open pdf file in asp net c# : How to insert text box on pdf Library SDK component asp.net wpf .net mvc 1257037713-part426

Pure rotational Raman on the JFJ-LIDAR  
115
The  temperature  dependence 
(Figure 2), of the PRRS, which is 
the  main  obstacle  for  aerosol 
measurements,  can  be  solved 
considering  that  the  sum  of  the 
integrals  of  the  O  and  S  or  of 
parts  of  them  is  temperature 
invariant. On the contrary, the use 
of  their  ratio  will  give  a  signal 
with  an  enhanced  sensitivity  to 
the temperature variations. 
Figure 2 PRRS dependency with the temperature (from [16] ) 
It is known that the intensity of the spectral envelope of either O- or S- branch of 
a PRRS is expressed by Eq. (1) 
' ''
( 1)
exp
J
J
J J
Bhc J J
I
A c w
KT
+
= ⋅ ⋅ ⋅
Eq. (1) 
where A is a normalizing parameter to establish the absolute value ( A ~1/T), C
J
is  the relative line strength, w
J
is the nuclear spin  weight, B is the molecular 
rotational constant and J is the rotational quantum number designating a mean 
value  for    the  upper  (J’)  and  lower  (J’’)  quantum  states.  The  frequency 
separation of the exciting and scattering lines is 4B (J’’+3/2), with B ~1.83 cm
-1
for  the N
2
molecule. The  rotational lines  are  discrete  and separated  by  some 
tenths  of  nm.  The  record  and  the  use  afterwards  of  the  lidar  signals 
correspondent to PRRS excited at 532 nm are presented here after as follows. 
In the next section (2) are described in the 1
st
part (2.1.) the implementation of 
the DGP module on the JFJ-LIDAR system and in the 2
nd
part (2.2.) the PRRS- 
based  algorithms  for  the  temperature,  aerosol  extinction,  backscatter 
coefficients, and other related  retrievals such as  relative  humidity, cirrus lidar 
ratio, lidar system overlap function, etc. These above-mentioned retrievals  are 
illustrated in section 3 on different atmospheric conditions.  
2. PRRS: implementation and retrievals algorithms 
2.1  Implementation of the DGP on the JFJ-LIDAR  
The double grating polychromator (DGP) was implemented in May 2002 on the 
existing  JFJ-LIDAR [17] at the Jungfraujoch station. The system described on 
How to insert text box on pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text fields to a pdf; how to add text fields to pdf
How to insert text box on pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to insert text into a pdf using reader; how to insert text in pdf using preview
Pure rotational Raman on the JFJ-LIDAR  
116
[17] was also modified in May 2002 passing from an OFF axis configuration 
(separated  three  beams  emission)  to  an  ON/OFF  axis  configuration  (coaxial 
emission). A schematic overview of the new layout and the positioning of the 
DGP were already shown in chapter II - section 3.1 in Figures 9 and 10. The 
former depolarization module at 532 nm was removed and instead, the DGP was 
optically coupled to the existent Filter Polychromator Module (FPM) of the JFJ-
LIDAR system as shown in the Figure 3.  
Figure 3 Optical coupling of the DGP module with the existent FPM  
The initial spectral separation of the optical signals is carried out by a modified 
version  of  the  Filter  Polychromator  Module  (FPM)  described  in  Chapter  II 
(Section 3.1 and Figure 11) as well as in [17].    
The backscattered radiation around 532 nm is focused on the head of an optical 
fiber  (OF)  mounted  in  an  adjustable  (x,y,z)  support.  The  radiation  is  thus 
injected  trough  the  optical  fiber  on  the  first  chamber  of  the  double  grating 
polychromator (DGP). The DGP module used here is a slightly modified version 
of the largely described version in [18]. 
A picture of the DGP opened is presented in Figure 4 (a) while in Figure 4 (b) 
the correspondent simplified optical layout is illustrated.  
The  input  of  the  DGP  is  connected  to  the  532  nm  output  of  the  filter-
polycromator via a 600 
µ
m
silica fiber. The fiber serves also as a scrambler and 
an entrance slit for the first part of the DGP, and the fiber diameter defines the
overlap function of the lidar temperature channel. 
(1
(2
(3
(4
(5
(1) 
Telescope 
optical 
coupling 
Filter 
Polychromator 
Module 
(FPM)  
(2) Dichroic beam splitter 
(3)  Optical  fiber  (OF) 
adjustable (x, y, z) head  
(4) Optical fibers coupling: 
FPM
DGP
PMTs 
(5) DGP protection cover 
(6
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Extract Field Data. Data: Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work with
adding text pdf files; add text pdf
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
C# PDF: Add Text Box. C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Text Box to PDF Page in C#.NET. C# Explanation to How to Add Text Box to PDF Page in C# Project with .NET PDF Library.
add text pdf file acrobat; adding text to a pdf form
Pure rotational Raman on the JFJ-LIDAR  
117
18600 
18700 
18800 
18900 
19000 
0.2 
0.4 
0.6 
0.8 
Wave number, cm
-1 
nm
532.075
0=
λ
Low J channel
High J channel
Figure  4 DGP (a) picture view  and (b) simplified optical layout. Note: L lenses, G 
refractive diffraction gratings and F focal points/slits. 
The DGP consists of two identical, Litrow configuration polychromators, based 
on 600 gr/mm gratings (G) operated in the 5
th
order. Achromatic doublet lenses 
(L) perform collimation and imaging in the polychromators
The inverse linear 
dispersion of each of the two parts is ~1.0 nm/mm. Four 600 
µ
m core diameter 
fused silica  fibers connect the two  parts  of the  DGP  operated  in a dispersion 
subtraction mode. As a result, the radiation of the pairs symmetric to the 532 nm 
line is optically summed at the exit fibers of the second polychromator leading 
to the signal enhancement. 
The  double  grating  polychromator 
(DGP)  configuration  is  needed  to 
achieve  suppression  level  of  the 
elastically  scattered light  higher  than 
10
-8
. DGP selects four  portions  from 
the  Stokes  and  anti-Stokes  branches 
of  the  PRRS  centered  on  the 
excitation  wavelength  at 532  nm  (as 
shown  in  Figure  5).  This  radiation, 
composed of the nitrogen and oxygen 
rotational  lines  (0.05  cm
-1
width,  8 
cm
-1
inter-lines  separation),  is 
proportional  to  the  pure  molecular 
atmosphere, 
without 
aerosols 
backscattered light. 
Figure 5 Illustration of the four PRRS portions  
The output optical fibers have
a core diameter of 1300 
µ
m and deliver the signal 
to the detecting PMTs. The elastic signal at 532 nm is taken from the first stage 
 
OF      
F
1
from FP 
F
2
1
L
1
G
2
L
2
(L
2
(L
1
(G
1
(G
2
(F
1
(F
2
(a) 
(b) 
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
C#.NET: Add Text Box to PDF Document. Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program.
add text box to pdf; add text pdf file
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Support to replace PDF text with a note annotation. Ability to insert a text note after selected text. Support to create a text box annotation to PDF file.
adding text to a pdf in acrobat; how to add text to a pdf document
Pure rotational Raman on the JFJ-LIDAR  
118
of the DGP by a 600 
µ
m fiber. Detailed information about the DGP design can 
be found in [18] and annex A27. 
Modified Hamamatsu photosensor modules in photon-counting mode, model H-
7421-40, detect the  pure  rotational  Raman  signals. The original  TTL forming 
stage in the electronic block of this module was eliminated because it caused 
reduction in the counting rate.  
A separate multi-channel scaler MS 8/10 developed at IOA
2
acquires the PRRS 
signals.  A  computer  (PC)  via  LabView  based  software controls  the  transient 
digitizers. A second computer controls the multi-channel scaler under Delphi 6 
based custom software.      
2.2  Algorithms of the atmospheric retrievals 
2.2.1 Temperature profiling 
The PRRS lidar method exploits the reverse or inverse temperature dependence 
of  the  low-  and  high-quantum  number  transitions  intensities  of  the  pure 
rotational  Raman  spectra.  The  temperature  is  derived  from  the  ratio of  lidar 
signals  S
JH
(z)  and  S
JL
(z), [5] corresponding  to  portions  of the  pure rotational 
Raman  spectra  with  high  and  respectively  low  rotational  quantum  numbers 
using the following relationship [9] 
( )
( )
ln
( )
JL
JH
A
T Z
S Z
B
S
Z
=
Eq. (2) 
where  A  and  B  are  calibration  constants  which  may  be  both  calculated  or 
experimentally determined. To enhance the signal  levels, the Stokes and anti-
Stokes  bands  with  equal  rotational  quantum  numbers  (same  temperature 
dependence) are optically summed as will be explained in the system description 
(2.2). The 1
σ
statistical errors formula (
δ
T
stat
) is given by  
2
2
2
δ
( )
δ
( )
A
( )
( )
( )
ln
B
( )
( )
JL
JH
stat
JL
JH
JL
JL
S
Z
S
Z
S Z
S
Z
S
Z
S
Z
T
Z
δ
=
+
Eq. (3) 
In addition to the statistical error (
δ
T
stat
), the calibration error (
δ
T
AB
) due to the 
determination and the variability of A and B is estimated as 
2
Institute of Applied Optics , Tomsk-Russia 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Extract bookmark & outlines. Extract hyperlink inside PDF. PDF Write. Insert text, text box into PDF. Edit, delete text from PDF. Insert images into PDF.
how to add text boxes to pdf; add text to pdf file
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Add text to PDF document. • Insert text box to PDF file. • Draw markups to PDF document. PDF Protection. • Add signatures to PDF document.
adding text to pdf document; how to add text box to pdf
Pure rotational Raman on the JFJ-LIDAR  
119
(
)
(
)
2
A
2
2
A
B
2
( )
( )
ln
B
ln
B
( )
( )
1
( )
AB
JL
JH
S
Z
S
Z
JL
S
Z
S
Z
JH
T
Z
δ
=
+
Eq. (4) 
In this work, the calibration constants were estimated by non-linear fitting with 
the closest space-time radiosonde temperature profile (Payerne, ~ 80 km NW)
3
For  comparison,  the  A  and  B  constants  were  also  calculated  from  the 
temperature profile given by US Standard Atmosphere 1976 model [19]. 
2.2.2 Pure rotational Raman signal: a molecular reference 
The surface envelope of the rotational lines (Stokes or anti-Stokes) is invariant 
with respect to the temperature changes and thus the sum of the portions with 
high (J
H
) and respectively low (J
L
) rotational quantum numbers may compensate 
the temperature dependence. The sum of selected pure-rotational Raman spectra 
portions with low and high J  
( )
( )
( )
R
JL
JH
S Z
Z
S Z
S
Z
=
+
Eq. (5)  
that  have  almost  equal  but  opposite  temperature  dependence  is  practically 
temperature  independent.  This  sum  is  proportional  to  the  molecular  number 
density and may be used as a pure molecular reference. The ratio between the 
elastic  at  532nm  (E
532nm
 to  S
R
signals  is  thus  proportional  to  the  total  to 
molecular  backscatter  ratio,  which  is  a  simple  parameter  quantifying  the 
aerosols atmospheric load for the altitudes with complete overlap
4
. Normalizing 
this ratio to the unity in regions of pure molecular evidence, the proportionality 
constant can be derived and finally, the true value of the total to the molecular 
backscatter can thus be retrieved. For the incomplete overlap altitudes, the ratio 
between the PRRS
532
in free troposphere conditions and a simulated molecular 
(Rayleigh)  signal  offers  a  very  good  estimation  of  the  overlap  function.  As 
generally used in this work, the simulated molecular lidar signals, are based on 
the molecular backscattering (
β
m
) and extinction (
α
m
) coefficients given below 
[20]: 
4.09
-32
m
air
550
β
(z)=5.45 x 10
n ( )
λ
Z
Eq. (6)   
8
( )
)
( )
3
m
m
Z
Z
π
α
β
=
Eq. (7) 
with 
β
m
expressed in m
-1
sr
-1
α
m
in m
-1
and 
λ
in nm. 
3
All radiosondes used here were launched at the midnight 01:00 LT from Payerne meteorological station 
4
The overlap is related to the degree of spatial coverage between the field of view of the telescope and the laser 
beam    
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Add text to PDF document in preview. • Add text box to PDF file in preview. • Draw PDF markups. PDF Protection. • Sign PDF document with signature.
add text to pdf file reader; add text box to pdf file
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
annotation. Ability to insert a text note after selected text. transparency. Support to create a text box annotation to PDF file in .NET project. VB
how to insert text box in pdf; how to add text to pdf file with reader
Pure rotational Raman on the JFJ-LIDAR  
120
The air number density (n
air
) is estimated based on the US Standard Atmosphere 
1976 model [19] initialised with the measured temperature (T) and pressure (P) 
at the Jungfraujoch station (see annex A3). 
2.2.3 Backscatter - Extinction Coefficients and Lidar Ratio  
To measure the aerosol extinction by the PRRS method we use the sum S
R
0
2
1
( )
( )
( )
( )exp 2 [ ( )
( )]
Z
m
a
R
JL
JH
R
Z
S Z
Z
S Z
S
Z
Const
Z
z
z dz
Z
β
α
α
=
+
=
+
Eq. (8) 
where 
β
R
is  the  average  value  for  the  Raman  backscattering, 
α
and 
α
m
are 
correspondingly the aerosol and molecular extinction coefficients. It can easily 
be shown by direct calculations that S
R
is practically temperature independent 
for suitably selected S
JL
(z), and S
JH
(z). The aerosol extinction is then derived as 
( )
1
( )
ln
2
( )
R
a
m
RCS Z
Z
d
Z
dz
z
RCS Z
α
=−
Eq. (9) 
where RCS
m
is a  simulated  range  corrected  molecular  signal. The RCS
m
was 
calculated following [20] and using air number density profiles based on the US 
Standard  Atmosphere  model  [19]  initialized  with  the  actual  temperature  and 
pressure values at the lidar site. In Eq. 9, the extinction wavelength dependence 
was  neglected  because  of  the  small  separation  between  the  excitation  and 
scattered wavelengths. 
The total extinction 
α
(z) is then obtained as the sum of the particle 
α
a
(z) and 
calculated  molecular  extinction 
α
m
(z)  profiles.  Finally,  the  total  backscatter 
coefficient 
β
(z)  is retrieved from  the  extinction profile  and the elastic  signal 
measured at the excitation wavelength S
E
(z): 
2
0
( )
)
( )exp 2
( )
Z
s
E
Z
Z
KZ S Z
zdz
β
α
=
Eq. (10) 
The system constant K
s
is found by normalizing the backscatter profile to a pure 
molecular  signal  at  a  reference  altitude defined  with  the  help  of  the  sum S
signal. The scattering (total to molecular backscatter) ratio is retrieved from the 
S
E
/S
R
ratio  for  altitudes  with  complete  overlap.  The  proportionality  constant 
between the scattering ratio and the S
E
/S
ratio is derived from measurements 
taken in aerosol free conditions.  
All above – described algorithms were implemented in Lab View routines (see 
the example of temperature retrieval shown in annex A28).  
Pure rotational Raman on the JFJ-LIDAR  
121
3. Results and Discussions 
3.1  PRRS as molecular reference    
The pure rotational Raman transitions are specific to the N
2
and O
2
molecules 
and independent of aerosols interference and thus the corresponding lidar signals 
may be used as molecular reference (see Figure 6, left panel). To compensate 
the  temperature  dependence  the  sum  (S
R
 is  considered.  Un  example  of 
calculation of total to molecular ratio is given (Figure 6, right panel).  
Figure  6 The PRRS and the calculated [20] Rayleigh range corrected  backscatter 
profiles in a clear sky atmosphere situation (left panel) and their ratio (right panel) in 
an aerosol-cirrus-clouds load. 
Figure  7  Scatter  plot  between 
Rayleigh and PRRS at 532 nm (only 
complete  overlap  points  were 
considered) 
3500
5000
6500
8000
9500
11000
12500
14000
15500
17000
18500
20000
0.E+00
5.E-07
1.E-06
2.E-06
RCS at 532 nm [m
-1
sr
-1
ASL [m]
0
1
2
3
4
5
Raman/Rayleigh Ratio
Rayleigh
PRSS
Raman to Rayleigh
Ratio
3500
5000
6500
8000
9500
11000
12500
14000
15500
17000
18500
20000
1.E+07
1.E+08
1.E+09
1.E+10
RCS at 532 nm [a.u] 
ASL [m]
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Elastic to Raman Ratio
PRRS
Elastic
Elastic-Raman Ratio
y = 0.9941x + 1E-08
R
2
= 0.9989
0.E+00
2.E-07
4.E-07
6.E-07
8.E-07
1.E-06
1.E-06
0.E+00 3.E-07 5.E-07 8.E-07 1.E-06
Rayleigh at 532 nm  [m
-1
sr
-1
-PRRS at 532 nm [msr1]
Scatter Plot
Linear (Scatter Plot)
Pure rotational Raman on the JFJ-LIDAR  
122
An excellent correlation (see Figure 7) is noticed when compare the PRRS (S
R
with the simulated lidar Rayleigh signal based on US1976 atmospheric model 
and  the  semi-empirical  backscatter  cross-section  proposed  by  [20].  This 
confirm:  (i)  the  possibility  to  use  the  sum  of  PRRS  signals  as  molecular 
reference and (ii) the accuracy of both US 1976 model and backscatter cross-
section used [20] 
PRRS signal (S
R)
may be successfully used 
for the determination of the system function 
K
S
(Z).  Particular  advantage  is  the 
determination  of  the  system  function  in 
regions with incomplete overlap (Figure 8). 
Thus  lower  altitudes  signals  can  be 
retrieved.  These  determinations  are 
preferable  to  be  done  from  measurements 
taken in free of aerosol regions.  
Figure  8  The  scatter  plot  between  Rayleigh 
and PRRS at 532 nm for the complete overlap 
(left  panel)  and  the  Rayleigh  and  PRRS 
togheter  with  the  overlap  function  O(z) 
estimation (right panel) 
3.2  Backscatter - extinction – lidar ratio
5
Following the algorithms described in Chapter III - Section 2.2 total backscatter 
and  total  extinction  coefficients,  and  the  lidar  ratio  were  obtained.  They  are 
shown together with the temperature profile in Figure 9.  Related examples are 
illustrated in Figure 11 b and in Figure 12 a. 
3.3  Temperature profiling    
The  first  step  towards  regular  operation  of  the  temperature  channel  was  to 
determine  the  calibration  constants  A  and  B  in  Eq.  (2).  They  were  initially 
obtained by non-linear fitting of the lidar to a model temperature profiles. The 
model profile was calculated according to the US standard atmosphere model 
[19] and initialized with pressure and temperature corresponding to the values 
measured in situ  at the lidar altitude (3580 m). To verify the applicability of the 
atmospheric  model,  a  simulated  pure  molecular  (Rayleigh)  lidar  profile  S
m
calculated from the model-derived density, was compared to a S
R
profile. The 
lidar profile was taken on the night of 27
th
July, 2002 in the middle of a four-day 
5
This approach is completely described in Chapter III, Section 2. 
3580
3830
4080
4330
4580
4830
5080
5330
5580
5830
5.E-10
5.E-07
1.E-06
RCS at 532 nm [m
-1
sr
-1
ASL [m]
0
0.25
0.5
0.75
1
Overlap function 
Rayleigh
PRRS
Overlap
Pure rotational Raman on the JFJ-LIDAR  
123
period  of high-pressure  conditions and  negligible aerosol  load. The simulated 
and the  lidar  profiles  were  fitted at an altitude of  7500 m.  The result  of this 
comparison is presented in Figure 9a. The almost perfect agreement between the 
two profiles shows: (i) that the atmospheric model describes adequately the air 
density i.e. the temperature and  pressure profiles  above Jungfraujoch, and  (ii) 
that the sum of PRRS signals (S
R
) depends on the temperature only trough the 
air density. The calibration constants retrieved by using the model temperature 
are correspondingly: A = 310.8 K and B = 0.67. We derived the A and B values 
for the same lidar measurements by fitting a lidar to a radiosonde temperature 
profile,  assuming  horizontal  homogeneity  of  the  atmosphere.  Since  the 
measurements were taken in the middle of a period of stable, high atmospheric 
pressure conditions, such an assumption seems to be reasonable. The radiosonde 
was  launched  during  the  lidar  measurement  from  Payerne,  situated  at 
approximately 80 km West of Jungfraujoch. 
Figure 9 (a) PRRS, radiosonde and US1976 model temperature profiles together with 
the  lidar  statistical error  estimation, and  (b)  Scatter  plot between  radiosonde  and 
PRRS temperature profiles 
The A and B values derived from radiosonde comparison are correspondingly 
307.1 K and 0.66. The model, radiosonde, and lidar temperature profiles for 27 
July are presented in Fig. 6b. All the three profiles show clearly the tropopause 
height at ~14000 m. The lidar and radiosonde data show very good agreement 
for  the lower part  of the  profile  as seen  from  the  scattered  plot presented  in 
Figure 9c. The most serious disagreement is observed in the tropopause region 
3500
5000
6500
8000
9500
11000
12500
14000
15500
17000
18500
20000
200
220
240
260
280
300
T [K]
0
2
4
6
8
10
1Sigma Stat.Er [K]
PRRS
JFJ
Radiosonde
US1976
1Sigma
(a) 
(b) 
y = 0.98x + 4.18
R
2
= 0.99
200
220
240
260
280
200
220
240
260
280
T
radiosounde
[K] 
 TPRRS
S
  [K]  
T Scatter Plot
Linear (T Scatter
Plot)
Pure rotational Raman on the JFJ-LIDAR  
124
where  both  instruments  and  especially  the  lidar  have  lower  accuracy.  The 
statistical error of the lidar is lower than 0.5 K for altitudes bellow 9500 m, 1.5 
K at the top of the troposphere, reaching values of 4.5 K at the highest point of 
the profile. To estimate the reliability of the calibration method, we studied also 
the variance of the calibration constants, derived from a comparison between the 
lidar  and the  radiosonde  temperature  profiles. Only  profiles with temperature 
deviation of less than ± 2° at 3580 m with respect to the temperature measured 
at the lidar site and drifted in the direction of Jungfraujoch were used for this 
calibration. The average values of A and B derived by fitting to eight radiosonde 
profiles, taken in July 2002 (four profiles) and August 2003 (four profiles), are 
correspondingly  A  = 301.8 (min. 298.4 max. 307.1)  and B = 0.65 (min.  0.62 
max. 0.67). The calibration  constant values derived by fitting to  a radiosonde 
profile show relatively low variance and their values do not differ by more than 
4%  for  A  and  8%  for  B,  from  the  values  determined  by  the  use  of  the 
atmospheric  model for  calibration. The  differences  appear mostly because the 
retrieval of  A and B  is based on comparison  of  data  obtained  with  different 
radiosondes  and  using  different  time  and  space  averaging  of  the  lidar  data 
profiles.  Furthermore,  the  radiosondes  and  the  lidar,  with  rare  exceptions, 
sample different air masses. Differences of 1 % for A and B lead to temperature 
errors of correspondingly ~ 1% and 0.5%.  
Figure 10 a) Range corrected sum PRRS (S
R
), elastic (S
E
) and the S
E
/S
R
ratio b) 
lidar  ratio,  and  backscatter  and  extinction  coefficients  c)  lidar  and  radiosonde 
temperature profiles. The profiles were taken on 13.05.2001 between 23:00-23:30 LT 
0.E+00 3.E-04 5.E-04 8.E-04
Extinction [m
-1
] and 
Backscatter [m
-1
sr
-1
] x 20  
0
20
40
60
80
100
Lidar Ratio
Total Extinction
Total Backscatter
Lidar Ratio
200
220
240
260
280
T [K]
PRRS 
Radiosonde
JFJ
3500
4500
5500
6500
7500
8500
9500
10500
11500
12500
13500
14500
1.E+06 1.E+08
1.E+10 1.E+12
RCS at 532 nm [a.u.] 
Altitude  [m ASL]
1
10
100
Elastic to PRRS Ratio
PRRS
Elastic
Elastic to
PRRS ratio
(a) 
(b) 
(c) 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested