Clean BARPATH='/a:/b/://b c://a:/my local pub'"
echo "(result should be: /a:/b:/b c:/my local pub)"
echo $BARPATH
***
David Wheeler kindly permitted me to use his instructive examples.
Doing it correctly: A quick summary
by David Wheeler
http://www.dwheeler.com/essays/filenames-in-shell.html
So, how can you process filenames correctly in shell? Here's a quick
summary about how to do it correctly, for the impatient who "just want the
answer". In short: Double-quote to use "$variable" instead of $variable,
set IFS to just newline and tab, prefix all globs/filenames so they cannot
begin with "-" when expanded, and use one of a few templates that work
correctly. Here are some of those templates that work correctly:
IFS="$(printf '\n\t')"
# Remove SPACE, so filenames with spaces work well.
 Correct glob use:
#+ always use "for" loop, prefix glob, check for existence:
for file in ./* ; do          # Use "./*" ... NEVER bare "*" ...
if [ -e "$file" ] ; then    # Make sure it isn't an empty match.
COMMAND ... "$file" ...
fi
done
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Appendix D. Parsing and Managing Pathnames
799
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Insert images into PDF form field. Access to freeware download and online C#.NET class source code. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo, scanned
how to enter text in a pdf document; adding text fields to pdf
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
PDF Online. This part will explain the usages of annotation tabs on RasterEdge VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer. Text Markup Tab. Item. Name. Description. 1. Add sticky
add text to pdf in preview; how to add text field to pdf form
# Correct glob use, but requires nonstandard bash extension.
shopt -s nullglob  #  Bash extension,
#+ so that empty glob matches will work.
for file in ./* ; do        # Use "./*", NEVER bare "*"
COMMAND ... "$file" ...
done
 These handle all filenames correctly;
#+ can be unwieldy if COMMAND is large:
find ... -exec COMMAND... {} \;
find ... -exec COMMAND... {} \+ # If multiple files are okay for COMMAND.
 This skips filenames with control characters
#+ (including tab and newline).
IFS="$(printf '\n\t')"
controlchars="$(printf '*[\001-\037\177]*')"
for file in $(find . ! -name "$controlchars"') ; do
COMMAND "$file" ...
done
 Okay if filenames can't contain tabs or newlines --
#+ beware the assumption.
IFS="$(printf '\n\t')"
for file in $(find .) ; do
COMMAND "$file" ...
done
# Requires nonstandard but common extensions in find and xargs:
find . -print0 | xargs -0 COMMAND
# Requires nonstandard extensions to find and to shell (bash works).
# variables might not stay set once the loop ends:
find . -print0 | while IFS="" read -r -d "" file ; do ...
COMMAND "$file" # Use quoted "$file", not $file, everywhere.
done
 Requires nonstandard extensions to find and to shell (bash works).
 Underlying system must include named pipes (FIFOs)
#+ or the /dev/fd mechanism.
 In this version, variables *do* stay set after the loop ends,
 and you can read from stdin.
#+ (Change the 4 to another number if fd 4 is needed.)
while IFS="" read -r -d "" file <&4 ; do
COMMAND "$file"   # Use quoted "$file" -- not $file, everywhere.
done 4< <(find . -print0)
 Named pipe version.
 Requires nonstandard extensions to find and to shell's read (bash ok).
 Underlying system must include named pipes (FIFOs).
 Again, in this version, variables *do* stay set after the loop ends,
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Appendix D. Parsing and Managing Pathnames
800
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Viewer & Editors, C# ASP.NET Document Viewer, C# Online Dicom Viewer, C# Online Jpeg images Viewer, C# HTML Document How to VB.NET: Add Text to PDF Page.
how to add text to a pdf in preview; how to add text to a pdf file in preview
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document online in C#.NET
PDF Online. This part will explain the usages of annotation tabs on RasterEdge C#.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer. Text Markup Tab. Item. Name. Description. 1. Add sticky
how to add text to pdf file with reader; add text boxes to pdf
 and you can read from stdin.
# (Change the 4 to something else if fd 4 needed).
mkfifo mypipe
find . -print0 > mypipe &
while IFS="" read -r -d "" file <&4 ; do
COMMAND "$file" # Use quoted "$file", not $file, everywhere.
done 4< mypipe
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Appendix D. Parsing and Managing Pathnames
801
Appendix E. Exit Codes With Special Meanings
Table E-1. Reserved Exit Codes
Exit Code
Number
Meaning
Example
Comments
1
Catchall for general errors
let "var1 = 1/0"
Miscellaneous errors, such as "divide by
zero" and other impermissible operations
2
Misuse of shell builtins
(according to Bash
documentation)
empty_function()
{}
Missing keyword or command, or
permission problem (and diff return code on
a failed binary file comparison).
126
Command invoked cannot
execute
/dev/null
Permission problem or command is not an
executable
127
"command not found"
illegal_command Possible problem with $PATH or a typo
128
Invalid argument to exit
exit 3.14159
exit takes only integer args in the range 0 -
255 (see first footnote)
128+n
Fatal error signal "n"
kill -9 $PPID of
script
$? returns 137 (128 + 9)
130
Script terminated by
Control-C
Ctl-C
Control-C is fatal error signal 2, (130 = 128
+ 2, see above)
255*
Exit status out of range
exit -1
exit takes only integer args in the range 0 -
255
According to the above table, exit codes 1 - 2, 126 - 165, and 255 [144] have special meanings, and should
therefore be avoided for user-specified exit parameters. Ending a script with exit 127 would certainly cause
confusion when troubleshooting (is the error code a "command not found" or a user-defined one?). However,
many scripts use an exit 1 as a general bailout-upon-error. Since exit code 1 signifies so many possible errors,
it is not particularly useful in debugging.
There has been an attempt to systematize exit status numbers (see /usr/include/sysexits.h), but this
is intended for C and C++ programmers. A similar standard for scripting might be appropriate. The author of
this document proposes restricting user-defined exit codes to the range 64 - 113 (in addition to 0, for success),
to conform with the C/C++ standard. This would allot 50 valid codes, and make troubleshooting scripts more
straightforward. [145] All user-defined exit codes in the accompanying examples to this document conform to
this standard, except where overriding circumstances exist, as in Example 9-2.
Issuing a $? from the command-line after a shell script exits gives results consistent with the table above
only from the Bash or sh prompt. Running the C-shell or tcsh may give different values in some cases.
Appendix E. Exit Codes With Special Meanings
802
Appendix F. A Detailed Introduction to I/O and I/O
Redirection
written by Stéphane Chazelas, and revised by the document author
A command expects the first three file descriptors to be available. The first, fd 0 (standard input, stdin), is
for reading. The other two (fd 1, stdout and fd 2, stderr) are for writing.
There is a stdin, stdout, and a stderr associated with each command. ls 2>&1 means temporarily
connecting the stderr of the ls command to the same "resource" as the shell's stdout.
By convention, a command reads its input from fd 0 (stdin), prints normal output to fd 1 (stdout), and
error ouput to fd 2 (stderr). If one of those three fd's is not open, you may encounter problems:
bash$ cat /etc/passwd >&-
cat: standard output: Bad file descriptor
For example, when xterm runs, it first initializes itself. Before running the user's shell, xterm opens the
terminal device (/dev/pts/<n> or something similar) three times.
At this point, Bash inherits these three file descriptors, and each command (child process) run by Bash inherits
them in turn, except when you redirect the command. Redirection means reassigning one of the file
descriptors to another file (or a pipe, or anything permissible). File descriptors may be reassigned locally (for
a command, a command group, a subshell, a while or if or case or for loop...), or globally, for the remainder of
the shell (using exec).
ls > /dev/null means running ls with its fd 1 connected to /dev/null.
bash$ lsof -a -p $$ -d0,1,2
COMMAND PID     USER   FD   TYPE DEVICE SIZE NODE NAME
bash    363 bozo        0u   CHR  136,1         3 /dev/pts/1
bash    363 bozo        1u   CHR  136,1         3 /dev/pts/1
bash    363 bozo        2u   CHR  136,1         3 /dev/pts/1
bash$ exec 2> /dev/null
bash$ lsof -a -p $$ -d0,1,2
COMMAND PID     USER   FD   TYPE DEVICE SIZE NODE NAME
bash    371 bozo        0u   CHR  136,1         3 /dev/pts/1
bash    371 bozo        1u   CHR  136,1         3 /dev/pts/1
bash    371 bozo        2w   CHR    1,3       120 /dev/null
bash$ bash -c 'lsof -a -p $$ -d0,1,2' | cat
COMMAND PID USER   FD   TYPE DEVICE SIZE NODE NAME
lsof    379 root    0u   CHR  136,1         3 /dev/pts/1
lsof    379 root    1w  FIFO    0,0      7118 pipe
lsof    379 root    2u   CHR  136,1         3 /dev/pts/1
bash$ echo "$(bash -c 'lsof -a -p $$ -d0,1,2' 2>&1)"
COMMAND PID USER   FD   TYPE DEVICE SIZE NODE NAME
lsof    426 root    0u   CHR  136,1         3 /dev/pts/1
Appendix F. A Detailed Introduction to I/O and I/O Redirection
803
lsof    426 root    1w  FIFO    0,0      7520 pipe
lsof    426 root    2w  FIFO    0,0      7520 pipe
This works for different types of redirection.
Exercise: Analyze the following script.
#! /usr/bin/env bash
mkfifo /tmp/fifo1 /tmp/fifo2
while read a; do echo "FIFO1: $a"; done < /tmp/fifo1 & exec 7> /tmp/fifo1
exec 8> >(while read a; do echo "FD8: $a, to fd7"; done >&7)
exec 3>&1
(
(
(
while read a; do echo "FIFO2: $a"; done < /tmp/fifo2 | tee /dev/stderr \
| tee /dev/fd/4 | tee /dev/fd/5 | tee /dev/fd/6 >&7 & exec 3> /tmp/fifo2
echo 1st, to stdout
sleep 1
echo 2nd, to stderr >&2
sleep 1
echo 3rd, to fd 3 >&3
sleep 1
echo 4th, to fd 4 >&4
sleep 1
echo 5th, to fd 5 >&5
sleep 1
echo 6th, through a pipe | sed 's/.*/PIPE: &, to fd 5/' >&5
sleep 1
echo 7th, to fd 6 >&6
sleep 1
echo 8th, to fd 7 >&7
sleep 1
echo 9th, to fd 8 >&8
) 4>&1 >&3 3>&- | while read a; do echo "FD4: $a"; done 1>&3 5>&- 6>&-
) 5>&1 >&3 | while read a; do echo "FD5: $a"; done 1>&3 6>&-
) 6>&1 >&3 | while read a; do echo "FD6: $a"; done 3>&-
rm -f /tmp/fifo1 /tmp/fifo2
# For each command and subshell, figure out which fd points to what.
# Good luck!
exit 0
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Appendix F. A Detailed Introduction to I/O and I/O Redirection
804
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested