open pdf file in asp net c# : Add text to pdf document in preview software control dll winforms web page .net web forms 1257037714-part427

Pure rotational Raman on the JFJ-LIDAR  
125
Therefore, to achieve a better calibration method more, accurate measurements 
are needed. Since the A and B values depend mostly on the relative position of 
the PRRS portions used for temperature retrieval, i.e. on the parameters of the 
DGP, an absolute calibration of the lidar is possible. Such a calibration can be 
performed  by  observing  the  Raman  scattering  from  the  air  at  different 
temperatures in laboratory conditions using only  the DGP and the operational 
photodetectors from the lidar receiver. Therefore, we plan to make an absolute 
calibration in the near future. 
We performed some tests of the PRRS channel in order to verify the rejection 
level  at  the  Cabannes  wavelength  in  the  PRRS  channels.  The  initial  test 
measurements  were  taken  under  weather  conditions  with  thick  and  optically 
dense clouds producing high backscatter.  
The  simultaneously measured  range corrected 532  nm  elastic and PRRS  sum 
signals,  presented  in  Figure  10a,  clearly  demonstrate,  that  there  is  no 
enhancement in the PRRS sum signal within the cloud i.e., there is no cross talk 
even  for  total-to-molecular  backscatter  ratio  values  exceeding  70. This  ratio, 
shown in the same figure, was obtained by normalizing the elastic-PRRS sum 
signals ratio to the pure molecular scattering in the aerosol free region around 
5000 m. The, derived  by the  PRRS method, nighttime  profiles  of the aerosol 
extinction  and  backscatter at 532  nm are presented  Figure  10b.  They  exhibit 
maximum extinction of up to 8.10
-4
m
-1
and strong backscatter of up to 0.4.10
-4
m
-1
sr
-1
in the cloud at   11 000 m ASL. The temperature profile, retrieved from 
the same measurement shown Figure 10c, also follows the general behavior of 
the  radiosonde  profile  but  reveals  the  local  features.  For  example,  two 
inversions, one below, and the other near the cloud base are well pronounced. 
The second inversion is well linked to the cloud stratification and corresponds to 
the  cloud  region  with  lower  backscatter  and  extinction  i.e.  lower  particle 
concentration. 
3.4  Aerosol - water vapor - temperature: horizontal sounding   
In the subsequent tests, scattering from a topographic target was used. The lidar 
was pointed at a steep, snow-covered mountain at approx. 8 km distance. The 
PRRS sum signal (S
R
) shows no increase at 8 km, whilst the corresponding 532 
nm  elastic  signal  at  the  same  distance  has  signature  of  saturation  and  even 
overshot (see Figure 11b).  
Add text to pdf document in preview - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add editable text box to pdf; add text box in pdf document
Add text to pdf document in preview - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add a text box to a pdf; add text to pdf reader
Pure rotational Raman on the JFJ-LIDAR  
126
Figure 11 a) Laser beam trajectory during the horizontal observations along an ~8-
km-long path above the Aletsch glacier, b) Range corrected sum PRSS and elastic 
signals together with the  PRRS derived  total  extinction coefficient,  c) water vapor 
mixing  ratio  and  temperature  horizontal  lidar  profiles  and  the  topography  of  the 
glacier  below  the  laser  beam  path  from  a  1:100  000  map  (Swiss  Topographic 
Institute). The measurements were taken on 27.07.2002 between 2:00 and 4:30 h. 
During  the  test  period,  initial  measurements  of  the  aerosol  extinction,  water 
vapor  and  temperature  along  a  horizontal  optical  path  above  Aletsch  glacier 
have  been  carried out. The data  will be used  for  a comparative study  of the 
aerosol optical properties derived from the lidar and in situ measurements. The 
measurements  presented  here  were  taken  at  night,  under  stable  weather 
conditions with the lidar pointing in Southern direction. A  map of the region 
with the lidar optical path marked with a dashed line is shown in Figure 11a. 
Temperature and water vapor mixing ratio profiles are also presented in Figure 
11c, together with a cross-section of the topography below the lidar optical path. 
The extinction of the order of 10
-4
m
-1
and the water vapor mixing ratio values 
between  2.5 to 6.5 g/kg are relatively  high and indicate hazy conditions. The 
temperature  varies  from  +5°  at  the  station  to  almost  0°C  above  the  deepest 
valley. Both, the water vapor mixing ratio and the temperature (Figure 11c) may 
suggest possible influence of the glacier topography. Note the general decrease 
of  the  temperature  and  the  water  vapor  content  above  the  valleys  and  the 
increase near to the mountain relief. The example demonstrates the potential of 
the method to measure simultaneously atmospheric extinction, temperature, and 
water  vapor over  the glacier. More  systematic  observations  may  bring useful 
1.E-07
1.E-06
1.E-05
0
1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 8000
RCS of PRRS an
n
Elastic [a.u]
0.E+00
1.E-04
2.E-04
3.E-04
4.E-04
-Extinction [m]
PRRS
Elastic
Ext
-1
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
0
1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 8000
Distance from Jungfraujoch station along the Aletsch Glacier  [m]
H2O[g/kg]
   T[°C ]
2750
2950
3150
3350
3550
3750
Glacier Topograph
h
[m ASL]
H2O
T
Topography
(a) 
(b) 
(c) 
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
With the SDK, you can preview the document content according to the preview thumbnail by the ways as following. C# DLLs for Word File Preview. Add references:
add text to pdf without acrobat; add text boxes to pdf
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
C# DLLs: Preview PowerPoint Document. Add necessary XDoc.PowerPoint DLL libraries into your created C# application as references. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
how to add a text box in a pdf file; how to enter text in a pdf document
Pure rotational Raman on the JFJ-LIDAR  
127
data  for  the  estimation  of  the  atmospheric  dynamics  over  complex  terrain, 
particularly over covered by glaciers mountains surfaces [21].  
3.5  Aerosol- water vapor - temperature: vertical sounding    
Regular measurements of extinction, backscatter, lidar ratio, water vapor mixing 
ratio, relative  humidity,  and temperature have been  taken  with the lidar  since 
June  2002. The  vertical  profiles  measured  on  24  July  2002  are  presented  in 
Figure 12 as an example. 
Figure  12  a)  Extinction,  backscatter  and  lidar  ratio  derived  using  PRRS  -  based 
method, b) Water vapor mixing ratio and relative humidity, c) lidar and radiosonde 
temperature profiles. The  measurements were  taken  on 24.07.2002  between  1:00 
and 2:00 h LT 
In the water vapor and aerosol profiles several atmospheric layers can be seen, 
some of which are noticeable also in the temperature profile. The cirrus cloud 
between 7 and 8 km is well defined, with relative humidity exceeding 100 % 
and a lidar ratio  of up to 45. The temperature profile follows the general  wet 
lapse rate  of  ~ 6.7  K/km  recorded by  the  radiosonde  and reveals  some local 
characteristics such as the temperature inversion in the upper part of the cirrus 
cloud. The lower part of the atmosphere (up to ~ 4700 m) is characterized by 
high specific humidity of up to 3 g/kg (RH above 70 %). The high humidity is 
3500
4000
4500
5000
5500
6000
6500
7000
7500
8000
8500
9000
9500
10000
0.E+00 5.E-05 1.E-04 2.E-04 2.E-04
Extinction [m
-1
]
Bacscatter x20  [m
-1
sr
-1
Altitude  [m]
0
20
40
60
80
100
Lidar Ratio
Extinction
Backscatter
Lidar Ratio
200
225
250
275
T [K]
PRRS 
Radiosonde
JFJ
0
1
2
3
4
5
H
2
O [g/Kg] 
0
25
50
75
100
125
150
175
200
RH [%]
H2O [g/Kg]
RH [%]
(c) 
(b) 
(a) 
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Highlight PDF text. • Add text to PDF document in preview. • Add text box to PDF file in preview. • Draw PDF markups. PDF Protection.
add text to pdf; how to enter text into a pdf form
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
PDF Annotation. • Add sticky notes to PDF document. • Highlight PDF text in preview. • Add text to PDF document. • Insert text box to PDF file.
add text fields to pdf; add text to pdf acrobat
Pure rotational Raman on the JFJ-LIDAR  
128
probably the reason for the high extinction observed up to this altitude. Despite 
the  high  relative  humidity  of  above  70%  measured  at  6000  m  there  is  no 
formation of water aerosol, as seen from the extinction and backscatter profiles. 
4. Conclusion 
This chapter reported the implementation of the PRRS method for measurement 
of  temperature, aerosol  extinction and  backscatter  coefficients  on the  existing 
Jungfraujoch multiwavelength  elastic-Raman  lidar. The portions of  the PRRS 
are isolated with a double-grating polychromator. This technique shows better 
immunity against contamination of the PRRS signals with elastically scattered 
light compared to interference  filter based polychromators. The high level  of 
suppression  of  the  elastic  light  in  the  PRRS  channels  is  demonstrated  by 
measurements  in  a  dense  cloud  with  scattering  ratio  higher  than  70  and  by 
scattering  from  a  solid  target.  A  method  based  on  comparison  with  an 
experimentally  verified  atmospheric  model  was  used  for  calibration  of  the 
temperature  channel.  Inter-comparison  calibration  measurements  with  a 
radiosonde show good agreement. The use of the PRRS for direct calculation of 
the total to molecular ratio, of the backscatter, the extinction coefficients, and of 
the  lidar  ratio  is  presented.  The  PRRS  temperature  profile  is  also  used  in 
combination  with  the  water  vapor mixing ratio  for  estimation  of  the  relative 
humidity.  Nighttime  temperature  profiles,  measured  by  the  PRRS  technique 
were obtained up to the lower stratosphere (18-20 km), with 30 min – 1 h time 
average. 
References 
1. 
Hauchecorne, A. and M.L. Chanin, Density and temperature profiles obtained by lidar 
between 35 and 70 km. Geophysical Research Letters, 1980. 
2. 
Gross, M.R., T.J. McGee, R.A. Ferrare, U.N. Singh, and P. Kimvilakani, Temperature 
measurements made with a combined Rayleigh-Mie and Raman lidar. Applied Optics, 
1997. 36(24): p. 5987-5995. 
3. 
Nedeljkovic,  D.,  A.  Hauchecorne,  and  M.L.  Chanin, Rotational Raman Lidar to 
Measure the Atmospheric-Temperature from the Ground to 30 Km. Ieee Transactions 
on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, 1993. 31(1): p. 90-101. 
4. 
Keckhut,  P.,  M.L.  Chanin,  and  A.  Hauchecorne, Stratosphere Temperature-
Measurement Using Raman Lidar. Applied Optics, 1990. 29(34): p. 5182-5186. 
5. 
Cooney, J., Measurement of atmospheric temperature profile by raman backscatter. 
Journal of Applied Meteorology, 1972. 11: p. 108-112. 
6. 
Cohen, A., J. Cooney, and N. Kenneth, Atmospheric temperature profiles from lidar 
measurements  of  rotational  Raman  and  elastic  scatering. Applied Optics, 1976. 
15(11): p. 2896-2901. 
7. 
Cooney,  J.A., Atmospheric-Temperature Measurement Using a Pure Rotational 
Raman Lidar - Comment. Applied Optics, 1984. 23(5): p. 653-654. 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
target PDF document file. Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. Also a preview component enables
how to input text in a pdf; add text block to pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
how to add text to pdf document; adding text pdf
Pure rotational Raman on the JFJ-LIDAR  
129
8. 
Behrendt, A. and J. Reichardt, Atmospheric temperature profiling in the presence of 
clouds  with a pure rotational Raman lidar  by  use of an  interference- filter-based 
polychromator. Applied Optics, 2000. 39(9): p. 1372-1378. 
9. 
Arshinov,  Y.F.,  S.M.  Bobrovnikov,  V.E.  Zuev,  and  V.M.  Mitev, Atmospheric-
Temperature Measurements Using a Pure Rotational Raman Lidar. Applied Optics, 
1983. 22(19): p. 2984-2990. 
10. 
Arshinov, Y. and S. Brobovnikov, Use of a Fabry-Perot interferometer to isolate pure 
rotational Raman spectra of diatomic molecules. Applied Optics, 1999. 38(21). 
11.  Klett, J.D., Stable analytical inversion solution for processing lidar returns. Applied 
Optics, 1981. 20: p. 211-220. 
12. 
Fernald, F.G., Analysis of atmospheric lidar observations: some comments. Applied 
Optics, 1984. 23: p. 652-653. 
13. 
Ansmann, A., M. Riebesell, and C. Weitkamp, Measurement of Atmospheric Aerosol 
Extinction Profiles with a Raman Lidar. Optics Letters, 1990. 15(13): p. 746-748. 
14. 
Angström, A., On the atmospheric transmission of sun radiation and on dust in the 
atmosphere. Geogr. Ann., 1929. 11: p. 156-166. 
15. 
Behrendt, A., T. Nakamura, M. Onishi, R. Baumgart, and T. Tsuda, Combined Raman 
lidar  for  the  measurement  of  atmospheric  temperature,  water  vapor,  particle 
extinction  coefficient,  and  particle  backscatter  coefficient. Applied Optics, 2002. 
41(36): p. 7657-7666. 
16. 
Hinkley, E.D., Laser Monitoring of the Atmosphere. Topics in Applied Physics, ed. 
E.D. Hinkley. Vol. 14. 1976: Springer-Verlag. 
17. 
Larcheveque, G., I. Balin, R. Nessler, P. Quaglia, V. Simeonov, H. van den Bergh, 
and B. Calpini, Development of a multiwavelength aerosol and water-vapor lidar at 
the Jungfraujoch Alpine Station (3580 m above sea level) in Switzerland. Applied 
Optics, 2002. 41(15): p. 2781-2790. 
18. 
Ansmann, A., Y. Arshinov, S. Bobrovnikov, I. Mattis, I. Serikov, and U. Wandinger. 
Double-grating  monochromator  for  a  pure  rotational  Raman  lidar. in  Fifth 
International Symposium on Atmospheric and Ocean Optics. 1998: Proc. SPIE. 
19. 
NOAA, NASA, and USAF, U.S. standard atmosphere (76). 1976, U.S. government 
Printing Office: Washington / USA. 
20.  Collis, R.T.H. and P.B. Russell, Lidar Measurement of Particles and Gases by Elastic 
Backscattering and Differential Absorption. Laser Monitoring of the Atmosphere, ed. 
E.D. Hinkley. 1976: Springer Verlag. 
21. 
Barry, R.G., Mountain Weather and Climate. Routledge Physical Environment. 1992: 
London and New York: Routledge. 
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo scanned signature or logo into PDF document page in
how to add text to pdf file; how to add text fields to a pdf document
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
following. C# DLLs: Preview Excel Document without Microsoft Office Installed. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
how to enter text in pdf; how to add text to a pdf file in acrobat
Saharan Dust Outbreak 
VI 
131
Chapter VI 
Optical properties of Saharan dust  
Both the sign and magnitude of the direct-indirect mineral dust  effects on the 
global radiative balance are poorly understood and various observations are used 
to  reduce  this  lack  of  information.  Within  this  general  research  effort,  this 
chapter  presents  results  concerning  the  optical  properties  of  long-range 
transported mineral  dust during  the Saharan dust outbreaks (SDO),  which are 
often  noticed  over  the  Western  Europe. This  work  focuses  on  the  August  2, 
2001 SDO event in which a dust plume was observed above the Swiss Alps in 
the upper troposphere. Co-located in situ, lidar, sun photometer, nephelometer 
and aethalometer measurements at the JFJ station were taken on August 1 and 2, 
2001 in three different sub-periods: (a) no dust occurrence (b) dust plume and 
(c) cloud-dust  mixture. The  measurements are  comparatively analyzed.  Lidar 
range corrected signals (RCS), elastic to molecular backscatter ratio, backscatter 
(
β
a
) and extinction  (
α
a
) coefficients  at  355,  532 and  1064  nm as  well as  the 
depolarization  ratio  at  532  nm  are  discussed.  Simultaneous  aerosol in situ 
measurements and aerosol optical depth (AOD) from a sun photometer precision 
filter radiometer  are presented. The  aerosol Angstrom coefficients  determined 
from in situ measurements,  sun-photometer instrument  and lidar observations 
are  used  to  link  and  compare  these  co  –  located  observations.  The  dust 
microphysical properties, initially calculated in a spherical approximation of the 
shape of the dust particles, are also presented as a preliminary result.  
Saharan Dust Outbreak  
VI 
133
1. Introduction 
Soil dust is one of the major contributors to global atmospheric aerosol loading 
and optical thickness, especially in sub-tropical and tropical regions. Estimates 
of its global source strength range from 1,000 to 5,000 Mt yr
-1
with very high 
spatial and temporal variability. Compared with the global continental mineral 
aerosols  estimated  emission  in  2000  all  other  categories  of  aerosols  (black 
carbon,  organic  matter,  fossil  fuel,  aviation,  industrial  dust,  biogenic,  forest 
fires, etc) have been  estimated  ten times lower.  With an estimated loading of 
about 3340 (Tg yr
-1
), sea salt seems to be the main contributor to global aerosol 
load. In the northern hemisphere, dust and sea salt loading has been estimated to 
1800 Tg yr
-1
and 1400 Tg yr
-1
, respectively, while contributions from all other 
aerosol categories reach only ~ 300 Tg yr
-1
.  The Saharan dust  aerosol optical 
depth (AOD) is quantified up to 0.35-0.45 compared with 0.15-0.25 for sea salt 
or with 0.20-0.25 for the all other categories over continental Europe [1, 2]. 
Dust source regions are deserts, dry lakebeds, and semi-arid desert fringes, but 
also  areas  where  vegetation  has  been  reduced  or  soil  surfaces  have  been 
disturbed by human activities. The desert regions of the Northern Hemisphere 
are  considered  major  sources  compared  with  minor  contributions  from  the 
Southern  Hemisphere.  In  addition  to  the  desert  sources,  about  50  %  of  the 
mineral  dust  loading  is  attributed  to  anthropogenically  disturbed  soil  [3]. 
Mineral  dust  may  be  redistributed  across  large  regions  of  the  Earth  via  the 
synoptic weather systems. Satellite images show mineral dust transported from 
the  Sahara  to  the  southeastern  United  States  [4].  Evidence  for  long-range 
transport  of  mineral  dust  has  even  been  observed  in  Antarctica,  where 
snowflakes  have  been  demonstrated to contain  mineral dust  originating  from 
long-range transport [5].  
In spite of the important amount and global scale transport and distribution, both 
the magnitude and sign of mineral dust on the direct net radiative forcing remain 
unclear. The complexity in estimating dust radiative forcing is mainly due to the 
non-uniform distribution of sources and sinks. In addition, the residence time of 
mineral dust in the atmosphere is highly variable ranging from seconds to years 
(for dust injected into the UTLS by volcanoes). The global models are beginning 
to address the complications of emission, sedimentation and wet removal with 
many simplified parameterizations [6]. Nevertheless the models have difficulty 
accounting for the mineral surface chemistry, interactions with other aerosols or 
cloud processing [7]. Mineral dust from the Saharan desert absorbs much less 
solar radiation than previously thought.  
The desert dust absorption of incident sunlight of the solar spectrum varies from 
1-5  %  to  10-15  %.  The  estimation  of  how  much  sunlight  is  absorbed  and 
reflected by desert dust vary widely - some show a net warming effect on the 
atmosphere while others a net cooling- that both climate warming and cooling 
Saharan Dust Outbreak  
VI 
134
scenarios were associated with mineral dust effects in the recent report by the 
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [1].  
Satellite observations (e.g. a dust storm over Senegal along the western African 
coast) show clear differences in the brightness of solar radiation reflected by the 
land surface  and the heavy dust clouds indicating  that  nearly all  the sunlight, 
from the VIS and NIR part of the solar spectrum, incident on the dust cloud, was 
reflected  back  into  space  [8].  Very  little  is  absorbed  by  the  iron-rich  dust 
particles, and this absorption mainly occurs in the UV. Concerning the indirect 
effects, dust may affect clouds in two ways. The dust inhibits precipitation by 
increasing the number density of small particles, which are much less likely to 
collide, resulting in an increased lifetime of low altitude clouds. The clouds with 
a dust supply have greater reflection of solar radiation, thereby trapping more 
infrared  radiation,  which  produces  stronger  cloud-top cooling  and  cloud-base 
heating. Conversely, by interacting with high-altitude clouds (i.e. cirrus) the dust 
may induce precipitation. Indeed, the dust acts as aggregation nuclei for growing 
ice crystals and causes the water droplets to freeze at higher temperatures than 
expected. This induces the precipitation of the coarse ice crystals,  which then 
collide  with  water  droplets  and  transform  into  rainfall.  The  response  of  the 
climate system to cloudiness  is differential; a decrease  in low altitude clouds 
leading to a cooling effect and an increase in high altitude clouds leading to a 
warming effect. This is a present general consensus [9, 10]. 
In  addition  to  the  laboratory  measured  chemical  and  physical  properties  of 
aerosols  the  climate  models  require  ambient  atmospheric  measurements  of 
aerosol optical properties for a better parameterization of the interaction between 
solar  radiation  and  dust.  This  interaction  can  be  quantified  based  on 
measurements of different aerosol-related parameters
1
such as: extinction (
α
a
), 
absorption  (
α
a
abs
),  total  scattering    (
α
a
scat
),  backscattering  (
β
a
),  the 
extinction/backscatter ratio (i.e. lidar ratio LR), the single scattering albedo (
ω
o
), 
and  the  depolarization  ratio  (
ϕ
)
2
). The  degree  of  depolarization  (
ϕ
 of  light, 
backscattered by dust, gives information on the particle shape  (spherical or non 
spherical),  and  it  can  be  related  to  hydration  state  (humid  or  dry)  or  to 
atmospheric  lifetime  (aged  or  fresh)  [11,  12].  The  functional  dependence  of 
light-scattering on relative humidity  (f[RH]), the complex refractive index  (n) 
and the asymmetry parameter (g) are also important [13].  
The  aerosol  optical  depth  e.g.  AOD  cf.  Eq.  (1)  is  the  most  commonly  used 
integrated value to characterise the aerosol load into the atmosphere,       
( )
)
Z
a
Zo
AOD
D
zdz
α
=
 Eq. (1) 
1
The index a refers to aerosols, to molecules (molecular) and to the situations with pure mineral dust 
2
Ratio of parallel to perpendicular polarization of atmospheric backscattered light, excited by a linear polarized 
laser beam, as already defined in chapter II and used in chapter III. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested