open pdf file in asp net c# : How to add text to a pdf file in preview SDK software service wpf winforms windows dnn 1257037711-part424

Upper troposphere water vapor
IV 
95
Figure  2 Block diagram of Raman  lidar signals processing for  water vapor mixing 
ratio retrieval and its related parameters.  
The ratio of the 407 and 387 signals is proportional to the water vapor ratio as 
shown  in  Eq.  (2).  After  the  application  of  the  differential  extinction  (
Γ
correction,  the  calibration  function  C  is  retrieved  based  on in situ  external 
calibration. The in situ water vapor mixing ratio is used to approximate the first 
value of the Raman lidar water vapor profile, which may be situated between 75 
up to 300 m above the station. The in situ  water vapor mixing ratio q
H2O
[g/kg] 
value is calculated as shown in Eq. (10).  
2
6.22
0.01
sat
HO
air
sat
P RH
q
P
P RH
=
 Eq. (10) 
where   q  is in  [g H2O  /Kg dry air],  the pressure P  in [hPa]  and the relative 
humidity RH in [%]. The calculation of the saturation vapor pressure (P
sat
) was 
S
H2O  
(407 nm) 
S
N2  
(387 nm) 
Time-Space 
Integration 
DT cor 
Lidar Signals
Analogue 
Ph.Count 
Comparison 
T, P, RH (
in situ
)
α
a (407)
S
H2O 
S
N2  
H2Oin situ 
Nair,T,P [z] 
Ext. using 
Raman 
Rayleigh 
Simulated 
α
a (387)
Angstrom law 
AOD >0.3 
α
m (387) 
α
m (407) 
q
H2O (z) 
Psat (z) 
ρ
H2O 
(z) 
P
H2O
(z) 
RH (z) 
in situ  calibration 
Rayleigh 
correction  
Aeroso
o
ls 
Correction
CWV 
[mm] 
Payerne 
Radiosounding 
P (z), T(z)
)
,Td (z) 
q (z), Nair (z) 
RH (z), IWP  
Comparisons 
Calibrations  
How to add text to a pdf file in preview - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text to a pdf document using acrobat; adding text fields to pdf acrobat
How to add text to a pdf file in preview - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to insert text box in pdf file; adding text to a pdf in preview
Upper troposphere water vapor
IV 
96
based  on  the  Magnus  formula  [47]  which  is  used  in  meteorology  for 
temperatures between –50 to 50 °C and cf. Eq. (11).   
17.856
6.1086 exp
245.52
sat
T
P
T
=
+
Eq. (11) 
where T is in [°C] and P in [hPa]. The air temperature (T
air
), air pressure (P
air
and  relative  humidity  (RH)  are  continuously  measured  at  the  Jungfraujoch 
meteorological station (i.e. Meteolabor hygrometer VTP6 (
±
0.15°K, 0.1% RH). 
These in situ  values  are  also  used  for  initializing  the  US  1976  atmospheric 
model of pressure P(z),  temperature T(z) and air number concentration N
air
(z) 
[48]. The temperature profile T(z) is used  for the estimation of the  saturation 
pressure P
sat
(z)  with   the same Magnus  formula used  in  Eq. (11). Then the 
relative humidity RH (z), and the water vapor partial pressure (P
H2O
) may also 
be determined from Eq. (10) and the q
H2O
(z) profile calibrated in g/Kg. Finally, 
the water vapor density 
ρ
H2O
[g  m
-3
] profile is obtained and integrated for the 
estimation of the integrated water vapor (IWV) column in mm or in kg m
-2
.  
The  calculations  of  different  errors,  corrections  and  comparisons  (e.g.  with 
Payerne  radiosounding)  complete  the  above-described  procedure.  For  the 
operations  schematically  presented  Figure  2,  a  corresponding  LabView 
complete software package was developed (see annexes A23, A24 and A25).  
Related  constants,  equations,  transformations,  definitions,  and  formulas  are 
listed in the annex A22. 
3.2  Corrections and Errors Discussion 
3.2.1 Photon counting de-saturation 
Although the number of photon counts in the water vapor channel at 407 nm, is 
largely under the maximum counting rate of the LICEL transient recorder, this is 
not  the case for the  nitrogen channel at 387  nm. Thus  at  low  altitude a clear 
underestimation of the nitrogen signal (saturated) is observed, which will result 
in an overestimation of the ratio of the two signals and finally will induce an 
underestimation of the water vapor mixing ratio profile after calibration. 
As the saturation of the nitrogen photon-counting signal occurs at low altitudes, 
it  is  sensitive  to  the  calibration  with  the  in  situ  value,  and  therefore  the  de-
saturation  correction  (dead  time-DT-correction)  is  mandatory  (see  its  critical 
effect in the Figure 3). 
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Add text to PDF document in preview. • Add text box to PDF file in preview. • Draw PDF markups. PDF Protection. • Sign PDF document with signature.
how to insert text into a pdf file; how to add text box in pdf file
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit
Convert CSV file to PDF (.pdf). Add, remove and save annotations to CSV file. Protection. Miscellaneous. • Select text on OpenOffice.
adding text to a pdf form; add text field pdf
Upper troposphere water vapor
IV 
97
Based  on  the  principle  of  the  photon-counting 
detection  and  the  Poisson  statistics  (see  annex 
A14)  one  may  correct  the  signal  following 
Eq. (12).  
387
387
387
1
1
desat
sat
sat
sat
t
S
S
S
f
=
Eq. (12) 
where  the S
desat
is  the  true  (corrected)  photon-
counting  rate,  the S
sat
is  the  recorded  photon-
counting  rate  and  the f
sat
is  the  maximum  of 
LICEL  counting rate, all expressed in [MHz]. 
The  value of  the f
sat
was  precisely  determined 
from  the  comparison  of  photon  counting  with 
analogue signals at 387 for each data series. 
Figure  3  The  photon  counting  saturation  effect  on  the  water  vapor  mixing  ratio 
retrieval.  
3.2.2 Aerosols differential extinction 
As expressed in section 2.2, Eq. (8) and Eq. (9), the differential extinction at 387 
and 407 nm may be estimated as a product of aerosol- molecular scattering and 
gas absorption. 
The  aerosol  correction  (
Γ
a
 may  be  neglected  in  many  cases  in  the  free 
troposphere.  The  calculations  were  based  on  the  Angstrom  [49]  power  law 
wavelength dependence of the extinction 
α
~
λ
-A
. The Angstrom exponent A ~ 
1.18 is found from  the median value of sun-photometer observations  between 
1999 and 2003 [50]. The 407 and 387 nm differential extinction correction due 
to aerosols is 
Γ
a
~1 – 2 % for the situation when the 387 and 408 nm shifts pass 
through aerosol layers having an AOD = 0.25-0.30. In the upper troposphere, the 
median  AODs  are  0.024-0.022  in  this  UV  range,  which  is  one  order  of 
magnitude  lower  [50].  In  the  case  of  thick  clouds  and  even  for  particular 
Saharan  dust  cases,  the  Angstrom  coefficient  tends  to  zero  (A 
0)  and 
practically no wavelength dependence is expected, which makes the differential 
transmission correction unnecessary (i.e. 
Γ
a
~ 1). Particular attention has to be 
paid to aerosol layers such as PBL intrusions or low altitude thick clouds. As a 
general rule, the AOD (Aerosol Optical Depth) is calculated only for altitudes 
where SNR
H2O
>
1 and it is based on the Raman shift at 387 nm and a molecular 
simulated signal [51]. For AOD
387
<
0.3, the aerosol correction is neglected. If 
the  AOD
387
>
0.3  and  if  a  wavelength  dependence  is  noticed,  an  aerosol 
correction  is  suitable. For this,  the Raman signal  at  387 nm and a  molecular 
3500
4500
5500
6500
7500
8500
9500
10500
11500
12500
0
1
2
3
4
5
q
H2O 
[g/kg]
Altitude  [m ASL]
q (Analog)
q (Ph.C saturated)
q (Ph.C desaturated)
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Also a preview component enables compressing and decompressing in preview in ASP.NET class. Also able to uncompress PDF file in VB.NET programs.
how to insert text box in pdf document; how to insert text in pdf using preview
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
With the SDK, you can preview the document content according to the preview thumbnail by the ways as following. C# DLLs for Word File Preview. Add references:
how to enter text in a pdf document; add text to pdf file
Upper troposphere water vapor
IV 
98
(Rayleigh) simulated signal [51] is used cf. Eq. (13) for retrieving the absolute 
extinction coefficient at 387 nm.  
387
387
( )
)
1
( )~
ln
2
( )
a
m
RCS
S
Z
d
Z
dz
z
RCS Z
α
Eq. (13) 
Then the extinction coefficient at 408 nm is obtained by extrapolation using the 
Angstrom  law  [49]  with  a  realistic  experimentally  determined  value  e.g.  A 
~1.188 as determined from complementary experiments or considerations. 
In Figure  4  the  aerosols  differential  correction  necessity  is  illustrated  in  two 
distinguished cases. 
Figure  4  (a)  shows  the  good  agreement  between  the  simulated  Rayleigh 
(molecular) signal and the Raman at 387 nm in an almost aerosol-free situation. 
Figure 4  (b) presents an example of the extinction calculation at 387 nm in the 
case of a low altitude (4000-5500 m ASL) aerosol layer with a higher (~8500 m 
ASL) cirrus cloud occurrence 
Figure  4  (a)  Raman  and 
Rayleigh  (simulated)  range 
corrected  signals  (RCS)  at 
387  nm  in  an  aerosol-  and 
cloud-free 
troposphere 
situation;  (b)  Raman  and 
Rayleigh  (simulated)  range 
corrected signals (RCS) and 
the  extinction  coefficient  at 
387  nm  in  presence of  low 
aerosol layer (< 5500 m) and 
a cirrus cloud at ~ 8500 m.  
3.2.3 Molecular differential extinction 
Based on n
air 
(Z) calculated from [48] and the Rayleigh cross-section formula 
from [51], the simulated molecular backscatter signals at 387 and 407 nm are 
obtained and used for the calculation of 
Γ
m
   
For the free troposphere, as shown in Figure 5, this is a systematic correction 
and it reaches ~3% at the tropopause altitudes. 
3500
4500
5500
6500
7500
8500
9500
10500
11500
12500
0.E+00
2.E-06
4.E-06
6.E-06
RCS at 387 nm 
[m
-1
sr
-1
]
Altitude  [m ASL]
10 9 9 8 8 7 7 6 6 5 5 4 3 3 2 2 1 1 0
Raman to Rayleigh Ratio
Raman
Rayleigh
Raman to
Rayleigh Ratio
3500
4500
5500
6500
7500
8500
9500
10500
11500
12500
0.E+00
2.E-06
4.E-06
6.E-06
RCS  at 387 nm 
[m
-1
sr
-1
]
0.E+00
3.E-04
5.E-04
Extinction at 387 nm  [m
-1
]
Raman
Rayleigh
Extinction
(b) 
(a) 
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
bitmap of the first page in the PowerPoint document file. C# DLLs: Preview PowerPoint Document. Add necessary XDoc.PowerPoint DLL libraries into your created C#
adding text to pdf in preview; adding text to pdf form
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
position and save existing PDF file or output a new PDF file. Insert images into PDF form field. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo, scanned
add text to pdf using preview; how to enter text in pdf form
Upper troposphere water vapor
IV 
99
Finally 
Γ
abs
~ 0 because the molecular differential absorption (
α
abs
) by ozone and 
other trace gases can in first approximation be neglected at the 387 and 408 nm 
[24, 32, 34]. 
The contamination from the Raman liquid water 
signal can also be considered negligible for such 
narrow  spectral  filtering.  The  filtering  is, 
however, large enough to avoid the temperature 
dependence of the signals due to the integration 
of the Q branch spectral band [52].  
Figure 5 Rayleigh (molecular)  simulated  extinction 
at  387  and  407  nm  as  well  as  the  differential 
Rayleigh  correction  factor.  Note:  the  atmospheric 
pressure  and  temperature  at  Jungfraujoch  station 
(~3500 m) were considered 0° C and 650 hPa. 
3.2.4 SNR, detection limit, statistical and calibration errors 
The  signal  to  noise  ratio  is  estimated  as  the  ratio  between  the  water  vapor 
detected signal at 407 nm and b
H2O
which is the average of the last 500-1000 
bins (~ last 3-7.5 km) from the end of the signal. The detection limit is estimated 
as the water vapor equivalent mixing ratio due to the noise (b
H2O
) and it is ~ 10
-
2
g/kg. As for one single water vapor profile many data files have to be averaged 
(i.e.  min.  30  min  at  50  Hz  300mJ@1064nm),  the  statistical  error  can  be 
estimated as 1
σ
standard deviation. For the time average at a given altitude, the 
Poisson statistics (see annex A14) is used (
σ
2
~ N
photon-counts
) for the variance of 
the signal and if added to the background variance, the relative statistical error in 
time becomes: 
n
2
2
2
2
2
1
( )
1 2
( )
)
( )
H O
H O
H O
H O
H O
time
q
b
z
q
S
z
S
z
δ
=
+
Eq. (14) 
The final statistical error is calculated as the root square of the sum of previously 
obtained  time  variances,  cf.  Eq.  (14),  corresponding  to  the  number  of  bins 
considered  in  the  spatial  gliding-averaging  window  (i.e.  reported  resolution). 
The statistics of the nitrogen signal may be neglected as it reaches only ~ 0.2 % 
at the tropopause.  
At the  present time,  the major  uncertainty  remains the  approximated  external 
calibration using the in situ  value. In spite of the availability of this one point in 
situ calibration, future calibrations using radiosoundings performed regularly at 
3500
4500
5500
6500
7500
8500
9500
10500
11500
12500
0.0E+00 1.0E-05 2.0E-05 3.0E-05 4.0E-05
Rayleigh Extinction [sr
-1
m
-1
]
Altitude [m ASL]
0.95
0.96
0.97
0.98
0.99
1
Rayleigh Correction Factor 
387nm
407nm
Rayleigh
Correction
Factor
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
add text pdf file acrobat; how to add text field to pdf
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
page of your defined page number which starts from 0. For example, your original PDF file contains 4 pages. C# DLLs: Split PDF Document. Add necessary references
adding text to a pdf; add text field to pdf acrobat
Upper troposphere water vapor
IV 
100
the station itself will give a more precise value of the calibration constant. The 
horizontal measurements can be also used for calibration purposes.    
3.3  Water vapor Raman lidar example profile:  August 2
nd
, 2000  
The first measurement results at the Jungfraujoch station were already reported 
on 02 August 2000 [53]. This first water vapor profile and its related parameters 
such as nitrogen and water vapor signals, the signal to noise ratio - SNR, 1
σ
standard deviation, relative  statistical error,  water vapor partial and saturation 
pressure and the relative humidity are presented in Figure 6 (a,b,c). The SNR-
signal  to  noise  ratio-  was  considered  as  the  ratio  between  the  signal  to  the 
average of the last 500 # channels of the acquisition (i.e. noise) 
Figure 6  (a) Water vapor, nitrogen signals and the signal to noise ratio (SNR, (b) 
water vapor mixing ratio profile (q
H2O
) and the statistic errors, (c) water vapor partial 
pressure (P
q
), the saturation pressure ((P
sat
) and the relative humidity (RH). 
Note  that this first Raman  lidar  water vapor profile (resolution 150 m with  a 
gliding average window of 300 m) was obtained at Jungfraujoch on 02.08.2000 
(0:00-1:10 LT), with the laser emission set at 400 mJ (1064 nm) and a repetition 
rate of 20 Hz (~84000 averaged shots). The calibration altitude was considered 
at 3780 m with the in situ  water vapor 2.5 g/kg (T~ 1.3°C, P ~ 669 hPa and RH 
~ 40%). The integrated profile (IWV) between 3600 and 9000 m ASL gives  ~ 
3.1 
±
0.5 mm of precipitable water column (PWV). 
3500
4000
4500
5000
5500
6000
6500
7000
7500
8000
8500
9000
9500
10000
0
2
4
6
8
P
[hPa]
0
25
50
75
100
RH [%]
Pq
Psat
RH
3500
4000
4500
5000
5500
6000
6500
7000
7500
8000
8500
9000
9500
10000
1.E-02
1.E+00
1.E+02 1.E+04
1.E+06
H
2
O and N
2
signals
[a.u.]
Altitude  [m ASL]
1
10
100
1000
10000
SNR
nitrogen
water vapor
SNR
3500
4000
4500
5000
5500
6000
6500
7000
7500
8000
8500
9000
9500
10000
0.0 0.51.0 1.5 2.02.5 3.0 3.5 4.0
q
H2O 
[g/kg]
0
20
40
60
80
100
Relative Statistic Error [%]
q
Standard Deviation
(a
(b) 
(c) 
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
page PDF document file to one-page PDF files or they can separate source PDF file to smaller VB.NET PDF Splitting & Disassembling DLLs. Add necessary references
adding text box to pdf; how to add text fields to a pdf document
Upper troposphere water vapor
IV 
101
3.4  Typical profiles and integrated columns  
Since  August  2000  many  regular  data  series  have been  taken  and  treated in 
conformity  with  the  above-discussed  operations  (illustrated  in  Figure  2).  In 
Figure 7 are selected some typical profiles observed above the Alps. 
Figure  7  Upper  troposphere  typical  Raman  lidar  profiles  (a)  dry  (occurrence 
December-February), (b)  cirrus clouds  presence,  (c) wet (occurrence July-August) 
and (d) PBL residual layer (August 2003). 
Figure 7 (a) presents the situation of a very dry water vapor content  (IPW < 0.5 
mm) which occurs often in winter (December to January) while in Figure 7 (b) 
one may distinguish water vapor layers often attributed to the presence of cirrus 
clouds.  
A relatively wet (IPW~ 3-5 mm) upper troposphere occurring mostly in summer 
(July to August) corresponds to the profile shown in Figure 7 (c) and Figure 7 
(d)  illustrates  the nighttime residual layer  consequent  to  a daytime high PBL 
convection as was the case in August 2003 heat wave period.  
In Figure 8, the time series of the integrated water vapor column are presented 
together with the estimated 1
σ
standard deviation.  
3500
4000
4500
5000
5500
6000
6500
7000
7500
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
qH2O [g/kg]
Altitude  [m ASL]
0
50
100
150
200
RH [%]
q
RH
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
qH2O [g/kg]
0
50
100
150
200
RH [%]
q
RH
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
qH2O [g/kg]
0
50
100
150
200
RH [%]
q
RH
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
qH2O [g/kg]
0
50
100
150
200
RH [%]
q
RH
(a) 
(b) 
(c) 
(d) 
Upper troposphere water vapor
IV 
102
Figure 8 Integrated water vapor columns (IWV) calculated from Raman lidar profiles 
and the estimated contribution (JFJ add) of the non-measured first layer above the 
Jungfraujoch station.  
The water vapor content  of the first atmospheric layer  above  the station (non 
measured effectively by the lidar) is added to the total column (JFJ add in Figure 
8). Seasonal variation with minima in February and maxima in August can be 
observed. The driest measured upper troposphere nighttime air was ~ 0.28 mm 
and the wettest was ~10 mm, with the median value at 2.7 mm. Within the time 
step used in the data series (30 min to 2 h) the 1
σ
standard deviation varied from 
very low (stable) ~1% to very high ~78% variability in the atmospheric water 
vapor content, with a median value of 16%.     
3.5  Raman  lidar  and  co-located  water  vapor  measurements  at 
Jungfraujoch   
Water vapor measurements are performed at Jungfraujoch observatory by other 
complementary techniques as follows.  
Microwave  Radiometer  (MR):  A  microwave  radiometer  measures  the 
stratospheric  water  vapor  content  based  on  the  183  GHz  water  microwave 
emission.  Tropospheric  water  vapor  is  considered  more  as  a  perturbation 
(limitation),  and  thus  it  is  not  measured  by  the  microwave  radiometer.  In 
combination with MR technique, the Raman lidar is used to complete a profile 
covering the upper troposphere and the stratosphere regions and it can also be 
used  to  verify  the  inversion  methods  used  by  microwave  technique  for  the 
retrieval of low resolution stratospheric profile [54] .  
Precision  Filter  Radiometer  (PFR)
:
 sun  tracker  photometer  derives  the 
daytime total column water vapor taking into account the water vapor absorption 
at 718, 816 and 946 nm [55, 56].  
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
01.08.00 23:10
29.08.00 23:30
24.10.00 23:45
16.01.01 00:00
14.02.01 22:30
26.03.01 23:10
11.05.01 23:30
20.11.01 00:00
15.01.02 00:00
30.01.02 18:30
16.02.02 01:03
13.03.02 22:59
19.06.02 21:15
20.07.02 00:50
24.07.02 00:00
28.07.02 00:00
09.10.02 00:30
19.11.02 23:45
19.12.02 21:46
10.02.03 20:02
12.02.03 22:30
18.06.03 23:40
03.08.03 00:00
04.08.03 23:30
10.08.03 00:00
IWV [mm]
Raman lidar
JFJ add 
Upper troposphere water vapor
IV 
103
Fourier  Transform  Infrared  Spectroscopy  (FTIR):
Integrated  daytime 
column  measurements  are  performed  using  various  infrared  ro-vibrational 
absorption bands recorded by the high resolution, FTIR Spectrometer [57].     
Geophysical  Positioning  System  (GPS):  The  technique  is  based  on  the 
estimation of microwaves (1.2-1.5 GHz) propagation delay between the satellite 
(transmitter) and antenna (receiver) due to the atmospheric refractivity [58]. The 
ionospheric (dispersive part of the atmosphere) induced path delay is cancelled 
by the use of combination of dual emission frequencies. The tropospheric (non-
dispersive atmospheric part) delay can be decomposed on a dry part (i.e. zenith 
hydrostatic delay (ZHD) due to the induced dipole moment) and a wet part (i.e. 
zenith wet delay (ZWD) due to the permanent dipole of the water vapor). The 
data recorded by a GPS antenna (Swiss Topography Institute) at the station is 
used to derive the wet zenith atmospheric delay (ZWD), which is proportional to 
the  water  vapor  column  (IWV).  The  ZWD  is  generally  obtained  as  the 
difference  between the  zenith total delay and the  dry  hydrostatic contribution 
(ZHD) [59] (see also details of the GPS principle of the retrieval in annex A26).    
The GPS is the single co-located technique that takes nighttime measurements 
simultaneously with the Raman lidar. For comparison, the GPS data were first 
corrected for a bias (offset) probably due to the modeling of the GPS antenna. 
This  offset  was  calculated  by  taking  as  reference  the  daytime  PFR  hourly-
integrated column data based on the water vapor absorption at 946 nm. The GPS 
and PFR daytime data scatter plot was built for a statistically significant number 
of  points (~ 20.000 points)  covering many seasons (2000-2002 period) and is 
expressed in Eq. (15). 
[
] 1.040
[
] 1.342
GPS
PFR
IWV
V
mm
IWV
mm
mm
=
Eq. (15) 
Application of the above regression model led to homoscedastic residuals with a 
fairly low variance 1
σ
residuals
~ 0.9 mm, a relatively good correlation coefficient 
r
~ 0.8 and a regression line slope close to unity at 1.040. These considerations 
allow  further  comparison  of  the  Raman  lidar  upper  troposphere  integrated 
column with the GPS nighttime co-located measurements. Thus in Figure 9 the 
PFR (daytime), GPS (day and nighttime) and the Raman lidar (nighttime) IWP 
data are represented.  
Upper troposphere water vapor
IV 
104
Figure  9  Water  vapor  integrated  column  (IWV)  estimation  from  precision  filter 
radiometer  (PFR),  geographical  positioning  system  (GPS)  and  Raman  lidar 
collocated instruments at Jungfraujoch observatory. The GPS data were calibrated in 
daytime with the PFR data. 
Figure  10  Water  vapor  integrated 
column  (IWV) scatter plot between the 
Raman  lidar  and  the  GPS  collocated 
instruments at Jungfraujoch observatory. 
The  1
σ
statistical  variation  is 
represented for the lidar  data  while the 
GPS  variation  is  related  to  the 
calculation constants variation and not to 
natural water vapor fluctuations.  
A fairly good agreement between the GPS and Raman lidar data (slope ~ 0.95, 
r
2
~0.95,  ~0.1  mm  bias,  50  points)  is  noticed.  Figure  10  indicates  that  the 
approximate calibration method of the Raman lidar allows a realistic estimation 
of  the  water  vapor  above  the  Alps.  Furthermore,  it  proves  also  that  a  well-
calibrated  Raman  lidar  system  can  be  used  for  GPS  correction  [60]  by 
independently determining the wet zenith delay (WZD).  
3.6  Jungfraujoch Raman lidar and the regional radiosounding 
In  order  to  check  the  vertical  profiles  obtained  by  Raman  lidar,  the  single 
available  possibility  was  to  compare  these  profiles  with  the  closest 
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
01.01.00 
15.02.00 
31.03.00 
15.05.00 
29.06.00 
13.08.00 
27.09.00 
11.11.00 
26.12.00 
09.02.01 
26.03.01 
10.05.01 
24.06.01 
08.08.01 
22.09.01 
06.11.01 
21.12.01 
04.02.02 
21.03.02 
05.05.02 
19.06.02 
03.08.02 
17.09.02 
01.11.02 
16.12.02 
30.01.03 
16.03.03 
30.04.03 
14.06.03 
29.07.03 
12.09.03 
IWV [mm]
PFR
GPS
Raman lidar
y = 0.95x + 0.13
R
2
= 0.95
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10 11
IWV
GPS
[mm]  
IWVlidar
  [mm
m
 
IWP
Linear (IWP)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested