open pdf file in asp net c# : Add editable text box to pdf SDK software service wpf .net azure dnn 1257037716-part429

Saharan Dust Outbreak  
VI 
145
This indirectly suggests a  possible  humidity  uptake  by the mineral dust  from 
Sahara, which may have a hygroscopic fraction. 
Figure 7 Aerosol optical depth (AOD) during the SDO 
The Saharan origin of this above described layer has been demonstrated by the 
backward calculated trajectories presented in the next section.   
4. Backward trajectory analysis 
4.1  Calculation procedure 
Backward trajectories have often been used to analyze Saharan dust outbreaks 
[37, 38]. For this study, analyzed wind fields with a temporal separation of six 
hours were used to calculate three-dimensional kinematic backward trajectories 
with  the  software  package  «Lagranto».  The  calculations  presented  here  were 
made at the Air Pollution/Environmental Technology Department from EMPA 
(Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research) [39]. The wind 
fields  were  provided  by  the  European  Center  for  Medium-Range  Weather 
Forecasts (ECMWF) model  with  a  resolution of  1° 
×
1°.  The  trajectories are 
resolved in 60-minute time  steps and  their length  has been  limited  to 7  days 
backward in time. In order to account for transport at different levels but also for 
inaccuracies, the arrival points have been varied both horizontally and vertically. 
In the horizontal plane, the accurate location of the JFJ (7.98 ° E, 46.55 ° N) was 
supplemented by 4 arrival points being displaced by ± 0.5 ° in latitude and ± 0.5 
° in longitude, respectively. In the vertical plane, the levels between 800 hPa and 
y = 10.11x
-0.98
R
2
= 0.93
y = 154.84x
-1.6
R
2
= 0.43
y = 1.23E-10x
3
- 3.26E-07x
2
+ 2.01E-04x + 2.42E-01
R
2
= 0.97
y = 0.55x
-0.15
R
2
= 0.82
0.00
0.01
0.10
1.00
10.00
300
400
500
600
700
800
900
1000
Wavelength [nm]
AOD 
01.08.01 (10h)
01.08.01 (18h)
02.08.01 (9h)
02.08.01 (10h)
02.08.01 (11h)
02.08.01 (12h)
02.08.01 (13h)
02.08.01 (10-12h30)avg
Power (01.08.01 (18h))
Power (01.08.01 (10h))
Poly. (02.08.01 (10-12h30)avg)
Power (02.08.01 (13h))
Add editable text box to pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text field pdf; adding a text field to a pdf
Add editable text box to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text fields to pdf; how to add text field to pdf form
Saharan Dust Outbreak  
VI 
146
400 hPa were covered in 25 hPa steps. Although 85 trajectories were calculated, 
only  trajectories indicating  paths of  air  masses  potentially  contributing to the 
measured Saharan dust episode are shown in the Figure 8. In order to filter the 
multitude of possible trajectories, only trajectories located at least one time step 
within a 20-hPa deep layer over the African continent were taken into account. 
4.2  The 2
nd
August 2001 SDO case 
Two main trajectory paths seem to be responsible for the Saharan dust arriving 
at  the JFJ. One  path  starts over the Mediterranean Sea  and propagates during 
several days southward and then westward over Libya, Tunisia and Algeria. A 
relatively low-pressure gradient was situated over Northern Africa during this 
time. The air mass movement was mainly influenced by a weak high-pressure 
system over  the Mediterranean near the Tunisian coast, which  resulted in  the 
clockwise  trajectory  movement  during  July  26  -  29.  The  calculated  7-day 
backward  trajectories  (Figure  8)  show  the  origin  and  the  movement  of  air 
masses during the investigated period. 
Figure  8.  7-day  backward-trajectories  arriving at the  JFJ  on 2
nd
of  August.  Note: 
Represented trajectories are  located at least one  time step within a 20-hPa  deep 
layer over the African continent. 
The other main path indicates trajectories originating further towards the south, 
over Mali. The trajectory model results show that Saharan dust arriving at the 
JFJ can originate from an extended region covering Libya, Algeria and Morocco 
(trajectory  path  1)  but  also  from  Mali  (trajectory  path  2).  The  trajectories 
originating above Mali indicate a further northward movement of the air masses 
-150
-100
-50
0
hours before arrival
0
200
400
600
surf.press.-traj.press. [hPa]
Back trajectory arrival at Jungfraujoch
02 Aug 2001, 10:00 MEST (8:00 UTC)

daily (24 h) time steps

ground-near trajectory time steps

(< 20 hPa) over Sahara
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Support to use C# source code to add text box to specified PDF position in C#.NET framework. Able to create a fillable and editable text box to PDF document in
adding text to a pdf; add text pdf reader
C# PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in C#.net
NET project. Powerful .NET control for batch converting PDF to editable & searchable text formats in C# class. Free evaluation library
add text to pdf document online; adding text fields to pdf acrobat
Saharan Dust Outbreak  
VI 
147
before  meeting  the  other  trajectories  over  Algeria  and  then  starting  over  the 
Mediterranean  Sea.  Above  Algeria  and Morocco,  all  the  trajectories  are then 
suddenly  lifted  on  31
st
of  July.  This  can  often  be  seen  during  Saharan  dust 
events in Switzerland when (cold) fronts propagate from the west and lift the air 
masses containing Saharan dust [17]. In our case, however, no frontal activity 
was  found  during  this  period  over  northwestern  Africa and southern  Europe, 
where  a  flat  pressure  distribution  predominated.  Another  explanation  could 
therefore  be  the  cut-off  low  that  had  been  developing  since  July  27
th
over 
Western  Europe  and moving  southward during the following  days (Figure 9, 
left).  
Figure 9 Weather chart (500 hPa) from MeteoSwiss for 30
th
of August with the cut-off 
low south-west of the Iberian Peninsula (left) and Meteosat image from 1
st
of August, 
at 15:30 LT. Note the cut-off low west of Portugal and the convective activities over 
the Saharan desert. A dust plume can be seen located between the coast of Africa 
and the Canary Islands. 
This low pressure surely explains the last part of the trajectory movement where 
the air masses travel in the middle troposphere at altitudes of about 4000 to 6000 
m. Once the air masses reached these altitudes in the free troposphere, they were 
accelerated  between  the  cut-off  low  situated  west  of  Portugal  and  a  high-
pressure system over the Mediterranean Sea. More influenced by the latter, the 
air turned eastward, subsided again and finally reached JFJ. 
The remaining question is how the air masses were lifted from surface levels to 
the middle troposphere. The clouds in the Meteosat image from 1
st
of August 
indicate convection over the north-western part of the Saharan desert, (Figure 9, 
right). It even seems that strong dust storms were active during this time, with a 
dust plume  over  the  Canary Islands. Figure 10 shows the aerosol  index  from 
TOMS  indicating  the  extended  region  with  convection  and  dust  storms  and 
therefore the potential for Saharan dust upload into the middle troposphere.  
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
and can be fully populated with editable text and graphics document in C#.NET using this PDF document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text
add text boxes to pdf document; how to add text to a pdf file in preview
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
of original PDF file and maintains the original text style (including need to convert PDF document to some easily editable files like Add necessary references:
acrobat add text to pdf; add text field to pdf
Saharan Dust Outbreak  
VI 
148
Figure  10  TOMS  aerosol  index  showing  the  strong  dust  storm  activity  over  the 
Saharan desert  during  the  investigated  period.  The  TOMS index is  linked  to  the 
measurement of differential reflectivity at two UV wavelengths and is proportional to 
the AOD and to the UV absorption of the aerosols. 
The convection over the Saharan desert can be a reason for the uplift of the air 
masses  to  the  middle  troposphere.  This  uplift  is  probably  stronger  over  the 
north-western part of Africa (over north-western Algeria and Morocco) as the 
cut-off low may additionally contribute to the uplift of the air masses. Trajectory 
analyses have their limitations concerning the reproduction of complex surface 
air mass flows. Therefore, a crude approach was used that defined the location 
of potential sources to be regions in our grid where trajectories travel within a 
ground distance of 20 hPa. The potential source regions of the Saharan dust are 
situated in Libya, Algeria, Morocco and Mali.  
Finally,  the  trajectories  arrive  2.5  to  5  days  later  from  the  potential  source 
regions above Switzerland at a (model) ground distance between 180 and 425 
hPa. This range is enlarged because of the fact that not all four arrival points 
(being horizontally  displaced  by 0.5°) lie in  the  same grid  as the  JFJ having 
therefore a model ground being situated at another height level. Nevertheless, 
taking into account the fact that in the 1°
×
1° ECMWF model, the JFJ is situated 
at a height of 877 hPa (8:00 LT), and the adjacent grids are about 930 hPa, we 
can  estimate  the  air  masses  to  arrive above  Switzerland  at  altitudes  between 
3000 and 6000 m. 
C# PDF Field Edit Library: insert, delete, update pdf form field
form maker allows users to create editable PDF form in Able to add text field to specified PDF file position 100F, 700F); fields.Add(field6); // add fields to
how to insert text box on pdf; how to insert text in pdf reader
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
keeping original layout. VB.NET control for batch converting PDF to editable & searchable text formats. Support .NET WinForms, ASP
how to add text to pdf; how to add text to a pdf document using reader
Saharan Dust Outbreak  
VI 
149
5. Results and Discussions 
5.1 In situ  measurements  
The hourly  mean  of total scatter  and backscatter obtained from nephelometer 
data are presented in Figure 11 for August 1
st
and 2
nd
, 2001. 
Figure 11 The scattering coefficients (
α
a
scat
) in the left panel and the backscattering 
coefficients (
β
a
nephel
) in the right panel during August 1
st
and 2
nd
, 2001 at the three 
wavelengths of the nephelometer. Note: 
β
a
nephel   
is measured under ~ 7-170° while 
β
determined
from lidar
observations is concerning only the unidirectional backscatter 
light at ~180 °.  
In situ backscattering (
β
nephel
) values represent ~ 10% of the total scatter. In the 
case of Saharan dust (b), the wavelength dependency is very weak. This is not 
the  case  for  the  dust-free  reference  period  (a)  and  for  cloud-haze  and  dust 
mixture  period  (c).  The  dust  total  scattering  is  4-5  times  higher  than  in  the 
reference case (a) and obviously lower than the scatter measured in the clouds-
dust-haze mixture,  period (c). The 7-wavelengths inter-extrapolated extinction 
values are plotted in Figure 12 together with the absorption coefficients. 
Figure 12 The aethalometer absorption coefficients (
α
a
abs
) in the left panel and the 
calculated corresponding extinction coefficients (
α
a
ext
) in the right panel at different 
wavelengths during August 1
st
and 2
nd
, 2001.  
0.E+00
1.E-05
2.E-05
3.E-05
4.E-05
5.E-05
6.E-05
01.08 
00
01.08 
06
01.08 
12
01.08 
18
02.08 
00
02.08 
06
02.08 
12
02.08 
18
03.08 
00
Total scatter [m-1]
450nm
550nm
700nm
(a
(b
(c
0.E+00
1.E-06
2.E-06
3.E-06
4.E-06
5.E-06
6.E-06
01.08
00
01.08
06
01.08
12
01.08
18
02.08
00
02.08
06
02.08
12
02.08
18
03.08
00
-Backscatter [srm]
450nm
550nm
700nm
(a
(b
(c
0.E+00
2.E-05
4.E-05
6.E-05
8.E-05
1.E-04
01.08
00
01.08
06
01.08
12
01.08
18
02.08
00
02.08
06
02.08
12
02.08
18
03.08
00
-Extinction [m]
370nm
470nm
520nm
590nm
660nm
880nm
950nm
(a
(b
(c
0.E+00
2.E-06
4.E-06
6.E-06
8.E-06
1.E-05
01.08
00
01.08
06
01.08
12
01.08
18
02.08
00
02.08
06
02.08
12
02.08
18
03.08
00
Absorbtion [m-1]
370nm
470nm
520nm
590nm
660nm
880nm
950nm
(a
(b
(c
C# Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in C#.net, ASP
Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. Add Stamp Annotation. PDF NET control for batch converting text formats to editable & searchable
adding text to pdf in acrobat; add text to pdf using preview
VB.NET Create PDF from Text to convert txt files to PDF in vb.net
Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Best VB.NET adobe text to PDF converter Batch convert editable & searchable PDF document from
adding text to pdf online; adding text to a pdf in preview
Saharan Dust Outbreak  
VI 
150
The dust extinction (~ 5 x 10
-5
m
-1
) exhibited almost no wavelength dependency. 
The slight wavelength dependency is due to the Saharan dust absorption, which 
remains wavelength  dependent. The  absorption represents  ~ 10% of  the  total 
extinction in UV and less than 3-5 % in VIS and NIR. 
5.2  Total to molecular backscatter ratio: a lidar-based estimation  
The total to molecular backscatter ratio, TMR (Z), is a relative indicator of the 
aerosols-clouds  load  compared  to  a  clean  molecular atmosphere.  Ideally,  the 
best solution is to use the Raman signals as molecular reference. When only the 
elastic signals are available the ratio (i.e. noted ERR*) of the elastic (E) and a 
molecular Rayleigh (R) is a good estimator of the TMR. The molecular RCS 
signal  was  simulated  based  on  [40]  and  the  molecular  reference  was  set  at 
9500m ASL.    
The ERR* is proposed to be compared at 355 (UV), 532 (VIS) and 1064 (IR) 
nm  for  the  three  situations (a,  b,  c). The  lidar  corresponding  data  series  are 
summarized in Table 1 below. 
Table 1 Lidar selected time series data corresponding to three distinct meteorological 
situations  (a)  =  free  troposphere  with  influence  of  valley  air  masses,  (b)  =  pure 
Saharan  dust  (layer  3500-6000m)  and  (c)  =  Saharan  dust  mixed  with  free 
troposphere clouds 
The simulated Rayleigh [27] and the elastic signals are presented together with 
the EMR* for periods (a), (b) and (c)  at 355, 532 and 1064 nm in Figure 13.  
Start 
Time 
Stop 
Time 
T [C]  RH [%] 
[mb] 
ID 
01.08.01 
16:00 
01.08.01 
20:00 
29 
670  (a) 
02.08.01 
10:00 
02.08.01 
12:30 
34 
669  (b) 
02.08.01 
14:30 
02.08.01 
17:00 
52 
668  (c) 
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Export all Word text and image content into high quality PDF without Convert multiple pages Word to fillable and editable PDF documents. Add necessary references
how to add text field to pdf; adding text to pdf in reader
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
to tiff, VB.NET read PDF, VB.NET convert PDF to text, VB.NET Convert multiple pages PowerPoint to fillable and editable PDF documents. Add necessary references:
add text pdf acrobat professional; how to add text box to pdf document
Saharan Dust Outbreak  
VI 
151
Figure  13  Range  corrected  signals  normalized  to  the  molecular  calculated 
backscatter  (RCS*)  at  9500  m  ASL,  simulated  Rayleigh  signals,  and  elastic  to 
Rayleigh ratio (ERR*) at 355, 532 and 1064 nm during periods (a), (b) and (c). Notes: 
CC cirrus clouds, VA valley aerosols, SD Saharan dust and FT regions. 
3500
4500
5500
6500
7500
8500
9500
1.E-08 1.E-07 1.E-061.E-05 1.E-04
RCS* at 355nm [m
-1
sr
-1
]
ASL [m]
0.1
1
10
100
ERR*
Elastic
Rayleigh
ERR*
FT
VA
3500
4500
5500
6500
7500
8500
9500
1.E-08 1.E-071.E-06 1.E-05 1.E-04
RCS* at 532nm [m
-1
sr
-1
0.1
1
10
100
ERR*
Elastic
Rayleigh
ERR*
FT
VA
3500
4500
5500
6500
7500
8500
9500
1.E-08 1.E-07 1.E-061.E-051.E-04
RCS* at 1064nm [m
-1
sr
-1
0.1
1
10
100
ERR*
Elastic
Rayleigh
ERR*
3500
4500
5500
6500
7500
8500
9500
1.E-08 1.E-07 1.E-061.E-05 1.E-04
RCS* at 355nm [m
-1
s
r-1
ASL [m]
0.1
1
10
100
ERR*
Elastic
Rayleigh
ERR*
SD
FT
3500
4500
5500
6500
7500
8500
9500
1.E-08 1.E-07 1.E-06 1.E-05 1.E-04
RCS* at 532nm [m
-1
sr
-1
0.1
1
10
100
ERR*
Elastic
Rayleigh
ERR*
SD
FT
3500
4500
5500
6500
7500
8500
9500
1.E-08 1.E-07 1.E-06 1.E-05 1.E-04
RCS* at 1064nm [m
-1
sr-1] 
0.1
1
10
100
ERR*
Elastic
Rayleigh
ERR*
SD
3500
4500
5500
6500
7500
8500
9500
1.E-08 1.E-07 1.E-061.E-05 1.E-04
RCS*at 355nm [m
-1
sr
-1
ASL [m]
0.1
1
10
100
ERR*
Elastic
Rayleigh
ERR*
CC
CC
CC
3500
4500
5500
6500
7500
8500
9500
1.E-08 1.E-07 1.E-06 1.E-05 1.E-04
RCS* at 532nm [m
-1
sr-
1
0.1
1
10
100
ERR*
Elastic
Rayleigh
ERR*
CC
CC
CC
3500
4500
5500
6500
7500
8500
9500
1.E-08 1.E-07 1.E-06 1.E-05 1.E-04
RCS* at 1064nm [m
-1
sr
-1
0.1
1
10
100
ERR*
Elastic
Rayleigh
ERR*
CC
CC
CC
(a) 
(b) 
(c) 
Saharan Dust Outbreak  
VI 
152
In  Table 2, ERR* related parameters are extracted at 4050 m, the lowest valid 
altitude of the lidar measurements and thus the closest to the in situ  sampling 
inlet.  
355 nm 
532 nm 
1064 nm 
4050m 
EMR*  M 
EMR*  M 
EMR* 
4.74E-6  5.27E-6  1.11 
1.01E-6  1.63E-6  1.61 
0.061E-6  6.88E-8  1.13 
4.74E-6  7.50E-6  1.58 
1.01E-6  3.39E-6  3.34 
0.061E-6  3.75E-7  6.15 
4.74E-6  1.23E-5  2.58 
1.01E-6  6.93E-6  6.84 
0.061E-6  5.13E-7  8.42 
Table  2  Comparative  molecular  (M),  Elastic  (E)  and  the  elastic  to  molecular 
(Rayleigh) ratio (EMR* or  ERR*) during  meteorological  periods (a), (b) and (c), at 
355, 532 and 1064 nm at 4050 m   (overlap =1) 
One observes the increase of total to molecular ratio (ERR*) for the Saharan 
dust from 1.6 (355 nm) to 3.2 (532nm) and to 6.2 (1064nm). In the afternoon 
(period  c),  these  values  are  considerably  enhanced  (see  Table  2)  which  is 
obviously due to the clouds’ contribution. 
5.3  Depolarization ratio at 532 nm  
Due  to  their  “non-spherical”  shape  the  mineral  aerosols  are  expected  to 
depolarize the laser light. The ratio of the RCS corresponding to perpendicular 
and parallel polarization states in the backscatter signal at 532 nm was used to 
estimate  the  atmospheric  depolarization.  The  calibration  constant  was 
determined based on measurements taken in the quasi-free atmospheric situation 
(morning  of  August  1,  2001)  following  the  procedure  proposed  in  [29].  In 
Figure 14, the cross/perpendicular (Depol) and the corrected ratios (Depol_cor)  
are  shown  for  periods  (a),  (b)  and  (c)  at  532  nm.  The  dust  (b)  exhibits  a 
depolarization of about 10 ~ 12 % (with a maximum at ~ 5000 m)  while the 
fairly clean atmosphere depolarization is about 2-3 % (period a) reaching up to 
30  %  within  the  cirrus  clouds  at  ~5700  m  during  period  (c).  These 
depolarization values are comparable with those retrieved for a dust plume over 
the Atlantic Ocean in a recent work [24] corresponding to 8-day aged Saharan 
dust  with  50-70  %  relative  humidity.  Slightly  higher  values  (15-17  %)  were 
reported  for  the  same  02.08.2001  SDO  event  based  on  lidar  measurements 
above Leipzig, Germany [23]. 
In the case (c), of the clouds-dust-fog mixture, both increasing (positive effect ~ 
5580 m) and decreasing (negative effect at ~ 4700 m) in dust depolarization by 
clouds were noticed. A gradual increase in depolarization within the ice cloud 
from  the  bottom  (19%) to  the  top  (30 %)  is  observed.  The  typical  dry  dust 
depolarization is ~ 45 % for hydrophobic dust. 
Saharan Dust Outbreak  
VI 
153
Figure 14 Depolarization ratio (
ϕ
) at 532  nm  during periods  (a), (b) and (c). Dust 
depolarization is ~10- 12% compared with the unperturbed free troposphere 2-3% or 
within ice-cold cirrus cloud ~30. 
Recent  observations  [23]  suggest  that  the  Saharan  dust  may  get  a  soluble 
fraction and in humid conditions ( ~ 50 % RH) they may condense partially and 
pass  to  the  liquid  phase.  This  may  explain  the  relatively  low  ~10-15% 
depolarization ratio specific to water vapor content particles.  
In the next section vertically resolved extinction and the backscatter coefficients 
will be presented. 
5.4  Backscatter - extinction coefficients and lidar ratio  
Based  on  the  inversion  of  elastic  lidar  signals,  dust  backscatter  (
β
d
 and 
extinction  (
α
d
 coefficients  were  calculated  during  the  dust  period  (b)  for 
different  lidar  ratios  (LR)  ranging  from  5  to  100.  The  data  concerned  were 
averaged on whole (b) dust period (between 10:00 and 12:30). The molecular 
reference was considered at 9500 m for 355a and 532 nm and at 7500 m ASL 
for 1064 nm. The decrease of the backscatter with an increase in the wavelength 
is observed. The  backscatter sensitivity to  lidar  ratio, within  the  dust  plume, 
decreases with wavelength as may be seen in Figure 15. The extinction profile is 
quite distinct with a clear enhancement at the top of the layer (~5500 m). The 
extinction at 355 nm exhibits an interesting behavior at low altitudes (~3500 m). 
In the hypothesis that the radiosounding is representative for the Saharan dust 
layer,  the  extinction  by  lidar  and  the  RH  from  the  balloon  are  positively 
correlated. For the 1064 nm channel, the inversion was not possible at higher 
altitudes  due  to  the  strong  attenuation  of  the  signal  within  the  dust. 
3500
4500
5500
6500
7500
8500
9500
0.E+00 5.E+04 1.E+05 2.E+05
RCS at 532 nm [a.u]  
ASL [m]
0.0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
Depol_Ratio
Perpendicular
Paralel
Depol
Depol_cor
3500
4500
5500
6500
7500
8500
9500
0.E+00 5.E+04 1.E+05 2.E+05
RCS at 532 nm [a.u.]  
0.0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
Depol_Ratio
Perpendicular
Paralel
Depol
Depol_cor
3500
4500
5500
6500
7500
8500
9500
0.E+00 5.E+05 1.E+06 2.E+06
RCS at 532 m [a.u.]  
0.0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
Depol_Ratio
Perpendicular
paralel
Depol
Depol_cor
(a
(b) 
(c) 
Saharan Dust Outbreak  
VI 
154
Misalignment  could  also  be  responsible  for  this  limitation  as  it  was  quite 
difficult  to  align  the  IR  beam  within  the  plume  dust.  Thus  backscatter  and 
extinction at 1064 nm have to be taken into account with criticism.  
In addition  the enhancement of the  extinction above 6000 m  may  be artifacts 
due to the use of the same constant lidar ratio simultaneously for the dust and 
the clear sky above.  
5.5  Dust AOD: sun photometer and lidar  
In order to find an appropriate lidar ratio for the mineral dust the lidar elastic 
signals were inverted at many lidar ratios to obtain the backscatter and elastic 
coefficients and after extinction profile  integration the AODs  from  lidar were 
compared with AOD given by sun photometer instrument. 
Figure  15  Backscatter  (a)  and  extinction  coefficients  (b)  for  the  Saharan  dust 
calculated by inverting the 355, 532 and 1064 nm elastic lidar signals at different lidar 
ratios (5 -100).  
4000
4500
5000
5500
6000
6500
7000
7500
8000
8500
9000
0.E+00 2.E-06
4.E-06
6.E-06
8.E-06
Backscatter at 355 nm [m
-1
sr
-1
]
ASL [m]
LR5
LR15
LR25
LR35
LR45
LR55
LR65
LR75
LR85
LR95
4000
4500
5000
5500
6000
6500
7000
7500
8000
8500
9000
0.E+00 2.E-06 4.E-06 6.E-06 8.E-06
Backscatter at 532 nm [m
-1
sr
-1
]
ASL [m]
LR5
LR15
LR25
LR35
LR45
LR55
LR65
LR75
LR85
LR95
4000
4500
5000
5500
6000
6500
7000
7500
8000
8500
9000
0.E+00 2.E-06 4.E-06
6.E-06 8.E-06
Backscatter at 1064 nm [m
-1
sr
-1
]
ASL [m]
LR5
LR15
LR25
LR35
LR45
LR55
LR65
LR75
LR85
LR95
4000
4500
5000
5500
6000
6500
7000
7500
8000
8500
9000
0.E+00 5.E-05
1.E-04
2.E-04
2.E-04
Extinction at 1064 nm [m
-1
]
LR5   AOD=0.009
LR15 AOD=0.027
LR25 AOD=0.045
LR35 AOD=0.061
LR45 AOD=0.077
LR55 AOD=0.092
LR65 AOD=0.107
LR75 AOD=0.122
LR85 AOD=0.135
LR95 AOD=0.149
4000
4500
5000
5500
6000
6500
7000
7500
8000
8500
9000
0.0E+00 5.0E-05 1.0E-04 1.5E-04 2.0E-04
Extinction at 355 nm [m
-1
]
LR5   AOD=0.063
LR15 AOD=0.153
LR25 AOD=0.215
LR35 AOD=0.259
LR45 AOD=0.293
LR55 AOD=0.319
LR65 AOD=0.340
LR75 AOD=0.356
LR85 AOD=0.370
LR95 AOD=0.382
4000
4500
5000
5500
6000
6500
7000
7500
8000
8500
9000
0.0E+005.0E-05 1.0E-04 1.5E-04 2.0E-04
Extinction at 532 nm [m
-1
]
LR5   AOD=0.028
LR15 AOD=0.077
LR25 AOD=0.120
LR35 AOD=0.158
LR45 AOD=0.191
LR55 AOD=0.221
LR65 AOD=0.248
LR75 AOD=0.273
LR85 AOD=0.295
LR95 AOD=0.315
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested