open pdf file in asp net c# : How to add text to pdf file software control project winforms web page wpf UWP 125703772-part433

Introduction 
5
remaining of 47%. A little bit more than half of the solar radiation absorbed at 
the surface is transformed into latent heat (24%) and sensible heat (5%). Only 
5% is lost by radiation and thus only the remaining ~ 15% of the incoming solar 
radiation is trapped in the atmosphere by the greenhouse gases [8].  
To estimate the relative impact of these different atmospheric compounds, their 
radiative  forcing has to be calculated. From the definition given by (IPCC
3
2001,  [9]),  the  radiative 
forcing  (
F)  of  the  surface-
troposphere  climate  system  
due  to  perturbation  or  the 
introduction of an agent (e.g. 
 change  in  greenhouse  gas 
concentrations) is  the  change 
in  net  (down  minus  up) 
irradiance  (solar  plus  long-
wave,  in  Wm
-2
 at  the 
tropopause  after  allowing  for 
stratospheric  temperatures  to 
readjust 
to 
radiative 
equilibrium,  but  with  surface 
and tropospheric temperatures 
and  states  held  fixed  at  the 
unperturbed values.  
Figure  2  Annual  mean  of  the  global  energy  mean  balance  of  the 
Atmosphere-Earth system (from ([8]) 
The above-cited definition does not take into consideration any feedbacks (e.g. 
water vapor positive feedback). The temperature change (
T
e
) is related to the 
radiative forcing 
F by the climate sensitivity factor 
λ
0
[K (Wm
-2
)
-1
] as below.  
0
e
F
T
S S
λ
= ∆
=
Eq. (3) 
A positive radiative forcing, such as that produced by increasing concentration 
of greenhouse gases, tends to warm the surface (greenhouse effect) whereas a 
negative radiative forcing, which can arise from  an increase in some types  of 
aerosols or clouds, tends to cool the surface (whitehouse effect). The estimates 
3
The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC ) has been conjointly established by 
World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and the United Nations Environmental Program 
(UNEP) to deal with: scientific, technical and socio - economic information relevant for the 
understanding of climate changes, potential impacts options and solutions for adaptation and 
mitigation. 
How to add text to pdf file - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text pdf acrobat; how to add text to a pdf document using acrobat
How to add text to pdf file - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add text boxes to pdf; how to add text to pdf document
Introduction 
6
of the radiative forcing due to an increase of well-mixed greenhouse gases are:  
+1.46 Wm
-2
for CO
2
,  +0.48 Wm
-2
for CH
4
,  +0.34 Wm
-2
for halocarbons,  and  
+0.15 Wm
-2
for N
2
O. The depletion of stratospheric ozone is estimated to cause 
 negative  radiative  forcing  of  -0.15Wm
-2
 whereas  the  radiative  forcing  of 
tropospheric ozone is +0.35 Wm
-2
. Ozone forcing varies considerably by region 
and responds  much  more  quickly  to  changes  in  emission  than the long-lived 
greenhouse gases (CO
2
, CH
4
, N
2
O and CFCs) [10].  
Radiative forcing has a high, 
medium  and  low  level  of 
scientific  understanding.  The 
infrared  absorption  and 
radiative transfer of the well-
mixed  greenhouse  gases  are 
well  quantified.  The  short 
time  life  greenhouse  gases, 
pose  more  problem  because 
they  are  highly  variable  in 
space and time [11]. 
Figure 3 IPCC synthesis on the radiative forcing, level of understanding 
and uncertainties 
Figure  3  shows  the  present  estimation  given  by IPCC   of  the  global  mean 
radiative forcing of the climate system for the year 2000, relative to 1750 [9]. 
The  majority of  the world's  scientific  community  estimates that  a  significant 
climatic change of anthropogenic source is as a growing body of evidence [12-
15]. A clear evidence is, for example, the exponential increase in atmospheric 
concentrations, since the beginning of the industrial era (~1860) and particularly 
after 1945-1950, of CO
2
, N
2
O, CH
4
, CFC (i.e. CO
2
: ~ 280 baseline in 1850 to 
~360 ppmv
4
nowadays). This increase is clearly correlated with anthropogenic 
activity (fuel consumption, energy production, refrigeration). For this reason the 
reduction of greenhouse gases was the primary objective of the United Nations 
Framework  Convention  on  Climate  Change  (UNFCCC)  protocol  launched in 
Kyoto-Japan in December 11, 1997 and to which more and more countries are 
adhering.   
Although it is clear that the ensemble of the greenhouse gases mentioned above 
are increasing the surface temperature of the planet, the effects of atmospheric 
4
ppmv- parts per million by volume i.e. 10
-6
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
adding text field to pdf; how to insert text in pdf file
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = true; // Add password to PDF file.
how to enter text into a pdf form; adding text to a pdf form
Introduction 
7
aerosols either  directly or  through the formation  of clouds are  still  subject  of 
scientific debate. Uncertainties about the aerosols’ effects are particularly high, 
for  example,  for  mineral  dust  (e.g.  Saharan  dust)  and  for  cirrus  clouds  and 
contrails. Another key aspect of this problem is the difficulty in characterizing 
the  global  basic  aerosol  properties  as  their  number  concentration,  size 
distribution  and  optical  parameters.  The  positive  feedback  of  water  vapor  is 
expected  to  lead  to  an  increase  in  the  upper  troposphere  (UT)  water  vapor 
concentrations and even transport to the tropopause (TP) and lower stratosphere 
(LS) regions. The main contribution to the natural greenhouse effect is in fact 
due to  atmospheric water  vapor but  its  exact contribution is still  a subject  of 
various and controversial opinions and ranges from 35-40 % to 95-98 % [9]. The 
large uncertainty in our present understanding of the effect of water vapor is due 
to its  high  space-time  variability,  the  positive  feedback  precise quantification 
and its involving in the cloud related processes. The IPCC reports that, despite 
non-uniform  effects  and  difficulties  in  assessing  the  quality  of  the  data,  a 
tropospheric increase in water vapor was noticed over the 20th century. 
For  the  assessment  of  the  above-described  problematic  it  is  necessary  to 
improve the set of well-calibrated instruments (both in situ  and remote sensing) 
so that they have the ability to measure changes in atmospheric aerosol amounts 
and radiative  properties, changes in  atmospheric water  vapor and  temperature 
distributions,  and  changes  in  cloud  cover  and  cloud  interaction  with  solar 
radiation [15, 16]. 
As it is impossible to make full-scale experiments in the atmosphere and even 
on a regional scale such an endeavor would hardly make sense because of the 
complexity of the involved phenomena, we rely on numerical models to provide 
detailed  estimates  of  climate  responses  and  regional  features.  Such  models 
cannot  yet  simulate  all  aspects  of  the  climate  and  there  are  particular 
uncertainties  associated  with  clouds  and  their  interactions  with radiation  and 
aerosols [9, 11, 13,  16-20].  A  common approach using the measurements for 
calibration  and  checking  out  of  the  model  performances  and  then  combining 
measurements  with  model  results  at  different  scales  is  the  present  adopted 
research solution. 
2. Research presentation  
In the above-described context, the present work implements new atmospheric 
measurements in order to address the lack of information and to take part via 
various  global  networks  in  the general  effort  to  understand the effects  of  the 
atmospheric compounds on radiative forcing and climate. These relatively new 
measurements  concern the  upper troposphere (UT)
5
region between  3600  and 
5
UT will be used as abbreviation for upper troposphere (i.e. atmospheric layer between 3600 
m ASL and tropopause); The abbreviation ASL will be used for altitude above see level 
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to PDF; C# Protect: Add Password
how to add text fields to a pdf; how to add text box to pdf document
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats through VB
how to add text to a pdf document using reader; adding text fields to a pdf
Introduction 
8
the tropopause (i.e.  12-15.000 m  ASL)  and  are  based  on  a multi-wavelength 
LIDAR  technique  (JFJ-LIDAR)
6
implemented  at  the  International  Scientific 
Station  of  Jungfraujoch  (JFJ)
7
.  The  LIDAR
8
(LIght Detection  and Ranging) 
technique  is  based  on  the  interaction  of  a  laser  beam  with  atmospheric 
compounds  (molecules,  gases,  clouds)  via  elastic-inelastic  or  resonant-non-
resonant processes (scattering, absorption, fluorescence) relative to the radiation 
of the laser beam. By analyzing the detected backscattered radiation, suitable at 
many wavelengths, one may retrieve: optical properties of the atmosphere (e.g. 
backscatter-extinction  coefficients  of  aerosols  and  clouds),  atmospheric 
concentrations  (e.g.  ozone,  water  vapor)  and  atmospheric  parameters  (e.g. 
temperature,  wind)  with  relatively  high  space-time  resolution  (e.g.  ~  tens  of 
minutes/hours - ten/hundred m).   
The results presented in this thesis report are structured in chapters as follows: 
Chapter II presents briefly the atmospheric related measurements at the JFJ 
station
9
and  introduces  the  principle  of  the  lidar  technique  and  its 
implementation  at  the  JFJ.  Then  the  fundamental  processes  (i.e.  light-
atmospheric compounds interactions) on which the lidar method is based and the 
lidar-associated equations are reviewed. The JFJ-LIDAR system configuration 
(i.e. setup and optical layouts) is presented in detail. Examples of lidar signals 
and results from two comparisons made at JFJ with two other lidar systems are 
also shown. 
Chapter III begins with a short description of the upper troposphere aerosols 
and cirrus clouds significance for the Earth radiative forcing. Then the lidar – 
based  algorithms  used  for  the  retrieval  of  their  optical  (i.e.  extinction  and 
backscatter  coefficients)  and  their  microphysical  properties  (i.e.  radius, 
refractive  index, albedo,  number-surface-volume  size  distributions)  are 
described.  These  algorithms  involve  the  use  of  elastic  (Rayleigh  and  Mie), 
inelastic  (Raman)  and  their  combination  for  retrieving  the  upper  troposphere 
optical  properties  (i.e.  backscatter  -  extinction  coefficients,  optical  depth)  in 
three distinct cases:  a quasi-aerosol-free upper troposphere, a medium aerosol 
loading, and in the presence of cirrus/contrails. The results obtained using the 
6
JFJ-LIDAR will be used as abbreviation for the multi-wavelength lidar system 
7
JFJ abbreviation will be used for Jungfraujoch, Jungfraujoch observatory, station, etc  
8
For simplification the LIDAR acronym will be written lidar as the LIDAR method starts to 
become a more known and common measurement technique nowadays  
9
The Jungfraujoch observatory (3580 m ASL, 46°33’ N, 7°59’ W) is geographically located 
in Switzerland, in the Berner Oberland region, in the area of Aletsch glacier and the Jungfrau 
– Mönch - Eiger Mountains.  
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
adding text to a pdf document acrobat; how to add a text box to a pdf
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
using RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic; using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Have a try with this sample C#.NET code to add an image to the first page of PDF file.
add text field to pdf acrobat; adding text to pdf reader
Introduction 
9
elastic signals at 355, 532 and 1064 nm extracted from regular measurements
10
concerning  the  backscatter-extinction  vertical  profiles  are  presented.  The 
integrated columns of lidar extinction vertical profiles are compared with similar 
measurements obtained from  a co-located sun-photometer instrument. The use 
of the elastic-inelastic signals combination for determining the absolute optical 
properties  of  the  cirrus  clouds  is  demonstrated.  Examples  of  atmospheric 
depolarization measurements at 532 nm, used to discriminate between water and 
ice crystal content clouds are shown. Finally a pure contrail is studied in detail 
in  terms  of  its  backscatter-extinction  coefficients  and  also  preliminary 
calculations  of  its  microphysical  properties  (i.e.  refractive  index, albedo  and 
effective radius) are illustrated. 
Chapter IV is devoted to the water vapor. It contains a brief introduction of 
water vapor climatic significance, measurements efforts and the specificities of 
UT  water  vapor.  Then  the  Raman  lidar  method,  based  on  the ratio  of water 
vapor at  407 and nitrogen at 387 Raman backscatter radiation excited by 355 
nm, for determination of the water vapor mixing ratio is described together with 
the corresponding lidar layout. The retrieval procedure and typical nighttime UT 
profiles of water vapor are presented. Systematic estimations, based on in situ 
one-point calibration,  of the water vapor column above JFJ are shown. These 
columns  are compared with those  obtained  from  the co-located GPS receiver 
data. Two  typical  vertical profiles  (for winter and  for  summer) are  compared 
with  the  closest  space-time  radiosounding  and  the  results  are  discussed. 
Integrated water vapor columns from regular measurements, between 2000 and 
2003, are also compared with those obtained from regional radiosoundings. 
Chapter V is built around the implementation of a double grating polychomator 
module allowing the detection of backscattering radiation corresponding to parts 
of  the  atmospheric  pure  rotational  Raman  spectra  excited  at  532  nm.  These 
signals  are  used  to  obtain  nighttime  UTLS  (upper  troposphere  –  lower 
stratosphere) temperature profiles but  also to determine absolute extinction  of 
cirrus clouds at 532 nm. The first calibration efforts led to temperature profiles 
in good agreement with US 1976 atmospheric model and the closest space-time 
radiosounding  profile.  The  estimation  of  the  relative  humidity  based  on 
temperature and water vapor profile simultaneously with absolute backscatter-
extinction  coefficients  are  also  exemplified  both  on  vertical  and  horizontal 
paths.  
Chapter VI is a case study concerning the characterization of the long-range 
transport  mineral  dust  often  occurring  over  Europe.  A  dust  plume  from  the 
10
Regular  measurements  (2000-2003)  in  the  framework  of  the EARLINET  (European 
Aerosols Research LIdar NETwork) project   
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Also able to uncompress PDF file in VB.NET programs. Offer flexible and royalty-free developing library license for VB.NET programmers to compress PDF file.
add text to pdf document in preview; add editable text box to pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
add text to pdf acrobat; adding text to a pdf
Introduction 
10
August  2
nd
,  2001  Saharan  dust  outbreak  (SDO)  over  the  Western  Europe  is 
analyzed by combining the lidar observations with co-located in situ and total 
column aerosol-related measurements. After introducing climatic significance of 
the Saharan dust,  the measurement  techniques  are briefly  described. Then  the 
SDO  patterns  are  evidenced  based  on  lidar, in situ   and  sun–photometer 
observations. The results of backward trajectory simulations are presented and 
they prove the African origin of this mineral dust. Furthermore the dust’s optical 
properties  are  discussed  based  on  measurements  taken  in  three  different 
situations: dust-free UT, dust and dust mixture with clouds. Preliminary results 
of dust microphysics calculations are also presented.  
Chapter  VII is another case study, which concern planetary boundary layer 
(PBL) air mass intrusions in the UT.  The analysis focuses on the particular case, 
during the  August 2003 heat  wave, when  a very  high  PBL convection  (i.e.  ~ 
5000 m ASL) covering the Swiss Alps was observed. Lidar, sonic anemometers 
and  other  complementary  observations  (i.e.  regional  radiosoundings,  glacier 
discharge,  aerosol  measurements  in  situ)  are  discussed  on  this  context. 
Nighttime  observations show  also  a persistent  residual layer  above the  Swiss 
Alps  characterized by  relatively high humidity,  aerosol  load  and temperature. 
The  measurements  are  also  compared  with  reference  measurements  taken  in 
springtime when the PBL air masses were trapped below the JFJ altitude.  
The  main  conclusions  as  well  as  the  salient  perspectives  of  this  work  are 
presented in chapter VIII.  
The Annexes referred in the text, as A
number
, are grouped in chapter IX .  
Summary: In the local atmospheric research context at JFJ this work may be 
seen  as  a  complementary  relatively  recent  implemented  tool  (i.e.  lidar 
technique)  for  high  spatial-temporal  resolution  measurements  (i.e.  aerosols-
cirrus optical properties, water vapor mixing ratio and temperature --- vertical 
and horizontal profiles) in the UT regions. In the global atmospheric research, it 
may be placed in the context of: aerosols-mineral dust-cirrus/contrails radiative 
forcing estimation, UT water vapor positive feedback monitoring, PBL – UT - 
LS exchanges, monitoring of changes in the profile of atmospheric temperature, 
and characterization and tracking of long range global aerosol transport. The 
achievements  of  this  work  are  forming  a  promising  foundation  for  their 
extension to stratosphere. A further step will be to add in the near future new 
observations as for example the stratospheric ozone measurement. 
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
page of your defined page number which starts from 0. For example, your original PDF file contains 4 pages. C# DLLs: Split PDF Document. Add necessary references
add text pdf file acrobat; adding text to pdf
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
by directly tagging the second PDF file to the target one, this PDF file merge function VB.NET Project: DLLs for Merging PDF Documents. Add necessary references
how to add text to a pdf in preview; add text to pdf file reader
Introduction 
11
 schematic  overview  resuming  the  main  features  of  the  present  work  is 
depicted in Figure 4. 
Figure 4 Simplified representation of the topics and achievements of the 
present  work.  Note:  the  Arabic  numbers  are  indicating  the  related 
chapters  
References  
1. 
Earthwatch, U.N.S.-W., Air pollution and health. 2004, UNEP/GRID- Geneva. 
2. 
Couach, O., I. Balin, R. Jimenez, P. Ristori, S. Perego, F. Kirchner, V. Simeonov, B. 
Calpini, and H. van den Bergh, An investigation of ozone and planetary boundary 
layer dynamics over the complex topography of Grenoble combining measurements 
and modeling. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 2003. 3: p. 549-562. 
3. 
EEA, Air pollution by ozone in Europe in summer 2003 - Overview of exceedances of 
EC  ozone  threshold  values  during  the  summer  season  April–August  2003  and 
comparisons with previous years. 2004, European Environment Agency. 
T [Z] 
(V) 
ASL 
[km] 
TP (9-14) 
PBL (< 3-4) 
JFJ-LIDAR 
(II) 
UT aerosols  
(III)  
SDO (VI) 
S (16-50) 
UT 
(4-9)  
PBL 
(VII) 
q
H2O
[Z]  
(IV, V, VII) 
Contrails (III) 
O
3
Layer 
Cirrus (III) 
α
[Z] 
III, IV,V 
H
2
O
UV  
355 
532 
1064 
nm 
Introduction 
12
4. 
Molina, M.J. and F.S. Rowland, Stratospheric sink for chlorofluoromethanes-chlorine 
atom catalyzed destruction of ozone. Nature, 1974. 249: p. 810. 
5. 
UNEP-WMO, Scientific Assesement of Ozone Depletion. 2002. 
6. 
Barry, R.G.,  Chorley, R. J., Atmosphere, Weather & Climate. Seventh  Edition ed. 
1998, New-York: Routledge. 
7. 
Harrison,  R.M., and van  Grieken,  R.  E., Atmospheric particles.  IUPAC series on 
analytical and physical chemistry of environmental systems, ed. J. Buffle, and van 
Leeuwen H. P. Vol. Volume 5. 1998, New-York: John Wiley & Sons. Ltd. 
8. 
Graedel, T.E., and Crutzen, P.J., Atmospheric Change: an Earth system perspective. 
1993, New-York: W. H. Freeman and Compagny. 
9. 
Houghton, J.T., Y. Ding, D.J. Griggs, M. Noguer, P.J. van der Linden, and D. Xiaosu, 
Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis: Contribution of Working Group I to the 
Third Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)
2001, Cambridge University Press, UK. p. 944. 
10. 
IPCC, Climate change 1994. 1995, Cambridge: Press Syndicate of the University of 
Cambridge. 
11. 
Seinfeld, J.H. and S.N. Pandis, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, ed. J.W.S. ed. 
1998: Wiley Interscience. 1326. 
12.  Santer, B., and al., Towards the detection and attribution of an anthropogenic effect 
on climate. Climate Dynamics, 1995. 12: p. 77-100. 
13. 
Houghton, J., Global Warming: the complete briefing. 1997: Cambridge University 
Press. 
14.  Shine, K.P., de Forster, P.M., The effect of human activity on radiative forcing of 
climate change: a review of recent developments. Global and Planetary Change, 1999. 
20: p. 205-225. 
15. 
Ramanathan, V., P.J. Crutzen, J.T. Kiehl, and D. Rosenfeld, Aerosols, Climate, and 
the Hydrological Cycle. Science, 2001. 294: p. 2119-2124. 
16.  Charlson,  R.J.,  and  Heintzenberg,  J.  (Eds.), Aerosol forcing of climate.  Dahlem 
Workshop  Reports,  ed.  R.J.  Charlson,  and  Heintzenberg,  J.  Vol.  Environmental 
Sciences Research Report 17. 1995, New-York: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. 
17. 
Jennings, S.G., Aerosol Effects on Climate, ed. S.G. Jennings. 1993: The University of 
Arizona Press. 
18. 
Kondratyev, K.Y., Climatic effects of aerosols and clouds. Atmospheric physics & 
climatology, ed. J.M.B. Sc. 1999, Berlin: Springer-Verlag. 
19.  Finlayson-Pitts,  B.J.,  and  Pitts,  J.N., Upper and lower atmosphere: theory, 
experiments, and applications. 2000, San Diego: Academic Press. 
20. 
de  Félice,  P., L'effet de serre: un changement climatique annoncé.  2001,  Paris: 
L'Harmattan. 
LIDAR-based methodology
II 
13
Chapter II  
LIDAR-based methodology: lidar technique and the JFJ-LIDAR  
In the last 20-30 years, environmental research at the Jungfraujoch observatory 
(3580 m ASL, 46°33’ N, 7°59’ E) has been focused more on the atmosphere. 
The station is an outstanding research facility that is capable of monitoring many 
atmospheric parameters, including trace gases and aerosols as well as solar and 
cosmic  radiation.  These  measurements  are  obtained  using techniques  such  as 
infrared and microwave spectroscopy, gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, 
instruments for in situ determination of aerosol properties, sun photometer, GPS 
receivers, meteorological sensors, and many others.  
Since  January  2000,  a  multi-wavelength  LIDAR  system  developed  at 
EPFL/LPAS has been installed at the Jungfraujoch station. The goal of a lidar 
implementation  at  JFJ  was  to  provide  atmospheric  profiles  of  aerosol-cirrus 
optical  properties,  water  vapor  mixing  ratio  and  air  temperature  with  high 
temporal and spatial resolution.  
This  chapter  briefly  introduces  the  measurement  techniques  that  exist  at  the 
station and explains the basic principles of the lidar technique. The fundamentals 
concerning the lidar methodology are reviewed. The latest configuration of the 
JFJ  lidar  system  is  described  in  detail.   Finally,  examples  of typical LIDAR 
signals  and  of  results  from  two  inter-comparisons  with  other  lidar  systems, 
installed temporarily at JFJ station, are illustrated. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested