open pdf file c# : Adding text box to pdf software control project winforms azure asp.net UWP 120326privacyreport0-part386

FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION  |  MARCH 2012
RECOMMENDATIONS FOR 
BUSINESSES AND POLICYMAKERS
FTC REPORT
Adding text box to pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text to pdf file; adding text to pdf online
Adding text box to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add text to a pdf file in preview; add text in pdf file online
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Provide VB.NET Users with Solution of Adding Text Box to PDF Page in VB.NET Project. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
how to insert text into a pdf with acrobat; add text to pdf file reader
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Provide .NET SDK library for adding text box to PDF document in .NET WinForms application. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
add text field to pdf; add text boxes to pdf
RECOMMENDATIONS FOR 
BUSINESSES AND POLICYMAKERS
FTC REPORT
MARCH 2012
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program. C#.NET: Draw Markups on PDF File.
adding text pdf files; add text box in pdf document
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references:
how to add text to a pdf in acrobat; add text to pdf online
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF VB.NET PDF - Annotate Text on PDF Page in VB Professional VB.NET Solution for Adding Text Annotation
how to insert a text box in pdf; add text fields to pdf
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Support adding protection features to PDF file by adding password, digital signatures and redaction feature. Various of PDF text and images processing features
how to enter text in pdf; add text to a pdf document
CONTENTS
Executive Summary ‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮i
Final FTC Privacy Framework and Implementation Recommendations ‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮ vii
I‮  Introduction ‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮ 1
II‮ Background  ‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮ 2
A.  FTC Roundtables and Preliminary Staff Report ....................................... 2
B.  Department of Commerce Privacy Initiatives ......................................... 3
C.  Legislative Proposals and Efforts by Stakeholders ...................................... 4
1.  Do Not Track .............................................................. 4
2.  Other Privacy Initiatives ...................................................... 5
III‮ Main 周emes From Commenters ‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮ 7
A.  Articulation of Privacy Harms .................................................... 7
B.  Global Interoperability .......................................................... 9
C.  Legislation to Augment Self-Regulatory Efforts ...................................... 11
IV‮ Privacy Framework ‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮ 15
A.  Scope ...................................................................... 15
1.  Companies Should Comply with the Framework Unless 周ey Handle Only Limited 
Amounts of Non-Sensitive Data that is Not Shared with 周ird Parties. ................. 15
2.  周e Framework Sets Forth Best Practices and Can Work in Tandem with Existing 
Privacy and Security Statutes. ................................................. 16
3.  周e Framework Applies to Offline As Well As Online Data. ......................... 17
4.  周e Framework Applies to Data 周at is Reasonably Linkable to a Specific Consumer, 
Computer, or Device.   ...................................................... 18
B.  Privacy by Design ............................................................. 22
1.  周e Substantive Principles: Data Security, Reasonable Collection Limits, Sound 
Retention Practices, and Data Accuracy. ......................................... 23
2.  Companies Should Adopt Procedural Protections to Implement the Substantive Principles. .. 30
C.  Simplified Consumer Choice .................................................... 35
1.  Practices 周at Do Not Require Choice. ......................................... 36
2.  For Practices Inconsistent with the Context of their Interaction with Consumers, 
Companies Should Give Consumers Choices. .................................... 48
D. Transparency ................................................................ 60
1.  Privacy Notices ............................................................ 61
2.  Access ................................................................... 64
3.  Consumer Education ....................................................... 71
V‮  Conclusion ‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮‮ 72
FTC Privacy Milestones
Personal Data Ecosystem
Dissenting Statement of Commissioner J‮ 周omas Rosch
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
application? To help you solve this technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc.PDF for .NET. Similar
how to add text to pdf file; add text pdf reader
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
By using reliable APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel
adding text fields to pdf; adding text to pdf reader
i
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
In today’s world of smart phones, smart grids, and smart cars, companies are collecting, storing, and 
sharing more information about consumers than ever before.  Although companies use this information 
to innovate and deliver better products and services to consumers, they should not do so at the expense of 
consumer privacy.  
With this Report, the Commission calls on companies to act now to implement best practices to protect 
consumers’ private information.  周ese best practices include making privacy the “default setting” for 
commercial data practices and giving consumers greater control over the collection and use of their personal 
data through simplified choices and increased transparency.  Implementing these best practices will enhance 
trust and stimulate commerce.  
周is Report follows a preliminary staff report that the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC” or 
“Commission”) issued in December 2010.  周e preliminary report proposed a framework for protecting 
consumer privacy in the 21
st
Century.  Like this Report, the framework urged companies to adopt the 
following practices, consistent with the Fair Information Practice Principles first articulated almost 40 years 
ago:
Privacy by Design:  Build in privacy at every stage of product development;
Simplified Choice for Businesses and Consumers:  Give consumers the ability to make decisions 
about their data at a relevant time and context, including through a Do Not Track mechanism, while 
reducing the burden on businesses of providing unnecessary choices; and 
Greater Transparency:  Make information collection and use practices transparent.
周e Commission received more than 450 public comments in response to the preliminary report from 
various stakeholders, including businesses, privacy advocates, technologists and individual consumers.  A 
wide range of stakeholders, including industry, supported the principles underlying the framework, and 
many companies said they were already following them.  At the same time, many commenters criticized the 
slow pace of self-regulation, and argued that it is time for Congress to enact baseline privacy legislation.  In 
this Report, the Commission addresses the comments and sets forth a revised, final privacy framework that 
adheres to, but also clarifies and fine-tunes, the basic principles laid out in the preliminary report.
Since the Commission issued the preliminary staff report, Congress has introduced both general privacy 
bills and more focused bills, including ones addressing Do Not Track and the privacy of teens.  Industry has 
made some progress in certain areas, most notably, in responding to the preliminary report’s call for Do Not 
Track.  In other areas, however, industry progress has been far slower.  周us, overall, consumers do not yet 
enjoy the privacy protections proposed in the preliminary staff report.
周e Administration and certain Members of Congress have called for enactment of baseline privacy 
legislation.  周e Commission now also calls on Congress to consider enacting baseline privacy legislation and 
reiterates its call for data security legislation.  周e Commission is prepared to work with Congress and other 
stakeholders to craft such legislation.  At the same time, the Commission urges industry to accelerate the 
pace of self-regulation.
ii
周e remainder of this Executive Summary describes key developments since the issuance of the 
preliminary report, discusses the most significant revisions to the proposed framework, and lays out several 
next steps. 
DEVELOPMENTS SINCE ISSUANCE OF THE PRELIMINARY REPORT
In the last 40 years, the Commission has taken numerous actions to shape the consumer privacy 
landscape.  For example, the Commission has sued dozens of companies that broke their privacy and 
security promises, scores of telemarketers that called consumers on the Do Not Call registry, and more 
than a hundred scammers peddling unwanted spam and spyware.  Since it issued the initial staff report, 
the Commission has redoubled its efforts to protect consumer privacy, including through law enforcement, 
policy advocacy, and consumer and business education.  It has also vigorously promoted self-regulatory 
efforts.  
On the law enforcement front, since December 2010, the Commission:
Brought enforcement actions against Google and Facebook.  周e orders obtained in these cases 
require the companies to obtain consumers’ affirmative express consent before materially changing 
certain of their data practices and to adopt strong, company-wide privacy programs that outside 
auditors will assess for 20 years.  周ese orders will protect the more than one billion Google and 
Facebook users worldwide.  
Brought enforcement actions against online advertising networks that failed to honor opt outs.  周e 
orders in these cases are designed to ensure that when consumers choose to opt out of tracking by 
advertisers, their choice is effective.  
Brought enforcement actions against mobile applications that violated the Children’s Online Privacy 
Protection Act as well as applications that set default privacy settings in a way that caused consumers 
to unwittingly share their personal data.  
Brought enforcement actions against entities that sold consumer lists to marketers in violation of the 
Fair Credit Reporting Act.
Brought actions against companies for failure to maintain reasonable data security. 
On the policy front, since December 2010, the FTC and staff:
Hosted two privacy-related workshops, one on child identity theft and one on the privacy 
implications of facial recognition technology. 
Testified before Congress ten times on privacy and data security issues.
Consulted with other federal agencies, including the Federal Communications Commission, the 
Department of Health and Human Services, and the Department of Commerce, on their privacy 
initiatives.  周e Commission has supported the Department of Commerce’s initiative to convene 
stakeholders to develop privacy-related codes of conduct for different industry sectors.  
Released a survey of data collection disclosures by mobile applications directed to children. 
Proposed amendments to the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act Rule. 
iii
On the education front, since December 2010, the Commission:
Continued outreach efforts through the FTC’s consumer online safety portal, OnGuardOnline.gov, 
which provides information in a variety of formats – articles, games, quizzes, and videos – to help 
consumers secure their computers and protect their personal information.  It attracts approximately 
100,000 unique visitors per month.  
Published new consumer education materials on identity theft, Wi-Fi hot spots, cookies, and mobile 
devices.
Sent warning letters to marketers of mobile apps that do background checks on individuals, 
educating them about the requirements of the Fair Credit Reporting Act.  
To promote self-regulation, since December 2010, the Commission:
Continued its call for improved privacy disclosures and choices, particularly in the area of online 
behavioral tracking.  In response to this call, as well as to Congressional interest:
A number of Internet browser vendors developed browser-based tools for consumers to request 
that websites not track their online activities.
周e World Wide Web Consortium, an Internet standard setting organization, is developing a 
universal web protocol for Do Not Track.  
周e Digital Advertising Alliance (“DAA”), a coalition of media and marketing organizations, 
has developed a mechanism, accessed through an icon that consumers can click, to obtain 
information about and opt out of online behavioral advertising.  Additionally, the DAA has 
committed to preventing the use of consumers’ data for secondary purposes like credit and 
employment and honoring the choices about tracking that consumers make through the settings 
on their browsers.
Participated in the development of enforceable cross-border privacy rules for businesses to harmonize 
and enhance privacy protection of consumer data that moves between member countries of the 
forum on Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation.  
THE FINAL REPORT
Based upon its analysis of the comments filed on the proposed privacy framework, as well as commercial 
and technological developments, the Commission is issuing this final Report.  周e final framework is 
intended to articulate best practices for companies that collect and use consumer data.  周ese best practices 
can be useful to companies as they develop and maintain processes and systems to operationalize privacy 
and data security practices within their businesses.  周e final privacy framework contained in this Report 
is also intended to assist Congress as it considers privacy legislation.  To the extent the framework goes 
beyond existing legal requirements, the framework is not intended to serve as a template for law enforcement 
actions or regulations under laws currently enforced by the FTC.  While retaining the proposed framework’s 
fundamental best practices of privacy by design, simplified choice, and greater transparency, the Commission 
makes revised recommendations in three key areas in response to the comments.  
iv
First, the Commission makes changes to the framework’s scope.  周e preliminary report proposed 
that the privacy framework apply to all commercial entities that collect or use consumer data that can be 
reasonably linked to a specific consumer, computer, or other device.  To address concerns about undue 
burdens on small businesses, the final framework does not apply to companies that collect only non-sensitive 
data from fewer than 5,000 consumers a year, provided they do not share the data with third parties.  
Commenters also expressed concern that, with improvements in technology and the ubiquity of public 
information, more and more data could be “reasonably linked” to a consumer, computer or device, and that 
the proposed framework provided less incentive for a business to try to de-identify the data it maintains.  
To address this issue, the Report clarifies that data is not “reasonably linkable” to the extent that a company:  
(1) takes reasonable measures to ensure that the data is de-identified; (2) publicly commits not to try to re-
identify the data; and (3) contractually prohibits downstream recipients from trying to re-identify the data.  
Second, the Commission revises its approach to how companies should provide consumers with privacy 
choices.  To simplify choice for both consumers and businesses, the proposed framework set forth a list 
of five categories of “commonly accepted” information collection and use practices for which companies 
need not provide consumers with choice (product fulfillment, internal operations, fraud prevention, legal 
compliance and public purpose, and first-party marketing).  Several business commenters expressed concern 
that setting these “commonly accepted practices” in stone would stifle innovation.  Other commenters 
expressed the concern that the “commonly accepted practices” delineated in the proposed framework were 
too broad and would allow a variety of practices to take place without consumer consent. 
In response to these concerns, the Commission sets forth a modified approach that focuses on the 
context of the consumer’s interaction with the business.  Under this approach, companies do not need 
to provide choice before collecting and using consumers’ data for practices that are consistent with the 
context of the transaction, consistent with the company’s relationship with the consumer, or as required 
or specifically authorized by law.  Although many of the five “commonly accepted practices” identified in 
the preliminary report would generally meet this standard, there may be exceptions.  周e Report provides 
examples of how this new “context of the interaction” standard would apply in various circumstances. 
周ird, the Commission recommends that Congress consider enacting targeted legislation to provide 
greater transparency for, and control over, the practices of information brokers.  周e proposed framework 
recommended that companies provide consumers with reasonable access to the data the companies maintain 
about them, proportionate to the sensitivity of the data and the nature of its use.  Several commenters 
discussed in particular the importance of consumers’ ability to access information that information brokers 
have about them.  周ese commenters noted the lack of transparency about the practices of information 
brokers, who often buy, compile, and sell a wealth of highly personal information about consumers but 
never interact directly with them.  Consumers are often unaware of the existence of these entities, as well as 
the purposes for which they collect and use data. 
周e Commission agrees that consumers should have more control over the practices of information 
brokers and believes that appropriate legislation could help address this goal.  Any such legislation could be 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested