open pdf file in asp net c# : How to enter text in pdf file application SDK tool html wpf web page online 125703771-part422

Acknowledgement 
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 
Prof. H. van den Bergh made possible this work by accepting me in the LPAS 
laboratory  advising  me  to  reorient  my  career  from  fundamental  physics  to 
environmental research including geophysical experiments related to air quality 
or climate change and mainly using lidar-based applications. I strongly thank 
him for the confidence and the opportunity he  offered me to work on such 
original, unique, actual and worth research as the Jungfraujoch EPFL-LIDAR 
project. 
I thank the examiners Prof. M. Parlange, Prof. C. Comninellis, Prof. B. Calpini 
and Dr. V. Simeonov for accepting to be in my thesis jury. 
The work here presented, and in a general manner the results obtained during 
my LPAS lifetime (May 1998 - March 2004) were not possible without a strong 
collaboration,  mutual  help,  critical  discussions,  scientific  confrontations, 
participation  to  many  international  measurement  field  campaigns  and  data 
interpretation within the LIDAR team formed by colleagues of quite different 
personalities, cultures and nationalities (many of them remaining friends for 
life):  Bertrand, Valentin,  Rodrigo, Gilles,  Remo, Philippe,  Francois,  Benoit, 
Pablo, Marian and many other shorter lifetime passengers in the LIDAR team 
e.g. Adriana, Mathieu, Fernando, Manuel, Alfonso, Robert, Todor, Minko, Luca, 
Jerôme, David, etc . I’ll add here Veronique, Carine and Flavio who were also 
within LIDAR spirit helping us a lot.  
I thank them all for all. 
Any emphasis doesn’t make sense as I always considered all in a team spirit. 
Besides my colleagues from atmospheric measurements group I want to thank 
also the modeling team: Erika, Olivier, Frank, Alain, Martin, Yves-Alain, Clive, 
Sylvain,  Jerôme,  Alberto,  and  many  others  for  the  fruitful  collaboration  in 
putting  together  measurement  and  model  outputs  for  answering  complex 
regional questions in air  quality studies.   I am also generally grateful to all 
LPAS members with whom I had useful and positive collaborations. 
 especially  acknowledge  the  Jungfraujoch  foundation  members  (Prof. 
Fluckiger, Mrs Louise Wilson, Mr and Ms: Jenni, Staub and Ficher. I’ll never 
forget the common time spent at the JFJ station and interesting discussions with 
various member of JFJ research teams (e.g. particularly Prof Delbouille, Dr. 
Roland, Dr. Cervais, P. Demoulin, Pierre Duchatelet, and many other scientists 
who I had the opportunity to meet or even to cohabite at the JFJ station).  
For the external collaboration I want to mention the PSI institute team (Dr. 
Ernest Weingartner and Dr. U. Baltensperger), the IAP team (e.g. Dr. Daniel 
Gerber and Dr. June Morland,), EMPA (Daniel Schaub), Swissmeteo (Mr P. 
Jeannet, M. G. Levrat, Dr. M. Collaud, Dr. S. Nyeki and Dr. L. Vuillemeyer), 
Neuchatel Observatory (Dr. R. Matthey and Dr. V. Mitev), Rusian Academy –
How to enter text in pdf file - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text fields to a pdf; how to add text to a pdf file in preview
How to enter text in pdf file - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text to a pdf document acrobat; how to add a text box in a pdf file
Acknowledgement 
Applied Optics Institute from Tomsk (Dr. Y. Arshinov, Dr. S. Brobovnikov and 
Dr. I. Serikov), from Johns Hopkins University (Prof. M. Parlange, Mrs. M. 
Adam and C Higgins), ETH (Dr. Stefan Bojinsky) and many many others.  
Thanks to undergraduate and high school students and visitors at JFJ for their 
patience, understanding and interest on my various presentations. 
I am grateful to the EPFL direction (communication department) for our positive 
collaboration. I remember also well the initial support of A. Jaccard and K. 
Vinckenbosch, from the EPFL social service, which made possible the start of 
my EPFL adventure in 1997. I also thank the support from the EPFL technical 
service mainly via Mlle Mercier. 
Prof  Tarradellas,  Sonja  Desplos  and  their  collaborators  are  thanked for  the 
excellent organization and the quality of the postgraduate cycle in environmental 
sciences, which in fact opened my mind of fundamentally involved physicist to 
what was, is and has to be done in environmental research and its usefulness. 
I am  also thanking  all  my  former students and  many  colleagues spread  all 
worldwide because they achieved to convince me that a scientist has to have a 
Dr.  title.  I  am  grateful  to  all  my  colleagues  from  UAIC  University  and 
particularly to those from the Optics and Spectroscopy Department from the 
time when I was there.  
For the improvement of the written English of this manuscript I am pleased to 
thank the great help given by Marry Parlange and Daniela Balin-Talamba. 
Finally  I  thank  all  members  of  my  family  from  Maramures  (North  of 
Transylvania) and all my friends wherever they are and I hope they keep on 
accepting my way, principles and scale of values during our Earth’s biological 
but rational lifetime. Within my Swiss family I thanks Cosinsky and Moldovan 
families for their moral and personal support as well as the Parintele Diaconu. 
This work was financially supported within EARLINET (European Aerosols 
Research  Lidar  Network)  project,  the  SNF (Swiss  National  Fundation),  the 
EPFL (Federal Institute of Technology from Lausanne) and it benefits from the 
endorsement of the Jungfraujoch Foundation.   
 am  particularly  grateful  to  my  wife  Daniela,  who  understood,  allowed, 
supported, and helped me in this complex task.  
My gratification will come in fact sincerely from everybody who will take time 
to read this thesis manuscript 
Yours, 
Lausanne-Switzerland, 
April 2004 
PS: I express my humble gratitude to   ???  … we still do not know very well who, how, 
where, when and he is (e.g God)  for the force, the courage and the necessary health to start, 
to continue and to finish this work.  
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on DotNetNuke Site
Select “DNN Platform” in App Frameworks, and enter a Site Name. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF. HTML5Editor.dll. Copy following file and folders to DNN Site project:
how to add text to a pdf file; how to insert a text box in pdf
C#: XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET Online Help Manual
Enter the URL to view the online document. Office 2003 and 2007, PDF, DICOM, Gif, Png, Jpeg, Bmp Click to OCR edited file (one for each) to plain text which can
adding text to pdf; how to add text fields in a pdf
TABLE   OF   CONTENTS 
Chapter I   Introduction 
1. 
Research context   
2. 
Research presentation   
3. 
Summary &References   
11 
Chapter II      LIDAR methodology and the JFJ-LIDAR system 
1. 
Introduction  
1.1  Atmospheric research at the Jungfraujoch station   
15 
1.2  Basics of the LIDAR technique  
18 
2. 
LIDAR related light-atmosphere interaction processes   
2.1  Elastic (Rayleigh) scattering   
23 
2.2  Elastic (Mie) scattering   
25 
2.3  Inelastic (Raman) scattering   
31 
2.4  Inelastic-resonant light absorption   
35 
3. 
Jungfraujoch multi-wavelength lidar system  
3.1  Technical specifications and optical layout   
36 
3.2  Lidar signal examples   
40 
3.3  System inter-comparisons 
43 
3.4  Conclusion & References  
44 
Chapter III      Aerosols-cirrus-contrails optical properties 
1. 
Introduction  
1.1  Aerosols and cirrus clouds: climatic significance   
51 
1.2  Optical properties of aerosols and cirrus clouds   
53 
2. 
LIDAR - based algorithms 
2.1  Mie and Rayleigh: elastic backscattering   
56 
2.2  Raman: inelastic backscattering  
58 
3. 
Results and discussions   
3.1  Molecular upper troposphere   
61 
3.2  Upper troposphere aerosols 
62 
3.3  Cirrus clouds 
68 
3.4  Contrail: case study 
72 
4. 
Conclusion & References  
77 
VB.NET Image: Image Rotator SDK; .NET Document Image Rotation
which allows VB.NET developers to enter the rotating Q 2: As the source image file (which I provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
how to enter text into a pdf; adding text to a pdf file
VB.NET TWAIN: TWAIN Image Scanning in Console Application
WriteLine("---Ending Scan---" & vbLf & " Press Enter To Quit & automatic scanning and stamp string text on captured to scan multiple pages to one PDF or TIFF
add text to pdf without acrobat; how to insert text into a pdf with acrobat
Chapter IV      Water vapor retrieval based on Raman lidar technique 
1. 
Introduction  
1.1  Water vapor significance for Earth’s climate  
85 
1.2  Water vapor measurements 
86 
1.3  Upper troposphere water vapor specificity    
87 
2. 
Method 
2.1  DIAL and RAMAN techniques  
88 
2.2  Water vapor mixing ratio from Raman backscatter  
90 
2.3  Raman lidar setup at Jungfraujoch station   
92 
3. 
Results and discussions   
3.1  Retrieval algorithm 
94 
3.2  Corrections and Errors Discussion   
3.2.1  Photon counting de-saturation   
96 
3.2.2  Aerosol differential extinction   
97 
3.2.3  Molecular differential extinction 
98 
3.2.4  SNR, detection limit, statistical and calibration errors 
99 
3.3  Water vapor example profile by Raman lidar  
99 
3.4  Typical profiles and integrated columns 
100 
3.5  Raman lidar and co-located water vapor measurements          102 
3.6  Raman lidar and regional radiosounding 
104 
4. 
Conclusion & References  
106 
Chapter V       Temperature and other atmospheric retrievals  
based on pure rotational Raman technique 
1. 
Introduction  
113 
2. 
PRRS: implementation and retrieval algorithms   
2.1  Implementation of the DGP on the JFJ-LIDAR   
115 
2.2  Algorithms of the atmospheric retrieval 
2.2.1  Temperature profiling   
118 
2.2.2  Pure rotational Raman signal as molecular reference 
119 
2.2.3  Backscatter - Extinction Coefficients and Lidar Ratio 
120 
Results and Discussions  
3.1.  PRRS as molecular reference                                                     121
3.2  Backscatter-Extinction-Lidar Ratio   
122
3.3  Temperature profiling                                                                   122 
3.4  Aerosols-water vapor-temperature: horizontal sounding            125            
3.5      Aerosols-water-vapor-temperature: vertical sounding            127 
4. 
Conclusion & References  
128 
C# TWAIN - Scan Multi-pages into One PDF Document
true; device.Acquire(); Console.Out.WriteLine("---Ending Scan---\n Press Enter To Quit also illustrates how to scan many pages into a PDF or TIFF file in C#
adding text to pdf in acrobat; add text boxes to pdf
VB.NET TIFF: .NET TIFF Splitting Control to Split & Disassemble
Developers can enter the page range value in this VB Data Imports System.Drawing Imports System.Text Imports System use TIFDecoder open a pdf file Dim baseDocs
adding text fields to pdf; add text to pdf
Chapter VI     Optical properties of Saharan dust  
1. 
Introduction  
132 
2. 
Measurement techniques  
2.1  Multi-wavelength lidar   
136 
2.2  In situ nephelometer and aethalometer  
138 
2.3  Sun photometer   
139 
3. 
Upper troposphere Saharan dust evidence   
3.1  Local meteorological context   
140 
3.2  Saharan dust patterns on the lidar signals   
141 
3.3 In situ Angstrom coefficients and single scattering albedo          142 
3.4  Sun photometer AOD and Angstrom coefficients   
144 
4. 
Backward trajectory analysis   
4.1  Calculation procedure   
145 
4.2  The 2nd August 2001 SDO case 
146 
5. 
Results and Discussions   
5.1  In situ measurements 
149 
5.2  Total to molecular backscatter ratio   
150 
5.3  Depolarization ratio at 532 nm   
152 
5.4  Backscatter - extinction coefficients and lidar ratio  
153 
5.5  Dust AOD: sun photometer and lidar   
154 
5.6  Dust extinction coefficients: in situ and lidar  
156 
5.7  Lidar profile of the Angstrom coefficients   
157 
5.8  Preliminary microphysics calculations  
158 
6. 
Conclusion &References  
Chapter VII 
August 2003 heatwave: related observations 
1. 
Introduction  
165 
2. 
Experimental data  
2.1  Lidar setup   
167 
2.2  Sonic anemometers 
168 
2.3  Complementary measurements  
168 
3. 
Results and Discussions   
3.1  Meteorological context   
170 
3.2  Aerosols tracing of PBL and RL 
172 
3.3  Water vapor tracing of the RL   
174 
3.4  Turbulence patterns on the Aletsch glacier   
175 
3.5  Regional radiosounding data   
177 
3.6 In situ aerosol measurements   
179 
3.7  Aletsch glacier discharge  
180 
4. 
Conclusion & References  
180 
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Planet Barcode Generator for Image, Picture &
REFile.SaveDocumentFile(doc, "c:/planet.pdf", New PDFEncoder()). type barcode.Data = "01234567890" 'enter a 11 Color.Black 'Human-readable text-related settings
add editable text box to pdf; add text box to pdf
Conclusions & Perspectives 
183 
Annexes   
189 
Curriculum Vitae & Publications  
233 
Contents Scheme 
Aerosols 
Cirrus 
Contrails 
JFJ 
LIDAR 
Water 
Vapor 
Temperature 
Saharan 
Dust 
Summer     
Heatwave 
Problematic & Objectives
Conclusions & Perspectives
Introduction 
1
Chapter I 
Introduction   
1. Research context 
The Earth atmosphere
1
is a vital global environmental segment together with the 
water and soil. The air-water-soil natural cycles drive transport and exchanges of 
energy and matter and they define in time and space the life-related processes on 
the Earth. The carbon and hydrologic cycles, for example, are fundamental for 
life on Earth. There is a growing body of evidence showing that the natural 
equilibrium of these dynamic cycles is sensitive to human activities. Human 
activities  have a  negative feedback  that  ultimately  affects  human  life  itself. 
These anthropogenic perturbations are of short duration compared to geological 
time scales and superpose over the long-term natural variability of the natural 
cycles.  
The increase in the magnitude of the anthropogenic perturbations seems to start 
with  the  industrialized  era  (i.e.  1850).  In  fact  the  environmental  entropy 
concerning the natural distribution of substances began to be strongly affected 
by the intensive exploitation of natural resources, by fabrication of new products 
and by their use. Thus the environment is under an anthropogenic pressure with 
involving  subsequent  perturbations  during  four  phases:  (a)  exploitation  of 
natural  resources,  (b)  production  processes,  (c)  products  utilization  and  (d) 
hazardous waste in environment. The general result of this anthropogenic chain 
is  the  space-time  redistribution  (i.e.  decreasing  entropy)  of  the  natural 
concentrations within the air-water-soil system, which ultimately changes the 
corresponding natural cycles. The effects occur on both the short (i.e. acute) and 
long  (i.e.  chronic)  terms.  Obviously  the  short-time  effects  are  immediately 
discovered  and  the  human  community  rapidly  activates  necessary  solutions 
while the long-term effects are more subtle and complex, and solutions more 
difficult to obtain.  
The atmosphere is intimately involved in this general environmental problem in 
all its processes and across all its time-space scales. The short-term (at the local 
scale) concerns the acute problem of air quality, while the long-term (at the 
global scale) concerns  the Earth-Sun radiation  budget perturbation. Between 
these two time-space scales, for the atmosphere in particular, many important 
meteorological  processes  have  to  be  taken  into  account  because  they  drive 
1
Derived from the Greek 
ατµοζ
(for vapor) and 
σϕαιρα
(for sphere), the word atmosphere 
describes the layer, essentially gaseous, that envelopes the Earth (more details in annex A1) 
Introduction 
2
regional air pollution effects and themselves may be subsequently influenced in 
magnitude and frequency by potential climatic scale changes. 
The present regional air pollution problem concerns the emissions of gases (e.g. 
CO,  CO
2
 NO,  NO
2
 SO
2
 VOC,….)  and  particles  (i.e.  aerosols)  and  their 
subsequent transport and photochemical transformations (i.e. O
3
as secondary 
pollutant)).  Industry  is  likely  the  main  culprit  for  volatile  organic  carbons 
(VOC), while automobile traffic is responsible for NOx emissions. In the United 
States, air pollution may be responsible for 50,000 deaths annually, more than 
2% of all deaths and similar health risks have been reported in France, United 
Kingdom and elsewhere [1]. In Western Europe legislation and measures that 
have  been  taken  last  years  have  started  to  show  positive  effects  (e.g.  SO
2
completely  reduced),  but  the  regional  summer  photochemical  smog  of 
tropospheric  ozone  and  other  related  photochemical  products  are  still  a 
challenge.  In  addition,  the  emissions  reductions  based  on  the  use  of  new 
automobile  catalytic  converters  were  counterbalanced  by  an  increase  in  the 
numbers of  cars owned  in Europe. In developing countries in Asia, Eastern 
Europe and Latin America, the primary emission of gases and particles or even 
heavy metals seems to outweigh the secondary photochemical pollution due to 
ozone [1]. Furthermore, regional air pollution has, in addition to its clear direct 
effects  on  human  health,  wide-ranging  indirect  effects  on  humans  through 
vegetation  (e.g  crops,  forests)  and  materials  (e.g.  buildings,  historical 
monuments) via direct oxidation/reduction processes.  
The regional air quality problem is concerning the first atmospheric layer (e.g. < 
3 Km and even higher) strongly influenced thermodynamically by the Earth’s 
surface processes, the planetary boundary layer (i.e. PBL). The magnitude of the 
pollution effects depends on the intensity, type and distribution of the emissions 
sources while the transport and secondary photo-chemical transformations are 
driven  by  the  regional  dynamics  of  the  PBL,  the  local  topography,  the 
meteorological conditions and are influenced by the geographical context  (i.e. 
the larger surrounding continental domain) [2]. For example, during the August 
2003 heat-wave, the air pollution high ozone episode (i.e. O
3
averaged ~ 200 
µg/m
3
in 23 countries in Europe when the present legal threshold for health 
effects is considered 180 µg/m3) reinforced the need for new consideration of 
the  role  that  tropospheric  ozone  plays  in  pollution  particularly  taking  into 
account the potential for repeatability of the event in the near future [3]. In the 
above context there is a crucial need for both air measurements and modeling 
studies  that  would  help  to  set  the  groundwork  for  establishing  abatement 
strategies.  
The first recognized long-term atmospheric problem at the global scale was the 
depletion  of  the  stratospheric  ozone  layer by halogenated anthropogenic 
compounds (CFCs). The ozone “hole” and the concomitant increase of the UV 
radiation on the Earth surface have led to a significant effect both on human 
health  (e.g  skin  cancer,  eyes  diseases)  and  public  awareness  of  large-scale 
Introduction 
3
atmospheric processes. What is not generally known is that scientists had, since 
1974, been warning the world that the ozone layer would deplete rapidly unless 
we  stopped  the  use  of  ozone  depleting  chemicals  [4].  It  took  11  years  of 
assessment,  research,  and  negotiations  to  promote  the  first  general  ozone 
agreement  in  1985.  Finally  in  1985  the  Vienna  convention  established  an 
international legal framework  for  action  and in 1987 the  Montreal  Protocol 
officially required industrialized countries and later developing ones to stop the 
production and use of ozone depleting substances (i.e. CFCs, halons, methyl-
chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, hydro-CFCs). 
The  implementation  of  this  protocol  has  led  to  a  dramatic  drop  in  the 
consumption of ozone depleting  chemicals in the last  ten years.  Due to  the 
relatively long lifetime of these chemicals, the stabilization and then decrease in 
concentration of ozone depleting substances in the stratosphere was observed 
only 15-20 years later. Thus ozone depletion remains a current problem and an 
increase in the ozone layer is expected only around ~2050 [5]. 
A second major global scale and long-term atmospheric related problem is the 
anthropogenic perturbation of the Earth’s natural greenhouse effect due to the 
warming/cooling effect of gases, aerosols and induced clouds in the atmosphere. 
The Earth’s natural greenhouse effect assures an average temperature on the 
Earth of ~ 12-15°C, a range that allows life to develop and flourish. This value 
is the result of the Sun-Earth radiation budget through the Earth’s atmosphere, 
which is playing the role of the “planetary greenhouse roof”.  The  radiation 
transfer within Sun-Earth-Atmosphere system is based on the Stefan-Boltzmann 
law cf. Eq. (1) 
(
)
4
4
-
a
S
T T
e
σ
= ⋅ ⋅
Eq. (1)  
where [Wm
-2
 is  the  mean  energy  in  radiated  by  a  blackbody, e  is  its 
emissivity  (e.g  1  for  ideal  case), 
σ
 5.6703  10
-8
Wm
-2
K
-4
is  the  Stefan-
Boltzmann constant, T  is  the  temperature of  the  radiator  and  the T
a
is  the 
temperature of its surroundings. Calculations based on Eq. (1) show that in the 
case when the Earth was considered as an ideal blackbody without atmosphere, 
the surface mean temperature would be ~278.6K (5.5 
o
C). 
As in reality the Earth reflects ~30 % of the long-wave solar radiation (mean 
albedo
2
ω
o ~ 0.3) only 70 % of the incoming radiation will be absorbed by the 
Earth  and  converted  to  infrared  radiation,  which  corresponds  to  a  surface 
temperature of 254.8 K (-18.3 
o
C). Although the albedo drastically influences 
surface temperature, it is not enough to explain the Earth’s surface temperature; 
the effect of the atmosphere has to be taken into account. In fact the atmosphere 
allows the penetration of short wave solar radiation to the Earth, which will 
absorb a fraction of this UV
A
-VIS-NIR (0.3 - 4 
µ
m) radiation and will reconvert 
internally in thermal energy, which in turn is reemitted as long wave radiation 
2
albedo is the ratio of scattered to incident light (i.e. ~1 for negligible light absorption) 
Introduction 
4
(IR  ~  4-100 
µ
m,  maximum 
peak  ~10 
µ
m)  back  to  the 
atmosphere.  The  spectral 
distribution  of  the  incoming 
(short-wave)  and  outgoing 
(long-wave)  radiations  is 
shown in 
Figure 1
. Atmospheric 
gases  such  as  water  vapor 
(H
2
O),  carbon  dioxide  (CO
2
methane  (CH
4
),  nitrous  oxide 
(N
2
O), 
chlorofluorocarbons 
(CFCs), ozone (O
3
), absorb the 
Earth  emitted  IR  radiation. 
They  influence  the  radiative 
budget  and  contribute  to  an 
increase in the Earth’s surface 
temperature.  
Figure 1 Spectral distribution of solar and terrestrial radiation (from [6]) 
Taking  into  account  the  atmosphere  effect  as  a  blackbody  absorbing  and 
reemitting the received infrared radiation from the Earth, the calculations show 
an enhancement of the Earth surface temperature to ~ 303 K (30 °C), due to the 
downward emissions, which is clearly an overestimation compared to 12-15° C 
[7]. In fact the atmosphere is not completely absorbing the IR radiation. Other 
phenomena  such  as  sensible  (i.e.  convection  -  turbulence)  and  latent  (i.e. 
evaporation – transpiration -- phase transitions) heat transfer have to be taken 
into  account  and thus  the  Earth  temperature  is determined  as expressed cf. 
Eq. (2) 
(
)(
)
0
4
2
1
2
s
s
e
l
f
a
a
S
T
a
ω
σ
+
=
 Eq. (2) 
where  S is the mean solar energy , f is the fraction transformed in latent and 
sensible  heat, a
s
is  the  short  wave  and a
l
is  the  long-wave  atmospheric 
absorbance fractions,   
ω
 is the  surface albedo  and T
e
is  the Earth  surface 
temperature [7]. An estimative overview of the global mean radiation budget is 
schematically shown in the  Figure 2.  An average of  28 % of the incoming 
radiation is returned into space due to the backscattering from clouds (19 %), air 
molecules and particles (6%), and by the Earth surface (3%). Almost 25% is 
absorbed within the atmosphere, mostly by stratospheric ozone (3%), clouds 
(5%)  and  tropospheric  water  vapor  (17%).  The  Earth  absorbs  finally  the 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested