open pdf file in asp net c# : Add text fields to pdf Library SDK component .net asp.net wpf mvc 1257037710-part423

Upper troposphere water vapor
IV 
85
1. Introduction 
1.1  Water vapor significance for Earth’s climate 
Due to its unique physical and chemical properties, water is crucial for the Earth 
system  both  on  the  local-short  time  scale  (weather)  and in long-term  (global 
climate) related processes.  Water is a universal solvent and is the main transport 
vector of matter  and energy  from  the microscale of molecules  and individual 
cells to the planetary scale.  In the range of the pressure and temperature values 
encountered on the Earth’s surface and in its atmosphere, a water molecule can 
change phase easily between solid, liquid and gas, releasing or absorbing heat in 
the  process  (latent  heat).  Water  vapor  is  the  primary  heat  exchanger  on  the 
planet  Earth. Because  of its high latent heat value,  and  large  thermal  inertia, 
water also acts as a climatic thermostat [1]. Water circulation at the global scale 
(the hydrological cycle [2]) is solar powered and is connected with the rotation 
of  the Earth. The global redistribution of precipitation occurs via atmospheric 
water vapor transport, synoptic-scale wind formations (jet stream), the southern 
oscillation  (El  Niño  and  La  Niña)  phenomena,  and  many  others.  Water 
participates in all its three phase states in a multitude of chemical reactions in 
the atmosphere. Water vapor is involved in the formation of the ice content polar 
stratospheric clouds (reservoirs of halogenated molecules involved in the spring 
polar  ozone  depletion).  Acid  rain  (H
2
CO
3
,  HNO
3
 H
2
SO
4
,  etc)  is  formed  by 
reactions of CO
2
, NO
2
or SO
2
in their aqueous phase. Water vapor is also the 
main  source  of  the  OH  radical,  an  important  atmospheric  oxidant  that  is 
obtained from a homogeneous gas phase reaction of the water vapor molecule 
with  the  single-D  excited  state  oxygen  O
1D
resulting  from  ozone  photo-
dissociation.  Compared  to  other  atmospheric  trace  greenhouse  gases  such  as 
carbon  dioxide  (CO
2
),  methane  (CH
4
),  nitrous  oxide  (N
2
O),  or 
chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs),  water vapor  is  the most efficient  greenhouse gas 
because of its global concentration and its spectral properties (i.e transparent to 
incoming short-wave radiation from the Sun and opaque to long-wave radiation 
leaving the Earth). Indeed the electronic absorption spectrum of water vapor is 
located  in  the  far  UV  (<  186  nm)  while  its  vibrational-rotational  spectrum 
contains three main bands centered at 
ν
1
~ 3657 cm
-1
(
λ
1
~2.73 
µ
m), 
ν
2
~ 1595 
(
λ
2
~6.3 
µ
m), and 
ν
3
~ 3756 cm
-1
(
λ
1
~2.66 
µ
m), with overtones, combinations 
and  hot  bands  in  the  infrared  and  visible  parts  of  the  spectrum.  The  most 
intensive and broad H
2
O vibration-rotation band is 
ν
2
centered at 6.3 
µ
m that 
completely absorbs solar radiation between 5.5 and 7.5 
µ
m. The overlap of the 
ν
1
ν
and the overtone  of 
ν
2
(3.14 
µ
m) also absorb completely the radiation 
from  2.6  to 3.3 
µ
m.  Other  vibration-rotation  bands are  centred close  to 1.87, 
Add text fields to pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add a text box to a pdf; how to add text fields to pdf
Add text fields to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
acrobat add text to pdf; how to add text to a pdf file in acrobat
Upper troposphere water vapor
IV 
86
1.38, 1.10, 0.94, 0.81 and 0.72 
µ
m and even some weaker bands are present in 
the  visible  part  of  the  spectrum.  The  large  dipole  moment  of  H
2
 and  its 
isotopes are responsible for an intensive rotational spectrum that occupies a very 
broad  region,  extending  from  8
µ
 to  wavelengths  of  several  cm  [3].  The 
contribution of water vapor to the total greenhouse effect is estimated from 50-
60%  [4]  up  to  ~95%  [5]  and  is  still  a  controversial  subject.  The  positive 
feedback  between  atmospheric  temperature  and  water  vapor  is  of  crucial 
importance. To a first approximation, a 1°C increase in atmospheric temperature 
will  cause  a  6%  increase  in  water  vapor  concentration,  leading  to  further 
warming and thus initiating a positive feedback [6]. This direct effect combined 
with  the  indirect  effect  (through  cloud  formation)  of  the  water  vapor  on  the 
Earth budget radiation is still poorly quantified [7] and scientific consensus is 
only qualitative at this point. The uncertainties stem from a lack of information 
on the high space-time variability of water vapor, which is difficult to measure 
due to the complex natural processes involved.  Water vapor averages about one 
per cent by volume in the atmosphere and its distribution in time and space is 
highly variable: it comprises about 4 percent of the atmosphere by volume near 
the surface, but only 3-6 ppmv (parts per million by volume) above 10 to 12 km. 
Nearly 50% of the total atmospheric water is trapped in the planetary boundary 
layer (PBL, from 0 to 1-3 km) while less than 6 % of the water is above 5 km, 
and only 1 % above 12 km. The annual average precipitation over the globe is 
about  1  meter,  while  the  water-vapor  column  density  (precipitable  water) 
averages about 5 cm in the tropical regions and less than 1 mm at the poles. The 
average lifetime of the water vapor molecule in the atmosphere is about 9 days 
[4]. At any given location in the atmosphere, the water vapor content can vary 
markedly in a relatively short time span, owing to the passage of cold or warm 
fronts, precipitation, etc. Because of the critical role that water vapor plays in 
most  atmospheric  processes,  accurate  water  vapor  profiles  are  needed  in 
atmospheric  modeling  applications.  Water  vapor  profiles  are  also  needed  for 
basic  meteorology  applications  (i.e.  the  identification  and  study  of  frontal 
boundaries,  dry  lines,...),  boundary  layer  studies  (such  as  cloud 
formation/dissipation), development of climatological records, and for radiative 
transfer calculations.  
1.2  Water vapor measurements 
However, measurements of water vapor through the troposphere have proven to 
be  difficult  to  obtain  with  good  accuracy.  A  wide  variety  of  observational 
technologies have been developed to address  this. Inexpensive in situ sensors 
(ground, towers) provide reasonably accurate water vapor measurements, but do 
not provide information on the water vapor content of the atmosphere at higher 
altitudes.
In situ sensors have also been installed on commercial and research 
aircraft to measure water vapor. Measurements from commercial aircraft are a 
VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in
featured PDF software, it should have functions for processing text, image as Add necessary references Demo Code to Retrieve All Form Fields from a PDF File in
adding text to a pdf document; how to add text to a pdf document
C# PDF Form Data Read Library: extract form data from PDF in C#.
Able to retrieve all form fields from adobe PDF file in C# featured PDF software, it should have functions for processing text, image as Add necessary references
add text box to pdf file; how to add text to pdf file with reader
Upper troposphere water vapor
IV 
87
promising but yet unproven technique[8]; however, data would only be available 
when  and  where  scheduled  flights  occur  –  a  significant  limitation.  Research 
aircraft can provide high-quality measurements at  any location but the cost is 
high  for  dedicated  aircraft  flights.  Another  well  established  approach  that 
provides a detailed  vertical profile is radiosounding. In this  technique, sondes 
are  carried  in  the  atmosphere  by  meteorological  balloons and  equipped  with 
appropriate  humidity  sensors.  However,  the  temporal  and  global  coverage 
resolution  is  typically  fairly  coarse  (launches  every  12  h  at  specific 
meteorological  stations).  Moreover,  radiosondes  are  expensive  because  their 
implementation  is  labor-intensive.  Satellites  can  provide  excellent  global 
coverage of water vapor distribution, but the horizontal and vertical resolution is 
very coarse
Water vapor measurement  sensors have  evolved from  goldbeater 
skin, hairs, lithium  chloride, carbon  hygristor, and  thin  film capacitors  to  the 
more recent frost point hygrometers (chilled mirror). Different types of Lyman -
α
hygrometers have been developed based on the photo dissociation of H
2
O at 
λ
< 137 nm and the detection of the fluorescence (
λ
~305-325 nm) of the excited 
OH radical. Open path measurements have also been made with tunable diode 
laser spectroscopy (TDLS) technique, which is based on the laser absorption in 
the near and mid infrared water vapor rotation-vibration spectrum. Microwave 
instruments using the H
2
O emission lines at 22.2 GHz or even 183 GHz are used 
mainly  for  the  estimation  of  the  stratosphere  –  mesosphere  humidity.  The 
inversion techniques for retrieving vertical profiles are still in development, and 
the results have very poor vertical resolution. The FTIR spectrophotometers and 
the precision filter radiometers (PFR) are used to estimate the integrated total 
column water vapor based on various IR absorption bands and on VIS (719, 817 
and  946  nm)  atmospheric  absorption.  Based  on  the  delays  induced  by  the 
atmospheric water vapor on the paths between the antennas of the receiver and 
the  satellites  of  the  GPS  network,  the  total  column  may  be  estimated.  More 
specific details of the technical specifications, advantages and limitations of all 
these  techniques  operating  in  upper  troposphere  -  lower  stratosphere  regions 
(UTLS) are reviewed in [9].  
The  continuous  profiling  of  the  water  vapor  dynamics  with  high  spatial  and 
temporal  resolution  is  possible  with  the  use  of  the  lidar  techniques  --  both 
differential absorption (DIAL, [10]) or rotational-vibrational Raman techniques 
[11, 12].  
1.3  Upper troposphere water vapor specificity 
Despite the small amount of water vapor in the free troposphere (above 2-3 km), 
recent studies [13-15] have shown that the middle and upper troposphere (600 - 
200  hPa)  water  vapor  content  contributes  as  ~27-35%  of  the  absolute 
greenhouse forcing due to the strong absorption in 100-600 cm
-1
spectral region 
which is within the spectral band of Earth surface infrared re-emission. Another 
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
Convert PDF to text in .NET WinForms and ASP.NET project. Text in any PDF fields can be copied and pasted to .txt files by keeping original layout.
add text pdf acrobat professional; how to insert text into a pdf using reader
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
add text pdf professional; how to add text box to pdf
Upper troposphere water vapor
IV 
88
study [16] shows that the contribution of water vapor in layers of equal mass to 
the  climate  sensitivity  varies  by  about  a  factor  of  two  with  the  height.  The 
largest  contribution  comes  from  layers  between  450  and  750  hPa,  and  the 
smallest, from layers above 230 hPa. The water vapor positive feedback is of 
crucial importance but poorly understood. The positive feedback of water vapor 
on the global mean surface temperature is also altitude sensitive. For example, 
the response of water vapor to the doubling of CO
concentrations is 2.6 times 
greater above 750 hPa than below 750 hPa in terms of its effects on the Earth 
surface temperature. High resolution and more accurate upper troposphere and 
low stratosphere water vapor measurements are also needed  for investigations 
into  tropopause  phenomena,  vertical  troposphere-stratosphere  exchanges, 
nucleation  processes,  cirrus/contrail  cloud  formation,  and  lower  stratosphere 
water vapor increasing concentrations (e.g. already observed increasing partially 
related  to  the  CH
4
oxidation).  In  addition,  these  data  are  necessary  for 
initializing the Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) and Global Climate  and 
Circulation models. 
In  this  context,  this  chapter presents  the  implementation  of  the  Raman  lidar 
technique at the Jungfraujoch observatory (3600 m ASL, 46.55 °N, 7.98 °E) for 
profiling the upper troposphere water vapor above the Swiss Alps. In section 2, 
after a brief comparative presentation of the DIAL and Raman techniques, the 
principle of the water vapor retrieval by Raman lidar is detailed and the Raman 
lidar layout is described. Section 3 addresses the water vapor retrieval algorithm, 
and describes the first water vapor profile obtained above the Alps using Raman 
lidar technique. Errors and corrections, as well as in situ  calibration, and typical 
upper troposphere profiles are presented. Finally different comparisons with co-
located PFR and GPS techniques and with the closest space-time radiosounding 
(i.e.  Payerne)  are  discussed.  The  conclusions  and  recommendations  for  the 
perspectives are given in section 4.  
2. Method 
2.1  DIAL and RAMAN lidar techniques  
As already mentioned, high spatial-resolution monitoring of atmospheric water 
vapor is possible using the DIAL or the Raman lidar techniques. 
The DIAL technique, first demonstrated in 1966 [10], exploits the differential 
absorption  of  water  wapor  in  the  VIS  and  NIR  using  two  lidar  emitted 
wavelengths: one on the peak of the absorption (
λ
ON
) and other in the wing of 
the absorption line (
λ
OFF
). The average absolute water vapor molecular number 
density n
H2O 
(z) between z and z + 
z is retrieved as given in Eq. (1):  
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats
add text to pdf in preview; how to add text to a pdf in reader
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
how to add text field to pdf form; adding text pdf files
Upper troposphere water vapor
IV 
89
2
2
( )
(
)
1
( )
ln
( )
2
(
)
( )
on
off
H O
H O
on
off
S Z S
Z
z
n
Z
N
Z
z S Z
zS
Z
δ
σ
+∆
=
±
∆ ∆
+∆
Eq. (1) 
where S are the lidar backscatter signals and 
∆σ
σ
on 
σ
off
is the differential 
absorption  cross-section.  The  DIAL  technique  is  self-calibrated,  providing 
absolute water vapor concentration in both daytime and nighttime. In addition, 
the OFF signal can be simultaneously considered for aerosol investigations. In 
spite of these advantages the water vapor DIAL technique requires specific laser 
sources  emitting  at  various and precise 
λ
ON, 
(tunable lasers),  having  relatively 
narrow (~ 10
-4
nm) bandwidths, and precise, stable and well-known line shapes. 
In addition, the knowledge and accuracy of the absorption cross-section values 
is  a  systematic  challenge  due  to  their  variation  within  a  normal  range  of 
atmospheric temperature and pressure. In  Eq. (1) the correction term 
δ
N
H2O
(Z) 
is  due  to  the  interference  (differential  extinction)  from  various  atmospheric 
gases  and  aerosols;  and  thus  for  a  precise  calculation,  the  atmospheric 
composition (aerosols and gases) has to be relatively well known. Several DIAL 
systems, ground  based or airborne, using the water vapor absorption bands at 
724,  815,  830  and  940  nm  were  developed  [17-21]    and    they  provide 
troposphere and stratosphere water vapor profiles. Due to the high absorption of 
the on-line in the lower troposphere, the ground based DIAL is less frequently 
used than the airborne or space nadir systems.   
The Raman technique is  based  on  the  Raman  effect.  When a  substance  is 
subjected to an incident  exciting  wavelength,  it  exhibits  the Raman  effect; it 
reemits  secondary  light  at  wavelengths  that  are  shifted  from  the  incident 
radiation. The magnitude of the shift is unique to the scattering molecule, while 
the intensity of the Raman band is proportional to the molecular number density. 
The water vapor Raman lidar technique uses the ratio of rotational-vibrational 
Raman scattering intensities from water vapor and nitrogen molecules [11, 12], 
which is a direct measurement of the atmospheric water vapor mixing ratio. The 
water vapor profile may be retrieved as expressed below:  
2
2
2
2
2
( )
( )
( )
( ) ( )
( )
( )
HO
H O
HO
N
N
S
Z
b
Z
q
Z
CZ
Z
S Z
Z
b Z
=
Γ
Eq. (2) 
where q is the water vapor mixing ratio in [g/Kg dry air] or in [ppmv],  is the 
detected  Raman  lidar  backscatter  signal  corresponding  to  nitrogen  and  water 
vapor, b is the background (noise) signal, 
Γ
is the correction factor related to the 
differential atmospheric absorption on the return paths and C is the calibration 
function ( see section 2.2). 
This technique is relatively free of systematic errors (aerosol effects), it can be 
operated  from  the  ground  (the  radiation  is  not  absorbed  by  the  water  vapor 
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
add text to pdf document in preview; adding a text field to a pdf
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
how to insert text in pdf file; add text pdf file
Upper troposphere water vapor
IV 
90
itself) and it can use relatively simple, robust and inexpensive laser sources. Its 
main limitation is the relatively small backscatter Raman cross- sections (
π
σ
R
), 
that result in weak Raman signals compared with the elastic backscatters or the 
electronic noise induced in daytime by  solar radiation. The use of the Raman 
lidar in daytime is theoretically  possible in the solar blind region (<  300 nm) 
[22]. For this a third  wavelength  is  necessary for the  determination of  the O
3
absorption  correction  and  also  the  absorption  of  many  other  gases  has  to  be 
taken into account, as for example SO
2
and NO
2
. For example, the 4
th
harmonic 
at 266.1 nm of Nd: YAG laser was used to excite the O
2
(277.5), N
2
(283.6) and 
H
2
O (294.6) Raman shifts and then used for O
3
and H
2
O retrievals into the PBL 
[22].  Another  possibility  for  performing  daytime  measurements  is  to  tune 
appropriately  the  exciting  laser  lines  such  that  the  water  vapor  and  nitrogen 
Raman shifts fall on the Fraunhofer solar spectral bands, thus reducing the solar-
induced signal noise. To this end, an excimer laser was used to pump a dye laser 
to produce appropriate wavelengths i.e. H
2
O (344.4 nm using p-terphenyl) and 
for N
2
(360.4 nm using DMQ) in order to fall in the Fraunhofer band at 393.5 
nm  [23].  The  high  complexity  of  the  required  laser  equipment  is  the  main 
inconvenience of this method.  
Several Raman lidar systems were developed in different spectral regions and 
configurations [24-37]. Various simulation studies were conducted in order to 
find the most appropriate technique [38-40]. 
As  already  mentioned,  powerful  laser  sources,  large  telescopes,  high 
performance  optical filtering,  and  long  integration  times  are  required  for  the 
application  of the  Raman  technique. In addition,  external  calibration  methods 
[41]  or  precise  calculations  [42]  are  needed  for  determining  the  calibration 
function C (Z).     
2.2  Water vapor mixing ratio from atmospheric Raman backscatter  
The rotational - vibrational Q branch Raman shift are: 
∆ν
H2O 
~ 3652 cm
-1
for the 
water vapor molecule and 
∆ν
N2 
~ 2331 cm
-1
(~ 32 nm) for the nitrogen molecule 
[43]. In the present case, using the third harmonic at 
λ
L
~354.7 nm from an Nd: 
YAG  laser,  the  Raman  backscatter returns  cf. Eq.  (3)  are  detected  at 
λ
H2O
386.68 nm (
∆λ
R
~ 58 nm) and 
λ
N2
~ 407.51 nm  (
∆λ
R
~ 32 nm). 
1
L
R
L
R
λ
λ
λ
ν
=
⋅∆
Eq. (3) 
The Raman backscatter signals 
( )
R
S z
λ
are described generically by: 
(
)
2
0
( , )
( , , )
( , )
( )
exp
()
()
( )
L
R
R
Z
R
S
L
R
R
R
K
Z
d
Z
S
z
n Z
z
z dz b Z
Z
d
π
λ
λ
λ
λ
σλ λ
λ
α
α
=
+
+
Eq. (4) 
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
how to add text to a pdf file in reader; how to add text fields to a pdf
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to PDF; C# Protect: Add Password to PDF; C# Form: extract value from fields; C# Annotate: PDF Markup
add text block to pdf; add text to pdf file reader
Upper troposphere water vapor
IV 
91
where R denotes the Raman channel ( 
λ
= 407.51 or 386.68 nm), K
S 
(
λ
R, 
Z) is a 
system  function  that  is  dependent  on  the  optical  transmission  and  detector 
efficiency, and is proportional to the power and duration of the laser pulse, the 
overlap function and the area of the collector mirror of the telescope, n
R
is the 
number  density  of  Raman active  molecule, 
π
d
σ
/d
is  the  differential Raman 
backscatter cross-section, 
α
is the extinction coefficient and b is the background 
signal (electronic and sky noise). 
One important issue for the application of the Raman lidar technique is the value 
of the water vapor differential Raman backscattering cross section. One of the 
first  estimated values    (by  Derr  and  Little,  not  referenced)  is  ~  1.86  x  10
-29
cm
2
sr
-1
with a Raman stimulation radiation at 337.1 nm. The best estimation is 
given by  Penney  and Lapp [44] and is ~ 6 x 10
-30
cm
2
sr
-1 
which is 2.5 times 
weaker  than  the  nitrogen  differential  Raman  cross-section  and  ~  10
3
times 
weaker than the Rayleigh differential cross section. The water vapor differential 
cross-section was also calculated in [45].   
The water vapor mixing ratio q
H2O
(specific humidity) is the mass of the water 
vapor divided by the mass of the dry air in a given volume: 
2
2
2
( )
( )
( )
H O
H O
H O
dryair
r
dryair
n
Z M
q
Z
n
Z M
=
Eq. (5) 
where  M is  the molecular weight and n the number density. When n
air
and n
H2O 
are extracted from Eq.  (4) written for N
2
and H
2
O Raman channels,  and then 
introduced in Eq. (5), one arrives at the expression of q
H2O:
2
2
2
2
2
( )
)
( )
( )
( ) ( )
( )
)
( )
H O
H O
H O
N
N
S
Z
b
Z
q
Z
CZ
Z
S
Z
b Z
=
Γ
Eq. (6) 
where   
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
,
,
( )
( )
( )
L
N
L
H O
N
N
N
H O
O
H O air
d
Z
K
M
n
d
C Z
d
Z
K
M
n
d
π
λ λ
π
λ λ
σ
σ
=
Eq. (7)  
C(Z) can be determined using an external calibration method (radiosonde, in situ 
value, etc) or by calculation in the case when  the parameters involved in Eq. (7)  
may be determined. The correction term 
Γ
(z) is the differential extinction on the 
return path of the two Raman backscattering radiations and can be expressed as: 
2
2
0
( ) exp
p
(
, )
( , )
( )
( )
( )
z
H O
N
a
m
abs
Z
z
zdz
Z
Z
Z
α λ
α λ
Γ
=
⋅Γ
⋅Γ
Eq. (8) 
Upper troposphere water vapor
IV 
92
where 
α
is the total extinction coefficient at wavelength 
λ
and is the sum of  the 
contributions of aerosol (Mie, 
α
a
) and molecular (Rayleigh, 
α
m
) light scattering 
as well as of gas absorption (
α
abs
), 
( , )
( , )
( , )
( , )
a
m
abs
Z
Z
Z
Z
α λ
α λ
α λ
α
λ
=
+
+
Eq. (9) 
The background noise b has to be extracted from the signals and is generally 
composed of the sky-solar induced signal superposed on the electronic noise of 
the detector itself. For  the water vapor channel  the b
H2O
value determines the 
water vapor detection limit. 
2.3  Raman lidar setup at Jungfraujoch station 
The  water  vapor  Raman  lidar  technique  has  been  implemented  in  the  JFJ-
LIDAR  system  [46]  since  August  1
st
,  2000.  The  system  layout  of  the  water 
vapor Raman lidar is schematically presented in Figure 1.  
Figure 1 Simplified part of the water vapor Raman lidar layout:  L lens, IF interference 
filters, ND neutral densities, D diaphragm M steering removable flat mirror disposed 
at 45°, MS telescope secondary mirror, MC collector mirror, PMT 387 and 407 (Thorn 
Emi photomultiplier tubes), PMT 355 (Hamamatsu photosensor module), BS different 
λ
dichroic beam splitters, BE beam expander, P alignment and guidance prisms. 
BS
2
BS
1
PMT 
355 
L
1
ND
1
IF
1
L
2
PMT 38
8
7
ND
2
IF
2
PMT 
407 
ND
3
IF
Tra
a
nsient Recorder 
(Licel 12b
b
its-
-
20Mh
h
z, 
250 Mhz Ph.C.) 
Trigger
Nd:YAG 
1064 nm 
400mJ -100Hz 
Harmonics Generation 
532 and 355 nm 
BE 
P
3
P
5x 
on 
axis 
off 
axis 
Vertical
Horizontal 
355, 532, 1064 nm
φ
20 cm 
MC 
Upper troposphere water vapor
IV 
93
Related technical specifications are summarized in Table 1.  
Table 1  Technical specifications of the water vapor Raman lidar layout. 
The third harmonic at 354.7 nm is used to excite nitrogen (386.68 nm) and water 
vapor (407.51 nm) Raman backscatter returns. The typical laser emission was 
~30 - 70 mJ/pulse at 354.7 nm, with 20 – 50 Hz repetition rate. The separation 
by wavelength of the atmospheric returns is assured via a polychromator based 
on various dichroic beam splitters (BSi) that selectively reflect the wavelength 
of interest. Narrow bandpass interferential filters (IF) (bandwidths ~0.5 nm for 
H
2
O  and  ~  1nm  for  N
2
)  were  used  for  the  spectral  selection  of  the nitrogen 
(386.68 
±
1nm) and the water-vapor Q branches (407.51 
±
0.3 nm) [35]. They 
also  assure  the  suppression  of  the  sky  background  and  block  the  elastic 
backscatter returns. The filters are combined with various neutral density filters 
Transmitter 
Laser, wavelength, rep.rate 
Energy/pulse at 355 nm 
Beam Expander 
Beam Diameter, Divergence 
Pulse duration 
Nd:YAG, 354.8 nm, 1-100 Hz rep rate 
30-70mJ   
5X, fused silica, antireflection coatings 
φ
~ 5.5 mm, 0.14 mrad 
~ 3 ns 
Receiver 
Telescope  
Detection Optics 
Beam            
Splitters 
Interferential    
Filters 
Neutral       
Densities 
Detectors 
Digitizer/channel 
Newtonian: 
φ
0.2 m/ 0.8 focal length, FOV: 0.2 - 3.8mrad 
φ
2”, 45° incident angle, Barr Associates Inc 
BS1: R = 97% at 355 nm,  T = 70% at 387 nm 
T = 85% at 407 nm  
BS2: T = 97% at 408 nm,  R = 99% at 387 nm 
(a BS is acting before BS1 and BS2 , with R = 95%  
φ
1”, 0° incident angle, Barr Associates Inc 
IF1: CW= 354.7nm,  BW=1.4nm,  T
max
~56%,  T
out
~ 10
-4
IF2: CW= 386.7nm,  BW=3.0nm,  T
max
~78%, T
out
~10
-5
CW= 386.7nm,  BW=0.5nm,  T
max
~65%, T
out
~10
-5 
IF3: CW= 407.2 nm, BW=0.46nm, T
max
~50%, T
out
~10
-6 
CW= 407.2 nm, BW=3.8nm,  T
max
~70%, T
out
~10
-5 
T~ 0.1 to 90% add generally on 355, 387 for desaturation of 
the Ph. Counting signals from low altitudes 
PMT355  = Hamamatsu photosensor module, H6780-06 
(8mm eff. 185-650nm, gain~105,  
43 
µ
A/nW, dark current 0.2-10nA 
PMT407  = Thorn EMI, QA9829 series 
PMT 387 = 45mm eff.area, 320-650 nm,  
dark current  0.4nAgain ~7.10
6
3  LICEL  transient  recorders  in  Analog  (20Mhz-12  bit)  and 
Photon Counting (< 250Mhz) modes 
Upper troposphere water vapor
IV 
94
(ND). Taking into account the cross-section values, the typical expected water 
vapor concentrations in the UT regions (and the optical rejection rates of the BS 
(~10
-4
) and of the IF (~10
-5 
for one filter, 10
-10
for two superposed filters), one 
may  easily  reach  up  to  ~10
-12 
total  rejection  of  the  radiation  at  355  nm 
corresponding to the injection into 408 nm in the water vapor Raman channel. 
This  value  is enough  to completely  reject  the Rayleigh  scattering  and  elastic 
backscatters from cirrus clouds at 355nm. The main limitation is the electronic 
noise  of  the  407  nm  channel  itself  in  photon-counting  mode.  The  data 
acquisition is performed using LICEL transient recorders working at 20Mz/12 
bit  in  analog  (A)  mode  and  250  MHz  maximum  count  rate  for  the  photon-
counting (P.C) mode. Typically an acquisition file contains 4000 shots averaged 
for  each  wavelength  in  A  and  P.C  modes  of  3000  bins  (1  bin  =  7.5  m 
resolution).  
In addition, the acquisition of the pure rotational Raman at 532 nm since May 
2002 allows the  retrieval of  the temperature  profile T (z) above  Jungfraujoch 
station (see chapter V). Simultaneous measurements  of temperature and water 
vapor profiles are thus performed. These profiles may be combined to retrieve 
the  relative  humidity,  which  allows  identification  of  inversions  and  super-
saturation  over  water/ice  throughout  the  upper  troposphere.  Horizontal 
observations above the Aletsch glacier using a steering mirror (M) disposed as 
shown  in  Figure  1  may  also  be  performed  (see  an  example  in  chapter  V)
3. Results and discussions  
3.1  Retrieval algorithm 
In order to obtain the water vapor mixing ratio and other related parameters, the 
signals recorded at 407 and 387 in photon-counting mode as well as the local 
meteorological  measurements  are  used.  The  signal  processing  procedure  is 
schematically summarized in the block diagram presented in Figure 2
.
Due to the low water vapor concentrations in the upper troposphere and to the 
relatively very weak water  vapor Raman cross-section, the water vapor signal 
was  detected  only  in  the  photon  counting  mode  at  407  nm.  The  molecular 
reference is the nitrogen photon-counting signal at 387 nm, which is used after 
being corrected for the saturation effect (dead time-DT-correction). 
Then the  two  signals  are time-space averaged and background corrected. The 
background value (the time-space average of last 500-1000 bins) for the water 
vapor  is  used  for  the  calculation  of  the  signal-to-noise  ratio  and  for  the 
estimation of the detection limit. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested