open pdf file in asp net c# : Add text to pdf in acrobat software SDK project winforms wpf .net UWP 120326privacyreport3-part390

15
IV. PRIVACY FRAMEWORK
In addition to the general comments described above, the Commission received significant comments 
on the scope of the proposed framework and each individual element.  周ose comments, as well as several 
clarifications and refinements based on the Commission’s analysis of the issues raised, are discussed below.
A. SCOPE
Proposed Scope:  周e framework applies to all commercial entities that collect or use consumer data 
that can be reasonably linked to a specific consumer, computer, or other device.
A variety of commenters addressed the framework’s proposed scope.  Some of these commenters 
supported an expansive reach while others proposed limiting the framework’s application to particular types 
of entities and carving out certain categories of businesses.  Commenters also called for further clarification 
regarding the type of data the framework covers and staff’s proposed “reasonably linked” standard.
1.  COMPANIES SHOULD COMPLY WITH THE FRAMEWORK UNLESS THEY HANDLE ONLY 
LIMITED AMOUNTS OF NON-SENSITIVE DATA THAT IS NOT SHARED WITH THIRD PARTIES.
Numerous commenters addressed whether the framework should apply to entities that collect, maintain, 
or use limited amounts of data.  Several companies argued that the burden the framework could impose on 
small businesses outweighed the reduced risk of harm from the collection and use of limited amounts of 
non-sensitive consumer data.
70
周ese commenters proposed that the framework not apply to entities that 
collect or use non-sensitive data from fewer than 5,000 individuals a year where the data is used for limited 
purposes, such as internal operations and first-party marketing.
71
As additional support for this position, 
these commenters noted that proposed privacy legislation introduced in the 111th Congress contained an 
exclusion to this effect.
72
Although one consumer and privacy organization supported a similar exclusion,
73
others expressed 
concern about exempting, per se, any types of businesses or quantities of data from the framework’s scope.
74
周ese commenters pointed to the possibility that excluded companies would sell the data to third parties, 
such as advertising networks or data brokers.
周e Commission agrees that the first-party collection and use of non-sensitive data (e.g., data that is not 
a Social Security number or financial, health, children’s, or geolocation information) creates fewer privacy 
70  See Comment of eBay, Inc., cmt. #00374, at 3; Comment of Microsoft Corp., cmt. #00395, at 4. 
71  Id. 
72  See BEST PRACTICES ACT, H.R. 5777, 111th Congress (2010); Staff Discussion Draft, H.R. __ , 111th Congress (2010), 
available at http://www.nciss.org/legislation/BoucherStearnsprivacydiscussiondraft.pdf.
73  Comment of the Center for Democracy & Technology, cmt. #00469, at 1.
74  See Comment of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, cmt. #00400, at 1; Comment of the Consumer Federation of America, cmt. 
#00358, at 2. 
Add text to pdf in acrobat - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text to pdf acrobat; adding text to a pdf file
Add text to pdf in acrobat - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text field pdf; how to insert text box in pdf
16
concerns than practices that involve sensitive data or sharing with third parties.
75
Accordingly, entities that 
collect limited amounts of non-sensitive consumer data from under 5,000 consumers need not comply with 
the framework, as long as they do not share the data with third parties.  For example, consider a cash-only 
curb-side food truck business that offers to send messages announcing when it is in a given neighborhood 
to consumers who provide their email addresses.  As long as the food truck business does not share these 
email addresses with third parties, the Commission believes that it need not provide privacy disclosures to 
its customers.  周is narrow exclusion acknowledges the need for flexibility for businesses that collect limited 
amounts of non-sensitive information.  It also recognizes that some business practices create fewer potential 
risks to consumer information. 
2.  THE FRAMEWORK SETS FORTH BEST PRACTICES AND CAN WORK IN TANDEM WITH 
EXISTING PRIVACY AND SECURITY STATUTES.
周e proposed framework’s applicability to commercial sectors that are covered by existing laws 
generated comments primarily from representatives of the healthcare and financial services industries.  周ese 
commenters noted that statutes such as the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (“HIPAA”), 
the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (“HITECH”), and the Gramm-
Leach-Bliley Act (“GLBA”) already impose privacy protections and security requirements through legal 
obligations on companies in these industries.
76
Accordingly, these commenters urged the Commission to 
avoid creating duplicative or inconsistent standards and to clarify that the proposed framework is intended 
to cover only those entities that are not currently covered by existing privacy and security laws.  Another 
commenter, however, urged government to focus on fulfilling consumer privacy expectations across all 
sectors, noting that market evolution is blurring distinctions about who is covered by HIPAA and that 
consumers expect organizations to protect their personal health information, regardless of any sector-specific 
boundaries.
77
周e Commission recognizes the concern regarding potentially inconsistent privacy obligations and 
notes that, to the extent Congress enacts any of the Commission’s recommendations through legislation, 
such legislation should not impose overlapping or duplicative requirements on conduct that is already 
regulated.
78
However, the framework is meant to encourage best practices and is not intended to conflict 
with requirements of existing laws and regulations.  To the extent that components of the framework exceed, 
but do not conflict with existing statutory requirements, entities covered by those statutes should view the 
framework as best practices to promote consumer privacy.  For example, it may be appropriate for financial 
institutions covered by GLBA to incorporate elements of privacy by design, such as collection limitations, or 
75  See infra at Sections IV.C.1.b.(v) and IV.C.2.e.(ii), for a discussion of what constitutes sensitive data.
76  See Comment of the Confidentiality Coalition c/o the Healthcare Leadership Council, cmt. #00349, at 1-4; Comment of Experian, 
cmt. #00398, at 8-10; Comment of IMS Health, cmt. #00380, at 2-3; Comment of Medco Health Solutions, Inc., cmt. #00393, 
at 3; Comment of SIFMA, cmt. #00265, at 2-3.
77  Comment of 周e Markle Foundation, cmt. #00456, at 3-10. 
78  Any baseline privacy law Congress may enact would likely consider the best way to take into account obligations under 
existing statutes. 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Add, insert PDF native annotations to PDF file. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print
how to add text to a pdf file in preview; adding text pdf
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Allow users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file. can manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
how to enter text in a pdf document; how to insert text in pdf file
17
to improve transparency by providing reasonable access to consumer data in a manner that does not conflict 
with their statutory obligations.  In any event, the framework provides an important baseline for entities that 
are not subject to sector-specific laws like HIPAA or GLBA.
79
3.  THE FRAMEWORK APPLIES TO OFFLINE AS WELL AS ONLINE DATA.
In addressing the framework’s applicability to “all commercial entities,” numerous commenters discussed 
whether the framework should apply to both online and offline data. Diverse commenters expressed strong 
support for a comprehensive approach applicable to both online and offline data practices.
80
Commenters 
noted that as a practical matter, many companies collect both online and offline data.
81
Commenters also listed different offline contexts in which entities collect consumer data.  周ese include 
instances where a consumer interacts directly with a business, such as through the use of a retail loyalty card, 
or where a non-consumer facing entity, such as a data broker, obtains consumer data from an offline third-
party source.
82
One commenter noted that, regardless of whether an entity collects or uses data from an 
online or an offline source, consumer privacy interests are equally affected.
83
To emphasize the importance 
of offline data protections, this commenter noted that while the behavioral advertising industry has started 
to implement self-regulatory measures to improve consumers’ ability to control the collection and the use of 
their online data, in the offline context such efforts by data brokers and others have largely failed.
84
By contrast, a financial industry organization argued that the FTC should take a more narrow approach 
by limiting the scope of the proposed framework in a number of respects, including its applicability to 
offline data collection and use.
85
周is commenter stated that some harms in the online context may not exist 
offline and raised concern about the framework’s unintended consequences.  For example, the commenter 
cited the significant costs that a requirement to provide consumers with access to data collected about them 
79  周ere may be entities that operate within covered sectors but that nevertheless fall outside of a specific law’s scope.  For 
instance, a number of entities that collect health information are not subject to HIPAA.  周ese entities include providers 
of personal health records – online portfolios that consumers can use to store and keep track of their medical information.  
In 2009, Congress passed the HITECH Act, which required HHS, in consultation with the FTC, to develop legislative 
recommendations on privacy and security requirements that should apply to these providers of personal health records and 
related entities.  Health Information Technology (“HITECH”) Provisions of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 
2009, Title XIII, Subtitle D (Pub. L. 111-5, 123 Stat. 115, codified in relevant part at 42 U.S.C. §§ 17937 and 17954).  
FTC staff is consulting with HHS on this project.
80  See Comment of the Center for Democracy & Technology, cmt. #00469, at 2; Comment of the Computer & Communications 
Industry Ass’n, cmt. #00434, at 14; Comment of Consumers Union, cmt. #00362, at 4-5; Comment of the Department of Veterans 
Affairs, cmt. #00479, at 3; Comment of Experian, cmt. #00398, at 1; Comment of Google Inc., cmt. #00417, at 7; Comment of 
Microsoft Corp., cmt. #00395, at 4.
81  See Comment of the Department of Veterans Affairs, cmt. #00479, at 3 n.7; Comment of the Computer & Communications 
Industry Ass’n, cmt. #00434, at 14; Comment of Consumers Union, cmt. #00362, at 1.
82  See Comment of the Department of Veterans Affairs, cmt. #00479, at 3 n.7; Comment of the Computer & Communications 
Industry Ass’n, cmt. #00434, at 14.
83  Comment of Center for Democracy & Technology, cmt. #00469, at 2.
84  Comment of Center for Democracy & Technology, cmt. #00469, at 2-3.
85  Comment of the Financial Services Forum, cmt. #00381, at 8-9. 
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
Using this VB.NET Imaging PDF Watermark Add-on, you simply create a watermark that consists of text or image And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no
how to insert pdf into email text; add text to pdf document in preview
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
how to add text fields to a pdf document; how to add a text box in a pdf file
18
would impose on companies that collect and maintain data in paper rather than electronic form.  Another 
commenter cited the costs of providing privacy disclosures and choices in an offline environment.
86
周e Commission notes that consumers face a landscape of virtually ubiquitous collection of their data.  
Whether such collection occurs online or offline does not alter the consumer’s privacy interest in his or her 
data.  For example, the sale of a consumer profile containing the consumer’s purchase history from a brick-
and-mortar pharmacy or a bookstore would not implicate fewer privacy concerns simply because the profile 
contains purchases from an offline retailer rather than from an online merchant.  Accordingly, the framework 
applies in all commercial contexts, both online and offline.
4.  THE FRAMEWORK APPLIES TO DATA THAT IS REASONABLY LINKABLE TO A SPECIFIC 
CONSUMER, COMPUTER, OR DEVICE.  
周e scope issue that generated the most comments, from a wide range of interested parties, was the 
proposed framework’s applicability to “consumer data that can be reasonably linked to a specific consumer, 
computer, or other device.”
A number of commenters supported the proposed framework’s application to data that, while not 
traditionally considered personally identifiable, is linkable to a consumer or device.  In particular, several 
consumer and privacy groups elaborated on the privacy concerns associated with supposedly anonymous 
data and discussed the decreasing relevance of the personally identifiable information (“PII”) label.
87
周ese 
commenters pointed to studies demonstrating consumers’ objections to being tracked, regardless of whether 
the tracker explicitly learns a consumer name, and the potential for harm, such as discriminatory pricing 
based on online browsing history, even without the use of PII.
88
Similarly, the commenters noted, the ability to re-identify “anonymous” data supports the proposed 
framework’s application to data that can be reasonably linked to a consumer or device.  周ey pointed to 
incidents, identified in the preliminary staff report, in which individuals were re-identified from publicly 
released data sets that did not contain PII.
89
One commenter pointed out that certain industries extensively 
86  Comment of National Retail Federation, cmt. #00419, at 6 (urging FTC to limit privacy framework to online collection of 
consumer data because applying it to offline collection would be onerous for businesses and consumers).
87  See Comment of the Center for Democracy & Technology, cmt. #00469, at 3; Comment of Consumers Union, cmt. #00362, at 4-5.  
In addition, in their comments both AT&T and Mozilla recognized that the distinction between PII and non-PII is blurring.  
Comment of AT&T Inc., cmt. #00420, at 13; Comment of Mozilla, cmt. #00480, at 6. 
88  Comment of Center for Democracy & Technology, cmt. #00469, at 3 (citing Edward C. Baig, Internet Users Say, Don’t Track 
Me, USA TODAY, Dec. 14, 2010, available at http://www.usatoday.com/money/advertising/2010-12-14-donottrackpoll14_
ST_N.htm); Scott Cleland, Americans Want Online Privacy – Per New Zogby Poll, The Precursor Blog (June 8, 2010), 
http://www.precursorblog.com/content/americans-want-online-privacy-new-zogby-poll); Comment of Consumers Union, 
cmt. #00362, at 4 (discussing the potential for discriminatory pricing (citing Annie Lowery, How Online Retailers Stay a Step 
Ahead of Comparison Shoppers, Wash. Post, Dec. 12, 2010, available at http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/
article/2010/12/11/AR2010121102435.html)).
89  For a brief discussion of such incidents, see FTC, Protecting Consumer Privacy in an Era of Rapid Change, A Proposed 
Framework for Businesses and Policymakers, Preliminary FTC Staff Report, at 38 (Dec. 2010), available at http://www.ftc.gov/
os/2010/12/101201privacyreport.pdf
.
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
how to add text box to pdf document; add text to pdf file online
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
how to add text to a pdf file in acrobat; add text pdf file
19
mine data for marketing purposes and that re-identification is a commercial enterprise.
90
周is adds to the 
likelihood of data re-identification.
Some industry commenters also recognized consumers’ privacy interest in data that goes beyond what 
is strictly labeled PII.
91
Drawing on the FTC’s roundtables as well as the preliminary staff report, one such 
commenter noted the legitimate interest consumers have in controlling how companies collect and use 
aggregated or de-identified data, browser fingerprints,
92
and other types of non-PII.
93
Another company 
questioned the notion of distinguishing between PII and non-PII as a way to determine what data to 
protect.
94
Supporting a scaled approach rather than a bright line distinction, this commenter noted that all 
data derived from individuals deserves some level of protection.
95
Other commenters representing industry opposed the proposed framework’s application to non-PII 
that can be reasonably linked to a consumer, computer, or device.
96
周ese commenters asserted that the 
risks associated with the collection and use of data that does not contain PII are simply not the same as the 
risks associated with PII.  周ey also claimed a lack of evidence demonstrating that consumers have the same 
privacy interest in non-PII as they do with the collection and use of PII.  Instead of applying the framework 
to non-PII, these commenters recommended the Commission support efforts to de-identify data.
Overall, the comments reflect a general acknowledgment that the traditional distinction between PII and 
non-PII has blurred and that it is appropriate to more comprehensively examine data to determine the data’s 
privacy implications.
97
However, some commenters, including some of those cited above, argued that the 
proposed framework’s “linkability” standard is potentially too open-ended to be practical.
98
One industry 
organization asserted, for instance, that if given enough time and resources, any data may be linkable to an 
90  Comment of Electronic Frontier Foundation, cmt. #00400, at 4 (citing Julia Angwin & Steve Stecklow, ‘Scrapers’ Dig Deep for 
Data on Web, Wall St. J., Oct. 12, 2010, available at http://online.wsj.com/article/SB100014240527487033585045755443
81288117888.html); Sorrell v. IMS Health Inc., 131 S. Ct. 2653 (2011). 
91  Comment of Mozilla, cmt. #00480, at 4-5; Comment of Google Inc., cmt. #00417, at 8.
92  周e term “browser fingerprints” refers to the specific combination of characteristics – such as system fonts, software, and 
installed plugins – that are typically made available by a consumer’s browser to any website visited.  周ese characteristics can 
be used to uniquely identify computers, cell phones, or other devices.  Browser fingerprinting does not rely on cookies.  See 
Erik Larkin, Browser Fingerprinting Can ID You Without Cookies, PCWorld, Jan. 29, 2010, available at http://www.pcworld.
com/article/188161/browser_fingerprinting_can_id_you_without_cookies.html.
93  Comment of Mozilla, cmt. #00480, at 4-5 (citing FTC, Protecting Consumer Privacy in an Era of Rapid Change: A Proposed 
Framework for Businesses and Policymakers, Preliminary FTC Staff Report, at 36-37 (Dec. 2010), available at http://www.ftc.
gov/os/2010/12/101201privacyreport.pdf).
94  Comment of Google Inc., cmt. #00417, at 8.
95  Comment of Google Inc., cmt. #00417, at 8.
96  Comment of Direct Marketing Ass’n, Inc., cmt. #00449, at 13-14; Comment of National Cable & Telecommunications Ass’n, cmt. 
#00432, at 13-17.
97  See Comment of AT&T Inc., cmt. #00420, at 13-15; Comment of Center for Democracy & Technology (Feb. 18, 2011), cmt. 
#00469, at 3-4; Comment of CTIA - 周e Wireless Ass’n, cmt. #00375, at 3-4; Comment of Consumers Union, cmt. #00362, at 
4-5; Comment of Electronic Frontier Foundation, cmt. #00400, at 1-4; Comment of Google Inc., cmt. #00417, at 7-8; Comment 
of Mozilla, cmt. #00480, at 4-6; Comment of Phorm Inc., cmt. #00353, at 3-4.
98  Comment of AT&T Inc., cmt. #00420, at 13; Comment of CTIA - 周e Wireless Ass’n, cmt. #00375 at 3-4; Comment of Google 
Inc., cmt. #00417, at 8; Comment of Phorm Inc., cmt. #00353, at 4.
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS hand, free hand line, rectangle, text, hotspot, hotspot Users need to add following implementations to
how to add text boxes to pdf; add text pdf professional
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
Excel documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
how to add text box to pdf; how to enter text in pdf file
20
individual.
99
In addition, commenters stated that requiring the same level of protection for all data would 
undermine companies’ incentive to avoid collecting data that is more easily identified or to take steps to 
de-identify the data they collect and use.
100
Other commenters argued that applying the framework to data 
that is potentially linkable could conflict with the framework’s privacy by design concept, as companies 
could be forced to collect more information about consumers than they otherwise would in order to be 
able to provide those consumers with effective notice, choice, or access.
101
To address these concerns, 
some commenters proposed limiting the framework to data that is actually linked to a specific consumer, 
computer, or device.
102
One commenter recommended that the Commission clarify that the reasonably linkable standard means 
non-public data that can be linked with reasonable effort.
103
周is commenter also stated that the framework 
should exclude data that, through contract or by virtue of internal controls, will not be linked with a 
particular consumer.  Taking a similar approach, another commenter suggested that the framework should 
apply to data that is reasonably likely to relate to an identifiable consumer.
104
周is commenter also noted 
that a company could commit through its privacy policy that it would only maintain or use data in a de-
identified form and that such a commitment would be enforceable under Section 5 of the FTC Act.
105
周e Commission believes there is sufficient support from commenters representing an array of 
perspectives – including consumer and privacy advocates as well as of industry representatives – for the 
framework’s application to data that, while not yet linked to a particular consumer, computer, or device, 
may reasonably become so.  周ere is significant evidence demonstrating that technological advances and the 
ability to combine disparate pieces of data can lead to identification of a consumer, computer, or device even 
if the individual pieces of data do not constitute PII.
106
Moreover, not only is it possible to re-identify non-
PII data through various means,
107
businesses have strong incentives to actually do so. 
In response to the comments, to provide greater certainty for companies that collect and use consumer 
data, the Commission provides additional clarification on the application of the reasonable linkability 
standard to describe how companies can take appropriate steps to minimize such linkability.  Under the final 
99  Comment of GS1, cmt. #00439, at 2.
100 Comment of AT&T Inc., cmt. #00420, at 13-14; Comment of CTIA - 周e Wireless Ass’n, cmt. #00375, at 4; Comment of 
Experian, cmt. #00398, at 11; Comment of National Cable & Telecommunications Ass’n, cmt. #00432, at 16.
101 Comment of United States Council for International Business, cmt. #00366, at 1; Comment of Phorm Inc., cmt. #00353, at 3.
102 Comment of Retail Industry Leaders Ass’n, cmt. #00352, at 4; Comment of Yahoo! Inc., cmt. #00444, at 3-4; Comment of GS1, 
cmt. #00439, at 3.
103 Comment of AT&T Inc., cmt. #00420, at 13.
104 Comment of Intel Corp., cmt. #00246, at 9.
105 Comment of Intel Corp., cmt. #00246, at 9.
106 FTC, Protecting Consumer Privacy in an Era of Rapid Change: A Proposed Framework for Businesses and Policymakers, 
Preliminary FTC Staff Report, 35-38 (Dec. 2010), available at http://www.ftc.gov/os/2010/12/101201privacyreport.pdf; 
Comment of Center for Democracy & Technology, cmt. #00469, at 3; Comment of Statz, Inc., cmt. #00377, at 11-12.  See supra 
note 89.  
107 See FTC, FTC Staff Report: Self-Regulatory Principles for Online Behavioral Advertising, 21-24, 43-45 (Feb. 2009), available at 
http://www.ftc.gov/os/2009/02/P0085400behavadreport.pdf; Paul M. Schwartz & Daniel J. Solove, 周e PII Problem: Privacy 
and a New Concept of Personally Identifiable Information, 86 N.Y.U. L. Rev. 1814, 1836-1848 (2011).
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
Also designed to be used add-on for .NET Image SDK, RasterEdge Bitmap Powerful image converter for Bitmap and PDF files; No need for Adobe Acrobat Reader &
add text boxes to pdf; how to insert text into a pdf using reader
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
It can be used standalone. JPEG to PDF Converter is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for conversion.
how to add text box in pdf file; how to add text to pdf document
21
framework, a company’s data would not be reasonably linkable to a particular consumer or device to the 
extent that the company implements three significant protections for that data.
First, the company must take reasonable measures to ensure that the data is de-identified.  周is means 
that the company must achieve a reasonable level of justified confidence that the data cannot reasonably be 
used to infer information about, or otherwise be linked to, a particular consumer, computer, or other device.  
Consistent with the Commission’s approach in its data security cases,
108
what qualifies as a reasonable level 
of justified confidence depends upon the particular circumstances, including the available methods and 
technologies.  In addition, the nature of the data at issue and the purposes for which it will be used are also 
relevant.  周us, for example, whether a company publishes data externally affects whether the steps it has 
taken to de-identify data are considered reasonable.  周e standard is not an absolute one; rather, companies 
must take reasonable steps to ensure that data is de-identified. 
Depending on the circumstances, a variety of technical approaches to de-identification may be 
reasonable, such as deletion or modification of data fields, the addition of sufficient “noise” to data, 
statistical sampling, or the use of aggregate or synthetic data.
109
周e Commission encourages companies and 
researchers to continue innovating in the development and evaluation of new and better approaches to de-
identification.  FTC staff will continue to monitor and assess the state of the art in de-identification.
Second, a company must publicly commit to maintain and use the data in a de-identified fashion, 
and not to attempt to re-identify the data.  周us, if a company does take steps to re-identify such data, its 
conduct could be actionable under Section 5 of the FTC Act.  
周ird, if a company makes such de-identified data available to other companies – whether service 
providers or other third parties – it should contractually prohibit such entities from attempting to re-identify 
the data.  周e company that transfers or otherwise makes the data available should exercise reasonable 
oversight to monitor compliance with these contractual provisions and take appropriate steps to address 
contractual violations.
110
FTC staff’s letter closing its investigation of Netflix, arising from the company’s plan to release 
purportedly anonymous consumer data to improve its movie recommendation algorithm, provides a good 
illustration of these concepts.  In response to the privacy concerns that FTC staff and others raised, Netflix 
revised its initial plan to publicly release the data.  周e company agreed to narrow any such release of data 
to certain researchers.  周e letter details Netflix’s commitment to implement a number of “operational 
108 周e Commission’s approach in data security cases is a flexible one.  Where a company has offered assurances to consumers 
that it has implemented reasonable security measures, the Commission assesses the reasonableness based, among other things, 
on the sensitivity of the information collected, the measures the company has implemented to protect such information, and 
whether the company has taken action to address and prevent well-known and easily addressable security vulnerabilities.
109 See, e.g., Cynthia Dwork, A Firm Foundation for Private Data Analysis, 54 Comm. of the ACM 86-95 (2011), available at 
http://research.microsoft.com/pubs/116123/dwork_cacm.pdf, and references cited therein.
110 See In the Matter of Superior Mortg. Corp., FTC Docket No. C-4153 (Dec. 14, 2005), available at, http://www.ftc.gov/os/
caselist/0523136/0523136.shtm (alleging a violation of the GLB Safeguards Rule for, among other things, a failure to ensure 
that service providers were providing appropriate security for customer information and addressing known security risks in a 
timely manner).
22
safeguards to prevent the data from being used to re-identify consumers.”
111
If it chose to share such data 
with third parties, Netflix stated that it would limit access “only to researchers who contractually agree to 
specific limitations on its use.”
112
Accordingly, as long as (1) a given data set is not reasonably identifiable, (2) the company publicly 
commits not to re-identify it, and (3) the company requires any downstream users of the data to keep it in 
de-identified form, that data will fall outside the scope of the framework.
113
周is clarification of the framework’s reasonable linkability standard is designed to help address the 
concern that the standard is overly broad.  Further, the clarification gives companies an incentive to collect 
and use data in a form that makes it less likely the data will be linked to a particular consumer or device, 
thereby promoting privacy.  Additionally, by calling for companies to publicly commit to the steps they take, 
the framework promotes accountability.
114
Consistent with the discussion above, the Commission restates the framework’s scope as follows.
Final Scope:  周e framework applies to all commercial entities that collect or use consumer data that 
can be reasonably linked to a specific consumer, computer, or other device, unless the entity collects 
only non-sensitive data from fewer than 5,000 consumers per year and does not share the data with 
third parties. 
B. PRIVACY BY DESIGN
Baseline Principle:  Companies should promote consumer privacy throughout their organizations 
and at every stage of the development of their products and services.
周e preliminary staff report called on companies to promote consumer privacy throughout their 
organizations and at every stage of the development of their products and services.  Although many 
companies already incorporate substantive and procedural privacy protections into their business practices, 
industry should implement privacy by design more systematically.  A number of commenters, including 
those representing industry, supported staff’s call that companies “build in” privacy, with several of these 
commenters citing to the broad international recognition and adoption of privacy by design.
115
周e 
Commission is encouraged to see broad support for this concept, particularly in light of the increasingly 
global nature of data transfers.
111 Letter from Maneesha Mithal, Assoc. Dir., Div. of Privacy & Identity Prot., FTC, to Reed Freeman, Morrison & Foerster 
LLP, Counsel for Netflix, 2 (Mar. 12, 2010), available at http://www.ftc.gov/os/closings/100312netflixletter.pdf (closing 
letter).
112 Id.
113 To the extent that a company maintains and uses both data that is identifiable and data that it has taken steps to de-identify as 
outlined here, the company should silo the data separately.
114 A company that violates its policy against re-identifying data could be subject to liability under the FTC Act or other laws.
115 Comment of Office of the Information and Privacy Commissioner of Ontario, cmt. #00239, at 2-3; Comment of Intel Corp., cmt. 
#00246, at 12-13; Comment of CNIL, cmt. #00298, at 2-3.
23
In calling for privacy by design, staff advocated for the implementation of substantive privacy protections 
– such as data security, limitations on data collection and retention, and data accuracy – as well as procedural 
safeguards aimed at integrating the substantive principles into a company’s everyday business operations.  
By shifting burdens away from consumers and placing obligations on businesses to treat consumer data in 
a responsible manner, these principles should afford consumers basic privacy protections without forcing 
them to read long, incomprehensible privacy notices to learn and make choices about a company’s privacy 
practices.  Although the Commission has not changed the proposed “privacy by design” principles, it 
responds to a number of comments, as discussed below.
1.  THE SUBSTANTIVE PRINCIPLES: DATA SECURITY, REASONABLE COLLECTION LIMITS, 
SOUND RETENTION PRACTICES, AND DATA ACCURACY.
Proposed Principle:  Companies should incorporate substantive privacy protections into their 
practices, such as data security, reasonable collection limits, sound retention practices, and data 
accuracy.  
a‮  Should Additional Substantive Principles Be Identified?
Responding to a question about whether the final framework should identify additional substantive 
protections, several commenters suggested incorporating the additional principles articulated in the 1980 
OECD Privacy Guidelines.
116
One commenter also proposed adding the “right to be forgotten,” which 
would allow consumers to withdraw data posted online about themselves at any point.
117
周is concept has 
gained importance as people post more information about themselves online without fully appreciating the 
implications of such data sharing or the persistence of online data over time.
118
In supporting an expansive 
view of privacy by design, a consumer advocacy group noted that the individual elements and principles of 
the proposed framework should work together holistically.
119
In response, the Commission notes that the framework already embodies all the concepts in the 1980 
OECD privacy guidelines, although with some updates and changes in emphasis.  For example, privacy by 
design includes the collection limitation, data quality, and security principles.  Additionally, the framework’s 
simplified choice and transparency components, discussed below, encompass the OECD principles of 
purpose specification, use limitation, individual participation, and openness.  周e framework also adopts the 
116 Comment of CNIL, cmt. #00298, at 2; Comment of the Information Commissioner’s Office of the UK, cmt. #00249, at 2; 
Comment of World Privacy Forum, cmt. #00369, at 7; Comment of Intel Corp., cmt. #00246, at 4; see also Organisation for 
Economic Co-operation & Development, OECD Guidelines on the Protection of Privacy and Transborder Flows of Personal 
Data (Sept. 1980), available at http://www.oecd.org/document/18/0,3343,en_2649_34255_1815186_1_1_1_1,00&&en-
USS_01DBC.html (these principles include purpose specification, individual participation, accountability, and principles to 
govern cross-border data transfers).  Another commenter called for baseline legislation based on the Fair Information Practice 
Principles and the principles outlined in the 1974 Privacy Act.  Comment of Electronic Privacy Information Center, cmt. 
#00386, at 17-20.
117 Comment of CNIL, cmt. #00298, at 3.
118 周e concept of the “right to be forgotten,” and its importance to young consumers, is discussed in more detail below in the 
Transparency Section, infra at Section IV.D.2.b
.
119 Comment of Consumers Union, cmt. #00362, at 1-2, 5-9, 18-19. 
24
OECD principle that companies must be accountable for their privacy practices.  Specifically, the framework 
calls on companies to implement procedures – such as designating a person responsible for privacy, training 
employees, and ensuring adequate oversight of third parties – to help ensure that they are implementing 
appropriate substantive privacy protections.  周e framework also calls on industry to increase efforts to 
educate consumers about the commercial collection and use of their data and the available privacy tools.  
In addition, there are aspects of the proposed “right to be forgotten” in the final framework, which calls on 
companies to (1) delete consumer data that they no longer need and (2) allow consumers to access their data 
and in appropriate cases suppress or delete it.
120
All of the principles articulated in the preliminary staff report are intended to work together to shift 
the burden for protecting privacy away from consumers and to encourage companies to make strong 
privacy protections the default.  Reasonable collection limits and data disposal policies work in tandem 
with streamlined notices and improved consumer choice mechanisms.  Together, they function to provide 
substantive protections by placing reasonable limits on the collection, use, and retention of consumer data to 
more closely align with consumer expectations, while also raising consumer awareness about the nature and 
extent of data collection, use, and third-party sharing, and the choices available to them. 
b‮  Data Security:  Companies Must Provide Reasonable Security for Consumer Data‮ 
It is well settled that companies must provide reasonable security for consumer data.  周e Commission 
has a long history of enforcing data security obligations under Section 5 of the FTC Act, the FCRA and 
the GLBA.  Since 2001, the FTC has brought 36 cases under these laws, charging that businesses failed 
to appropriately protect consumers’ personal information.  Since issuance of the preliminary staff report 
alone, the Commission has resolved seven data security actions against resellers of sensitive consumer 
report information, service providers that process employee data, a college savings program, and a social 
media service.
121
In addition to the federal laws the FTC enforces, companies are subject to a variety of 
120 See In the Matter of Facebook, Inc., FTC File No. 092 3184 (Nov. 29, 2011) (proposed consent order), available at http://
www.ftc.gov/os/caselist/0923184/index.shtm (requiring Facebook to make inaccessible within thirty days data that a user 
deletes); see also Do Not Track Kids Act of 2011, H.R. 1895, 112th Cong. (2011). 
121 In the Matter of Upromise, Inc., FTC File No. 102 3116 (Jan. 18, 2012) (proposed consent order), available at http://www.
ftc.gov/os/caselist/1023116/index.shtm; In the Matter of ACRAnet, Inc., FTC Docket No. C-4331(Aug. 17, 2011) (consent 
order), available at http://ftc.gov/os/caselist/0923088/index.shtm; In the Matter of Fajilan & Assocs., Inc., FTC Docket 
No. C-4332 (Aug. 17, 2011) (consent order), available at http://ftc.gov/os/caselist/0923089/index.shtm; In the Matter 
of SettlementOne Credit Corp., FTC Docket No. C-4330 (Aug. 17, 2011) (consent order), available at http://ftc.gov/os/
caselist/0823208/index.shtm; In the Matter of Lookout Servs., Inc., FTC Docket No. C-4326 (June 15, 2011) (consent order), 
available at http://www.ftc.gov/os/caselist/102376/index.shtm; In the Matter of Ceridian Corp., FTC Docket No. C-4325 
(June 8, 2011) (consent order), available at http://www.ftc.gov/os/caselist/1023160/index.shtm; In the Matter of Twitter, Inc., 
FTC Docket No. C-4316 (Mar. 11, 2011) (consent order), available at http://www.ftc.gov/os/caselist/0923093/index.shtm.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested