open pdf file in asp net c# : How to insert text box in pdf file software SDK cloud windows wpf asp.net class 1257037712-part425

Upper troposphere water vapor
IV 
105
radiosoundings. The closest space-time sondes are launched generally at midday 
and midnight from the meteorological station in Payerne (490 m, at ~ 80 Km 
North-West from Jungfraujoch). A typical radiosonde i.e. SRS400 is equipped 
with  a  Copper-Constantan  thermocouple  for  measuring  the  temperature,  a 
carbon-cellulose  hygristor  for  the  humidity  and  three  times  a  week  with  an 
ozone  detection unit  based  on  ECC  method  [61].   In  Figure 11 water  vapor 
mixing ratio from radiosonde and Raman lidar are compared in two summer and 
wintertime cases. Figure 11 (a) refers to  a dry upper troposphere case  in  the 
winter  (February)  when  the  sonde  was  equipped  with  a  frost  point  -  chilled 
mirror hygrometer (i.e. Snow-White, SW35/N from Meteolabor AG). Figure 11 
(b) refers to a wet summer situation (August) when the sonde was equipped with 
a standard carbon-cellulose thin film hygristor (i.e. from VIZ/Sippican) [62]. In 
both  cases there is  relatively  good  agreement for  large  altitude ranges in the 
homogeneous upper troposphere above the Swiss plateau.   
Some differences between the two profiles are evident at low altitudes, but these 
are  expected  and  mainly  due  to  the  different  geographical  locations,  local 
orographic effects, atmospheric variability, etc.  
Figure 11 Raman lidar and the closest space-time (Payerne) radiosounding water 
vapor  profiles:    (a)  Snow-white  sonde  equipped  with a chilled  hygristror  detector 
launched  at  ~  20:00  LT  and Raman averaged  profile from  20:00 to 22:00 LT  on 
14.02.2001;  (b)  standard  meteorological  sonde  equipped  with  carbon  –  cellulose 
hygristor launched at 1:00 LT and the Raman averaged profile from 1:00 to 2:00 LT 
on 23.07.2002. 
3500
4000
4500
5000
5500
6000
6500
7000
7500
8000
8500
9000
9500
10000
10500
11000
0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6
q
H2O 
[g/kg]
Altitude  [m ASL]
JFJ Raman lidar
Payerne radiosonde
3500
4000
4500
5000
5500
6000
6500
7000
7500
8000
8500
9000
9500
10000
10500
11000
0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0
q
H2O 
[g/kg]
JFJ Raman lidar
Payerne radiosonde
(a) 
(b) 
How to insert text box in pdf file - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to insert pdf into email text; how to enter text in pdf file
How to insert text box in pdf file - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text to a pdf in reader; add text pdf reader
Upper troposphere water vapor
IV 
106
In Figure 12 the Raman lidar integrated columns (3500 to 8 -10.000 m ASL) 
together  with  upper  troposphere  total  integrated  columns  above  Payerne  are 
plotted. 
Figure 12 Comparison of the integrated water vapor columns (IWV) from Raman lidar 
at JFJ profiles with the closest space-time radiosounding from Payerne- Switzerland.  
A  relatively  realistic  and  good  agreement  between  Raman  lidar  and  Payerne 
upper troposphere sounding as well the upper troposphere seasonal variation is 
evident.  
4. Conclusion 
This  work reviews the implementation  of a Raman lidar  technique  at  the JFJ 
station for the measurement of the water vapor  mixing ratio. The ratio of  the 
rotational - vibrational Raman shifts at ~ 407 nm (water vapor) and at ~387 nm 
(nitrogen), is used to derive the upper troposphere water vapor mixing ratio as a 
direct measurement. The Raman lidar setup specifications are described together 
with the water vapor retrieval procedure (profile calculation, corrections, errors, 
and  calibration).  After  application  of  the  necessary  corrections,  the  absolute 
values of  this profile are obtained by assimilating the first point (~ 75-300  m 
above the station) of the Raman profile with the in situ value determined from 
simultaneous meteorological measurements. The present configuration (i.e. 30-
70 mJ/355 nm laser pulse, 20-50 Hz repetition rate, 20 cm Newtonian telescope, 
ThornEmi PMT detectors)  allows  high resolution (75-150 m) profiling of  the 
water vapor in the upper troposphere (< 8-10 km) within 1-2 h integration time. 
The present detection limit is ~10
-2
g/kg (~15 ppmv).   Regular measurements 
have been taken since August 2000, and selected typical profiles are presented. 
Different  comparisons  with  co-located  techniques  such  as  PFR  and  GPS  at 
Jungfraujoch or with  the  closest  radiosoundings show  realistic agreement.  At 
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
20
22
24
26
28
30
32
34
01.01.00 
15.02.00 
31.03.00 
15.05.00 
29.06.00 
13.08.00 
27.09.00 
11.11.00 
26.12.00 
09.02.01 
26.03.01 
10.05.01 
24.06.01 
08.08.01 
22.09.01 
06.11.01 
21.12.01 
04.02.02 
21.03.02 
05.05.02 
19.06.02 
03.08.02 
17.09.02 
01.11.02 
16.12.02 
IWV [mm]
Payerne 0.5-10km
Payerne 3.5-10km
JFJ Raman lidar
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Extract Field Data. Data: Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work with
how to add text to a pdf document using reader; add text pdf acrobat
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
with .NET PDF Library. A best PDF annotator for Visual Studio .NET supports to add text box to PDF file in Visual C#.NET project.
adding text to pdf in reader; adding text to a pdf in acrobat
Upper troposphere water vapor
IV 
107
present, the Raman lidar setup is the only technique that is able to profile at high 
resolution  the  nighttime  water  vapor  above  JFJ  station.  A  more  precise 
calibration  method  based  for  example  on in situ  launches  of  radiosondes 
equipped  with  new  frost  point  hygrometers  is necessary.  The  stability  of  the 
calibration constant may then be verified based on the horizontal measurements, 
which might be a simple and inexpensive solution. 
The sensitivity of the method is expected to increase (~15-20 times 
1 ppmv) 
by coupling the existing astronomic Cassegrain telescope (
φ
76 cm) with a 3X 
more powerful laser source. The use of the  Hamamatsu photosensor modules 
instead of the ThornEmi PMT detectors may improve the detection efficiency 
and particularly its stability  at  local  electromagnetic  influences.  These further 
developments will allow retrieval of the stratospheric water vapor profiles, and 
make it possible to  investigate the  increase in lower stratosphere water  vapor 
and troposphere-stratosphere exchanges. 
An important future challenge is to address the difficulty of obtaining daytime 
water vapor measurements.  
References 
1. 
Eagleson,  P.S., The role of water in climate.  Proceedings  of  the  American 
philosophical society, 2000. 144(1). 
2. 
Chahine,  M.T., The hydrological cycle and its influence on climate.  Nature, 
1992(359): p. 373. 
3. 
Zuev, V.E., Laser Monitoring of the Atmosphere. Topics in Applied Physics, ed. E.D. 
Hinkley. Vol. 14. 1976: Springer-Verlag. 29-69. 
4. 
Starr, D.O., and Melfi, S. H. (Eds.), The role of water vapor in climate: a strategic 
research plan for the proposed GEWEX, water vapor project (GVaP). 1991: NASA 
Conf. Publ. 
5. 
Broecker, W., Lecture presnted AGU1996 - Baltimore US . 1996,  Lamont-Doherty 
Earth Observatory, Columbia University. 
6. 
Jones,  R.L.  and  J.F.B.  Mitchell, Climate Change - Is Water-Vapor Understood. 
Nature, 1991. 353(6341): p. 210-210. 
7. 
Houghton, J.T., Y. Ding, D.J. Griggs, M. Noguer, P.J. van der Linden, and D. Xiaosu, 
Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis: Contribution of Working Group I to the 
Third Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)
2001, Cambridge University Press, UK. p. 944. 
8. 
Gierens, K.M., U. Schumann, M. Helten, H. Smit, and A. Marenco, A distribution law 
for relative humidity in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere derved from 
three yers MOZAIC experiment. Ann. Geophys., 1999. 17(1218-1226). 
9. 
Kley, D., J.M. Russell, and C. Phillips, SPARC Assesement of upper tropospheric and 
stratospheric  water  vapor. 2000, WMO/ICSU/IOC: World Climate Research 
Progamm. p. 11-91. 
10. 
Schotland, R.M. Some observations of the vertical profile of water vapor by means of 
a ground based optical radar. in 4th Symposium on Remote Sensing of Environment
1966. U. Michigan, Ann Arbor. 
11. 
Melfi, S.H., J.D. Lawrence, and M.P. McCormick, Observation of Raman Scattering 
by Water Vapor in the Atmosphere. Applied Physics Letters, 1969. 15(9): p. 295-297. 
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program. C#.NET: Draw Markups on PDF File.
add text fields to pdf; how to insert text box in pdf
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Support to replace PDF text with a note annotation. Ability to insert a text note after selected text. Support to create a text box annotation to PDF file.
how to insert text in pdf reader; adding text to pdf file
Upper troposphere water vapor
IV 
108
12. 
Cooney, J., Remote measurement of atmospheric water vapor profiles using Raman 
component of laser backscatter. Journal of Applied Meteorology, 1970(9): p. 182-184. 
13. 
Shine,  K.P.  and  A. Sinha, Sensitivity of the Earths Climate to Height-Dependent 
Changes in the Water-Vapor Mixing-Ratio. Nature, 1991. 354(6352): p. 382-384. 
14. 
Clough, S.A., M.J. Iacono, and J.L. Moncet, Line by line calculations of atmospheric 
fluxes  and  cooling  rates:  applications  to  water  vapor. Journal of Geophysical 
Research-Atmospheres, 1992(97): p. 15761-15785. 
15. 
Sinha,  A. and  J.E. Harries, Water vapor and greenhouse traping: the role of far 
infrared absorbtion. Geophysical Research Letters, 1995(22): p. 2147-2150. 
16. 
Schneider, E.K.,  B.P.  Kirtman, and R.S. Lindzen, Tropospheric water vapor and 
climate sensitivity. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 1999(56): p. 1649-1658. 
17. 
Browell, E., T.D. Wilkerson, and T.J. McIlrath, Water vapor differential absorption 
lidar development and evaluation. Applied Optics, 1979. 
18. 
Bosenberg,  J., Ground-based differential absorption lidar for water vapor and 
temperature profiling: methodology. Applied Optics, 1998. 37(18): p. 3845-3860. 
19.  Ehret,  G.,  C.  Kiemle,  W.  Renger,  and  G.  Simmet, Airborne Remote-Sensing of 
Tropospheric Water-Vapor with a near-Infrared Differential Absorption Lidar System. 
Applied Optics, 1993. 32(24): p. 4534-4551. 
20. 
Wulfmeyer,  V.  and  J.  Bosenberg, Ground-based differential absorption lidar for 
water-vapor  profiling:  assessment  of  accuracy,  resolution,  and  meteorological 
applications. Applied Optics, 1998. 37(18): p. 3825-3844. 
21. 
Higdon, N.S., E.V. Browell, P. Ponsardin, B.E. Grossmann, C.F. Butler, T.H. Chyba, 
M.N. Mayo, R.J. Allen, A.W. Heuser, W.B. Grant, S. Ismail, S.D. Mayor, and A.F. 
Carter, Airborne Differential Absorption Lidar System for Measurements of 
Atmospheric Water-Vapor and Aerosols. Applied Optics, 1994. 33(27): p. 6422-6438. 
22. 
Lazzarotto, B., M. Frioud, G. Larcheveque, V. Mitev, P. Quaglia, V. Simeonov, A. 
Thompson, H. van den Bergh, and B. Calpini, Ozone and water-vapor measurements 
by  Raman  lidar  in  the  planetary  boundary  layer:  error  sources  and  field 
measurements. Applied Optics, 2001. 40(18): p. 2985-2997. 
23. 
Stead, R., Development of a Prototype Raman Lidar for Daytime Measurements of 
Water Vapour Mixing Ratio, in LPAS. 2003, EPFL: Lausanne. 
24. 
Ansmann, A., M. Riebesell, U. Wandinger, C. Weitkamp, E. Voss, W. Lahmann, and 
W. Michaelis, Combined Raman Elastic-Backscatter Lidar for Vertical Profiling of 
Moisture,  Aerosol  Extinction,  Backscatter,  and  Lidar  Ratio. Applied Physics B-
Photophysics and Laser Chemistry, 1992. 55(1): p. 18-28. 
25. 
Behrendt, A., T. Nakamura, M. Onishi, R. Baumgart, and T. Tsuda, Combined Raman 
lidar  for  the  measurement  of  atmospheric  temperature,  water  vapor,  particle 
extinction  coefficient,  and  particle  backscatter  coefficient. Applied Optics, 2002. 
41(36): p. 7657-7666. 
26. 
Cooney, J., K. Petri, and A. Salik, Measurements of High-Resolution Atmospheric 
Water-Vapor Profiles by Use of a Solar Blind Raman Lidar. Applied Optics, 1985. 
24(1): p. 104-108. 
27. 
de  Tomasi,  F.,  G.  Torsello,  and  M.R.  Perrone, Water-vapor mixing-ratio 
measurements in the solar-blind region. Optics Letters, 2000. 25(10): p. 686-688. 
28. 
Eichinger, W.E., D.I. Cooper, F.L. Archuletta, D. Hof, D.B. Holtkamp, R.R. Karl, 
C.R.  Quick, and J. Tiee, Development of a Scanning, Solar-Blind, Water Raman 
Lidar. Applied Optics, 1994. 33(18): p. 3923-3932. 
29. 
Ferrare, R., S.H. Melfi, D. Whiteman, K. Evans, G. Schwemmer, Y.J. Kaufman, and 
R.G. Ellingson. Raman Lidar and Sun Photometer Measurements of Aerosols and 
Water Vapor. in 18th ILRC. 1996. Berlin. 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
from PDF file. Read PDF metadata. Search text content inside PDF. Extract bookmark & outlines. Extract hyperlink inside PDF. PDF Write. Insert text, text box into
adding text to pdf; add text pdf professional
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Add text to PDF document. • Insert text box to PDF file. • Draw markups to PDF document. PDF Protection. • Add signatures to PDF document.
how to add text to a pdf file; adding text to pdf in preview
Upper troposphere water vapor
IV 
109
30. 
Goldsmith, J.E.M.  and S.E. Bisson. Daytime Raman lidar for vertical profiling of 
atmospheric water vapour. in 17th ILRC. 1994. Sendai / Japan. 
31. 
Lahmann,  W.,  I.  Eck,  J.  Glauer,  and  S.  Köhler. Solar-Blind Raman Lidar 
Measurements of Tropospheric Water Vapor Profiles. in poster
32. 
Sherlock,  V.,  A.  Garnier,  A.  Hauchecorne,  and  P.  Keckhut, Implementation and 
validation of a Raman lidar measurement of middle and upper tropospheric water 
vapor. Applied Optics, 1999. 38(27): p. 5838-5850. 
33. 
Vaughan, G., D.P. Wareing, L. Thomas, and V. Mitev, Humidity measurements in the 
free troposphere. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, 1988(114): 
p. 1471-1484. 
34.  Whiteman,  D.N.,  S.H.  Melfi,  and  R.A.  Ferrare, Raman Lidar System for the 
Measurement of Water-Vapor and Aerosols in the Earths Atmosphere. Applied Optics, 
1992. 31(16): p. 3068-3082. 
35.  Melfi, S.H. and D. Whiteman, Observation of Lower-Atmospheric Moisture Structure 
and Its Evolution Using a Raman Lidar. Bulletin of the American Meteorological 
Society, 1985. 66(10): p. 1288-1292. 
36. 
Mattis, I., A. Ansmann, D. Althausen, V. Jaenisch, U. Wandinger, D. Muller, Y.F. 
Arshinov, S.M.  Bobrovnikov, and I.B.  Serikov, Relative-humidity profiling in the 
troposphere with a Raman lidar. Applied Optics, 2002. 41(30): p. 6451-6462. 
37. 
Renaut,  D.,  J.C.  Pourny, and R. Capitini, Daytime Raman-lidar measurements of 
water vapor. Optics Letters, 1980. 5(6): p. 233-235. 
38. 
Grant,  W.B., Differential Absorption and Raman Lidar for Water-Vapor Profile 
Measurements - a Review. Optical Engineering, 1991. 30(1): p. 40-48. 
39. 
Goldsmith, J.E.M. and R. Ferrare. Performance Modeling of Daytime Raman Lidar 
Systems for Profiling Atmospheric Water Vapor. in 16th ILRC. 1992. Cambridge / 
UK. 
40. 
Marenco, F. and B. P.T, Diffrent possibilities for water vapor measurements by lidar 
in daytime at ENEA's obervatory in Lampedusa, Italy: a simulation. Journal of Optics 
A: Pure and Applied Optics, 2002(4): p. 408-418. 
41. 
Ferrare,  R.A., S.H.  Melfi, D.N. Whiteman, K.D.  Evans,  F.J. Schmidlin, and  D.O. 
Starr, A Comparison of Water-Vapor Measurements Made by Raman Lidar and 
Radiosondes. Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, 1995. 12(6): p. 1177-
1195. 
42. 
Sherlock,  V.,  A.  Hauchecorne, and  J.  Lenoble, Methodology for the independent 
calibration of Raman backscatter water-vapor lidar systems. Applied Optics, 1999. 
38(27): p. 5816-5837. 
43. 
Hinkley, E.D., Laser Monitoring of the Atmosphere. Topics in Applied Physics, ed. 
E.D. Hinkley. Vol. 14. 1976: Springer-Verlag. 
44. 
Penney, C. and M. Lapp, Raman scatering cross-section for water vapor. Journal of 
the Optical Society of America, 1976(66): p. 422-425. 
45.  Avila, G., J.M. Fernandez, B. Maté, G. Tejeda, and S. Montero, Ro-vibrational Raman 
cross-sections  in  the  OH  stretching  region. Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy, 
1999(196): p. 77-92. 
46. 
Larcheveque, G., I. Balin, R. Nessler, P. Quaglia, V. Simeonov, H. van den Bergh, 
and B. Calpini, Development of a multiwavelength aerosol and water-vapor lidar at 
the Jungfraujoch Alpine Station (3580 m above sea level) in Switzerland. Applied 
Optics, 2002. 41(15): p. 2781-2790. 
47. 
Magnus, G., Versuche über  die Spannkräfte des Wasser-dampfs. Ann. Phys. Chem, 
1844. 61: p. 225-247. 
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Add text to PDF document in preview. • Add text box to PDF file in preview. • Draw PDF markups. PDF Protection. • Sign PDF document with signature.
add text pdf acrobat; adding text to pdf reader
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
annotation. Ability to insert a text note after selected text. transparency. Support to create a text box annotation to PDF file in .NET project. VB
adding text to pdf form; adding text to a pdf file
Upper troposphere water vapor
IV 
110
48. 
NOAA, NASA, and USAF, U.S. standard atmosphere (76). 1976, U.S. government 
Printing Office: Washington / USA. 
49. 
Angström, A., On the atmospheric transmission of sun radiation and on dust in the 
atmosphere. Geogr. Ann., 1929. 11: p. 156-166. 
50. 
Ingold,  T.,  C.  Matzler,  N.  Kampfer,  and  A.  Heimo, Aerosol optical depth 
measurements by  means of  a Sun  photometer network in  Switzerland. Journal of 
Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, 2001. 106(D21): p. 27537-27554. 
51. 
Collis, R.T.H. and P.B. Russell, Lidar Measurement of Particles and Gases by Elastic 
Backscattering and Differential Absorption. Laser Monitoring of the Atmosphere, ed. 
E.D. Hinkley. 1976: Springer Verlag. 
52. 
Turner, D.D. and D. Whiteman, Remote Raman Spectroscopy. Profiling Water Vapor 
and Aerosols in the Troposphere Using Raman Lidars, in Handbook of Vibrational 
Spectroscopy, J.M.C.a.P.R.G. (Editors), Editor. 2002, John Wiley & Sons Ltd, 
Chichester. 
53. 
Balin, I., G. Larchevêque, P. Quaglia, V. Simeonov, H. van den Bergh, and B. Calpini, 
Water vapor profile by Raman lidar in the free troposphere from the Jungfraujoch 
Alpine  Station, in  Advances  in  global  change  research, M.e. Beniston, Climatic 
Changes: Implications for the Hydrological Cycle and Water Management, Editor. 
2002, Kluwer Academic Publisher: Dordrecht and Boston,. p. 123-138. 
54. 
Gerber, D., I. Balin, D. Feist, N. Kämpfer, V. Simeonov, B. Calpini, and H. van den 
Bergh, Ground-based water vapour soundings by microwave radiometry and Raman 
lidar on Jungfraujoch (Swiss Alps). Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions, 
2003. 3: p. 4833-4856. 
55. 
Schmid, B., J.J. Michalsky, D.W. Slater, J.C. Barnard, R.N. Halthore, J.C. Liljegren, 
B.N.  Holben, T.F. Eck, J.M.  Livingston, P.B. Russell, T. Ingold,  and  I.  Slutsker, 
Comparison  of  Columnar  Water-Vapor  Measurements  from  Solar  Transmittance 
Methods. Applied Optics, 2001. 40: p. 1886-1896. 
56. 
Ingold,  T.,  B. Schmid, C.  Matzler,  P.  Demoulin, and N.  Kampfer, Modeled and 
empirical approaches for retrieving columnar water vapor from solar transmittance 
measurements  in  the  0.72,  0.82,  and  0.94  mu  m  absorption  bands. Journal of 
Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, 2000. 105(D19): p. 24327-24343. 
57. 
Demoulin, P., B. Schmid, G. Roland, and C. Servais. Vertical column abundance and 
profile retrievals of water vapor above the Jungfraujoch. in Atmospheric Spectroscopy 
Applications, ASA96. 1996. Reims. 
58. 
Bevis, M., S. Businger, T.A. Herring, C. Rocken, R.A. Anthes, and R.H. Ware, Gps 
Meteorology  -  Remote-Sensing  of  Atmospheric  Water-Vapor  Using  the  Global 
Positioning System. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, 1992. 97(D14): p. 
15787-15801. 
59. 
Guerova, G., E. Brockmann, J. Quiby, F. Schubiger, and C. Matzler, Validation of 
NWP  mesoscale  models  with  Swiss  GPS  Network  AGNES. Journal of Applied 
Meteorology, 2003. 42(1): p. 141-150. 
60. 
Tarniewicz, J., O. Bock, J. Pelon, and C. Thom, Raman lidar for external GPS path 
delay  calibration  devoted  to  high  accuracy  height  determination. Physics and 
Chemistry of the Earth, 2002. 27(4-5): p. 329-333. 
61. 
Richner, H. and S. Hunerbein, Grundlagen aerologischer Messungen speziell mittels 
der Schweizer Sonde SRS 400. 1999, SMA MeteoSchweiz. 
62. 
Jeannet,  P.,  P.  Ruppert,  B.  Hoegger,  and  G.  Levrat. Atmosph¨ arische 
Wasserdampfprofile  mit-mittels  Taupunktspiegel–Hygrometer. in  DACH–MT  2001
2001. Wien. 
Pure rotational Raman on the JFJ-LIDAR  
111
Chapter V 
Temperature  and  other  atmospheric  retrievals  based  on  pure 
rotational Raman lidar technique  
The  retrieval  of  the  UTLS  temperature  profile  based  on  the  use  of  pure 
rotational  Raman spectra  (PRRS)  of  atmospheric  nitrogen  and  oxygen  is the 
main  subject  of  this  chapter.  The  implementation
1
of  a  double  grating 
polychromator (DGP) on the existent JFJ-LIDAR enables from May 2002 the 
recording  of  pure  rotational  Raman  lidar  nitrogen  and  oxygen  atmospheric 
returns  around  532  nm.  The DGP  module  allows  the  spectral  separation  (1
st
chamber)  and  appropriate  optical  combination  (2
nd
chamber)  of  two  narrow 
spectral bands from each Stokes and anti-Stokes branches, excited at 532 nm. 
Thus  beside  the  elastic  at  532  nm,  two  other  lidar  signals  are  acquired 
corresponding  to  pure  rotational  radiation  at  low  (i.e.  S
JL
(Z))  and  at  high 
quantum numbers (i.e. S
JH
(Z)).  
The sum of S
JL
(Z) and S
JH
(Z) is demonstrated to be temperature independent 
and may be used as a molecular reference. Furthermore it is used for calculation 
of the true absolute value of the elastic to molecular ratio and to determine the 
lidar  overlap  or  system  function.  In  the  presence  of  aerosols  or  clouds,  this 
signal  together  with  a  Rayleigh  reference  allows  direct  calculation  of 
backscatter, extinction and lidar ratio values.  
From the ratio of S
JL
(Z) and S
JH
(Z) signals, nighttime temperature profiles are 
retrieved. The temperature profiles together with the water vapor mixing ratio 
profiles, derived using the vibrational Raman signals of water vapor at 407 nm 
and nitrogen at 387 nm, allow the estimation of atmospheric relative humidity.  
These  atmospheric  retrievals  are  illustrated  in  this  chapter  based  on  an 
appropriate set of lidar observations in different atmospheric conditions. 
1
With  the  essential  collaboration  of  Institute  for  Atmospheric  Optics,  SB-RAS,  Tomsk-Russia    (Dr.  Y. 
Arshinov, Dr. S. Brobovnikov and Dr. I. Serikov) 
Pure rotational Raman on the JFJ-LIDAR  
113
1. Introduction 
Simultaneous measurements  of atmospheric temperature profiles together with 
water  vapor  and  aerosol  optical  properties  (i.e.  backscatter  and  extinction 
coefficients)  are  required  for  the  retrieval  and  interpretation  of  atmospheric 
relative humidity, planetary boundary layer (PBL) height and dynamics. Vertical 
temperature  and  humidity  profiles  are  usually  obtained  by  systematic, 
worldwide  radiosonde  measurements.  However,  the  standard  radiosondes  are 
not  equipped with instruments  for  aerosol  measurements. More,  the  temporal 
resolution of the observations is rather low, typically two radiosonde launches a 
day,  with  only single  data  readout  per  height  bin.  As a  result,  the  measured 
profiles  are  often  not  representative.  Therefore,  some  important  weather 
phenomena  such  as  the development  of a  convective  boundary layer  and the 
transition between cold and warm fronts cannot be resolved. 
Alternative  remote  sensing  techniques  like  lidar  can  be  extremely  useful  for 
supplying  temperature,  humidity,  and  aerosol  data  with  high  temporal  and 
spatial resolution. The  two lidar techniques used for temperature profiling are 
the Rayleigh and the pure rotational Raman methods. The Rayleigh approach [1] 
employs  the  proportionality  of  the  lidar  return  signal  due  to  molecular 
backscatter to the atmospheric density.  This method requires data on the density 
and pressure at a relatively high altitude (30-40 km) as a starting point for the 
retrieval  and  assumes  hydrostatic  equilibrium  through  the  entire  atmospheric 
column below this point. In addition, it does not work within the atmospheric 
layers having aerosol load [2]. Consequently, it can be used mainly in free of 
aerosols  stratospheric  regions  [3].  The  Rayleigh  method  applicability  can  be 
extended  to  lower  altitudes  by  employing  a  vibrational  Raman  signal  from 
atmospheric nitrogen to compensate for the aerosol influence [4].  
Cooney [5] was the first to propose the use of temperature dependence of the 
pure-rotational Raman spectra (PRRS) of atmospheric N
2
and O
2
molecules for 
temperature profiling. The  temperature is  deduced by  measuring the  intensity 
ratio of two portions with reverse temperature dependence from the S or/and O 
bands of the air PRRS [6, 7] excited by a laser radiation. Because of the low 
cross  section  of  the  spontaneous  Raman  scattering  the  resulting  PRRS  lidar 
returns from the atmosphere are normally about six orders of magnitude weaker 
than  the  return  signal  due  to  elastic  light  scattering  closely  spaced  in  the 
spectrum.  To  prevent  the  contamination  of  the  pure  rotational  Raman-lidar 
returns with spurious light from the elastic scattering one has to use devices with 
the out-of-band  rejections  higher  than 10
for  spectral  isolation of the  PRRS 
portions. ?? For this reason narrowband interference filters usually isolate PRRS 
signals or diffraction grating based instruments are used. The interference filters 
are easy to use, have a relatively high transmission and out-of-band rejection up 
Pure rotational Raman on the JFJ-LIDAR  
114
to 10
-9
. However, their bandwidth and central wavelength position are sensitive 
to temperature variations and have long-term drifts [8]. To achieve the necessary 
rejection ratio,  the grating instruments  have to be used either  in  combination 
with atomic resonance absorption filters or as double-grating devices [9]. The 
advantages of the grating based instruments are their proven long-term stability 
and the possibility to sum portions from the O and S branches with the same 
temperature dependence enhancing the signal to noise ratio (SNR) [9]. Further 
improvement  of  the  technique  for daytime  operation  (aimed at  the  signal-to-
background enhancement) is achieved by employing an additional Fabry-Perot 
interferometer  (FPI)  with  free  spectral  range  equal  to  the  spectral  spacing 
between the nitrogen PRRS lines [10]. The FPI cuts out the unwanted daylight 
background from the spectral gaps between the PRRS lines without reducing the 
optical transmission of the rotational lines themselves. 
The aerosol extinction profile is usually measured by elastic backscatter lidars. 
In  order  to  retrieve  the  extinction  coefficient  by  inverting  the  elastic-lidar 
equation in the most frequently  used Fernald or Klett approaches, the  aerosol 
extinction–to-backscatter ratio and the extinction at a reference altitude have to 
be  assumed  [11,  12].  Using  the  elastic  and  vibrational  Raman  signals,  the 
retrieval  of the aerosol  extinction  coefficient  is  possible  [13]  with  the  single 
assumption made on the wavelength dependence of the aerosol extinction [14].  
Because  of  the  spectral  closeness  of  the  PRRS  and  the  Cabannes  line,  the 
aerosol  extinction  can  be  obtained  from  the  PRRS  signal  without  any 
assumption about the aerosol and atmosphere optical properties (see Figure 1).  
Figure 1 Overview of lidar-backscattered signals at 532 nm. Note: the PRRS is  ~two 
order of magnitude higher then the ro-vibrational of nitrogen and oxygen (from [15]).   
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested