open pdf file in asp net c# : How to insert text into a pdf using reader application SDK tool html wpf azure online 120326privacyreport10-part388

B-3
Public
examples:
UTILITY
COMPANIES
MEDIA
GOVERNMENT
AGENCIES
examples:
Medical
PHARMACIES
HOSPITALS
DOCTORS
& NURSES
examples:
Retail
RETAIL
STORES
AIRLINES
CREDIT CARD
COMPANIES
examples:
SOCIAL
NETWORKING
SERVICES
SEARCH
ENGINES
RETAIL &
CONTENT
WEBSITES
BUY ONE,
GET 
ONE!
SPECIAL
OFFER!
Internet
examples:
Financial & Insurace
STOCK
COMPANIES
INSURANCE
BANKS
Information Brokers
Websites
Catalog Co-ops
Media Archives
List Brokers
Affiliates
Media
Marketers
Employers
Banks
Product & Service
Delivery
Government
Lawyers/
Private Investigators
Individuals
Law Enforcement
Credit Bureaus
Healthcare Analytics
Ad Networks & 
Analytics Companies
examples:
Telecommunications
 & Mobile
ISPs
MOBILE
PROVIDERS
CABLE
COMPANIES
Examples of uses of consumer information in personally identifiable or aggregated form:
Financial services, such as for 
banking or investment accounts
Credit granting, such as for credit or 
debit cards; mortgage, automobile 
or specialty loans; automobile rentals; 
or telephone services 
Insurance granting, such as for health, 
automobile or life
Retail coupons and special offers
Catalog and magazine solicitations
Web and mobile services, including
content, e-mail, search, and social 
networking
Product and service delivery, such as
streaming video, package delivery, or
a cable signal 
Attorneys, such as for case
investigations
Journalism, such as for fact checking
Marketing, whether electronically, 
through direct mail, or by telephone
Data brokers for aggregation and resale
to companies and/or consumers
Background investigations by employers
or landlords
DATA USES:
Locating missing or lost persons, 
beneficiaries, or witnesses
Law enforcement
Research (e.g., health, financial, and
online search data) by academic
institutions, government agencies, and
commercial companies
Fraud detection and prevention
Government benefits and services,
such as licensing
How to insert text into a pdf using reader - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text field to pdf acrobat; adding a text field to a pdf
How to insert text into a pdf using reader - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to input text in a pdf; how to insert text in pdf reader
B-4
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
to add & insert an (empty) page into an existing to specify where they want to insert (blank) PDF page or after any desired page of current PDF document) using
how to insert text box in pdf file; how to enter text into a pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
page adding in C# class, we suggest you go to C# Imaging - how to insert a new empty page to PDF file DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class.
how to insert text in pdf using preview; how to insert text box on pdf
C-1
Dissenting Statement of 
Commissioner J. Thomas Rosch
APPENDIX C
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo, scanned signature or logo into PDF document page in from RasterEdge.com, this C#.NET PDF image adding
how to add text box in pdf file; adding text to a pdf in reader
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Insert images into PDF form field in VB.NET. Insert Image to PDF Page Using VB. Dim doc As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
how to enter text in pdf file; add text to pdf using preview
C-2
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
options, outputOps); Divide PDF File into Two Using C#. This is an C# example of splitting a PDF to two new PDF files. String inputFilePath
add text boxes to pdf document; how to add text to a pdf document
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
outputOps). Divide PDF File into Two Demo Code Using VB.NET. This is an VB.NET example of splitting a PDF to two new PDF files. Dim
how to add text to a pdf document using acrobat; how to insert text into a pdf file
C-3
Dissenting Statement of Commissioner J. 周omas Rosch 
Protecting Consumer Privacy in an Era of Rapid Change: Recommendations for Businesses and Policymakers 
March 26, 2012
Introduction
I agree in several respects with what the “final” Privacy Report says.  Specifically, although I disagree that 
the consumer has traditionally ever been given any “choice” about information collection practices (other 
than to “take-it-or-leave-it” after reviewing a firm’s privacy notice), I agree that consumers ought to be given 
a broader range of choices if for no other reason than to customize their privacy protection.  However, I still 
worry about the constitutionality of banning take-it-or-leave-it choice (in circumstances where the consumer 
has few alternatives); as a practical matter, that prohibition may chill information collection, and thus impact 
innovation, regardless whether one’s privacy policy is deceptive or not.
1
I also applaud the Report’s recommendation that Congress enact “targeted” legislation giving consumers 
“access” to correct misinformation about them held by a data broker.
2
I also support the Report’s 
recommendation that Congress implement federal legislation that would require entities to maintain 
reasonable security and to notify consumers in the event of certain security breaches.
3
Finally, I concur with the Report insofar as it recommends that information brokers who compile 
data for marketing purposes must disclose to consumers how they collect and use consumer data.
4
I have 
long felt that we had no business counseling Congress or other agencies about privacy concerns without 
that information.  Although I have suggested that compulsory process be used to obtain such information 
(because I am convinced that is the only way to ensure that our information is complete and accurate),
5
voluntary centralized website is arguably a step in the right direction.
Privacy Framework
My disagreement with the “final” Privacy Report is fourfold.  First, the Report is rooted in its insistence 
that the “unfair” prong, rather than the “deceptive” prong, of the Commission’s Section 5 consumer 
protection statute, should govern information gathering practices (including “tracking”).  “Unfairness” is 
an elastic and elusive concept.  What is “unfair” is in the eye of the beholder.  For example, most consumer 
advocacy groups consider behavioral tracking to be unfair, whether or not the information being tracked 
is personally identifiable (“PII”) and regardless of the circumstances under which an entity does the 
 Protecting Consumer Privacy in an Era of Rapid Change: Recommendations for Businesses and Policymakers (“Report”) at 50-52.
 Id. at 14, 73.
 Id. at 26.  I also support the recommendation that such legislation authorize the Commission to seek civil penalties for 
violations.  However, despite its bow to “targeted” legislation, the Report elsewhere counsels that the Commission support 
privacy legislation generally.  See, e.g., id. at 16.  To the extent that those recommendations are not defined, or narrowly 
targeted, I disagree with them.
 Id. at 14, 68-70.
 See J. 周omas Rosch, Comm’r, Fed. Trade Comm’n, Information and Privacy:  In Search of a Data-Driven Policy, 
Remarks at the Technology Policy Institute Aspen Forum (Aug. 22, 2011), available at http://www.ftc.gov/speeches/
rosch/110822aspeninfospeech.pdf.
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
PDF document splitting, PDF page reordering and PDF page image and text extraction. C# Demo Code: Combine and Merge Multiple PDF Files into One in .NET.
add text to pdf in acrobat; adding text to pdf document
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
Among all the DLL components, there is a PDF processing library which enables developers to convert PDF document into text file using Visual Basic .NET
how to add text to a pdf in reader; adding text to a pdf document acrobat
C-4
tracking.  But, as I have said, consumer surveys are inconclusive, and individual consumers by and large do 
not “opt out” from tracking when given the chance to do so.
6
Not surprisingly, large enterprises in highly 
concentrated industries, which may be tempted to raise the privacy bar so high that it will disadvantage 
rivals, also support adopting more stringent privacy principles.
7
周e “final” Privacy Report (incorporating the preliminary staff report) repeatedly sides with consumer 
organizations and large enterprises.  It proceeds on the premise that behavioral tracking is “unfair.”
8
周us, the Report expressly recommends that “reputational harm” be considered a type of harm that 
the Commission should redress.
9
周e Report also expressly says that privacy be the default setting for 
commercial data practices.
10
Indeed, the Report says that the “traditional distinction between PII and non-
PII has blurred,”
11
and it recommends “shifting the burdens away from consumers and placing obligations 
on businesses.”
12
To the extent the Report seeks consistency with international privacy standards,
13
I would 
urge caution.  We should always carefully consider whether each individual policy choice regarding privacy is 
appropriate for this country in all contexts.
周at is not how the Commission itself has traditionally proceeded.  To the contrary, the Commission 
represented in its 1980, and 1982, Statements to Congress that, absent deception, it will not generally 
enforce Section 5 against alleged intangible harm.
14
In other contexts, the Commission has tried, through 
its advocacy, to convince others that our policy judgments are sensible and ought to be adopted.  And, as I 
stated in connection with the recent Intel complaint, in the competition context, one of the principal virtues 
 See Katy Bachman, Study:  Internet User Adoption of DNT Hard to Predict, adweek.com, March 20, 2012, available at http://
www.adweek.com/news/technology/study-internet-user-adoption-dnt-hard-predict-139091 (reporting on a survey that found 
that what Internet users say they are going to do about using a Do Not Track button and what they are currently doing about 
blocking tracking on the Internet, are two different things); see also Concurring Statement of Commissioner J. 周omas Rosch, 
Issuance of Preliminary FTC Staff Report “Protecting Consumer Privacy in an Era of Rapid Change: A Proposed Framework 
for Businesses and Policymakers” (Dec. 1, 2010), available at http://www.ftc.gov/speeches/rosch/101201privacyreport.pdf.
 See J. 周omas Rosch, Comm’r, Fed. Trade Comm’n, Do Not Track:  Privacy in an Internet Age, Remarks at Loyola Chicago 
Antitrust Institute Forum, (Oct. 14, 2011), available at http://www.ftc.gov/speeches/rosch/111014-dnt-loyola.pdf; see also 
Report at 9.
 Report at 8 and n.37.
 Id. at 2.  周e Report seems to imply that the Do Not Call Rule would support this extension of the definition of harm.  See 
id. (“unwarranted intrusions into their daily lives”).  However,  it must be emphasized that the Congress granted the FTC 
underlying authority under the Telemarketing and Consumer Fraud and Abuse Prevention Act, 15 U.S.C. §§ 6101-6108, 
to promulgate the Do Not Call provisions and other substantial amendments to the TSR.  周e Commission did not do so 
unilaterally.
10  Id. 
11  Id. at 19.
12  Id. at 23, see also id. at 24.
13  Id. at 9-10.  周is does not mean that I am an isolationist or am impervious to the benefits of a global solution.  But, as stated 
below, there is more than one way to skin this cat.
14  See Letter from the FTC to Hon. Wendell Ford and Hon. John Danforth, Committee on Commerce, Science and 
Transportation, United States Senate, Commission Statement of Policy on the Scope of Consumer Unfairness Jurisdiction 
(Dec. 17, 1980), reprinted in International Harvester Co., 104 F.T.C. 949, 1070, 1073 (1984) (“Unfairness Policy 
Statement”) available at http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/policystmt/ad-unfair.htm; Letter from the FTC to Hon. Bob Packwood and 
Hon. Bob Kasten, Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation, United States Senate, reprinted in FTC Antitrust 
& Trade Reg. Rep. (BNA) 1055, at 568-570 (“Packwood-Kasten letter”); and 15 U.S.C. § 45(n), which codified the FTC’s 
modern approach. 
C-5
of applying Section 5 was that that provision was “self-limiting,” and I advocated that Section 5 be applied 
on a stand-alone basis only to a firm with monopoly or near-monopoly power.
15
Indeed, as I have remarked, 
absent such a limiting principle, privacy may be used as a weapon by firms having monopoly or near-
monopoly power.
16
周ere does not appear to be any such limiting principle applicable to many of the recommendations 
of the Report.  If implemented as written, many of the Report’s recommendations would instead apply to 
almost all firms and to most information collection practices.  It would install “Big Brother” as the watchdog 
over these practices not only in the online world but in the offline world.
17
周at is not only paternalistic, but 
it goes well beyond what the Commission said in the early 1980s that it would do, and well beyond what 
Congress has permitted the Commission to do under Section 5(n).
18
I would instead stand by what we have 
said and challenge information collection practices, including behavioral tracking, only when these practices 
are deceptive, “unfair” within the strictures of Section 5(n) and our commitments to Congress, or employed 
by a firm with market power and therefore challengeable on a stand-alone basis under Section 5’s prohibition 
of unfair methods of competition.
Second, the current self-regulation and browser mechanisms for implementing Do Not Track solutions 
may have advanced since the issuance of the preliminary staff Report.
19
But, as the final Report concedes, 
they are far from perfect,
20
and they may never be, despite efforts to create a standard through the World 
Wide Web Consortium (“W3C”) for the browser mechanism.
21
More specifically, as I have said before, the major browser firms’ interest in developing Do Not Track 
mechanisms begs the question of whether and to what extent those major browser firms will act strategically 
and opportunistically (to use privacy to protect their own entrenched interests).
22
In addition, the recent announcement by the Digital Advertising Alliance (DAA) that it will honor the 
tracking choices consumers make through their browsers raises more questions than answers for me.  周e 
Report is not clear, and I am concerned, about the extent to which this latest initiative will displace the 
standard-setting effort that has recently been undertaken by the W3C.  Furthermore, it is not clear that all 
the interested players in the Do Not Track arena – whether it be the DAA, the browser firms, the W3C, or 
consumer advocacy groups – will be able to come to agreement about what “Do Not Track” even means.
23
It may be that the firms professing an interest in self-regulation are really talking about a “Do Not Target” 
mechanism, which would only prevent a firm from serving targeted ads, rather than a “Do Not Track” 
15  See Concurring and Dissenting Statement of Commissioner J. 周omas Rosch, In re Intel Corp., Docket No. 9341, (Dec. 16, 
2009), available at  http://www.ftc.gov/os/adjpro/d9341/091216intelstatement.pdf.
16  See Rosch, supra note 7 at 20.
17  See Report at 13.
18  Federal Trade Commission Act Amendments of 1994, Pub. L. No. 103-312.
19  Report at 4, 52.
20  Id. at 53, 54; see esp. id. at 53 n.250.
21  Id. at 5, 54.
22  See Rosch, supra note 7 at 20-21.
23  Tony Romm, “What Exactly Does ‘Do Not Track’ Mean?,” Politico, Mar. 13, 2012, available at http://www.politico.com/news/
stories/0312/73976.html; see also Report at 4 (DAA allows consumer to opt out of “targeted advertising”). 
C-6
mechanism, which would prevent the collection of consumer data altogether.  For example, the DAA’s Self-
Regulatory Principles for Multi-Site Data do not apply to data collected for “market research” or “product 
development.”
24
For their part, the major consumer advocacy groups may not be interested in a true “Do 
Not Track” mechanism either.  周ey may only be interested in a mechanism that prevents data brokers from 
compiling consumer profiles instead of a comprehensive solution.  It is hard to see how the W3C can adopt 
a standard unless and until there is an agreement about what the standard is supposed to prevent.
25
It is also not clear whether or to what extent the lessons of the Carnegie Mellon Study respecting the 
lack of consumer understanding of how to access and use Do Not Track will be heeded.
26
Similarly, it is not 
clear whether and to what extent Commissioner Brill’s concern that consumers’ choices, whether it be “Do 
Not Collect” or merely “Do Not Target,” will be honored.
27
Along the same lines, it is also not clear whether 
and to what extent a “partial” Do Not Track solution (offering nuanced choice) will be offered or whether 
it is “all or nothing.”  Indeed, it is not clear whether consumers can or will be given complete and accurate 
information about the pros and the cons of subscribing to Do Not Track before they choose it.  I find this 
last question especially vexing in light of a recent study that indicated 84% of users polled prefer targeted 
advertising in exchange for free online content.
28
周ird, I am concerned that “opt-in” will necessarily be selected as the de facto method of consumer 
choice for a wide swath of entities that have a first-party relationship with consumers but who can 
potentially track consumers’ activities across unrelated websites, under circumstances where it is unlikely, 
because of the “context” (which is undefined) for such tracking to be “consistent” (which is undefined) 
with that first-party relationship:
29
1) companies with multiple lines of business that allow data collection 
in different contexts (such as Google);
30
2) “social networks,” (such as Facebook and Twitter), which could 
potentially use “cookies,” “plug-ins,” applications, or other mechanisms to track a consumer’s activities across 
24  See Self-Regulatory Principles for Multi-Site Data, Digital Advertising Alliance, Nov. 2011, at 3, 10, 11, available at http://
www.aboutads.info/resource/download/Multi-Site-Data-Principles.pdf; see also Tanzina Vega, Opt-Out Provision Would 
Halt Some, but Not All, Web Tracking, New York Times, Feb. 26, 2012, available at http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/27/
technology/opt-out-provision-would-halt-some-but-not-all-web-tracking.html?pagewanted=all. 
25  See Vega, supra note 24. 
26  “Why Johnny Can’t Opt Out:  A Usability Evaluation of Tools to Limit Online Behavioral Advertising,” Carnegie Mellon 
University CyLab, Oct. 31, 2011, available at http://www.cylab.cmu.edu/files/pdfs/tech_reports/CMUCyLab11017.pdf; see 
also Search Engine Use 2012, at 25, Pew Internet & American Life Project, Pew Research Center, Mar. 9, 2012, available at 
http://pewinternet.org/~/media/Files/Reports/2012/PIP_Search_Engine_Use_2012.pdf (“[j]ust 38% of internet users say 
they are generally aware of ways they themselves can limit how much information about them is collected by a website”). 
27  See Julie Brill, Comm’r, Fed. Trade Comm’n, Big Data, Big Issues, Remarks at Fordham University School of Law (Mar. 2, 
2012) available at http://www.ftc.gov/speeches/brill/120228fordhamlawschool.pdf.
28  See Bachman, supra note 6.
29  Report at 41.
30  Id.  Notwithstanding that Google’s prospective conduct seems to fit perfectly the circumstances set forth on this page of 
the Report (describing a company with multiple lines of business including a search engine and ad network), where the 
Commission states “consumer choice” is warranted, the Report goes on to conclude on page 56 that Google’s practices do 
not require affirmative express consent because they “currently are not so widespread that they could track a consumer’s every 
movement across the Internet.”
C-7
the Internet;
31
and 3) “retargeters,” (such as Amazon or Pacers), which include a retailer who delivers an ad 
on a third-party website based on the consumer’s previous activity on the retailer’s website.
32
周ese entities might have to give consumers “opt-in” choice now or in the future:  1) regardless whether 
the entity’s privacy policy and notices adequately describe the information collection practices at issue; 2) 
regardless of the sensitivity of the information being collected;  3) regardless whether the consumer cares 
whether “tracking” is actually occurring; 4) regardless of the entity’s market position (whether the entity 
can use privacy strategically – i.e., an opt-in requirement – in order to cripple or eliminate a rival); and 5) 
conversely, regardless whether the entity can compete effectively or innovate, as a practical matter, if it must 
offer “opt in” choice.
33
Fourth, I question the Report’s apparent mandate that ISPs, with respect to uses of deep packet 
inspection, be required to use opt-in choice.
34
周is is not to say there is no basis for requiring ISPs to 
use opt-in choice without requiring opt-in choice for other large platform providers.  But that kind of 
“discrimination” cannot be justified, as the Report says, because ISPs have “are in a position to develop 
highly detailed and comprehensive profiles of their customers.”
35
So does any large platform provider who 
makes available a browser or operating system to consumers.
36
Nor can that “discrimination” be justified on the ground that ISPs may potentially use that data to 
“track” customer behavior in a fashion that is contrary to consumer expectations.  周ere is no reliable data 
establishing that most ISPs presently do so.  Indeed, with a business model based on subscription revenue, 
ISPs arguably lack the same incentives as do other platform providers whose business model is based on 
attracting advertising and advertising revenue:  ISPs assert that they track data only to perform operational 
and security functions; whereas other platform providers that have business models based on advertising 
revenue track data in order to maximize their advertising revenue.
What really distinguishes ISPs from most other “large platform providers” is that their markets can be 
highly concentrated.
37
Moreover, even when an ISP operates in a less concentrated market, switching costs 
can be, or can be perceived as being, high.
38
As I said in connection with the Intel complaint, a monopolist 
or near monopolist may have obligations which others do not have.
39
周e only similarly situated platform 
provider may be Google, which, because of its alleged monopoly power in the search advertising market, 
31  Id. at 40.  See also supra note 30.  周at observation also applies to “social networks” like Facebook.
32  Id. at 41.
33  See id. at 60 (“Final Principle”).
34  Id. at 56 (“the Commission has strong concerns about the use of DPI for purposes inconsistent with an ISP’s interaction with 
a consumer, without express affirmative consent or more robust protection”).
35  Id.
36  Id. 
37  Federal Communications Commission, Connecting America:  周e National Broadband Plan, Broadband Competition and 
Innovation Policy, Section 4.1, Networks, Competition in Residential Broadband Markets at 36, available at http://www.
broadband.gov/plan/4-broadband-competition-and-innovation-policy/. 
38  Federal Communications Commission Working Paper, Broadband decisions:  What drives consumers to switch – or stick 
with – their broadband Internet provider (Dec. 2010), at 3, 8, available at http://transition.fcc.gov/Daily_Releases/Daily_
Business/2010/db1206/DOC-303264A1.pdf.
39  See Rosch, supra note 15.
C-8
has similar power.  For any of these “large platform providers,” however, affirmative express consent should 
be required only when the provider actually wants to use the data in this fashion, not just when it has the 
potential to do so.
40
Conclusion
Although the Chairman testified recently before the House Appropriations Subcommittee chaired 
by Congresswoman Emerson that the recommendations of the final Report are supposed to be nothing 
more than “best practices,”
41
I am concerned that the language of the Report indicates otherwise, and 
broadly hints at the prospect of enforcement.
42
周e Report also acknowledges that it is intended to serve 
as a template for legislative recommendations.
43
Moreover, to the extent that the Report’s “best practices” 
mirror the Administration’s privacy “Bill of Rights,” the President has specifically asked either that the “Bill 
of Rights” be adopted by the Congress or that they be distilled into “enforceable codes of conduct.”
44
As 
I testified before the same subcommittee, this is a “tautology;” either these practices are to be adopted 
voluntarily by the firms involved or else there is a federal requirement that they be adopted, in which case 
there can be no pretense that they are “voluntary.”
45
It makes no difference whether the federal requirement 
is in the form of enforceable codes of conduct or in the form of an act of Congress.  Indeed, it is arguable 
that neither is needed if these firms feel obliged to comply with the “best practices” or face the wrath of “the 
Commission” or its staff.
40  See, e.g., Report at 56.
41  Testimony of Jon Leibowitz and J. 周omas Rosch, Chairman and Comm’r, FTC, 周e FTC in FY2013: Protecting Consumers 
and Competition: Hearing on Budget Before the H. Comm. on Appropriations Subcomm. on Financial Services and General 
Government, 112
th Cong. 2 (2012), text from CQ Roll Call, available from: LexisNexis® Congressional.
42  One notable example is found where the Report discusses the articulation of privacy harms and enforcement actions brought 
on the basis of deception.  周e Report then notes “[l]ike these enforcement actions, a privacy framework should address 
practices that unexpectedly reveal previously private information even absent physical or financial harm, or unwarranted 
intrusions.”  Report at 8.  周e accompanying footnote concludes that “even in the absence of such misrepresentations, 
revealing previously-private consumer data could cause consumer harm.”  See also infra note 43.
43  Id. at 16 (“to the extent Congress enacts any of the Commission’s recommendations through legislation”); see also id. at 12-
13 (“the Commission calls on Congress to develop baseline privacy legislation that is technologically neutral and sufficiently 
flexible to allow companies to  continue to innovate”).
44  See Letter from President Barack Obama, appended to White House, Consumer Data Privacy in a Networked World: A 
Framework for Protecting Privacy and Promoting Innovation in the Global Digital Economy (Feb. 23, 2012), available at http://
www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/privacy-final.pdf.
45  See FTC Testimony, supra note 41.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested