open pdf file c# : Adding text to a pdf document Library SDK component .net wpf azure mvc 09_12_Voorrips0-part258

Electronic Information Systems in archaeology
1
ELECTRONIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS IN ARCHAEOLOGY.
SOME NOTES AND COMMENTS
1. I
NTRODUCTION
Since about 1960, a wide variety of electronic ‘tools’, both hardware
and software, have been invented, copied, and adapted to manage archaeo-
logical enterprises and analyze archaeological problems. Specialized journals,
like this one, and Quantitative Anthropology, together with proceedings of
regular meetings like the Convegni Internazionali di Archeologia e Informatica,
the CAA conferences, and the  symposia of  Commission 4 of  the Union
Internationale des Sciences Préhistoriques et Protohistoriques contain a wealth
of information on the subject. An overview of the development and quality
of the applications of computers in archaeology, assuming that such an at-
tempt would be useful, readily would fill a book. Faithful predictions about
future developments in the field are almost impossible to make, given the
fast evolution of technology. Moreover, perspectives on the role of archaeol-
ogy in general and on the ways archaeological findings should be presented
in particular strongly influence the manner in which archaeological informa-
tion is collected, analyzed, stored, and disseminated.
In my opinion, we can divide archaeological projects into ‘collection-
oriented’ ones, COP for  short, ‘planning-oriented  ones’, or POP, and ‘re-
search-oriented’ ones, or ROP. By collection-oriented I mean an archaeology
whose first task is to store and display to the public the information about
our past. It is the kind of work accomplished by museums and libraries. One
could say that its emphasis is on administration, not on investigation.
By planning-oriented I mean an archaeology which advises the govern-
ment or  whoever is  responsible  on the measures that should be taken  to
minimize  or, better, to prevent the  loss of the archaeological record in a
world  where large-scale  landscape-construction is  occurring almost every-
where. In order to perform its advising tasks, this archaeology develops meth-
ods and executes procedures, preferably non-destructive ones, for estimating
the locations and values of archaeological resources (G
ROENEWOUDT
1994).
This work, in general carried out by organisations for cultural resource man-
agement, puts emphasis on protecting the archaeological record as such, by
means of administration and mapping.
By research-oriented I mean an archaeology whose first task is to inter-
pret, to explain why the archaeological record is what it is and where it is, to
construct models for the developments and changes that took place in the
past, based on the archaeological record, and to discuss and publish the rea-
Archeologia e Calcolatori
9, 1998, 251-267
Adding text to a pdf document - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text pdf; how to add text to a pdf document
Adding text to a pdf document - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text to a pdf form; add text fields to pdf
A. Voorrips
2
soning and its conclusions. It is the kind of work accomplished by the depart-
ments of archaeology in universities and comparable institutions.
In this paper I restrict myself to making some notes and comments on
the use of electronic  information systems (EIS, for short) in archaeology,
based mainly on my own experiences over the last 20 years. I do this in the
form of stating a number of theses, each followed by an explanation and/or
defence. The last section of the paper shortly discusses some projects in which
EIS are being used. To most readers, my theses probably will sound like plati-
tudes or be self-evident. I hope, however, that some of them may be of some
use to some readers…
2. A
N
EIS 
IS
A
NECESSARY
PART
OF
A
RESEARCH
DESIGN
BUT
NOT
MORE
THAN
A
PART
Today, almost every archaeological project makes use of computers in
some way or another. In order to do so effectively, it is necessary that the
structure of the EIS is embedded within the overall research design. In that
research design, the expectations of the role of the EIS in the project need to
be defined, and, based on those expectations, the structure of the EIS, its
hardware and software, as well as the procedures to be followed in ‘filling’
and using it, must be clearly stated.
In almost all situations, there will be a need for an information man-
ager, not necessarily  an archaeologist, with whom  the archaeologist(s) re-
sponsible for the project can discuss the possibilities, desired properties, im-
plementation and procedures of the EIS, before the start of the project as
well as during its accomplishment. The presence of an information manager
is, in my opinion, mandatory in all but the smallest archaeological projects.
She/he should function directly under the project leader(s), and should have
the power to veto approaches which would inhibit consistency in the struc-
ture of the EIS. In most cases, the information manager will also be the data-
base administrator (see next section), who has the final responsibility for the
database design, its maintenance, backup and access procedures.
What should not happen is that the EIS itself dictates (part of) the
research design, which may occur because of either a lack of software and
hardware or too much of it. In the first case, outdated equipment restricts
the functionality of the EIS and, therefore, of the project as a whole. The
solution is first to decide what the EIS should look like, given the goals of the
project, and then to decide what hardware  and software need to be pur-
chased. In the second case, the information manager, archaeologically trained
or not, adds components to the EIS which have no real purpose in the con-
text of the project, but are only there to use the latest computer gadgets. The
solution is simple: consider the EIS a tool, not a toy.
Another situation where it may look as if the EIS dictates the research
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
how to add text box to pdf; how to add text to pdf file
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
C#.NET: Add Text Box to PDF Document. Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program.
how to add text fields in a pdf; adding text to pdf form
Electronic Information Systems in archaeology
3
design occurs when there are prescribed standards for the documentation of
archaeological findings. This  is common  in  much CRM-oriented work
(M
ADSEN
1997). This problem, however, lies more with the standards them-
selves than with the manner they have been implemented in an EIS.
3. T
HE
HEART
OF
AN
EIS 
IS
A
FLEXIBLE
RELATIONAL
DATABASE
MANAGEMENT
SYSTEM
The use of a relational database management system for the storage of
information is becoming the rule in archaeology. Few, if any, archaeological
projects are so small that a single ‘card file’ or ‘flat file’, electronic or not,
suffices. A database which consists of a number of flat files, which are for-
mally independent, is cumbersome and difficult to maintain. Hierarchical
systems, still common in many governmental institutions, may allow very
fast retrievals, but the hierarchical structure itself tends to be a straight jacket
and is extremely complicated to change. In contrast, the relational model
enables optimal structuring of the information, which, in turn, makes check-
ing, correcting, and querying of the data a straightforward matter.
It is not too difficult to design a relational database for small to moder-
ately sized projects. By ‘small to moderately sized’ I  mean projects which
need only a restricted number of tables in the database with few ‘many-to-
many’ relationships. The design of  a good relational database for  larger
projects is not a trivial task, however, particularly if the project consists of a
number of related sub-projects, each of which addresses in an independent
manner specific research questions, and/or if the project takes a number of
years to be completed, during which there will be inevitably differences and
changes in the manner the data are collected and analyzed. A good approach
is to design  separate  databases for the sub-projects and consecutive cam-
paigns to suit the specific needs of each of them. These databases should then
be incorporated into a ‘meta-database’, querying of which makes it possible
to combine the information from all different sources. An example of this
flexible approach is the IDEA project (A
NDRESEN
, M
ADSEN
1996). The project’s
information manager should serve as the database administrator of the ‘meta-
database’ and should oversee the work of the database administrators – every
database needs one! – of the sub-projects.
In archaeological practice it is important that, after its initial defini-
tion, a relational database can be easily updated – tables and columns can be
added, deleted or changed without having to rebuild the entire structure. In
the course of an archaeological project the database can grow with the addi-
tion of information resulting from more and more detailed investigations.
But problems can occur as well. At the time of the initial definition of a
relational database, it is generally not too difficult to ensure that its tables are
in the third normal form (e.g., D
ATE
1986, chapter 17), a prerequisite for its
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
C#.NET Winforms Document Viewer, C#.NET WPF Document Viewer. VB.NET PDF - Add Text Box to PDF Page in VB Provide VB.NET Users with Solution of Adding Text Box to
add text in pdf file online; how to insert text into a pdf with acrobat
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
DNN (DotNetNuke), SharePoint. Provide .NET SDK library for adding text box to PDF document in .NET WinForms application. A web based
adding text pdf files; add text to pdf without acrobat
A. Voorrips
4
frugality, and to guarantee its integrity. When various people, with varying
skills in the art of database definition start to add tables to such a database,
both frugality and integrity may suffer. Therefore, the database of a project
must be managed by a trained database administrator, for the full lifetime of
the project, who has the final word on what can be put into the database and
how that must be done.
Whereas the databases of a project, possibly including the meta-data-
base, are specifically created for the project, often by one or a few people,
the relational database management system (RDBMS) into which the data-
bases are put should be a generally accepted and available product with good
support from the manufacturers and a ‘life span’ expected to be at least as
long as the duration of the project. This condition is fulfilled only by some
products from large, commercial companies, which can allot enough time
and money to keep their products up-to-date, given the ever-changing hard-
ware and operating systems.
No individual or small number of individuals, however smart they are
and how wonderful their systems may be, can ever guarantee that their pro-
gramming efforts will not be obsolete within a few years, or even months.
But, the products of the large companies should be studied critically as well
before selecting one to be used in a long-term project. One major condition
is that an RDBMS fully supports the SQL (Structured Query Language) stand-
ards. This means, among other things, that the user of the system must be
able to directly write, store, and execute commands written in standard SQL.
The QBE (Query By Example) approach, where a retrieval is composed by
pointing and clicking in some kind of menu is fine for many not too compli-
cated queries, but in a number of situations the – high level – user needs to be
able to write a query directly in SQL. Another condition, particularly when
the EIS includes a meta-database, is that the RDBMS supports the use of
object-oriented programming, so that many ‘house keeping’ tasks – the re-
sponsibility of the database administrator – can be accomplished with mini-
mal effort.
4. T
HERE
IS
AN
ESSENTIAL
DIFFERENCE
BETWEEN
SPATIAL
DATA
AND
ATTRIBUTE
DATA
I want to consider briefly the rather different natures of attribute data
and spatial data. Attribute data, as the word says, consist of descriptions of
the characteristics possessed by archaeological phenomena, using a well-de-
fined and consistent method. They are most often stored as tables or cata-
logues. Spatial data, on the other hand, consist of the information about the
location of archaeological or other phenomena and, therefore, on their spa-
tial relationships. In ROP the ‘unedited’ field drawing is considered the spa-
tial information. Of course, field drawings are themselves constructs whose
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Feel free to define text or images on PDF document and extract accordingly. Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB.NET program.
how to add text to pdf document; how to insert text box in pdf file
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
NET Winforms Document Viewer, C#.NET WPF Document Viewer. VB.NET PDF - Annotate Text on PDF Page in VB Professional VB.NET Solution for Adding Text Annotation to
adding text to pdf in acrobat; adding text field to pdf
Electronic Information Systems in archaeology
5
quality heavily depends  on the archaeological expertise to ‘read’ the sur-
faces and sections of an excavation. Photographically stored spatial infor-
mation can be used to support the field drawings, but cannot replace them.
Field drawings are physically stored as maps on different scales, which then
can be digitized. In POP, particularly when projects are on a regional level,
the spatial information tends to be derived from different sources – maps,
air photographs, satellite data – with different resolution.
It is possible to have ‘error free’ attribute data in terms of the method
employed, at least in theory, but it is not possible to have error free spatial
data. There will always be differences between three-dimensional reality and
our representations of it; the ‘errors’ not only include mistakes or faults, but
also the statistical  concept  of variation  (H
EUVELINK
1993,  23, following
B
URROUGH
1986). In particular in POP, when GIS modelling techniques for
the construction of new maps are used and planning decisions are made on
the basis of these maps, it is of utmost importance to be aware of the nature
of the errors that are transferred from one map to another, because their
presence can lead to decisions which are fatal to the archaeological record.
5. A G
EOGRAPHIC
I
NFORMATION
S
YSTEM
IS
NOT
SUITED
TO
BE
THE
HEART
OF
AN
EIS
The defining characteristic of a Geographic Information System (GIS)
is that it stores and manipulates spatial data in either vector format or raster
format. Non-spatial information is kept in separate tables which can be linked
to the spatial data in various ways. Therefore, it can be tempting to build an
EIS around a GIS, with the spatial information at the core of the enterprise.
However, the capacities for the management of non-spatial information in
the GISs I am somewhat familiar with (ArcInfo, Genamap, Idrisi, MapInfo),
even those that allow attribute tables to be located in an external RDBMS,
are quite restricted. Support of SQL, for example, ranges from incomplete to
non-existent.
Moreover, the digitizing routines for entering spatial information seem
to be a weak part of almost every GIS. There is another problem in con-
structing the EIS around a GIS, in particular in projects which involve exca-
vation. To my knowledge, all GISs require that areas are completely bounded
before any manipulation of the spatial information is possible. In an ongoing
excavation it often occurs that parts of the edges of features have not yet
been excavated or are indistinct. In the latter case, the manipulation of the
spatial data in the database is exactly what is needed to help decide where a
boundary should be.
For all these reasons, it seems to me that when a GIS is needed in a
project it is better to use it as a specialized tool that gets its data from the EIS
and stores its products back into the EIS again.
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
This C# .NET PDF document page inserting & adding component from RasterEdge is written in managed C# code and designed particularly for .NET class applications
how to insert text box on pdf; adding text fields to a pdf
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Using this C# .NET image adding library control for PDF document, you can easily and quickly add an image, picture or logo to any position of specified PDF
how to add text to a pdf in preview; adding text fields to pdf acrobat
A. Voorrips
6
6. T
HE
AMOUNT
AND
KIND
OF
STANDARDIZATION
OF
DESCRIPTION
IN
AN
EIS 
IS
COMPLETELY
DEPENDENT
ON
THE
RESEARCH
DESIGN
Standardization of description always has been a topic of discussion in
archaeology, and probably will be so forever. After all, each description is a
form of classification, and classification is one of the major themes in our
discipline. A description is a, sometimes simple, classification, because as-
signing an interpretation or a name to an archaeological event – like “this is
(the remnant of) a ditch”, “this is a Mousterian point”, “the size of the tem-
per of this sherd is coarse” – is the identification of a real-world phenom-
enon into one of the classes of an ideational classification. A classification
itself is “…an exhaustive set of mutually exclusive classes, where each class is
defined as a number of properties” (V
OORRIPS
1982), and the same should
hold true for a descriptive system.
There are no ‘natural’ classifications or descriptions. At the same time,
every archaeological project in COP, POP or ROP, on whatever scale, must
develop a consistent system for description and storage. The definition of a
classification or a descriptive system depends on the specific research goals,
on the overall amount of knowledge about the phenomena which need to be
identified into the system, on the convictions of the researcher, on the finan-
cial means, and, often, on the requirements of bureaucracy. It is interesting
that most ‘official’ systems, by which I mean systems that somehow are sup-
ported by governmental bodies, seem to exist in the museum world and the
world of rescue archaeology, the COP and the POP. Systems for excavations
and surveys that can said to belong to the ROP rarely, if ever, have been
forced into the use of general standards, and whenever this has happened it
invariably proved to be a bad policy. No two projects are exactly the same,
have exactly the same purposes, or have exactly the same type of data.
To communicate the ‘why’ of the decisions made about data descrip-
tion, be it to colleagues or to the public, it seems logical to make available in
some form or another the research design for the project, which absolutely
has to address this subject. The ‘how’ is communicated by the structures and
dictionaries (code books) of the databases created.
Some descriptive systems can be shared by different projects, or within
a large project by different sub-projects, but only on a very basic, most of the
time administrative level. A common setup for the registration of geographi-
cal location, municipality, primary geological, pedological and geomorpho-
logical categories is feasible, as is a common setup for the documentation of
the circumstances  in which  observations were  made, like date, time, and
weather conditions – although the choice between classes like ‘hot’, ‘warm’,
and ‘cool’ for the registration of temperature is a rather subjective one. Also
a descriptive system for primary material categories – ceramics, glass, stone,
Electronic Information Systems in archaeology
7
obsidian, flint, bone, wood, textiles – can be shared, as it is independent
from research goals and real-world situations in that almost no special knowl-
edge is required to make the identification, and the distinction is at the basis
of nearly every archaeological enterprise.
In the end, it is a matter of resolution. A descriptive system that can be
shared by different projects or sub-projects has a resolution that is sufficiently
low to enable the users to unambiguously identify into it all the different
observations made. It is part of the research design to select the resolution
appropriate for the research goals, and to define descriptive systems consist-
ent with that resolution.
Of course, different levels of resolution for different kinds of observa-
tions can be defined within a research design, but one should be aware that
overall comparison of observations only can occur at the lowest level.
7. T
HE
USE
OF
A
WELL
-
DESIGNED
RELATIONAL
DATABASE
IN
AN
EIS 
MAKES
DISCUSSIONS
ABOUT
DATA
ENCODING
OBSOLETE
It is sometimes disputed whether, when entering and storing data into
an EIS, codes – numeric, mnemonic, or whatever – are to be preferred over
more-or-less complete textual descriptions. When using a relational data-
base, such disputes are unnecessary. First, when the database is well-designed,
which means that its tables are in the third normal form, internal codes are
used to prevent unwanted duplication of information. These codes, whose
actual form is determined by the database designer, are the primary keys of
separate tables, which at least should contain meaningful textual labels and/
or mnemonics, but also can hold, or refer to, the complete textual descrip-
tions. Second, in well-designed input- and report forms, it can be up to the
user to decide what she/he wants to work with: code, mnemonic, textual
label or full textual description.
8. A G
EOGRAPHIC
I
NFORMATION
S
YSTEM
IS
NOT
NECESSARILY
THE
BEST
TOOL
FOR
THE
ENTRY
EDITING
AND
STORAGE
OF
SPATIAL
DATA
The spatial data collected in the course of an archaeological project
should  be digitized  and stored in the EIS as soon as  possible. The major
reason for this is the  correction of mistakes. The length of time and the
amount of effort required for correcting mistakes in a field situation is al-
ways an exponential function of the length of time between the making and
the detection of a mistake. While this is true for all kinds of data, the situa-
tion is even worse for spatial data. Correction may be impossible because in
the time between the making and the detection of the mistake the informa-
tion necessary to correct it has been destroyed by the ongoing fieldwork. In
A. Voorrips
8
order to be able to detect mistakes as soon as possible, digitizing the field
drawings is not enough. They must be entered into the EIS which allows the
archaeologist to combine the spatial information in various ways and to search
for inconsistencies.
Another reason for immediately incorporating spatial data into the EIS
is to allow the researcher to aggregate the data and to make decisions regard-
ing the course of  the project based on the outcomes of such aggregations.
Whenever possible, preliminary outcomes of analyses of attribute data should
be linked to the spatial data in this process.
Digitizing is a tedious procedure even under the best circumstances.
Digitizing routines built into GISs tend not to be very user-friendly or sophis-
ticated (e.g., J
OHNSON
1996, chapter 9), and some GISs do not support digi-
tizing at all. An example is Idrisi, the purchase of which so far (1997) in-
cludes the separate digitizing package Tosca. For digitizing plans and draw-
ings of excavations, which are in a Cartesian coordinate system, packages
like AutoCAD work much more smoothly, and it is not too complicated to
transfer the digitized and cleaned data to a GIS. When dealing with spatial
data covering larger areas, e.g. topographic maps, which are registered in
some non-Cartesian coordinate system, the advantage of using the digitizing
routines provided by a GIS is that, in general, the data are stored right-away
as the accurate real-world coordinates.
An interesting development is the addition of GIS capacities to CAD
systems. The package AutoCAD Map, for example, combines the full power
of AutoCAD with all standard GIS functions, including the querying of at-
tribute data located in an external relational database, and a limited number
of analytical tools (Autodesk 1997). While not exactly cheap, such a combi-
nation makes the separate purchase of digitizing software and GIS software
unnecessary, and simplifies the overall design of the EIS.
9. A
RCHAEOLOGICAL
ANALYSIS
OFTEN
REQUIRES
SPECIAL
ANALYTICAL
TOOLS
WHICH
ARE
NOT
INCLUDED
IN
GENERAL
PROGRAM
PACKAGES
The archaeologist who wants to describe and analyze archaeological
data needs a fair knowledge of ‘standard’ statistical methods and familiarity
with at least one general statistical program package. The initial steps usually
involve uni- and bivariate analysis, but  the characteristics of many of our
data demand an approach along the lines of exploratory data analysis (EDA),
a methodology which, by now, has been incorporated in many general statis-
tical packages. All such packages permit the import and export of data in a
variety of formats, and it is therefore not difficult to have an EIS communi-
cate with them.
There are a number of archaeological problems, however, for which
Electronic Information Systems in archaeology
9
methods of analysis have been developed which are not, or incompletely
covered by general packages. One of the first and probably best examples is
seriation, but also various forms of cluster analysis and methods for the evalu-
ation of the clusters ‘found’ by some analytical technique (e.g., K
INTIGH
1988;
W
HALLON
1990), methods for estimating the number of vessels represented
in a sample of sherds (O
RTON
, T
YERS
1992), etc., are not generally available.
To a large extent, this problem is being addressed by the Bonn Archaeo-
logical Statistics Package (BASP), which tries to collect special archaeological
analytical methods, to present them in a consistent manner, and to make
them available at low costs to the archaeological community (S
COLLAR
1997).
Like the general statistical packages, BASP recognizes a number of different
data-formats. There may be other methods which an archaeologist wants to
use in the context of a large project, however, which only exist as individual
programs or in small program packages. If these require specific input for-
mats and/or produces specifically formatted output, the information man-
ager of the project may want to add an interface to the EIS which can handle
the program’s demands.
One would expect that every GIS contains routines for a variety of
spatial analyses, but in practice the possibilities are restricted. Most spatial
analyses are performed using raster-data, so it is not surprising that, for ex-
ample, MapInfo has not much to offer in this respect. Idrisi, on the other
hand, contains a fair amount of rather sophisticated analytical tools. ArcInfo
has a module ArcGrid, which offers a number of raster-based analysis rou-
tines, but for specialized analytical work it is often linked to a special subset
of the general statistics package S+, named S+SpatialStats (SPLUS 1997).
In my opinion, archaeology has not done much yet in the area of devel-
oping analytical tools for spatial analysis, although there are exceptions (e.g.,
K
VAMME
1997; V
ERHAGEN
, M
C
G
LADE
1997). It might be worthwhile consider-
ing whether such tools can and should be incorporated in a  package like
BASP.
10. A
N
EIS 
IS
NEITHER
A
CATALOGUE
NOR
AN
ARCHIVE
After the completion of a project, the results need to be made public in
one form or another, and the collected information needs to be archived. It
may be tempting to consider the EIS of a project as the replacement of the
written monograph and/or catalogue and of the card files and drawings in
the archive. This, however, would be overrating and underrating the func-
tion of an EIS simultaneously.
It would be overrating, because the EIS itself is not the instrument by
which the information it contains gets interpreted, it only simplifies access to
the information, and can be used to present relations between different kinds
A. Voorrips
10
of information. It remains the task of the archaeologist, or other specialist,
to provide the reasoning to explain the information and its relationships. It
might be possible to add such reasoning and resulting interpretation to the
EIS in the form of a knowledge base, structured along the lines set out by J.-
C. Gardin (e.g., G
ARDIN
1987). Such an expanded EIS could indeed replace
other forms of publication, but at present this seems still too far-fetched to
me, however.
It would be underrating, because the capabilities of an EIS are much
more than is needed for an archive. After all, an archive is ‘only’ our last
resource for the recuperation of information that has been lost by some dis-
aster, and, while it of course must be well-ordered, the multitude of manners
in which data can be accessed in an EIS is not really functional in this respect.
At the same time, a well-structured EIS is an invaluable tool and re-
source for researchers, cataloguers, exhibition builders and archivists. It ena-
bles each of them to access with ease the data from their different points of
view and to extract what they need for their specific purposes.
11. D
ISCUSSION
OF
SOME
PROJECTS
WHICH
USE
EIS 
AND
GIS
The six projects I have been asked to discuss – the short descriptions of
them follow this paper – can be divided into three  types.  Four  of them:
‘Ateliers céramiques gallo-romains d’Argonne’ (1), ‘Archaeomedes’ (2), ‘Noord
Oostelijke Verbinding Betuwelijn’ (3), and ‘Landscape and habitation along
the Dutch Meuse-valley in the early Middle Ages’ (4b) concern themselves
solely with archaeology on the regional level. Project (1), (3) and (4b) are
typically POP: their aim is the production of maps of archaeological poten-
tial, to be used in CRM-type decision making processes for protecting the
archaeological heritage (1), (4b) and/or for the selection of sites to excavate
(3). Basically, the method utilized in (1) and (3), and probably also in (4b), is
a  form of predictive modeling, with emphasis on environmental variables
like soils and/or geology, distance to water, etc. Project (2) is more ROP, and
its aim is not so much prediction as the investigation of the processes which
led to (changes in) settlement pattern, a pattern that is apparently already
known. Besides ‘standard’ analyses of distance to water and soil properties,
the study of road networks play a role in the analysis as well.
All four projects use standards  for description  that  were developed
independently, and from the short overviews it is not clear whether or not
this is a successful approach.
It is interesting to note that projects (1) and (3), both of which started
in 1996 and use ArcInfo, as well as project (4b), which starts in 1995 and
uses MapInfo, make no mention of a separate RDBMS for storing the at-
tribute data, in contrast to project (2), which started in 1994 and uses GRASS
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested