open password protected pdf using c# : How to enter text into a pdf software Library cloud windows .net html class abs-guide82-part1872

 Escape characters:
#
 To localize a sentence like
    echo -e "Hello\tworld!"
#+ you must use
    echo -e "`gettext \"Hello\\tworld\"`"
 The "double escape character" before the `t' is needed because
#+ 'gettext' will search for a string like: 'Hello\tworld'
 This is because gettext will read one literal `\')
#+ and will output a string like "Bonjour\tmonde",
#+ so the 'echo' command will display the message correctly.
#
 You may not use
    echo "`gettext -e \"Hello\tworld\"`"
#+ due to the xgettext bug explained above.
# Let's localize the following shell fragment:
    echo "-h display help and exit"
#
# First, one could do this:
    echo "`gettext \"-h display help and exit\"`"
 This way 'xgettext' will work ok,
#+ but the 'gettext' program will read "-h" as an option!
#
# One solution could be
    echo "`gettext -- \"-h display help and exit\"`"
 This way 'gettext' will work,
#+ but 'xgettext' will extract "--", as referred to above.
#
# The workaround you may use to get this string localized is
    echo -e "`gettext \"\\0-h display help and exit\"`"
 We have added a \0 (NULL) at the beginning of the sentence.
 This way 'gettext' works correctly, as does 'xgettext.'
 Moreover, the NULL character won't change the behavior
#+ of the 'echo' command.
 ------------------------------------------------------------------
bash$ bash -D localized.sh
"Can't cd to %s."
"Enter the value: "
This lists all the localized text. (The -D option lists double-quoted strings prefixed by a $, without executing
the script.)
bash$ bash --dump-po-strings localized.sh
#: a:6
msgid "Can't cd to %s."
msgstr ""
#: a:7
msgid "Enter the value: "
msgstr ""
The --dump-po-strings option to Bash resembles the -D option, but uses gettext "po" format.
Bruno Haible points out:
Starting with gettext-0.12.2, xgettext -o - localized.sh is recommended instead of bash
--dump-po-strings localized.sh, because xgettext . . .
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Appendix K. Localization
815
How to enter text into a pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text box to pdf; add text to pdf using preview
How to enter text into a pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text to pdf; adding text to pdf in acrobat
1. understands the gettext and eval_gettext commands (whereas bash --dump-po-strings understands only
its deprecated $"..." syntax)
2. can extract comments placed by the programmer, intended to be read by the translator.
This shell code is then not specific to Bash any more; it works the same way with Bash 1.x and other
/bin/sh implementations.
Now, build a language.po file for each language that the script will be translated into, specifying the
msgstr. Alfredo Pironti gives the following example:
fr.po:
#: a:6
msgid "Can't cd to $var."
msgstr "Impossible de se positionner dans le repertoire $var."
#: a:7
msgid "Enter the value: "
msgstr "Entrez la valeur : "
 The string are dumped with the variable names, not with the %s syntax,
#+ similar to C programs.
#+ This is a very cool feature if the programmer uses
#+ variable names that make sense!
Then, run msgfmt.
msgfmt -o localized.sh.mo fr.po
Place the resulting localized.sh.mo file in the /usr/local/share/locale/fr/LC_MESSAGES
directory, and at the beginning of the script, insert the lines:
TEXTDOMAINDIR=/usr/local/share/locale
TEXTDOMAIN=localized.sh
If a user on a French system runs the script, she will get French messages.
With older versions of Bash or other shells, localization requires gettext, using the -s option. In this
case, the script becomes:
#!/bin/bash
# localized.sh
E_CDERROR=65
error() {
local format=$1
shift
printf "$(gettext -s "$format")" "$@" >&2
exit $E_CDERROR
}
cd $var || error "Can't cd to %s." "$var"
read -p "$(gettext -s "Enter the value: ")" var
# ...
The TEXTDOMAIN and TEXTDOMAINDIR variables need to be set and exported to the environment. This
should be done within the script itself.
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Appendix K. Localization
816
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on DotNetNuke Site
Select “DNN Platform” in App Frameworks, and enter a Site Name RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF. HTML5Editor.dll. 4.0, only put <system.web.extensions> into <configuration
add text box to pdf file; how to insert text in pdf using preview
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on ASP.NET MVC
reduce the size of SDK package, all dlls are put into RasterEdge.DocImagSDK C#, select "ASP,NET MVC 3 Web Application" and enter a Name RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll.
adding text fields to a pdf; add text pdf reader
---
This appendix written by Stéphane Chazelas, with modifications suggested by Alfredo Pironti, and by Bruno
Haible, maintainer of GNU gettext.
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Appendix K. Localization
817
C# TWAIN - Scan Multi-pages into One PDF Document
true; device.Acquire(); Console.Out.WriteLine("---Ending Scan---\n Press Enter To Quit RasterEdge also illustrates how to scan many pages into a PDF or TIFF
how to insert text box in pdf; how to add text fields to pdf
VB.NET TWAIN: TWAIN Image Scanning in Console Application
WriteLine("---Ending Scan---" & vbLf & " Press Enter To Quit & automatic scanning and stamp string text on captured to scan multiple pages to one PDF or TIFF
how to enter text into a pdf; how to add text to a pdf document using reader
Appendix L. History Commands
The Bash shell provides command-line tools for editing and manipulating a user's command history. This is
primarily a convenience, a means of saving keystrokes.
Bash history commands:
history
1. 
2. fc
bash$ history
1  mount /mnt/cdrom
2  cd /mnt/cdrom
3  ls
...
Internal variables associated with Bash history commands:
$HISTCMD
1. 
$HISTCONTROL
2. 
$HISTIGNORE
3. 
$HISTFILE
4. 
$HISTFILESIZE
5. 
$HISTSIZE
6. 
$HISTTIMEFORMAT (Bash, ver. 3.0 or later)
7. 
8. !!
9. !$
!#
10. 
!N
11. 
!-N
12. 
!STRING
13. 
!?STRING?
14. 
^STRING^string^
15. 
Unfortunately, the Bash history tools find no use in scripting.
#!/bin/bash
# history.sh
# A (vain) attempt to use the 'history' command in a script.
history                      # No output.
var=$(history); echo "$var"  # $var is empty.
 History commands are, by default, disabled within a script.
 However, as dhw points out,
#+ set -o history
#+ enables the history mechanism.
set -o history
var=$(history); echo "$var"   # 1  var=$(history)
bash$ ./history.sh
(no output)
Appendix L. History Commands
818
VB.NET Image: Image Rotator SDK; .NET Document Image Rotation
which allows VB.NET developers to enter the rotating VB.NET image rotation control SDK into ASP.NET powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
add text to pdf in acrobat; how to enter text in pdf form
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Planet Barcode Generator for Image, Picture &
VB: How to Insert Planet Barcode into PDF. select barcode type barcode.Data = "01234567890" 'enter a 11 Drawing.Color.Black 'Human-readable text-related settings
adding text to a pdf form; add text box in pdf
The Advancing in the Bash Shell site gives a good introduction to the use of history commands in Bash.
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Appendix L. History Commands
819
VB.NET TIFF: .NET TIFF Splitting Control to Split & Disassemble
to split 500+ page TIFF file into individual one Developers can enter the page range value in this Data Imports System.Drawing Imports System.Text Imports System
adding text to pdf in reader; how to insert text box in pdf document
Appendix M. Sample .bashrc and
.bash_profile Files
The ~/.bashrc file determines the behavior of interactive shells. A good look at this file can lead to a
better understanding of Bash.
Emmanuel Rouat contributed the following very elaborate .bashrc file, written for a Linux system. He
welcomes reader feedback on it.
Study the file carefully, and feel free to reuse code snippets and functions from it in your own .bashrc file
or even in your scripts.
Example M-1. Sample .bashrc file
# =============================================================== #
#
# PERSONAL $HOME/.bashrc FILE for bash-3.0 (or later)
# By Emmanuel Rouat [no-email]
#
# Last modified: Tue Nov 20 22:04:47 CET 2012
 This file is normally read by interactive shells only.
#+ Here is the place to define your aliases, functions and
#+ other interactive features like your prompt.
#
 The majority of the code here assumes you are on a GNU
#+ system (most likely a Linux box) and is often based on code
#+ found on Usenet or Internet.
#
 See for instance:
 http://tldp.org/LDP/abs/html/index.html
 http://www.caliban.org/bash
 http://www.shelldorado.com/scripts/categories.html
 http://www.dotfiles.org
#
 The choice of colors was done for a shell with a dark background
#+ (white on black), and this is usually also suited for pure text-mode
#+ consoles (no X server available). If you use a white background,
#+ you'll have to do some other choices for readability.
#
 This bashrc file is a bit overcrowded.
 Remember, it is just just an example.
 Tailor it to your needs.
#
# =============================================================== #
# --> Comments added by HOWTO author.
# If not running interactively, don't do anything
[ -z "$PS1" ] && return
#-------------------------------------------------------------
# Source global definitions (if any)
#-------------------------------------------------------------
Appendix M. Sample .bashrc and .bash_profile Files
820
if [ -f /etc/bashrc ]; then
. /etc/bashrc   # --> Read /etc/bashrc, if present.
fi
#--------------------------------------------------------------
 Automatic setting of $DISPLAY (if not set already).
 This works for me - your mileage may vary. . . .
 The problem is that different types of terminals give
#+ different answers to 'who am i' (rxvt in particular can be
#+ troublesome) - however this code seems to work in a majority
#+ of cases.
#--------------------------------------------------------------
function get_xserver ()
{
case $TERM in
xterm )
XSERVER=$(who am i | awk '{print $NF}' | tr -d ')''(' )
# Ane-Pieter Wieringa suggests the following alternative:
#  I_AM=$(who am i)
#  SERVER=${I_AM#*(}
#  SERVER=${SERVER%*)}
XSERVER=${XSERVER%%:*}
;;
aterm | rxvt)
# Find some code that works here. ...
;;
esac
}
if [ -z ${DISPLAY:=""} ]; then
get_xserver
if [[ -z ${XSERVER}  || ${XSERVER} == $(hostname) ||
${XSERVER} == "unix" ]]; then
DISPLAY=":0.0"          # Display on local host.
else
DISPLAY=${XSERVER}:0.0     # Display on remote host.
fi
fi
export DISPLAY
#-------------------------------------------------------------
# Some settings
#-------------------------------------------------------------
#set -o nounset     # These  two options are useful for debugging.
#set -o xtrace
alias debug="set -o nounset; set -o xtrace"
ulimit -S -c 0      # Don't want coredumps.
set -o notify
set -o noclobber
set -o ignoreeof
# Enable options:
shopt -s cdspell
shopt -s cdable_vars
shopt -s checkhash
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Appendix M. Sample .bashrc and .bash_profile Files
821
shopt -s checkwinsize
shopt -s sourcepath
shopt -s no_empty_cmd_completion
shopt -s cmdhist
shopt -s histappend histreedit histverify
shopt -s extglob       # Necessary for programmable completion.
# Disable options:
shopt -u mailwarn
unset MAILCHECK        # Don't want my shell to warn me of incoming mail.
#-------------------------------------------------------------
# Greeting, motd etc. ...
#-------------------------------------------------------------
# Color definitions (taken from Color Bash Prompt HowTo).
# Some colors might look different of some terminals.
# For example, I see 'Bold Red' as 'orange' on my screen,
# hence the 'Green' 'BRed' 'Red' sequence I often use in my prompt.
# Normal Colors
Black='\e[0;30m'        # Black
Red='\e[0;31m'          # Red
Green='\e[0;32m'        # Green
Yellow='\e[0;33m'       # Yellow
Blue='\e[0;34m'         # Blue
Purple='\e[0;35m'       # Purple
Cyan='\e[0;36m'         # Cyan
White='\e[0;37m'        # White
# Bold
BBlack='\e[1;30m'       # Black
BRed='\e[1;31m'         # Red
BGreen='\e[1;32m'       # Green
BYellow='\e[1;33m'      # Yellow
BBlue='\e[1;34m'        # Blue
BPurple='\e[1;35m'      # Purple
BCyan='\e[1;36m'        # Cyan
BWhite='\e[1;37m'       # White
# Background
On_Black='\e[40m'       # Black
On_Red='\e[41m'         # Red
On_Green='\e[42m'       # Green
On_Yellow='\e[43m'      # Yellow
On_Blue='\e[44m'        # Blue
On_Purple='\e[45m'      # Purple
On_Cyan='\e[46m'        # Cyan
On_White='\e[47m'       # White
NC="\e[m"               # Color Reset
ALERT=${BWhite}${On_Red} # Bold White on red background
echo -e "${BCyan}This is BASH ${BRed}${BASH_VERSION%.*}${BCyan}\
- DISPLAY on ${BRed}$DISPLAY${NC}\n"
date
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Appendix M. Sample .bashrc and .bash_profile Files
822
if [ -x /usr/games/fortune ]; then
/usr/games/fortune -s     # Makes our day a bit more fun.... :-)
fi
function _exit()              # Function to run upon exit of shell.
{
echo -e "${BRed}Hasta la vista, baby${NC}"
}
trap _exit EXIT
#-------------------------------------------------------------
# Shell Prompt - for many examples, see:
      http://www.debian-administration.org/articles/205
      http://www.askapache.com/linux/bash-power-prompt.html
      http://tldp.org/HOWTO/Bash-Prompt-HOWTO
      https://github.com/nojhan/liquidprompt
#-------------------------------------------------------------
# Current Format: [TIME USER@HOST PWD] >
# TIME:
   Green     == machine load is low
   Orange    == machine load is medium
   Red       == machine load is high
   ALERT     == machine load is very high
# USER:
   Cyan      == normal user
   Orange    == SU to user
   Red       == root
# HOST:
   Cyan      == local session
   Green     == secured remote connection (via ssh)
   Red       == unsecured remote connection
# PWD:
   Green     == more than 10% free disk space
   Orange    == less than 10% free disk space
   ALERT     == less than 5% free disk space
   Red       == current user does not have write privileges
   Cyan      == current filesystem is size zero (like /proc)
# >:
   White     == no background or suspended jobs in this shell
   Cyan      == at least one background job in this shell
   Orange    == at least one suspended job in this shell
#
   Command is added to the history file each time you hit enter,
   so it's available to all shells (using 'history -a').
# Test connection type:
if [ -n "${SSH_CONNECTION}" ]; then
CNX=${Green}        # Connected on remote machine, via ssh (good).
elif [[ "${DISPLAY%%:0*}" != "" ]]; then
CNX=${ALERT}        # Connected on remote machine, not via ssh (bad).
else
CNX=${BCyan}        # Connected on local machine.
fi
# Test user type:
if [[ ${USER} == "root" ]]; then
SU=${Red}           # User is root.
elif [[ ${USER} != $(logname) ]]; then
SU=${BRed}          # User is not login user.
else
SU=${BCyan}         # User is normal (well ... most of us are).
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Appendix M. Sample .bashrc and .bash_profile Files
823
fi
NCPU=$(grep -c 'processor' /proc/cpuinfo)    # Number of CPUs
SLOAD=$(( 100*${NCPU} ))        # Small load
MLOAD=$(( 200*${NCPU} ))        # Medium load
XLOAD=$(( 400*${NCPU} ))        # Xlarge load
# Returns system load as percentage, i.e., '40' rather than '0.40)'.
function load()
{
local SYSLOAD=$(cut -d " " -f1 /proc/loadavg | tr -d '.')
# System load of the current host.
echo $((10#$SYSLOAD))       # Convert to decimal.
}
# Returns a color indicating system load.
function load_color()
{
local SYSLOAD=$(load)
if [ ${SYSLOAD} -gt ${XLOAD} ]; then
echo -en ${ALERT}
elif [ ${SYSLOAD} -gt ${MLOAD} ]; then
echo -en ${Red}
elif [ ${SYSLOAD} -gt ${SLOAD} ]; then
echo -en ${BRed}
else
echo -en ${Green}
fi
}
# Returns a color according to free disk space in $PWD.
function disk_color()
{
if [ ! -w "${PWD}" ] ; then
echo -en ${Red}
# No 'write' privilege in the current directory.
elif [ -s "${PWD}" ] ; then
local used=$(command df -P "$PWD" |
awk 'END {print $5} {sub(/%/,"")}')
if [ ${used} -gt 95 ]; then
echo -en ${ALERT}           # Disk almost full (>95%).
elif [ ${used} -gt 90 ]; then
echo -en ${BRed}            # Free disk space almost gone.
else
echo -en ${Green}           # Free disk space is ok.
fi
else
echo -en ${Cyan}
# Current directory is size '0' (like /proc, /sys etc).
fi
}
# Returns a color according to running/suspended jobs.
function job_color()
{
if [ $(jobs -s | wc -l) -gt "0" ]; then
echo -en ${BRed}
elif [ $(jobs -r | wc -l) -gt "0" ] ; then
echo -en ${BCyan}
fi
Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide
Appendix M. Sample .bashrc and .bash_profile Files
824
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested