open pdf file in asp net c# : Adding text to a pdf in reader application control utility html web page winforms visual studio 120326privacyreport6-part393

45
DATA ENHANCEMENT CASE STUDY: 
FACIAL RECOGNITION SOFTWARE
Facial recognition technology
1
enables the identification of an individual based on his or her 
distinct facial characteristics.  While this technology has been used in experiments for over thirty 
years, until recently it remained costly and limited under real world conditions.
2
However, steady 
improvements in the technology combined with increased computing power have shifted this 
technology out of the realm of science fiction and into the marketplace.  As costs have decreased and 
accuracy improved, facial recognition software has been incorporated into a variety of commercial 
products.  Today it can be found in online social networks and photo management software, where it 
is used to facilitate photo-organizing,
3
and in mobile apps where it is used to enhance gaming.
4
周is surge in the deployment of facial recognition technology will likely boost the desire of 
companies to use data enhancement by offering yet another means to compile and link information 
about an individual gathered through disparate transactions and contexts.  For instance, social 
networks such as Facebook and LinkedIn, as well as websites like Yelp and Amazon, all encourage 
users to upload profile photos and make these photos publicly available.  As a result, vast amounts of 
facial data, often linked with real names and geographic locations, have been made publicly available.  
A recent paper from researchers at Carnegie Mellon University illustrated how they were able to 
combine readily available facial recognition software with data mining algorithms and statistical re-
identification techniques to determine in many cases an individual’s name, location, interests, and 
even the first five digits of the individual’s Social Security number, starting with only the individual’s 
picture.
5
Companies could easily replicate these results.  Today, retailers use facial detection software in 
digital signs to analyze the age and gender of viewers and deliver targeted advertisements.
6
Facial 
detection does not uniquely identify an individual.  Instead, it detects human faces and determines 
gender and approximate age range.  In the future, digital signs and kiosks placed in supermarkets, 
transit stations, and college campuses could capture images of viewers and, through the use of facial 
recognition software, match those faces to online identities, and return advertisements based on the 
websites specific individuals have visited or the publicly available information contained in their 
social media profiles.  Retailers could also implement loyalty programs, ask users to associate a photo 
with the account, then use the combined data to link the consumer to other online accounts or their 
in-store actions.  周is would enable the retailer to glean information about the consumer’s purchase 
habits, interests, and even movements,
7
which could be used to offer discounts on particular 
products or otherwise market to the consumer.
Adding text to a pdf in reader - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text to a pdf document using acrobat; how to add text fields to pdf
Adding text to a pdf in reader - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to insert text in pdf using preview; adding text to pdf online
46
周e ability of facial recognition technology to identify consumers based solely on a 
photograph, create linkages between the offline and online world, and compile highly 
detailed dossiers of information, makes it especially important for companies using this 
technology to implement privacy by design concepts and robust choice and transparency 
policies.  Such practices should include reducing the amount of time consumer information 
is retained, adopting reasonable security measures, and disclosing to consumers that the 
facial data they supply may be used to link them to information from third parties or 
publicly available sources.  For example, if a digital sign uses data enhancement to deliver 
targeted advertisements to viewers, it should immediately delete the data after the consumer 
has walked away.  Likewise, if a kiosk is used to invite shoppers to register for a store loyalty 
program, the shopper should be informed that the photo taken by the kiosk camera and 
associated with the account may be combined with other data to market discounts and offers 
to the shopper.  If a company received the data from other sources, it should disclose the 
sources to the consumer. 
NOTES
 周e Commission held a facial recognition workshop on December 8, 2011.  See FTC Workshop, Face Facts: A 
Forum on Facial Recognition Technology (Dec. 8, 2011), http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/workshops/facefacts/.
 See Alessandro Acquisti et al., Faces of Facebook: Privacy in the Age of Augmented Reality, http://www.heinz.cmu.
edu/~acquisti/face-recognition-study-FAQ/.
 See Justin Mitchell, Making Photo Tagging Easier, The Facebook Blog (June 30, 2011, 5:16 PM), https://blog.
facebook.com/blog.php?post=467145887130; Matt Hickey, Picasa Refresh Brings Facial Recognition, TechCrunch 
(Sept. 2, 2008), http://techcrunch.com/2008/09/02/picasa-refresh-brings-facial-recognition/.
 See Tomio Geron, Viewdle Launches ‘周ird Eye’ Augmented Reality Game, Forbes, June 22, 2011, available at http://
www.forbes.com/sites/tomiogeron/2011/06/22/viewdle-lauches-third-eye-augmented-reality-game/.
 See Alessandro Acquisti et al., Faces of Facebook: Privacy in the Age of Augmented Reality, http://www.heinz.cmu.
edu/~acquisti/face-recognition-study-FAQ/.
 See Shan Li & David Sarno, Advertisers Start Using Facial Recognition to Tailor Pitches, L.A. Times, Aug. 21, 2011, 
available at http://articles.latimes.com/2011/aug/21/business/la-fi-facial-recognition-20110821.
 For instance, many consumers use services such as Foursquare which allow them to use their mobile phone to 
“check in” at a restaurant to find friends who are nearby.  See Foursquare, About Foursquare, https://foursquare.
com/about.
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
C# source code for adding or removing annotation from PDF Support to take notes on adobe PDF file without Support to add text, text box, text field and crop
adding text fields to pdf acrobat; add text pdf file acrobat
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Others. Provide VB.NET Users with Solution of Adding Text Box to PDF Page in VB.NET Project.
add text boxes to a pdf; how to insert text into a pdf with acrobat
47
(v) Companies Should Generally Give Consumers a Choice Before Collecting Sensitive Data for 
First-Party Marketing.
Commenters addressed whether companies that collect sensitive data
214
for their own marketing should 
offer consumer choice.  A number of privacy and consumer organizations asserted that even where a business 
collects data in a first-party setting, any marketing based on sensitive data should require the consumer’s 
affirmative express consent.
215
周ese commenters stated that the use of sensitive data for marketing could 
cause embarrassment for consumers or lead to various types of discriminatory conduct, including denial of 
benefits or being charged higher prices.  One such commenter also noted that heightened choice for sensitive 
data is consistent with the FTC staff’s Self-Regulatory Principles for Online Behavioral Advertising (“2009 
OBA Report”).
216
Rather than always requiring consent, an industry trade association pushed for a more flexible approach 
to the use of sensitive data in first-party marketing.
217
周is commenter stated that the choice analysis should 
depend upon the particular context and circumstances in which the data is used.  周e commenter noted 
that, for example, with respect to sensitive location data, where a consumer uses a wireless service to find 
nearby restaurants and receive discounts, the consumer implicitly understands his location data will be used 
and consent can be inferred.
周e Commission agrees with the commenters who stated that affirmative express consent is appropriate 
when a company uses sensitive data for any marketing, whether first- or third-party.  Although, as a general 
rule, most first-party marketing presents fewer privacy concerns, the calculus changes when the data is 
sensitive.  Indeed, when health or children’s information is involved, for example, the likelihood that data 
misuse could lead to embarrassment, discrimination, or other harms is increased.  周is risk exists regardless 
of whether the entity collecting and using the data is a first party or a third party that is unknown to the 
consumer.  In light of the heightened privacy risks associated with sensitive data, first parties should provide 
a consumer choice mechanism at the time of data collection.
218
At the same time, the Commission believes this requirement of affirmative express consent for first-party 
marketing using sensitive data should be limited.  Certainly, where a company’s business model is designed to 
target consumers based on sensitive data – including data about children, financial and health information, 
Social Security numbers, and certain geolocation data – the company should seek affirmative express 
consent before collecting the data from those consumers.
219
On the other hand, the risks to consumers may 
not justify the potential burdens on general audience businesses that incidentally collect and use sensitive 
214 周e Commission defines as sensitive, at a minimum, data about children, financial and health information, Social Security 
numbers, and certain geolocation data, as discussed below.  See infra Section IV.C.2.e.(ii).
215 Comment of Center for Democracy & Technology, cmt. #00469, at 10; Comment of Consumer Federation of America, cmt. 
#00358, at 8-9; Comment of Consumers Union, cmt. #00362, at 12-13. 
216 See Comment of Center for Democracy & Technology, cmt. #00469 at 10 (citing FTC, FTC Staff Report: Self-Regulatory 
Principles for Online Behavioral Advertising, 43-44 (2009), http://www.ftc.gov/os/2009/02/P085400behavadreport.pdf).
217 Comment of CTIA – 周e Wireless Ass’n, cmt. #00375, at 4-6.
218 Additional discussion regarding the necessary level of consent for the collection or use of sensitive data, as well as other 
practices that raise special privacy considerations, is set forth below. See infra Section IV.C.2.e.(ii).
219 周ese categories of sensitive data are discussed further below. See infra Section IV.C.2.e.(ii). 
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Provide .NET SDK library for adding text box to PDF document in .NET WinForms application. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
adding text to pdf; how to add text fields in a pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references:
add text to pdf; how to insert text box in pdf file
48
information.  For example, the Commission has previously noted that online retailers and services such as 
Amazon.com and Netflix need not provide choice when making product recommendations based on prior 
purchases.  周us, if Amazon.com were to recommend a book related to health or financial issues based on 
a prior purchase on the site, it need not provide choice.  However, if a health website is designed to target 
people with particular medical conditions, that site should seek affirmative express consent when marketing 
to consumers.
Final Principle:  Companies do not need to provide choice before collecting and using consumer 
data for practices that are consistent with the context of the transaction or the company’s relationship 
with the consumer, or are required or specifically authorized by law. 
2.  FOR PRACTICES INCONSISTENT WITH THE CONTEXT OF THEIR INTERACTION WITH 
CONSUMERS, COMPANIES SHOULD GIVE CONSUMERS CHOICES.
Proposed Principle:  For practices requiring choice, companies should offer the choice at a time and 
in a context in which the consumer is making a decision about his or her data. 
For those practices for which choice is contemplated, the proposed framework called on companies to 
provide choice at a time and in a context in which the consumer is making a decision about his or her data.  
In response, commenters discussed a number of issues, including the methods for providing just in time 
choice, when “take-it-or-leave-it” choice may be appropriate, how to respond to the call for a Do Not Track 
mechanism that would allow consumers to control online tracking, and the contexts in which affirmative 
express consent is necessary.  
周e Commission adopts the proposed framework’s formulation that choice should be provided at a time 
and in a context in which the consumer is making a decision about his or her data.  周e Commission also 
adds new language addressing when a company should seek a consumer’s affirmative express consent. 
a‮  Companies Should Provide Choices At a Time and In a Context in Which the Consumer Is 
Making a Decision About His or Her Data‮
周e call for companies to provide a “just in time” choice generated numerous comments.  Several 
consumer organizations as well as industry commenters stressed the importance of offering consumer 
choice at the time the consumer provides – and the company collects or uses – the data at issue and 
pointed to examples of existing mechanisms for providing effective choice.
220
One commenter stated 
that in order to make choice mechanisms meaningful to consumers, companies should incorporate them 
as a feature of a product or service rather than as a legal disclosure.
221
Using its vendor recommendation 
service as an example, this commenter suggested incorporating a user’s sharing preferences into the sign-up 
process instead of setting such preferences as a default that users can later adjust and personalize.  Another 
220 See Comment of Consumer Federation of America, cmt. #00358, at 10; Comment of Center for Democracy & Technology, cmt. 
#00469, at 23-24; Comment of AT&T Inc., cmt. #00420, at 22-23; Comment of Phorm Inc., cmt. #00353, at 9-10.
221 Comment of AT&T Inc., cmt. #00420, at 22-23.
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Support adding protection features to PDF file by adding password, digital signatures and redaction feature. Various of PDF text and images processing features
adding text to a pdf in reader; add text to pdf file
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Others. Professional VB.NET Solution for Adding Text Annotation to PDF Page in VB.NET.
adding text box to pdf; adding text fields to pdf
49
commenter stated that choice options should occur in a “time-appropriate manner” that takes into account 
the “functional and aesthetic context” of the product or service.
222
Others raised concerns about the practicality of providing choice prior to the collection or use of data in 
different contexts.
223
For instance, a number of commenters discussed the offline retail context and noted 
that cashiers are typically unqualified to communicate privacy information or to discuss data collection and 
use practices with customers.
224
One commenter further discussed the logistical problems with providing 
such information at the point of sale, citing consumer concerns about ease of transaction and in-store wait 
times.
225
Other commenters described the impracticality of offering and obtaining advance consent in 
an offline mail context, such as a magazine subscription card or catalogue request that a consumer mails 
to a fulfillment center.
226
In the online context, one commenter expressed concern that “pop-up” choice 
mechanisms complicate or clutter the user experience, which could lead to choice “fatigue.”
227
Another 
commenter noted that where data collection occurs automatically, such as in the case of online behavioral 
advertising, obtaining consent before collection could be impractical.
228
One theme that a majority of the commenters addressing this issue articulated is the need for flexibility 
so that companies can tailor the choice options to specific business models and contexts.
229
Rather than 
a rigid reliance on advance consent, commenters stated that companies should be able to provide choice 
before collection, close to the time of collection, or a time that is convenient to the consumer.
230
周e precise 
method should depend upon context, the sensitivity of the data at issue, and other factors.
231
Citing its own 
best practices guidance, one trade organization recommended that the Commission focus not on the precise 
mechanism for offering choice, but on whether the consent is informed and based on sufficient notice.
232
周e Commission appreciates the concerns that commenters raised about the timing of providing 
choices.  Indeed, the proposed framework was not intended to set forth a “one size fits all” model for 
designing consumer choice mechanisms.  Staff instead called on companies to offer clear and concise choice 
222 Comment of Center for Democracy & Technology, cmt. #00469, at 11.
223 See Comment of Microsoft Corp., cmt. #00395, at 8-10, 14; Comment of SIFMA, cmt. #00265, at 5-6; Comment of Retail 
Industry Leaders Ass’n, cmt. #00352, at 8-10.
224 Comment of Retail Industry Leaders Ass’n, cmt. #00352, at 8; Comment of Experian, cmt. #00398, at 9.
225 Comment of Retail Industry Leaders Ass’n, cmt. #00352, at 8.
226 See Comment of Magazine Publishers of America, cmt. #00332, at 4 (noting that the “blow-in cards” in magazines often used 
to solicit new subscriptions have very limited space, and including lengthy disclosures on these cards could render them 
unreadable); Comment of American Catalogue Mailers Ass’n, cmt. #00424, at 7.
227 See Comment of Retail Industry Leaders Ass’n, cmt. #00352 at 7; see also Comment of Experian, cmt. #00398, at 9 (noting that 
the proposed changes in notice and choice procedures would be inconvenient for consumers and would damage the consumer 
experience).  
228 Comment of Retail Industry Leaders Ass’n, cmt. #00352, at 8.
229 Comment of Microsoft Corp., cmt. #00395, at 2; Comment of AT&T Inc., cmt. #00420 at 3, 7; Comment of Consumers Union, 
cmt. #00362, at 5, 11-12; Comment of Consumer Federation of America, cmt. #00358, at 10. 
230  Comment of Retail Industry Leaders Ass’n, cmt. #00352, at 9. 
231 Comment of Facebook, Inc., cmt. #00413, at 10; Comment of Retail Industry Leaders Ass’n, cmt. #00352, at 9; see also Comment 
of Experian, cmt. #00398, at 9 (generally disputing the need for “just-in-time” notice, but acknowledging that it might be 
justified for the transfer to non-affiliated third parties of sensitive information for marketing purposes). 
232 See Comment of CTIA - 周e Wireless Ass’n, cmt. #00375, at 10 (describing the form of consent outlined in the CTIA’s “Best 
Practices and Guidelines for Location-Based Services”).  
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF reader installed. technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc
add text field pdf; add text to pdf acrobat
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
By using reliable APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel
adding text to pdf reader; how to enter text in pdf form
50
mechanisms that are easy to use and are delivered at a time and in a context that is relevant to the consumer’s 
decision about whether to allow the data collection or use.  Precisely how companies in different industries 
achieve these goals may differ depending on such considerations as the nature or context of the consumer’s 
interaction with a company or the type or sensitivity of the data at issue.
In most cases, providing choice before or at the time of collection will be necessary to gain consumers’ 
attention and ensure that the choice presented is meaningful and relevant.  If a consumer is submitting his or 
her data online, the consumer choice could be offered, for example, directly adjacent to where the consumer 
is entering his or her data.  In other contexts, the choice might be offered immediately upon signing up for a 
service, as in the case of a social networking website.
In some contexts, however, it may be more practical to communicate choices at a later point.  For 
example, in the case of an offline retailer, the choice might be offered close to the time of a sale, but in a 
manner that will not unduly interfere with the transaction.  周is could include communicating the choice 
mechanism through a sales receipt or on a prominent poster at the location where the transaction takes 
place.  In such a case, there is likely to be a delay between when the data collection takes place and when 
the consumer is able to contact the company in order to exercise any choice options.  Accordingly, the 
company should wait for a disclosed period of time before engaging in the practices for which choice is 
being offered.
233
周e Commission also encourages companies to examine the effectiveness of such choice 
mechanisms periodically to determine whether they are sufficiently prominent, effective, and easy to use.  
Industry is well positioned to design and develop choice mechanisms that are practical for particular 
business models or contexts, and that also advance the fundamental goal of giving consumers the ability to 
make informed and meaningful decisions about their privacy.  周e Commission calls on industry to use the 
same type of creativity industry relies on to develop effective marketing campaigns and user interfaces for 
consumer choice mechanisms.  One example of such a creative approach is the online behavioral advertising 
industry’s development of a standardized icon and text that is embedded in targeted advertisements.  周e 
icon and text are intended to communicate that the advertising may rely on data collected about consumers.  
周ey also serve as a choice mechanism to allow the consumer to exercise control over the delivery of such 
ads.
234
Even though in most cases, cookie placement has already occurred, the in-ad disclosure provides a 
logical “teachable moment” for the consumer who is making a decision about his or her data.
235
b‮  Take-it-or-Leave-it Choice for Important Products or Services Raises Concerns When 
Consumers Have Few Alternatives‮
Several commenters addressed whether it is appropriate for a company to make a consumer’s use of its 
product or service contingent upon the consumer’s acceptance of the company’s data practices.  Two industry 
233 周e FTC recognizes that incorporating this delay period may require companies to make programming changes to their 
systems.  As noted above, in the discussion of legacy data systems, see supra at Section IV.B.2., these changes may take time to 
implement. 
234 As noted in Section IV.C.2.c., industry continues to consider ways to make the icon and opt out mechanism more usable and 
visible for consumers. 
235  But see Comment of Center for Digital Democracy and U.S. PIRG, cmt. #00338, at 29 (criticizing visibility of the icon to 
consumers). 
51
commenters suggested that “take-it-or-leave-it” or “walk away” choice is common in many business models, 
such as retail and software licensing, and companies have a right to limit their business to those who are 
willing to accept their policies.
236
Another commenter stated that preventing companies from offering take-
it-or-leave-it choice might be unconstitutional under the First Amendment.
237
Other commenters, however, 
characterized walk away choice as generally inappropriate.
238
Some argued that the privacy framework 
should prevent companies from denying consumers access to goods or services, including website content, 
where consumers choose to limit the collection or use of their data.
239
Most of the commenters that addressed this issue took a position somewhere in between.
240
In 
determining whether take-it-or-leave-it choice is appropriate, these commenters focused on three main 
factors.  First, they noted that there must be adequate competition, so that the consumer has alternative 
sources to obtain the product or service in question.
241
Second, they stated that the transaction must not 
involve an essential product or service.
242
周ird, commenters stated that the company offering take-it-or-
leave-it choice must clearly and conspicuously disclose the terms of the transaction so that the consumer 
is able to understand the value exchange.  For example, a company could clearly state that in exchange 
for receiving a service at “no cost,” it collects certain information about your activity and sells it to third 
parties.
243
Expanding upon this point, commenters stressed that to ensure consumer understanding of the 
nature of the take-it-or-leave-it bargain, the disclosure must be prominent and not buried within a privacy 
policy.
244
周e Commission agrees that a “take it or leave it” approach is problematic from a privacy perspective, 
in markets for important services where consumers have few options.
245
For such products or services, 
businesses should not offer consumers a “take it or leave it” choice when collecting consumers’ information 
in a manner inconsistent with the context of the interaction between the business and the consumer.  Take, 
236 Comment of Performance Marketing Ass’n, cmt. #00414, at 6; Comment of Business Software Alliance, cmt. #00389, at 11-12. 
237 Comment of Tech Freedom, cmt. #00451, at 17.
238 Comment of Consumer Federation of America, cmt. #00358, at 11; Comment of ePrio, Inc., cmt. #00267, at 4-5.  
239 Comment of Consumer Federation of America, cmt. #00358, at 11; see also Comment of Consumers Union, cmt. #00362, at 12 
(urging that consumers who choose to restrict sharing of their PII with unknown third parties should not be punished for 
that choice). 
240 See, e.g., Comment of Center for Democracy & Technology, cmt. #00469, at 13 (stating that it has no objection to take-it-
or-leave-it approaches, provided there is competition and the transaction does not involve essential services); Comment of 
Microsoft Corp., cmt. #00395, at 10 (stating that take-it-or-leave-it choice is appropriate provided the “deal” is made clear to 
the consumer); Comment of the Information Commissioner’s Office of the UK, cmt. #00249, at 4 (stating that take-it-or-leave-it 
choice would be inappropriate where the consumer has no real alternative but to use the service); Comment of Reed Elsevier, 
Inc., cmt. #00430, at 11 (stating that while acceptable for the websites of private industry, websites that provide a public 
service and may be the single source of certain information, such as outsourced government agency websites, should not 
condition their use on take-it-or-leave-it terms).
241 Comment of Center for Democracy & Technology, cmt. #00469, at 13; Comment of the Information Commissioner’s Office of the 
UK, cmt. #00249, at 4.
242 Comment of Center for Democracy & Technology, cmt. #00469, at 13; Comment of Reed Elsevier, Inc., cmt. #00430, at 11.
243 Comment of Microsoft Corp., cmt. #00395, at 10; see also Comment of Center for Democracy & Technology, cmt. #00469, at 13 
(stating that the terms of the bargain should be clearly and conspicuously disclosed). 
244 Comment of TRUSTe, cmt. #00450, at 11; see also Comment of Center for Democracy & Technology, cmt. #00469, at 13 (stating 
that terms should be “transparent and fairly presented”).
245  周is Report is not intended to reflect Commission guidance regarding Section 5’s prohibition on unfair methods of 
competition.
52
for example, the purchase of an important product that has few substitutes, such as a patented medical 
device.  If a company offered a limited warranty for the device only in exchange for the consumer’s agreeing 
to disclose his or her income, religion, and other highly-personal information, the consumer would not have 
been offered a meaningful choice and a take-it-or-leave approach would be inappropriate. 
Another example is the provision of broadband Internet access.  As consumers shift more aspects of 
their daily lives to the Internet – shopping, interacting through social media, accessing news, entertainment, 
and information, and obtaining government services – broadband has become a critical service for many 
American consumers.  When consumers have few options for broadband service, the take-it-or-leave-it 
approach becomes one-sided in favor of the service provider.  In these situations, the service provider should 
not condition the provision of broadband on the customer’s agreeing to, for example, allow the service 
provider to track all of the customer’s online activity for marketing purposes.  Consumers’ privacy interests 
ought not to be put at risk in such one-sided transactions.  
With respect to less important products and services in markets with sufficient alternatives, take-it-or-
leave-it choice can be acceptable, provided that the terms of the exchange are transparent and fairly disclosed 
– e.g., “we provide you with free content in exchange for collecting information about the websites you visit 
and using it to market products to you.”  Under the proper circumstances, such choice options may result in 
lower prices or other consumer benefits, as companies develop new and competing ways of monetizing their 
business models.
c‮  Businesses Should Provide a Do Not Track Mechanism To Give Consumers Control Over 
the Collection of 周eir Web Surfing Data‮
Like the preliminary staff report, this report advocates the continued implementation of a universal, one-
stop choice mechanism for online behavioral tracking, often referred to as Do Not Track.  Such a mechanism 
should give consumers the ability to control the tracking of their online activities.  
Many commenters discussed the progress made by industry in developing such a choice mechanism in 
response to the recommendations of the preliminary staff report and the 2009 OBA Report, and expressed 
support for these self-regulatory initiatives.
246
周ese initiatives include the work of the online advertising 
industry over the last two years to simplify disclosures and improve consumer choice mechanisms; efforts 
by the major browsers to offer new choice mechanisms; and a project of a technical standards body to 
246 See, e.g., Comment of American Ass’n of Advertising Agencies et. al, cmt. #00410, at 3 (describing the universal choice 
mechanisms used in the coalition’s Self-Regulatory Principles for Online Behavioral Advertising Program); Comment of 
BlueKai, cmt. #00397, at 3 (describing its development of the NAI Opt-Out Protector for Firefox ); Comment of Computer & 
Communications Industry Ass’n, cmt. #00434, at 17 (describing both company-specific and industry-wide opt-out mechanisms 
currently in use); Comment of Direct Marketing Ass’n, Inc., cmt. #00449, at 3 (stating that the Self-Regulatory Principles 
for Online Behavioral Advertising Program addresses the concerns that motivate calls for a “Do-Not-Track” mechanism); 
Comment of Facebook, Inc., cmt. #00413, at 13 (describing behavioral advertising opt-out mechanisms developed by both 
browser makers and the advertising industry); Comment of Future of Privacy Forum, cmt. #00341, at 2-4 (describing the 
development of a browser-based Do-Not-Track header and arguing that the combined efforts of browser companies, ad 
networks, consumers, and government are likely to result in superior choice mechanisms); Comment of Google, Inc., cmt. 
#00417, at 5 (describing its Ad Preferences Manager and Keep My Opt-Outs tools); Comment of Interactive Advertising 
Bureau, cmt. #00388, at 5-7 (describing the Self-Regulatory Principles for Online Behavioral Advertising Program); Comment 
of Microsoft Corp., cmt. #00395, at 11-14 (describing a variety of browser-based and ad network-based choice tools currently 
available); Comment of U.S. Chamber of Commerce, cmt. #00452, at 5-6 (describing a variety of browser-based and ad 
network-based choice tools currently available).
53
standardize opt outs for online tracking.
247
A number of commenters, however, expressed concerns 
that existing mechanisms are still insufficient.  Commenters raised questions about the effectiveness 
and comprehensiveness of existing mechanisms for exercising choice and the legal enforceability of such 
mechanisms.
248
Due to these concerns, some commenters advocated for legislation mandating a Do Not 
Track mechanism.
249
周e Commission commends recent industry efforts to improve consumer control over behavioral 
tracking and looks forward to final implementation.  As industry explores technical options and implements 
self-regulatory programs, and Congress examines Do Not Track, the Commission continues to believe that 
in order to be effective, any Do Not Track system should include five key principles.  First, a Do Not Track 
system should be implemented universally to cover all parties that would track consumers.  Second, the 
choice mechanism should be easy to find, easy to understand, and easy to use.  周ird, any choices offered 
should be persistent and should not be overridden if, for example, consumers clear their cookies or update 
their browsers.  Fourth, a Do Not Track system should be comprehensive, effective, and enforceable.  It 
should opt consumers out of behavioral tracking through any means and not permit technical loopholes.
250
Finally, an effective Do Not Track system should go beyond simply opting consumers out of receiving 
targeted advertisements; it should opt them out of collection of behavioral data for all purposes other than 
those that would be consistent with the context of the interaction (e.g., preventing click-fraud or collecting 
de-identified data for analytics purposes).
251
Early on the companies that make web browsers stepped up to the challenge to give consumers choice 
about how they are tracked online, sometimes known as the “browser header” approach.  周e browser 
header is transmitted to all types of entities, including advertisers, analytics companies, and researchers, 
that track consumers online.  Just after the FTC’s call for Do Not Track, Microsoft developed a system to 
let users of Internet Explorer prevent tracking by different companies and sites.
252
Mozilla introduced a Do 
Not Track privacy control for its Firefox browser that an impressive number of consumers have adopted.
253
247 See supra at Section II.C.1.
248 Comment of American Civil Liberties Union, cmt. #00425, at 12; Comment of Center for Digital Democracy and U.S. PIRG, 
cmt. #00338, at 28; Comment of Consumer Federation of America, cmt. #00358, at 13; Comment of Consumers Union, cmt. 
#00362, at 14; see also Comment of World Privacy Forum, cmt. #00369, at 3 (noting prior failures of self-regulation in the 
online advertising industry).  
249 E.g., Comment of Consumers Union, cmt. #00362, at 14; Comment of World Privacy Forum, cmt. #00369, at 3.
250 For example, consumers may believe they have opted out of tracking if they block third-party cookies on their browsers; yet 
they may still be tracked through Flash cookies or other mechanisms.  周e FTC recently brought an action against a company 
that told consumers they could opt out of tracking by exercising choices through their browsers; however, the company used 
Flash cookies for such tracking, which consumers could not opt out of through their browsers.  In the Matter of ScanScout, 
Inc., FTC Docket No. C-4344 (Dec. 21, 2011) (consent order), available at http://www.ftc.gov/os/caselist/1023185/111221s
canscoutdo.pdf.
251 Such a mechanism should be different from the Do Not Call program in that it should not require the creation of a “Registry” 
of unique identifiers, which could itself cause privacy concerns. 
252 Comment of Microsoft Corp., cmt. #00395, at 12. 
253 Comment of Mozilla, cmt. #00480, at 2; Alex Fowler, Do Not Track Adoption in Firefox Mobile is 3x Higher than Desktop, 
Mozilla Privacy Blog, (Nov. 2, 2011), http://blog.mozilla.com/privacy/2011/11/02/do-not-track-adoption-in-firefox-
mobile-is-3x-higher-than-desktop/.
54
Apple subsequently included a similar Do Not Track control in Safari.
254
Google has taken a slightly 
different approach – providing consumers with a tool that persistently opts them out of most behavioral 
advertising.
255
In another important effort, the online advertising industry, led by the DAA, has implemented a 
behavioral advertising opt-out program.  周e DAA’s accomplishments are notable:  it has developed a notice 
and choice mechanism through a standard icon in ads and on publisher sites; deployed the icon broadly, 
with over 900 billion impressions served each month; obtained commitments to follow the self-regulatory 
principles from advertisers, ad networks, and publishers that represent close to 90 percent of the online 
behavioral advertising market; and established an enforcement mechanism designed to ensure compliance 
with the principles.
256
More recently, the DAA addressed one of the long-standing criticisms of its approach 
– how to limit secondary use of collected data so that the consumer opt out extends beyond simply blocking 
targeted ads to the collection of information for other purposes.  周e DAA has released new principles that 
include limitations on the collection of tracking data and prohibitions on the use or transfer of the data for 
employment, credit, insurance, or health care eligibility purposes.
257
Just as important, the DAA recently 
moved to address some persistence and usability criticisms of its icon-based opt out by committing to honor 
the tracking choices consumers make through their browser settings.
258
At the same time, the W3C Internet standards-setting body has gathered a broad range of stakeholders 
to create an international, industry-wide standard for Do Not Track.  周e group includes a wide variety of 
stakeholders, including DAA members; other U.S. companies; international companies; industry groups; 
and public-interest groups.  周e W3C group has done admirable work to flesh out the details required 
to make a Do Not Track system practical in both desktop and mobile settings.  周e group has issued two 
public working drafts of its standards.  Some important details remain to be filled in, and the Commission 
encourages all of the stakeholders to work within the W3C group to resolve these issues. 
While more work remains to be done on Do Not Track, the Commission believes that the developments 
to date are significant and provide an effective path forward.  周e advertising industry, through the DAA, 
has committed to deploy browser-based technologies for consumer control over online tracking, alongside its 
ubiquitous icon program.  周e W3C process, thanks in part to the ongoing participation of DAA member 
companies, has made substantial progress toward specifying a consensus consumer choice system for tracking 
254 Nick Wingfield, Apple Adds Do-Not-Track Tool to New Browser, Wall St. J. Apr. 13, 2011, available at http://online.wsj.com/
article/SB10001424052748703551304576261272308358858.html. 
255 Comment of Google Inc., cmt. #00417, at 5.
256 Peter Kosmala, Yes, Johnny Can Benefit From Transparency & Control, Self-Regulatory Program for Online Behavioral 
Advertising, http://www.aboutads.info/blog/yes-johnny-can-benefit-transparency-and-control (Nov. 3, 2011); see also Press 
Release, Digital Advertising Alliance, White House, DOC and FTC Commend DAA’s Self-Regulatory Program to Protect 
Consumers Online Privacy, (Feb. 23, 2012), available at http://www.aboutads.info/resource/download/DAA%20White%20
House%20Event.pdf.
257 Digital Advertising Alliance, About Self-Regulatory Principles for Multi-Site Data (Nov. 2011), available at http://www.
aboutads.info/resource/download/Multi-Site-Data-Principles.pdf.
258 Press Release, Digital Advertising Alliance, DAA Position on Browser Based Choice Mechanism (Feb. 22, 2012), available at 
http://www.aboutads.info/resource/download/DAA.Commitment.pdf.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested