open pdf file in asp net c# : How to add text to a pdf in acrobat application SDK tool html winforms windows online 120326privacyreport7-part394

55
that is practical and technically feasible.
259
周e Commission anticipates continued progress in this area as 
the DAA members and other key stakeholders continue discussions within the W3C process to work to 
reach consensus on a Do Not Track system in the coming months. 
d‮  Large Platform Providers 周at Can Comprehensively Collect Data Across the Internet 
Present Special Concerns‮
As discussed above, even if a company has a first-party relationship with a consumer in one setting, 
this does not imply that the company can track the consumer for purposes inconsistent with the context of 
the interaction across the Internet, without providing choice.  周is principle applies fully to large platform 
providers such as ISPs, operating systems, and browsers, who have very broad access to a user’s online 
activities.
For example, the preliminary staff report sought comment on the use of DPI for marketing purposes.  
Many commenters highlighted the comprehensive nature of DPI.
260
Because of the pervasive tracking 
that DPI allows, these commenters stated that its use for marketing should require consumers’ affirmative 
express consent.
261
Privacy concerns led one commenter to urge the Commission to oppose DPI and hold 
workshops and hearings on the issue.
262
Another commenter argued that a lack of significant competition 
among broadband providers argues in favor of heightened requirements for consumer choice before ISPs can 
use DPI for marketing purposes.
263
Two major ISPs emphasized that they do not use DPI for marketing purposes and would not do so 
without first seeking their customers’ affirmative express consent.
264
周ey cautioned against singling out 
DPI as a practice that presents unique privacy concerns, arguing that doing so would unfairly favor certain 
technologies or business models at the expense of others.  One commenter also stated that the framework 
should not favor companies that use other means of tracking consumers.
265
周is commenter noted that 
various technologies – including cookies – allow companies to collect and use information in amounts 
similar to that made possible through DPI, and the framework’s principles should apply consistently based 
259 A system practical for both businesses and consumers would include, for users who choose to enable Do Not Track, 
significant controls on the collection and use of tracking data by third parties, with limited exceptions such as security and 
frequency capping.  As noted above, first-party sharing with third parties is not consistent with the context of the interaction 
and would be subject to choice.  Do Not Track is one way for users to express this choice.  
260 Comment of Computer and Communications Industry Ass’n, cmt. #00233, at 15; Comment of Center for Democracy & 
Technology, cmt. #00469, at 14-15.
261 See Comment of Center for Democracy & Technology, cmt. #00469, at 14; Comment of Phorm Inc., cmt. #00353, at 5; see also 
Comment of Computer and Communications Industry Ass’n, cmt. #00233, at 15 (urging that heightened requirements for 
consumer choice apply for the use of DPI); Comment of Online Trust Alliance, cmt. #00299, at 6 (“周e use of DPI and related 
technologies may also be permissible when consumers have the ability to opt-in and receive appropriate and proportional 
quantifiable benefits in return.”) 
262 Comment of Center for Digital Democracy and U.S. PIRG, cmt. #00338, at 37. 
263 Comment of Computer and Communications Industry Ass’n, cmt. #00233, at 15. 
264 Comment of AT&T Inc., cmt. #00420, at 21; see also Comment of Verizon, cmt. #00428, at 7 n.6.  Likewise, a trade association 
of telecommunications companies represented that ISPs have not been extensively involved in online behavioral advertising.  
See Comment of National Cable & Telecommunications Ass’n, cmt. #00432, at 33.  
265 See Comment of Verizon, cmt. #00428, at 7.
How to add text to a pdf in acrobat - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add a text box in a pdf file; adding text to a pdf in preview
How to add text to a pdf in acrobat - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text to pdf document in preview; add text to a pdf document
56
on the type of information collected and how it is used.
266
Rather than isolating a specific technology, 
commenters urged the Commission to focus on the type of data collected and how it is used.
267
ISPs serve as a major gateway to the Internet with access to vast amounts of unencrypted data that their 
customers send or receive over the ISP’s network.  ISPs are thus in a position to develop highly detailed and 
comprehensive profiles of their customers – and to do so in a manner that may be completely invisible.  
In addition, it may be difficult for some consumers to obtain alternative sources of broadband Internet 
access, and they may be inhibited from switching broadband providers for reasons such as inconvenience or 
expense.  Accordingly, the Commission has strong concerns about the use of DPI for purposes inconsistent 
with an ISP’s interaction with a consumer, without express affirmative consent or more robust protection.
268
At the same time, the Commission agrees that any privacy framework should be technology neutral.  
ISPs are just one type of large platform provider that may have access to all or nearly all of a consumer’s 
online activity.  Like ISPs, operating systems and browsers may be in a position to track all, or virtually all, of 
a consumer’s online activity to create highly detailed profiles.
269
Consumers, moreover, might have limited 
ability to block or control such tracking except by changing their operating system or browser.
270
周us, 
comprehensive tracking by any such large platform provider may raise serious privacy concerns. 
周e Commission also recognizes that the use of cookies and social widgets to track consumers across 
unrelated websites may create similar privacy issues.
271
However, while companies such as Google and 
Facebook are expanding their reach rapidly, they currently are not so widespread that they could track a 
consumer’s every movement across the Internet.
272
Accordingly, although tracking by these entities warrants 
consumer choice, the Commission does not believe that such tracking currently raises the same level of 
privacy concerns as those entities that can comprehensively track all or virtually of a consumer’s online 
activity.
周ese are complex and rapidly evolving areas, and more work should be done to learn about the practices 
of all large platform providers, their technical capabilities with respect to consumer data, and their current 
and expected uses of such data.  Accordingly, Commission staff will host a workshop in the second half 
266 Id. at 7-8.
267 See, e.g., Comment of Internet Commerce Coalition, cmt. #00447, at 10; Comment of KINDSIGHT, cmt. #00344, at 7-8 ; 
Comment of National Cable & Telecommunications Ass’n, cmt. #00432, at 36; Comment of Verizon, cmt. #00428, at 7-8.
268 周is discussion does not apply to ISPs’ use of DPI for network management, security, or other purposes consistent with the 
context of a consumer’s interaction with their ISP. 
269 周is discussion is not meant to imply that ISPs, operating systems, or browsers are currently building these profiles for 
marketing purposes.
270 ISPs, operating systems, and browsers have different access to users’ online activity.  A residential ISP can access unencrypted 
traffic from all devices currently located in the home.  An operating system or browser, on the other hand, can access all traffic 
regardless of location and encryption, but only from devices on which the operating system or browser is installed.  Desktop 
users have the ability to change browsers to avoid monitoring, but mobile users have fewer browser options. 
271  A social widget is a button, box, or other possibly interactive display associated with a social network that is embedded into 
another party’s website.
272 BrightEdge, Social Share Report: Social Adoption Among Top Websites, 3-4 (July 2011), available at http://www.brightedge.
com/resfiles/brightedge-report-socialshare-2011-07.pdf (reporting that by mid-2011, the Facebook Like button appeared on 
almost 11% of top websites’ front pages and Google’s +1 button appeared on 4.5% of top websites’ front pages); see also Justin 
Osofsky, After f8: Personalized Social Plugins Now on 100,000+ Sites, Facebook Developer Blog (May 11, 2010, 9:15 AM), 
http://developers.facebook.com/blog/post/382/.
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Add, insert PDF native annotations to PDF file. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print
how to insert text into a pdf; add text to pdf in acrobat
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Allow users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file. can manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
how to add text to a pdf document using reader; how to add text box to pdf
57
of 2012 to explore the privacy issues raised by the collection and use of consumer information by a broad 
range of large platform providers such as ISPs, operating systems, browsers, search engines, and social media 
platforms as well as how competition issues may bear on appropriate privacy protection.
273
e‮  Practices Requiring Affirmative Express Consent‮
Numerous commenters focused on whether certain data collection and use practices warrant a 
heightened level of consent – i.e., affirmative express consent.
274
周ese practices include (1) making material 
retroactive changes to a company’s privacy representations; and (2) collection of sensitive data.  周ese 
comments and the Commission’s analysis are discussed here.
(i)  Companies Should Obtain Affirmative Express Consent Before Making Material Retroactive 
Changes To Privacy Representations.
周e preliminary staff report reaffirmed the Commission’s bedrock principle that companies should 
provide prominent disclosures and obtain affirmative express consent before using data in a manner 
materially different than claimed at the time of collection.
275
Although many commenters supported the affirmative express consent standard for material retroactive 
changes,
276
some companies called for an opt-out approach for material retroactive changes, particularly 
for changes that provide benefits to consumers.
277
One example cited was the development of Netflix’s 
personalized video recommendation feature using information that Netflix originally collected in order 
to send consumers the videos they requested.
278
Other companies sought to scale the affirmative consent 
requirement according to the sensitivity of the data and whether the data is personally identifiable.
279
Many commenters sought clarification on when a change is material – for example, whether a change in 
data retention periods would be a material change requiring heightened consent.
280
One company posited 
273  See Comment of Center for Digital Democracy and U.S. PIRG, cmt. #00338, at 37 (recommending FTC hold a workshop to 
address DPI).
274 Companies may seek “affirmative express consent” from consumers by presenting them with a clear and prominent disclosure, 
followed by the ability to opt in to the practice being described.  周us, for example, requiring the consumer to scroll through 
a ten-page disclosure and click on an “I accept” button would not constitute affirmative express consent.
275 In the preliminary report, this principle appeared under the heading of “transparency.”  See, e.g., In the Matter of Gateway 
Learning Corp., FTC Docket No. C-4120 (Sept. 10, 2004) (consent order) (alleging that Gateway violated the FTC Act 
by applying material changes to a privacy policy retroactively), available at http://www.ftc.gov/os/caselist/0423047/040917
do0423047.pdf; see also FTC, Self-Regulatory Principles for Online Behavioral Advertising (Feb. 2009), available at http://www.
ftc.gov/os/2009/02/P085400behavadreport.pdf (noting the requirement that companies obtain affirmative express consent 
before making material retroactive changes to their privacy policies).  
276 See Comment of Consumers Union, cmt. #00362, at 17; Comment of Future of Privacy Forum, cmt. #00341, at 5; Comment of 
Privacy Rights Clearinghouse, cmt. #00351, at 21.
277 See Comment of Facebook, Inc., cmt. #00413, at 11; see also Comment of Retail Industry Leaders Ass’n, cmt. #00352, at 12; 
Comment of AT&T Inc., cmt. #00420, at 29-30; Comment of National Cable & Telecommunications Ass’n, cmt. #00432, at 30-
31.
278 Comment of Facebook, Inc., cmt. #00413, at 8.
279 See Comment of AT&T Inc., cmt. #00420, at 30; Comment of Phorm Inc., cmt. #00353, at 1.
280 See Comment of Future of Privacy Forum, cmt. #00341, at 4; Comment of Retail Industry Leaders Ass’n, cmt. #00352, at 12; 
Comment of Microsoft Corp., cmt. #00395, at 17.
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
Using this VB.NET Imaging PDF Watermark Add-on, you simply create a watermark that consists of text or image And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no
add text to pdf without acrobat; how to insert text in pdf file
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
adding text to pdf online; how to add text boxes to pdf
58
that the affirmative express consent standard would encourage vague disclosures at the outset to avoid the 
requirement for obtaining such consent.
281
周e Commission reaffirms its commitment to requiring companies to give prominent disclosures and 
to obtain express affirmative consent for material retroactive changes.  Indeed, the Commission recently 
confirmed this approach in its settlements with Google and Facebook.  周e settlement agreements mandate 
that the companies give their users clear and prominent notice and obtain affirmative express consent prior 
to making certain material retroactive changes to their privacy practices.
282
In response to the request for clarification on what constitutes a material change, the Commission 
notes that, at a minimum, sharing consumer information with third parties after committing at the time of 
collection not to share the data would constitute a material change.  周ere may be other circumstances in 
which a change would be material, which would have to be determined on a case-by-case basis, analyzing the 
context of the consumer’s interaction with the business.  
周e Commission further notes that commenters’ concerns that the affirmative express consent 
requirement would encourage vague disclosures at the outset should be addressed by other elements of the 
framework.  For example, other elements of the framework call on companies to improve and standardize 
their privacy statements so that consumers can easily glean and compare information about various 
companies’ data practices.  周e framework also calls on companies to give consumers specific information 
and choice at a time and in a context that is meaningful to consumers.  周ese elements, taken together, are 
intended to result in disclosures that are specific enough to be meaningful to consumers.
周e preliminary staff report posed a question about the appropriate level of consent for prospective 
changes to companies’ data collection and use.  One commenter cited the rollout of Twitter’s new user 
interface – “new Twitter” – as a positive example of a set of prospective changes about which consumers 
received ample and adequate notice and ability to exercise choice.
283
When “new Twitter” was introduced, 
consumers were given the opportunity to switch to or try out the new interface, or to keep their traditional 
Twitter profile.  周e Commission supports innovative efforts such as these to provide consumers with 
meaningful choices when a company proposes to change its privacy practices on a prospective basis. 
(ii) Companies Should Obtain Consumers’ Affirmative Express Consent Before Collecting 
Sensitive Data.
A variety of commenters discussed how to delineate which types of data should be considered 
sensitive.  周ese comments reflect a general consensus that information about children, financial and 
health information, Social Security numbers, and precise, individualized geolocation data is sensitive and 
281 Comment of Facebook, Inc., cmt. #00413, at 10.
282 See In the Matter of Google Inc., FTC Docket No. C-4336 (Oct. 13, 2011) (consent order), available at http://www.ftc.gov/
os/caselist/1023136/111024googlebuzzdo.pdf; In the Matter of Facebook, Inc., FTC File No. 092-3184 (Nov. 29, 2011) 
(proposed consent order), available at http://www.ftc.gov/os/caselist/0923184/111129facebookagree.pdf.
283 Comment of Electronic Frontier Foundation, cmt. #00400, at 15.
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
add text boxes to a pdf; how to insert text in pdf reader
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
how to add text field to pdf; add text pdf
59
merits heightened consent methods.
284
In addition, some commenters suggested that information related 
to race, religious beliefs, ethnicity, or sexual orientation, as well as biometric and genetic data, constitute 
sensitive data.
285
One commenter also characterized as sensitive information about consumers’ online 
communications or reading and viewing habits.
286
Other commenters, however, noted the inherent 
subjectivity of the question and one raised concerns about the effects on market research if the definition of 
sensitive data is construed too broadly.
287
Several commenters focused on the collection and use of information from teens, an audience that may 
be particularly vulnerable.  A diverse coalition of consumer advocates and others supported heightened 
protections for teens between the ages of 13 and 17.
288
周ese commenters noted that while teens are heavy 
Internet users, they often fail to comprehend the long-term consequences of sharing their personal data.  In 
order to better protect this audience, the commenters suggested, for example, limiting the amount of data 
that websites aimed at teens can collect or restricting the ability of teens to share their data widely through 
social media services.  
Conversely, a number of industry representatives and privacy advocates objected to the establishment 
of different rules for teens.
289
周ese commenters cited the practical difficulties of age verification and the 
potential that content providers will simply elect to bar teen audiences.
290
Rather than requiring different 
choice mechanisms for this group, one company encouraged the FTC to explore educational efforts to 
address issues that are unique to teens.
291
Given the general consensus regarding information about children, financial and health information, 
Social Security numbers, and precise geolocation data, the Commission agrees that these categories of 
information are sensitive.  Accordingly, before collecting such data, companies should first obtain affirmative 
express consent from consumers.  As explained above, the Commission also believes that companies should 
284 See, e.g., Comment of Consumer Federation of America, cmt. #00358, at 9; Comment of CNIL, cmt. #00298, at 4; Comment 
of Massachusetts Office of the Attorney General, cmt. #00429, at 3; Comment of Kindsight, cmt. #00344, at 11; Comment 
of Experian, cmt. #00398, at 9; Comment of Center for Democracy & Technology, cmt. #00469, at 14; Comment of Office 
of the Information and Privacy Commissioner of Ontario, cmt. #00239, at 2; see also Comment of TRUSTe, cmt. #00450, at 
11 (agreeing that sensitive information should be defined to include information about children, financial and medical 
information, and precise geolocation information but urging that sensitive information be more broadly defined as 
“information whose unauthorized disclosure or use can cause financial, physical, or reputational harm”); Comment of 
Facebook, Inc., cmt. #00413, at 23 (agreeing that sensitive information may warrant enhanced consent, but noting that 
enhanced consent may not be possible for activities such as the posting of status updates by users where those updates may 
include sensitive information such as references to an illness or medical condition).
285 See Comment of Consumer Federation of America, cmt. #00358, at 9; see also Comment of CNIL, cmt. #00298, at 4, Comment 
of Center for Digital Democracy and U.S. PIRG, cmt. #00338, at 35.
286 See Comment of Electronic Frontier Foundation, cmt. #00400, at 7.
287 See Comment of Marketing Research Ass’n, cmt. #00405, at 6-7; Comment of American Trucking Ass’ns, cmt. #00368, at 2-3; 
Comment of Microsoft Corp., cmt. #00395, at 10.
288 See Comment of Institute for Public Representation, cmt. #00346, at 4; Comment of Consumers Union, cmt. #00362, at 13.
289 See Comment of Center for Democracy & Technology, cmt. #00469, at 15; Comment of CTIA – 周e Wireless Ass’n, cmt. #00375, 
at 12-13; Comment of Microsoft Corp., cmt. #00395, at 10; see also Comment of Electronic Frontier Foundation, cmt. #00400, 
at 14 (opposing the creation of special rules giving parents access to data collected about their teenaged children); Comment 
of PrivacyActivism, cmt. #00407, at 4 (opposing the creation of special rules giving parents access to data collected about their 
teenaged children).
290 See Comment of Center for Democracy & Technology, cmt. #00469, at 15; Comment of CTIA – 周e Wireless Ass’n, cmt. #00375, 
at 12-13; Comment of Microsoft Corp., cmt. #00395, at 10.
291 See Comment of Microsoft Corp., cmt. #00395, at 10.
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS hand, free hand line, rectangle, text, hotspot, hotspot Users need to add following implementations to
how to add text to a pdf document using acrobat; adding text fields to a pdf
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
Also designed to be used add-on for .NET Image SDK, RasterEdge Bitmap Powerful image converter for Bitmap and PDF files; No need for Adobe Acrobat Reader &
add text pdf file acrobat; add text to pdf file online
60
follow this practice irrespective of whether they use the sensitive data for first-party marketing or share it 
with third parties.
292
周e Commission is cognizant, however, that whether a particular piece of data is sensitive may lie in the 
“eye of the beholder” and may depend upon a number of subjective considerations.  In order to minimize 
the potential of collecting any data – whether generally recognized as sensitive or not – in ways that 
consumers do not want, companies should implement all of the framework’s components.  In particular, a 
consumer’s ability to access – and in appropriate cases to correct or delete – data will allow the consumer to 
protect herself when she believes the data is sensitive but others may disagree.
With respect to whether information about teens is sensitive, despite the difficulties of age verification 
and other concerns cited in the comments, the Commission agrees that companies that target teens should 
consider additional protections.  Although affirmative express consent may not be necessary in every 
advertising campaign directed to teens, other protections may be appropriate.  For example, all companies 
should consider shorter retention periods for teens’ data. 
In addition, the Commission believes that social networking sites should consider implementing more 
privacy-protective default settings for teens.  While some teens may circumvent these protections, they can 
function as an effective “speed bump” for this audience and, at the same time, provide an opportunity to 
better educate teens about the consequences of sharing their personal information.  周e Commission also 
supports access and deletion rights for teens, as discussed below.
293
Final Principle:  For practices requiring choice, companies should offer the choice at a time and in a 
context in which the consumer is making a decision about his or her data.  Companies should obtain 
affirmative express consent before (1) using consumer data in a materially different manner than 
claimed when the data was collected; or (2) collecting sensitive data for certain purposes.
D. TRANSPARENCY
Baseline Principle:  Companies should increase the transparency of their data practices.
Citing consumers’ lack of awareness of how, and for what purposes, companies collect, use, and share 
data, the preliminary staff report called on companies to improve the transparency of their data practices.  
Commission staff outlined a number of measures to achieve this goal.  One key proposal, discussed in the 
previous section, is to present choices to consumers in a prominent, relevant, and easily accessible place at a 
time and in a context when it matters to them.  In addition, Commission staff called on industry to make 
privacy statements clearer, shorter, and more standardized; give consumers reasonable access to their data; 
and undertake consumer education efforts to improve consumers’ understanding of how companies collect, 
use, and share their data.  
292 See infra at Section IV.C.1.b.(v).
293 See infra at Section IV.D.2.b. 
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
It can be used standalone. JPEG to PDF Converter is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for conversion.
add text to pdf online; how to insert text box on pdf
PDF to WORD Converter | Convert PDF to Word, Convert Word to PDF
PDF to Word Converter has accurate output, and PDF to Word Converter doesn't need the support of Adobe Acrobat & Microsoft Word.
add text field to pdf; adding text to a pdf in acrobat
61
Commenters offered proposals for how to achieve greater transparency and sought clarification on how 
they should implement these elements of the framework.  Although the Commission adopts the proposed 
framework’s transparency principle without change, it clarifies the application of the framework in response 
to these comments, as discussed below.
1.  PRIVACY NOTICES
Proposed Principle:  Privacy notices should be clearer, shorter, and more standardized to enable 
better comprehension and comparison of privacy practices.
周e preliminary staff report highlighted the consensus among roundtable participants that most privacy 
policies are generally ineffective for informing consumers about a company’s data practices because they 
are too long, are difficult to comprehend, and lack uniformity.
294
While acknowledging privacy policies’ 
current deficiencies, many roundtable participants agreed that the policies still have value – they provide 
an important accountability function by educating consumer advocates, regulators, the media, and other 
interested parties about the companies’ data practices.
295
Accordingly, Commission staff called on companies 
to provide clear and concise descriptions of their data collection and use practices.  Staff further called on 
companies to standardize the format and the terminology used in privacy statements so that consumers can 
compare the data practices of different companies and exercise choices based on privacy concerns, thereby 
encouraging companies to compete on privacy.
Despite the consensus from the roundtables that privacy statements are not effective at communicating 
a company’s data collection and use practices to consumers, one commenter disagreed that privacy notices 
need to be improved.
296
Another commenter pointed out that providing more granular information about 
data collection and use practices could actually increase consumer confusion by overloading the consumer 
with information.
297
Other industry commenters highlighted the work they have undertaken since the 
preliminary staff report to improve their own privacy statements.
298
Many consumer groups supported staff’s call to standardize the format and terminology used in privacy 
statements so that consumers could more easily compare the practices of different companies.
299
Some 
commenters suggested a “nutrition label” approach for standardizing the format of privacy policies and cited 
294 Recent research and surveys suggests that many consumers (particularly among lower income brackets and education levels) 
do not read or understand privacy policies, thus further heightening the need to make them more comprehensible.  Notably, 
in a survey conducted by Zogby International, 93% of adults – and 81% of teens – indicated they would take more time to 
read terms and conditions for websites if they were shorter and written in clearer language.  See Comment of Common Sense 
Media, cmt. #00457, at 1.
295 See Comment of AT&T , Inc., cmt. #00420, at 17; Comment of Center for Democracy & Technology, cmt. #00469, at 24.
296 See Comment of National Cable & Telecommunications Ass’n, cmt. #00432, at 22.
297 See Comment of United States Council for International Business, cmt. #00366, at 3.
298 See Comment of Google Inc., cmt. #00417, at 1; Comment of Facebook, Inc., cmt. #00413, at 9; Comment of AT&T Inc., cmt. 
#00420, at 24.
299 See Comment of Privacy Rights Clearinghouse, cmt. #00351, at 15-16; Comment of Consumer Federation of America, cmt. 
#00358, at 16; Comment of Consumer Watchdog, cmt. #00402, at 2.
62
research underway in this area.
300
Another suggested the “form builder” approach used for GLBA Short 
Notices to standardize the format of privacy notices outside the financial context.
301
One consumer group 
called for standardization of specific terms like “affiliate” and “anonymize” so that companies’ descriptions of 
their data practices are more meaningful.
302
A wide range of commenters suggested that different industry 
sectors come together to develop standard privacy notices.
303
Other commenters opposed the idea of 
mandated standardized notices, arguing that the Commission should require only that privacy statements 
be clear and in plain language.  周ese commenters stated that privacy statements need to take into account 
differences among business models and industry sectors.
304
Privacy statements should account for variations in business models across different industry sectors, 
and prescribing a rigid format for use across all sectors is not appropriate.  Nevertheless, the Commission 
believes that privacy statements should contain some standardized elements, such as format and terminology, 
to allow consumers to compare the privacy practices of different companies and to encourage companies 
to compete on privacy.  Accordingly, Commission calls on industry sectors to come together to develop 
standard formats and terminology for privacy statements applicable to their particular industries.  周e 
Department of Commerce will convene multi-stakeholder groups to work on privacy issues; this could be a 
useful venue in which industry sectors could begin the exercise of developing more standardized, streamlined 
privacy policies. 
Machine-readable policies,
305
icons, and other alternative forms of providing notice also show promise as 
tools to give consumers the ability to compare privacy practices among different companies.
306
In response 
to the preliminary staff report’s question on machine-readable policies, commenters agreed that such 
policies could improve transparency.
307
One commenter proposed combining the use of machine-readable 
policies with icons and standardized policy statements (e.g., “we collect but do not share consumer data 
300 See Comment of Consumer Watchdog, cmt. #00402, at 2; Comment of Consumer Federation of America, cmt. #00358, at 16; 
see also Comment of Lorrie Faith Cranor, cmt. #00453, at 2 n.7 (discussing P3P authorizing tools that enable automatic 
generation of “nutrition label” privacy notices). 
301 See Comment of Privacy Rights Clearinghouse, cmt. #00351, at 16.
302 See Comment of Electronic Frontier Foundation, cmt. #00400, at 6.
303 See Comment of General Electric, cmt. #00392, at 2; Comment of the Information Commissioner’s Office of the UK, cmt. #00249, 
at 4; Comment of Consumers Union, cmt. #00362, at 15-16; Comment of Facebook, Inc., cmt. #00413, at 9.
304 See Comment of AT&T Inc., cmt. #00420, at 25; Comment of eBay, cmt. #00374, at 10; Comment of National Cable & 
Telecommunications Ass’n, cmt. #00432, at 29; Comment of Retail Industry Leaders Ass’n, cmt. #00352, at 12; Comment of 
Microsoft Corp., cmt. #00395, at 15.
305 A machine-readable privacy policy is a statement about a website’s privacy practices – such as the collection and use of data 
– written in a standard computer language (not English text) that software tools such as consumer’s web browser can read 
automatically.  For example, when the browser reads a machine-readable policy, the browser can compare the policy to the 
consumer’s browser privacy preferences, and can inform the consumer when these preferences do not match the practices of 
the website he is visiting.  If the consumer decides he does not want to visit websites that sell information to third parties, 
he might set up a rule that recognizes that policy and blocks such sites or display a warning upon visiting such a site.  
Machine-readable language will be the subject of an upcoming summit.  See White House, National Archives & Records 
Administration, Informing Consumers 周rough Smart Disclosures (Mar. 1, 2012), available at http://www.nist.gov/ineap/
upload/Summit_Invitation_to_Agencies_FINAL.pdf (describing upcoming summit).
306 Likewise, new tools like privacyscore.com may help consumers more readily compare websites’ data practices.  See Tanzina 
Vega, A New Tool in Protecting Online Privacy, N.Y. Times, Feb. 12, 2012, available at http://mediadecoder.blogs.nytimes.
com/2012/02/12/a-new-tool-in-protecting-online-privacy/?scp=2&sq=privacy&st=cse.
307 Comment of Phorm Inc., cmt. #00353, at 9; Comment of Lorrie Faith Cranor, cmt. #00453, at 6.
63
with third parties”) to simplify privacy decision-making for consumers.
308
Other commenters described 
how icons work or might work in different business contexts.  One browser company described efforts 
underway to develop icons that might be used to convey information, such as whether a consumer’s data is 
sold or may be subject to secondary uses, in a variety of business contexts.
309
Representatives from online 
behavioral advertising industry groups also described their steps in developing and implementing an icon to 
communicate that online behavioral advertising may be taking place.
310
Commenters also discussed the particular challenges associated with providing notice in the mobile 
context, noting the value of icons, summaries, FAQs, and videos.
311
Indeed, some work already has been 
done in this area to increase the transparency of data practices.  For example, the advocacy organization 
Common Sense Media reviews and rates mobile apps based on a variety of factors including privacy
312
and a platform provider uses an icon to signal to consumers when a mobile application is using 
location information.
313
In addition, CTIA – a wireless industry trade group – in conjunction with the 
Entertainment Software Rating Board, recently announced plans to release a new rating system for mobile 
apps.
314
周is rating system, which is based on the video game industry’s model, will use icons to indicate 
whether specific apps are appropriate for “all ages,” “teen,” or only “adult” audiences.  周e icons will also 
detail whether the app shares consumers’ personal information.  Noting the complexity of the mobile 
ecosystem, which includes device manufacturers, operating system providers, mobile application developers, 
and wireless carriers, some commenters called for public workshops to bring together different stakeholders 
to develop a uniform approach to icons and other methods of providing notice.
315
Also, as noted above, the 
Mobile Marketing Association has released its Mobile Application Privacy Policy.
316
周e Commission appreciates the complexities of the mobile environment, given the multitude of 
different entities that want to collect and use consumer data and the small space available for disclosures 
308 Comment of Lorrie Faith Cranor, cmt. #00453, at 6 (explaining how icons combined with standard policies might work: “For 
example, a type I policy might commit to not collecting sensitive categories of information and not sharing personal data 
except with a company’s agents, while a type II policy might allow collection of sensitive information but still commit to 
not sharing them, a type III policy might share non-identified information for behavioral advertising, and so on. Companies 
would choose which policy type to commit to. 周ey could advertise their policy type with an associated standard icon, while 
also providing a more detailed policy. Users would be able to quickly determine the policy for the companies they interact 
with.”).
309 Comment of Mozilla, cmt. #00480, at 12.
310 Comment of American Ass’n of Advertising Agencies, American Advertising Federation, Ass’n of National Advertisers, Direct 
Marketing Ass’n, Inc., and Interactive Advertising Bureau, cmt. #00410 at 2-3; Comment of Digital Marketing Alliance, cmt. 
#00449, at 18-24; Comment of Evidon, cmt. #00391, at 3-6; Comment of Internet Advertising Bureau, cmt. #00388, at 4.
311 Comment of General Electric, cmt. #00392, at 1-2; Comment of CTIA - 周e Wireless Ass’n, cmt. #00375, at 2-3; Comment of 
Mozilla, cmt. #00480, at 12.
312 See Common Sense Media, App Reviews, http://www.commonsensemedia.org/app-reviews.
313 See Letter from Bruce Sewell, General Counsel & Senior Vice President of Legal and Governmental Affairs, Apple, to Hon. 
Edward J. Markey, U.S. House of Representatives (May 6, 2011), available at http://robert.accettura.com/wp-content/
uploads/2011/05/apple_letter_to_ejm_05.06.11.pdf.
314 See Press Release, CTIA – 周e Wireless Ass’n, CTIA – 周e Wireless Ass’n to Announce Mobile Application Rating System 
with ESRB (Nov. 21, 2011), available at http://www.ctia.org/media/press/body.cfm/prid/2145.
315 Comment of Consumer Federation of America, cmt. #00358, at 16; Comment of GSMA, cmt. #00336, at 10.
316 Although this effort is promising, more work remains.  周e Mobile Marketing Association’s guidelines are not mandatory and 
there is little recourse against companies who elect not to follow them.  More generally, there are too few players in the mobile 
ecosystem who are committed to self-regulatory principles and providing meaningful disclosures and choices. 
64
on mobile screens.  周ese factors increase the urgency for the companies providing mobile services to 
come together and develop standard notices, icons, and other means that the range of businesses can use to 
communicate with consumers in a consistent and clear way.  
To address this issue, the Commission notes that it is currently engaged in a project to update its existing 
business guidance about online advertising disclosures.
317
In conjunction with this project, Commission staff 
will host a workshop later this year.
318
One of the topics to be addressed is mobile privacy disclosures:  How 
can these disclosures be short, effective, and accessible to consumers on small screens?  周e Commission 
hopes that the discussions at the workshop will spur further industry self-regulation in this area. 
Final Principle:  Privacy notices should be clearer, shorter, and more standardized to enable better 
comprehension and comparison of privacy practices.  
2.  ACCESS
Proposed Principle:  Companies should provide reasonable access to the consumer data they 
maintain; the extent of access should be proportionate to the sensitivity of the data and the nature of 
its use.
周ere was broad agreement among a range of commenters that consumers should have some form of 
access to their data.  Many of these commenters called for flexibility, however, and requested that access 
rights be tiered according to the sensitivity and intended use of the data at issue.
319
One commenter argued 
that access rights should be limited to sensitive data, such as financial account information, because a 
broader access right would be too costly for offline retailers.
320
Some companies and industry representatives 
supported providing consumers full access to data that is used to deny benefits; several commenters affirmed 
the significance of the FCRA in providing access to information used for critical decisionmaking.  For other 
less sensitive data, such as marketing data, they supported giving consumers a general notice describing the 
types of data they collect and the ability to suppress use of the data for future marketing.
321
One commenter raised concerns about granting access and correction rights to data files used to prevent 
fraudulent activity, noting that such rights would create risks of fraud and identity theft.  周is commenter 
also stated that companies would need to add sensitive identifying information to their marketing databases 
in order to authenticate a consumer’s request for information, and that the integration of multiple databases 
would raise additional privacy and security risks.
322
317 See Press Release, FTC, FTC Seeks Input to Revising its Guidance to Business About Disclosures in Online Advertising (May 
26, 2011), available at http://www.ftc.gov/opa/2011/05/dotcom.shtm.
318 See Press Release, FTC, FTC Will Host Public Workshop to Explore Advertising Disclosures in Online and Mobile Media on 
May 30, 2012 (Feb. 29, 2012), available at http://www.ftc.gov/opa/2012/02/dotcom.shtm.
319 Comment of Intuit, Inc., cmt. #00348, at 12; Comment of eBay, cmt. #00374, at 10; Comment of IBM, cmt. #00433, at 3; 
Comment of Consumers Union, cmt. #00362, at 16.
320 Comment of Meijer, cmt. #00416, at 7.
321 Comment of Intel Corp., cmt. #00246, at 8; Comment of 周e Centre for Information Policy Leadership at Hunton & Williams 
LLP, cmt. #00360, at 8; Comment of Experian, cmt. #00398, at 11. 
322 Comment of Experian, cmt. #00398, at 10-11.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested