open pdf file in asp net c# : How to insert pdf into email text control Library system azure asp.net windows console 1257037718-part431

PBL - UT dynamics  
VII 
165
1. Introduction 
The  planetary  boundary  layer  (PBL)  is  the  lowest  layer  of  the  atmosphere 
directly influenced by processes at the Earth surface. Important meteorological 
processes, such as evaporation, rainfall, snowfall, and low cloud formation are 
taken  place  in  the  PBL.  The  transport  and  transformation  of  pollutants,  and 
chemical (i.e. photochemical ozone formation) processes occur also within the 
PBL  [1].  The  PBL  average  daytime  height  and  its  growth  rate  are  highly 
variable and dependent on geographical location, time of the day, daily weather 
conditions and season. In many cases the PBL top is not well defined [2]. 
The layer  above  the PBL  up  to  the  tropopause  is  the  free troposphere  (FT). 
Intense mixing between the FT and PBL occurs during the diurnal rise and fall 
of the boundary layer. The interface between the PBL and the FT is defined by a 
strong, net temperature inversion. The altitude of this inversion increases from 
the  ocean/sea  border  (lowest  PBL  height)  up  to  3  -  4  km  over  continental 
complex topography.  Radiative heating and frictional forces at the Earth surface 
produce a well-mixed layer  (ML) within the PBL. A residual layer  (RL) may 
form in nighttime at high altitudes as a consequence of the fast decrease of the 
ML.  Thus the  ML  during  nighttime becomes  a  stable  boundary  layer  (SBL) 
whose height doesn’t exceed some hundred meters. 
The physical and chemical properties of the PBL  are determined by: thermal 
diurnal  cycle,  convective  turbulent  updrafts,  moisture  convection  (clouds), 
orographic transport (i.e. valley-mountains thermal and hill slope winds), strong 
nocturnal low altitude inversions, nocturnal jets and even tropopause folding. 
The PBL-FT dynamics are of major importance for the air pollution studies. The 
RL is a “reservoir” layer, which may contain ozone, ozone precursors, aerosols, 
and small clouds that will thermodynamically join the ML the next day. Thus, 
the RL contributes at the progressive increase in time of pollutant concentrations 
(e.g. ozone) in a stable anticyclone regime. This process stops when the regime 
changes (i.e. precipitations, fronts, changes in cloud cover, fog). Strong updrafts 
may break the inversion between the free troposphere and the PBL. When the 
inversion breaks, ozone  and its  precursors,  stored in  the RL during the night, 
mix into the PBL air [3]. Orographic forcing can also break through the PBL-FT 
inversion increasing the mountain  ozone concentration in summer or bringing 
FT air into the valleys and decreasing the ozone concentration in winter [4]. In 
this  sense  the  simultaneous  consideration  of  the  PBL  evolution  with  the  air 
pollutant  measurements  and  model  calculations  is  necessary  to  estimate  the 
photochemical potential of a given region [5]. 
These complex effects of the planetary boundary layer dynamics and PBL - FT 
interaction  are  still  difficult  to  reproduce  in  photochemical  regional  models, 
particularly over  mountains regions. Typically the PBL mixing rate can affect 
the  reaction  rates  due  to  the  extension  or  confinement  of  the  reaction  space 
How to insert pdf into email text - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text pdf file; how to add text to a pdf in acrobat
How to insert pdf into email text - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text to a pdf document; adding text pdf files
PBL - UT dynamics  
VII 
166
scale. Many air pollutants models still assume that the PBL height is a constant 
value while for other models, significant differences (200 m at night, and 500 m 
during  the  day)  between  observed  and  modeled  PBL  heights  are  found  [6].  
Therefore  more  PBL  -  FT  measurements  over  complex  terrain  are  required. 
They are related to: (a) the definition of the representative chemical and physical 
PBL “tracers”, (b) the choice of appropriate measurements techniques, and (c) 
the realization of experiments in various locations and meteorological situations.  
The most  common PBL tracers are the strong  negative  gradients of the water 
vapor mixing ratio (q
H2O
) and the inversion in the virtual potential temperature 
(
θ
v)
2
profiles [2]. The aerosol load and occasionally the presence of clouds at 
the PBL top may also be used as physical tracers. 
This chapter concerns observations related to the tracking of the PBL air mass 
intrusions  into  the  upper  troposphere  regions.  In  this  aim,  lidar  ultrasonic 
anemometers,  radiosoundings,  glacier  discharge,  and  aerosol in situ 
measurements have been considered. The experimental data sources considered 
for the analysis are presented in section 2. 
In  section  3,  lidar  and  ultrasonic  anemometers  results  are  presented  and 
discussed taking into account the local and regional meteorological context, the 
regional  radiosonding,  the  discharge  at  the  outlet  of  the  Aletsch  glacier 
catchment  and  in  situ  aerosols  measurements.  A  brief  conclusion  will 
summarize this study in section 4.  
2. Experimental data  
JFJ-LIDAR vertical and horizontal observations were taken simultaneously with 
measurements of  temperature and the three-components  of  the  wind  velocity 
vector  from  ultrasonic  anemometers
3
on  the  glacier surface between  April  to 
August 2003. The relative  positioning of the two instruments is schematically 
shown in Figure 1.  
This experiment may be placed within the frame of mountain weather, climate, 
high alpine glaciers sensitivity and free troposphere dynamics- related topics [7].  
High elevation “incursions” from the PBL can be quantified by measuring the 
atmospheric aerosols, water vapor and turbulence [8, 9]. 
2
[
]
0
v
v
v
θ
( ) T
;T ( )
( ) 1 0.61 ( ) ;
1 0.23 ( )/
( )
k
d
pd
P
Z
Z
T Z
q Z
k R
q z C
P z
=
=
+
=
where T is the air 
temperature, T
v
is the virtual temperature, R
d
is the gas constant and C
pd
is the specific heat for dry air, q is the  
specific humidity, P the air pressure, P
0
the standard pressure.  
3
Realized in collaboration with Prof. M. Parlange team from Johns Hopkins University 
C# Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF in C#
Export PDF from Excel with cell border or no border. Free online Excel to PDF converter without email. Quick integrate online C# source code into .NET class.
how to enter text in pdf file; how to add text to pdf file with reader
RasterEdge.com General FAQs for Products
or need additional assistance, please contact us via email (support@rasteredge dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
add text to pdf reader; add text in pdf file online
PBL - UT dynamics  
VII 
167
Figure 1 Relative locations of lidar (L) and sonics  (S) instruments. The X and Y are 
the Swiss coordinates units. Note that North direction N, sonics orientations and the 
laser beam direction are represented by arrows). The lidar beam path is about 2000 
m lengths and is passing at the same altitude, 200-300 m to the right of the ultrasonic 
anemometers.  
The JFJ station is situated above the PBL excepting few days in summer time. 
The combination lidar-sonics measurements offers two important information: 
(i) lidar 
PBL height and its spatial-temporal evolution together with the water 
vapor  content  and  aerosols  optical  properties,  (ii) ultrasonic  anemometers 
turbulence  parameters  at  glacier  surface  with  high  temporal  resolution 
(necessary for Eddy calculations).  
2.1  Lidar setup  
The  lidar  measurements  were  performed  with  the  JFJ-LIDAR  on  the 
configuration presented in the chapter II - section 3.1. The system was operating 
in  ON  axis  configuration  with  laser  energies  300-350  mJ  and  50-80  Hz 
repetition rates. The overlap was reached at 200-250 m distance from the station. 
The horizontal measurements were obtained using steering mirror assuring both 
horizontal emission and detection.  
Aerosols backscattering at 532 nm and the water vapor mixing ratio are the main 
lidar  measurements  used  here. The  range  corrected  signal  (RCS)
4
is  used  for 
tracking the atmospheric aerosol load. The night time water vapor mixing ratio 
(q
H2O
) was derived as explained in chapter IV and [10]. 
4
2
( )
( )
RCS z
z
S z z
=
×
; S(z) is the lidar detected signal due to the light backscattered from the altitude z 
Trugbergh Mt.
C# Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in C#.
Free online Word to PDF converter without email. Description: Convert to PDF/TIFF and save it into stream. Parameters: Name, Description, Valid Value.
add text box in pdf; adding text to a pdf in preview
C# Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to PDF
Excellent .NET control for turning all PowerPoint presentation into high quality PDF without Free online PowerPoint to PDF converter without email.
adding text pdf; adding text to pdf document
PBL - UT dynamics  
VII 
168
2.2  Ultrasonic anemometers 
Four sonic anemometers were installed on the Aletsch glacier as presented in 
Figure 1 in order to obtain high spatial and temporal resolution measurements of 
the  three  orthogonal  component  wind  velocity  vector  (U,  V,  W)  and  of  the 
sound  speed  (C)  from  which  the  temperature  may  be  retrieved/found
5
 The 
principle  of  these  measurements  is  based  on  the  fact  that  the  velocity of  an 
acoustic pulse in air can be either augmented or impeded by the velocity of the 
air itself. Measuring the transit time of two opposite acoustic pulses between the 
emission and reception antennas, the wind speed along the line of sight of two 
antennas  is  determined.  A  precise  description  of  the  principles  of  the  sonic 
anemometer can be found in [11].  In this experiment we used CSAT3 3-D sonic 
anemometers from Campbell Scientific Inc.’s model CSAT3 3-D (10 cm path, 
pulsed acoustic mode, output maximum rate of 60 Hz) that can measure winds < 
30 m/s and have an error of < 0.04 m/s for the horizontal wind components and 
< 0.02 m/s for the vertical speed.  
The anemometers array was oriented vertically with a 0.5 m vertical separation 
between each anemometer. The lowest sonic was located 0.6 m above the snow. 
A solar panel setup assured the autonomy of the system. The reference direction 
(Sonic arms) was oriented to South - South West. The temperature (T) and wind 
field (U, V and W) were in situ  internally calibrated and directly recorded on an 
acquisition card. Data were stored with a 10 min average time step and at 20 Hz 
time resolutions. Only the 10 min data at 2.50 m above the glacier surface are 
considered  here.  The ultrasonic anemometers  technical specifications  may  be 
consulted in Annex A32. 
2.3  Complementary measurements  
2.3.1 Regional  radiosoundings 
Water vapor mixing ratio, virtual potential temperature and ozone profiles have 
been  obtained  from  radiosonde  data.  A  typical  radiosonde  (SRS400  [12])  is 
launched generally at midday and midnight from Payerne station (490 m, at ~ 80 
km North-West from Jungfraujoch). A typical sonde is equipped with Copper-
Constantan  thermocouple  for  measuring  the  temperature,  a  carbon-cellulose 
hygristor for the humidity and, three times a week, with a unit ozone detection 
based on electrochemical concentration cells (ECCs) method. The data used in 
this  analysis  were  obtained  from  Payerne  -  SwissMeteo  station.  Additional 
radiosonding data from Lyon, Stuttgart and Milano were considered. 
5
RT
C
M
γ
=
, with 
γ
the adiabatic constant, R the gas universal constant and M air molecular weight 
.NET RasterEdge XDoc.PDF Purchase Details
PDF Print. License Agreement. Support Plans Each RasterEdge license comes with 1-year dedicated support (email, online chat) with 24-hour response time (working
how to insert a text box in pdf; how to enter text in pdf form
C# PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in C#.net
Create editable Word file online without email. TIFF with specified zoom value and save it into stream. zoomValue, The magnification of the original PDF page size
add text block to pdf; add text fields to pdf
PBL - UT dynamics  
VII 
169
2.3.2 Meteorology  
The  meteorological  station,  at  Jungfraujoch,  provided  a  complete  set  of 
meteorological  parameters:  temperature,  pressure,  wind,  solar  radiation,  and 
humidity. 
The  synoptic  consideration  was  taken  into  account  via  synoptic  maps  and 
satellites images obtained from SwissMeteo (Payerne) 
2.3.3 Glacier catchment discharge 
The  glacier  related  discharge  was  obtained  at  Blatten  bei  Naters,  from  a 
hydrometric gage on Massa River, situated at the outlet of the Aletsch glacier 
catchment, a hydrological station belonging to Swiss Federal Office for Water 
and Geology. 
2.3.4 In situ  aerosol measurements  
Number  density,  scattering  and  absorption  coefficients  of  the in situ   (at  10 
%RH, 25°C) aerosol properties  (as  described in  chapter VI  section  3.3) have 
been obtained.  Data used are from the Laboratory of  Atmospheric  Chemistry 
(Paul Scherer Institute-Villigen-CH).  
3. Results and Discussions   
Between  17  April  2003  and  11  August  2003,  series  of  lidar  and  sonic 
measurements  were  obtained.  Three  different  situations  of  PBL  height  have 
been investigated: (a) lower, (b) medium and (c) higher, relative to the altitude 
of  the  Jungfraujoch  station  (3580  m).  Accordingly  lidar  data  series  were 
considered (Table 1).  
Table  1  LIDAR  selected  data  series 
and  the  corresponding  averages  of 
temperature, the relative humidity and 
pressure  at  the  station.  The 
identification  (ID)  notations  are:  A  = 
day  and  B  =  night  time,  1  = PBL  < 
3600m, 2 = PBL ~ 3600-4000m and 3 
= PBL > 4000m 
The reference data  (1)  from 17-18.04.2003 are  typical  for  a free  troposphere 
situation at 3600 m while the series (2) 1 - 5.08.03, and (3) 6 - 11.08.03 were 
selected during a persistent anticyclonic regime period. 
Start 
Time 
Stop 
Time 
T [C] 
RH 
[%] 
[mb] 
ID 
17.04.03 
23:03 
17.04.03 
0:20 
-5.6 
23 
661 
B1 
18.04.03 
11:30 
18.04.03113
:30 
-8.8 
23 
653 
A1 
04.08.03 
12:20 
04.08.02 
18:00 
8.9 
70 
674 
A2 
05.08.03 
01:00 
05.08.02 
02:00 
6.6 
86 
674 
B2 
09.08.03 
12:30 
09.08.02 
15:30 
6.3 
70 
671 
A3 
10.08.03 
01:00 
10.08.02 
02:00 
6.2 
39 
671 
B3 
About RasterEdge.com - A Professional Image Solution Provider
Email to: support@rasteredge.com. We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and components for
adding text fields to pdf; how to add a text box in a pdf file
VB.NET Create PDF from PowerPoint Library to convert pptx, ppt to
Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Turn all PowerPoint presentation into high quality PDF Create PDF file from PowerPoint free online without
add text to pdf file; how to insert text into a pdf
PBL - UT dynamics  
VII 
170
3.1  Meteorological context 
During the experiment period many anticyclonic regimes occurred but the most 
intense with unusual meteorological values was observed from 1 to 15.08.2003. 
In this period a stationary meteorological regime (Azores anticyclone) persisted 
over Western Europe. This high-pressure regime conducted to the interruption 
of the normal currents over Europe between 1 and 12 August 2003 Figure 2, a 
and b).  
An historical heatwave was noticed at the continental scale in this period. 
Figure 2 Representative day-by-day “frozen” picture for the first decade of the August 
2003  from  the  METEOSAT  Infrared  channel  on  10.08.2003  at  01:00  (a)  and  a 
synoptic map (from MeteoSwiss) showing the extension of the Azores anticyclone 
over Western Europe (b).  
The  local  meteorology  recorded  at  the  Jungfraujoch  observatory  (Figure  3) 
shows  unusually  high  pressure,  temperature,  moisture  and  weak  winds  field. 
Higher  pressure  (+10  mbar)  and  higher  temperatures  (+  4  °C)  were  noticed 
compared to those observed during the hottest anticyclone regime in July 2003 
(665 mbar, 3°C). The average wind speed was low (2.5 m/s) with peaks of 5-6 
m/s  blowing  mainly  from  the  North  direction. Before  sunset and  sunrise  the 
wind direction was generally turned to South with an average speed of 1-2 m/s 
(Figure 3, b). High solar short-wave incoming radiation (1050 W/m
2
) occurred 
during the whole period. The first sub-period was clearly wetter, (i.e. 70 -100% 
RH) than the second (i.e. 30-50% RH) while the air average temperature was the 
same (6-7 °C) for both sub-periods (Figure 3, c).  
(a) 
(b
VB.NET Create PDF from Word Library to convert docx, doc to PDF in
Data: Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update all Word text and image content into high quality Free online Word to PDF converter without email.
adding text to pdf in acrobat; add text pdf professional
VB.NET Create PDF from Excel Library to convert xlsx, xls to PDF
Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Turn all Excel spreadsheet into high quality PDF Convert Excel to PDF document free online without email.
how to insert text box in pdf; how to add text to a pdf file
PBL - UT dynamics  
VII 
171
Figure 3 Meteorological parameters at the Jungfraujoch station. Temperature (T) and 
Pressure (P) are shown for July and August (a). Wind speed (WS), wind direction 
(WD) in (b) relative humidity (RH) and incoming total solar radiation (Rad) in (c) are 
plotted only from 02 to 15.08.2003, corresponding to the rectangle from (a). 
Figure 4  The Aletsch glacier: autumn-winter spring typical  view (a)  and  in  August 
2003 (b). Note the huge difference in snow cover and melting processes as well as 
the possible PBL top indicated by the cirrus altitude. 
The daily temperature amplitude of 7°C in the first half of the period decreased 
to only a 2-3 °C in the second half. There was not precipitation during the study 
period. In Figure 4 two pictures representing the glacier in winter-spring-autumn 
time and during August 2003 heat wave are shown comparatively.  
(a) 
(b
-5
0
5
10
15
20
25
28.6
8.7
18.7 28.7
7.8
17.8
27.8
T [°C]
625
635
645
655
665
675
P [mbar]
T [°C]
P [mbar]
0
20
40
60
80
100
2.8
4.8
6.8
8.8
10.8
12.8
14.8
RH [%]
0
200
400
600
800
1000
-Rad [Wm]
RH [%]
Rad [W/m2]
0
5
10
15
20
25
2.8
4.8
6.8
8.8
10.8
12.8
14.8
-WS [ms]
0
90
180
270
360
WD [°N]
WS [m/s]
WD [°N]
(a) 
(b
(c)
PBL - UT dynamics  
VII 
172
13580
3580
5000
6000
7000
8000
9000
10000
11000
12000
13000
(1) 
(1) 
(2) 
(3) 
(A) 
13580
3580
5000
6000
7000
8000
9000
10000
11000
12000
13000
(B) 
(1) 
(1)
)
(2) 
(3) 
3.2  Aerosols tracing of PBL and RL 
As the lidar corrected signals (RCS) are direct proportional to the atmospheric 
attenuated  aerosols  backscatter  light,  the  representation  of  the  RCS  in  a  2D 
intensity  graph  (Figure  5)  at  532  nm  allows  us  to  appreciate  the  vertical 
distribution  and  the  time  evolution  of  the  aerosols  layers.  The  reference 
situations AB1 are aerosols, clouds-free. The situations A2 and B2 show several 
well-identified  (yellow  colors  on  the  blue  background)  aerosols  layers. Their 
height increased during  the day  (A2) reaching 4000 m at  midday and 4300 - 
4400 m in the late afternoon (18:00 LT). 
Figure  5  LIDAR  range  corrected  signals  intensity  (RCS)  at  532  nm  tracing  the 
aerosols above Jungfraujoch observatory during day (A) and night (B) time in three 
distinctive meteorological situations: (1) PBL < 3600 m, (2) PBL ~ 3600-4000 m, and 
(3) PBL > 4000 m. The color scale varies from blue (lowest RCS intensities for a free 
troposphere  sky)  passing  through  yellow  (RCS  medium  intensities  due  to  the 
aerosols  layers)  to  read  (high  intensities  of  the  RCS  due  to  the  cirrus  cloud 
backscattered light).  
A layer persists during the night (B2) at high altitude (~ 4000 m). In the B2 case, 
a secondary higher layer was noticed. Even more complex layer structures have 
been identified in nighttime during this heatwave period. In  the cases A3 and 
B3, the altitude of the daytime layer increases at 4500 - 4750 m (A3). A residual 
layer is persisting over the night at ~ 4700 - 5000 m (B3). The corresponding 
RCS time averaged profiles are presented in Figure 6 for the above-cited series.  
The profiles present net gradients (“steps”) at lower altitudes above the station 
on situations AB23, which is not the case for AB1 situations.  
This net gradient is occasionally marked by the presence of small clouds at the 
top (e.g. B2 and A3) enhancing the backscatter signal. 
PBL - UT dynamics  
VII 
173
Figure  6  LIDAR  Range  correcting  signals  (molecular  scaled)  profiles  at  532nm 
corresponding to day (A) and night (B) in the three different meteorological situations: 
(1) PBL < 3600 m, (2) PBL ~3600-4000 m and (3) PBL >4000 m. The PBL top in the 
daytime cases (A) and the RL top in the nighttime (B) are indicated by arrows. The 
occurrence  of  cirrus  clouds  (CC)  or  tropopause  cirrus  clouds  (TCC)  in  the  free 
troposphere (FT) can be seen. 
In the AB3 cases, the layer is clearly higher than the Alps (the highest near peak 
being Jungfrau at 4200 m). These aerosol layers could be associated to the PBL 
top  during  the  daytime  and  with  the  RL  top  in  the  nighttime.  Already  high 
aerosol  layers  (4000  m  ASL)  in  the  Alps  were  previously  reported  by  lidar 
aerosol measurements [13] and the  homogeneous elevation of  the PBL at the 
Jungfraujoch  station  was shown  up  to  4200 m in the  late afternoon  by  lidar 
aircraft embarqued observations [14].  
In  this  case,  the  PBL  elevation  seems  to  be  clearly  higher  followed  by  the 
persistence in the night of a high altitude RL.  
Next section considers the water vapor mixing ratio measured by lidar Raman in 
nighttime.   
3500
4500
5500
6500
7500
8500
9500
10500
11500
12500
13500
0.E+00
2.E+06
4.E+06
RCS at 532nm 
ASL [m]
RCS (B1)
RCS (B2)
RCS (B3)
RL top
FT
CC
3500
4500
5500
6500
7500
8500
9500
10500
11500
12500
13500
0.E+00
2.E+06
4.E+06
RCS at 532nm 
ASL [m]
RCS (A1)
RCS (A2)
RCS (A3)
TCC
PBL  top
FT
CC
(b) 
PBL - UT dynamics  
VII 
174
3.3  Water vapor tracing of the RL 
The nighttime water vapor mixing ratio vertical (B123v) vertical profiles (Figure 
7) show a clear correlation with the RCS signals (B123).  
Figure 7 Nighttime (B) vertical (v) and horizontal (h) water vapor estimation using the 
Raman vibrational lidar technique above the Aletsch glacier for the three selected 
situations. 
The Bv1 situation can be considered as a free 
troposphere  reference  with  a  quite  low  i.e. 
typical  spring-autumn  water  vapor  content 
(e.g. ~1 g/Kg). For the other two cases (B23v) 
the  gradients  steps  on  aerosols  backscatters 
(RCS)  are  strongly  correlated  with  the  water 
vapor mixing ratio gradients. The RCS (B2) is 
greater  than  RCS (B3) due to the significant 
difference  in  the  moisture  level,  86%  RH 
average  compared  to  39%  respectively  (for 
almost the same average temperature 6 °C).  
Figure  8 LIDAR extinction  coefficient at  532 nm 
and  water  vapor  mixing  ratio  on  10.08.2003 
(1:00-02:00)  both  showing  the  same  top  of  a 
nighttime residual layer 
3500
4500
5500
6500
7500
8500
9500
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
H
2
O [g/Kg] 
ASL [m]
H2O (B1v)
H2O (B2v)
H2O (B3v)
RL top
FT
0
3
5
8
10
13
15
0
500
1000
1500
2000
Distance [m] 
H2O [g/Kg]
H2O (B1h)
H2O (B2h)
H2O B(3h)
(a) 
(b
3500
4000
4500
5000
5500
6000
6500
7000
7500
8000
8500
9000
9500
10000
0.E+00
5.E-05
1.E-04
2.E-04
2.E-04
Ext.Coef [m
-1
]
ASL [m]
0
1
2
3
4
5
H
2
O [g/Kg] 
Ext.Coef (B3)
H2O (B3v)
RL top
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested