open pdf file in asp net c# : Add text fields to pdf application software utility azure winforms windows visual studio 1257037720-part434

Conclusions and Perspectives  
VIII 
185
module  proves  its  stability  (i.e.  weak  variation  in  time  of  calibration 
constants). The best result obtained was a temperature profile for 30 min 
acquisition time and a vertical gliding smoothing of 500 m, up to 18 km 
ASL using 400  mJ emission  energy at 1064  nm. Statistical  errors (1
σ
reach some ~ 4 - 6 °C at the 18 km ASL. The temperature profiles are in 
good  agreement  both  with  atmospheric  models  and  with  the  closest 
regional  radiosonde  measurements.  The  sum  of  the  lidar  signals, 
corresponding of pure rotational backscatter radiation, is used to retrieve 
the  aerosol-cirrus  extinction  and  lidar  ratio  absolute  values  of  cirrus 
clouds. 
Two  case studies  are  also included  in  this  work  due  to  their  climate  related 
relevance.  
(i)  The first concerns the optical characterization of the mineral dust that 
often blows over the Alps from the Saharan desert (SDO),  
(ii)  The  second  involves  lidar  and  complementary  measurements  taken 
during the Western Europe heat wave that occurred between 1 and 15 
August 2003.   
(i)  The Saharan dust extended up to 5500 - 6000 m ASL and it was found 
optically  thick  (i.e.  0.2-03  aerosols  optical  depth)  and  formed  by 
relatively large particles (i.e.  > 1 
µ
m and low Angstrom exponent ~ 
0.14) of quasi-spherical shapes (i.e. ~10 % depolarization ratio). The 
ambient average extinction estimated from lidar data is ~ 0.1 km
-1
and 
is almost  not wavelength  dependent  in  the UV-VIS-NIR. The slight 
dependency is due  to the absorption contribution which is estimated 
for in situ  measurements at  ~10 % in UV and less than ~ 5 % in VIS 
and  NIR.  Results  from  different  related  co-located  observations  are 
presented.  
(ii)  The  horizontal  and  vertical  lidar  measurements  of  water  vapor  and 
aerosols  backscatter  coefficient  were  analyzed  together  with 
simultaneous  sonic anemometer wind and temperature measurements 
at  the Aletsch  glacier surface from April  to August  2003.  Using the 
aerosols and water vapor as tracers of the planetary boundary layer it 
was  noticed  a  relatively  unusual  daytime  high  convection  of  the 
planetary boundary layer (i.e. PBL 
5000 m ASL). The persistence 
of PBL residual air masses above the Alps during the nighttime was 
also  observed.  These  results,  confirmed  by  the  regional 
radiosoundings, may be of importance for future work concerning the 
consequences of the August 2003 heatwave extreme event. 
Add text fields to pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text to pdf file; adding text to a pdf document
Add text fields to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to enter text into a pdf; how to add text to pdf
Conclusions and Perspectives  
VIII 
186
Perspectives 
These promising results encourage the continuation of regular operation of the 
JFJ lidar with an emphasis on maintaining the data series with as few breaks as 
possible  towards  a  long-term  monitoring.  At  the  same  time,  more  precise 
calibration procedures and comparisons with co-located measurements are still 
needed.  For  this,  the  regular  launching  at  JFJ  of  radiosondes  equipped  with 
temperature,  water  vapor, pressure,  ozone  and  aerosol  measurements specific 
detectors will allow determination of more precise calibration constants and the 
checking of their in time stability. Improvements and changes are also necessary 
for obtaining daytime temperature and water vapor profiles and in general, the 
increase in the SNR of Raman  signals is suitable.  For this purpose additional 
optical device as Fabry-Perrot interferometer that could perform better filtering 
of the pure rotational may be a solution. The operation in the Fraunhofer regions 
may also reduce the solar induced noise  on the  water vapor  Raman detection 
channels. One big step in the further developments will be the extension to the 
stratosphere  of  these  observations  using  the  Cassegrain  former  astronomic 
telescope (0.76 m diameter collector mirror;  focal length F ~11.4 m)  coupled 
with a new more powerful laser source. The use of the Cassegrain will increase 
the sensitivity by ~ 15 times while the new Nd: YAG laser source may be used 
with ~3 times more energy (i.e. 1600 mJ at 1064 nm). In principle, stratospheric 
aerosols  (e.g.  volcanic  ash,  sub-visible  stratospheric  clouds),  and  nighttime 
stratospheric  water vapor  could  be  retrieved.  In  order  to  avoid  the  problems 
associated with the mechanical stability of the Cassegrain telescope, and thus the 
sensitivity of the alignment, the emission of the laser may use the path of the 
Coudé optical  layout. An additional steering mirror mounted on the  telescope 
structure will finally send the laser beam into the atmosphere. This layout will 
avoid  the  problem  of  misalignment,  as  the  emission  will  be  mechanically 
coupled  with the telescope  movements. Based on these system  developments, 
the measurement of stratospheric ozone may be performed by DIAL technique. 
The  ozone  OFF/ON  appropriate  wavelengths  pair,  situated  in  the  ozone 
absorption  spectra  (Hartley  band),  may  be  generated  as  Raman  stimulated 
radiations from a nitrogen high pressure cell pumped by the 4
th
harmonic (e.g. 
266 nm) of the new Nd: YAG laser source. Obviously the new system will be 
able  to  be  used  for  determining  stratosphere  temperature  profiles  based  on 
Rayleigh molecular scattering, which can be coupled with the pure rotational-
based  determination  in  the  troposphere  to  get  a  complete  profile  up  to  the 
mesosphere.  The  troposphere-stratosphere folding  and exchanges may be also 
addressed.  This  will  enhance  the  other  measuring  techniques  at  JFJ  making 
multi-technique atmospheric complex investigations possible. On the horizon as 
 long-term  goal  is  a  plan  to  provide  remote  control  of  the  JFJ-LIDAR 
operation,  which  is  still  a  challenge  due  to  the  complex  technical  and 
meteorological conditions involved.   
VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in
featured PDF software, it should have functions for processing text, image as Add necessary references Demo Code to Retrieve All Form Fields from a PDF File in
add text box to pdf file; how to input text in a pdf
C# PDF Form Data Read Library: extract form data from PDF in C#.
Able to retrieve all form fields from adobe PDF file in C# featured PDF software, it should have functions for processing text, image as Add necessary references
how to insert text in pdf reader; adding text to pdf form
Conclusions and Perspectives  
VIII 
187
A resuming scheme…  
Summarizing, the main achievement of this research is the implementation and 
the  regular  operation  of  the  JFJ-LIDAR,  which  allows  the  high-resolution 
retrieval  of  aerosols-cirrus-contrails  extinction  and  backscatter  coefficients, 
temperature and water vapor mixing ratio, both vertically (up to the tropopause) 
and  horizontally  (above  the  Aletsch  glacier).  The  analysis  of  these 
measurements brings more knowledge in the general effort to reduce the present 
uncertainties in quantifying the contribution of various atmospheric compounds 
as water vapor, cirrus clouds and aerosols to the radiative budget of the Earth-
Atmosphere-Sun system.  
Hatched accolades 
past and present (i.e. conclusions)  
Non hatched accolades 
future (i.e. perspectives)
T (troposphere) 
S (stratosphere) 
α
T
(Mie + 
Raman) 
JFJ @ 3.6 
km 
50 km ASL 
H
2
O
T
(Raman rot.-vib.)
8 km 
TP 9-14 km 
α
S
(Mie +Raman)
O
3
S
(DIAL) 
T
T
(Raman Rot.)
T
S
(Rayleigh) 
H
2
O
S
(Raman rot.-vib.)
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
Convert PDF to text in .NET WinForms and ASP.NET project. Text in any PDF fields can be copied and pasted to .txt files by keeping original layout.
add text to pdf; how to insert text into a pdf using reader
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
adding text to pdf in reader; add text field to pdf
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats
how to insert text into a pdf file; add text pdf file acrobat
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
how to add text to a pdf document using acrobat; how to add text fields to pdf
Annexes  
IX   
189
Chapter IX 
ANNEXES 
A 1  Earth Atmosphere Characterization...........................................................................190 
A 2  LIDAR: brief historic................................................................................................191 
A 3  US-Standard-Atmosphere 1976.................................................................................192 
A 4  Lidar system related pictures.....................................................................................194 
A 5  Laser (Nd:YAG Infinity 40-100) related schemas.....................................................196 
A 6  Hamamatsu Photosensor module Type H5773-6780................................................198 
A 7  Thorn Emi Type QA9829B series technical specifications.......................................200 
A 8  Avalanche Photodiode (NIR-Si-APD) series technical specifications.......................202 
A 9  JFJ –LIDAR system: list of technical specifications.................................................204 
A 10  Inter-comparison with the Neuchatel Observatory lidar............................................207 
A 11  Inter-comparison with the Johns Hopkins University lidar.......................................209 
A 12  Aerosols typology .....................................................................................................210 
A 13  JFJ-LIDAR: 2000-2003 measurements series...........................................................211 
A 14  Poisson statistics and the photon - counting detection mode.....................................212 
A 15  MatLab front panel of the main sub-routine..............................................................212 
A 16  Clouds texture: sky black and white pictures............................................................213 
A 17  LabView front panel for RCS, Rayleigh, TMR and Depolarization calculus............213 
A 18  LabView: Raman 387 – Elastic 355 nm inversion combined method.......................214 
A 19  LabView: for Raman 532 – Elastic 532 nm inversion combined method.................214 
A 20  RSL Suphotometer specifications.............................................................................215 
A 21  Atmospheric -TOD - sun-photometer measurements on May 2001..........................216 
A 22  Water vapor definitions and transformation equations..............................................217 
A 23  Main routine for water vapor mixing ratio retrieval..................................................218 
A 24  Dead time photon counting correction sub-routine ...................................................219 
A 25  Payerne radiosoundings data treatment sub-routine..................................................219 
A 26  GPS principle for water vapor column retrieval .......................................................220 
A 27  Details of the DGP optical combinations..................................................................221 
A 28  LabView routine for temperature retrveal using PRRS lidar signals.........................222 
A 29  Sonics anemometers technical specifications............................................................223 
A 30  Overview of ultrasonic anemometers measurements.................................................225 
A 31  Jungfraujoch project: puzzle of pictures....................................................................230 
A 32  Constants...................................................................................................................232 
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
how to add text box in pdf file; add text pdf professional
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
how to add text to a pdf in acrobat; how to insert text into a pdf with acrobat
Annexes  
IX   
190
A 1  Earth Atmosphere Characterization 
Terrestrial  atmosphere  has  been 
slowly  but  radically  transformed 
since the formation of our planet, 
about  4,6 billion  years  ago. 
Reductive  (strongly  or  weakly 
according  to  the  earth  accretion 
theories)  at  the  beginning,  the 
atmosphere  is  oxidant  nowadays 
knowing  that  the  current  oxygen 
concentration (20,95 % in volume) 
was  reached  400 million  years 
ago.  But,  since  a  few  decades, 
atmosphere composition has been 
evolving  relatively  rapidly  irre-
spective  to  the  two  major 
constituent  N
2
(78.08 %  in 
volume) 
and 
O
2
whose 
concentrations  stay  stable,  but 
with the trace components having 
a mixing ratio less than 100 ppm (N
2
O, NO, NO
2
, O
3
, CO, CH
4
, VOC, CFC, …) and the 
minor component like CO
2
. These trace and minor components play an important role in 
tropospheric (NO
2
, VOC,.…) and stratospheric chemistry (N
2
O, CFC,.…), and in the global 
warming of our planet (CO
2
, CFC, O
3
, N
2
O, CH
4
). This change is due in a large part to human 
activities (fossil gas combustion, farming practices, CFC use, …) that lead to massive, gases 
or  particular,  emissions  of  primary  pollutants like  SO
2
 NO, VOC,  CO.  Those ones  are 
susceptible to react in the atmosphere to generate secondary pollutants, like photochemical 
oxidants,  which  are  often  more  harmful  than  the  initial  ones.  Air  pollution  effects  are 
multiple: decrease of the visibibility (especially for particles in suspension which diameter is 
included between 0,1 and 1 
µ
m), lakes acidification, attack or corrosion of numerous non-
biological material like historic monuments, injuries to plants, animals and human health 
(growth of mortality and morbidity). Additionally to the potential effects on health of an 
increase on earth surface of the sun UV-B radiation, due to the decrease of the stratospheric 
ozone layer, this radiation increase could also generate higher ozone concentration in the 
troposphere,  created  by  photolysis,  this  being  the  main  component  of  the  problematic 
photochemical smog. In the other hand O
3
, N
2
O, CFC, CO
2
and CH
4
whose concentrations 
are also growing (except the water vapor that seems stable) are all greenhouse gases. So they 
could  contribute  to  a  temperature  elevation  on  earth  and  bring  potential  effects  more 
dangerous than those that would result from the solely increase of the UV-B radiation.  
The Earth atmosphere describes the layer, essentially gaseous, that envelopes the earth. The 
atmosphere can be seen as a fluid in movement, so all the theories related to it will try to 
explain its behavior and among this its vertical structure, the winds and more generally the 
meteorology, and the pollution related problems. Several classifications can be defined, but 
the most commonly used is based on the vertical stratification of the temperature as proposed 
and accepted in  1960,  after it  had given rise to much controversy, by  the Geodesy and 
Geophysics International Union in Helsinki then in 1962 by the executive committee of the 
World Meteorological Organization (WMO). 
The troposphere, the first layer, starts from the ground and is characterized by a negative 
temperature gradient.  
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
how to insert text box in pdf; add text to pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to PDF; C# Protect: Add Password to PDF; C# Form: extract value from fields; C# Annotate: PDF Markup
adding text fields to a pdf; adding text pdf file
Annexes  
IX   
191
The stratosphere starts from the tropopause and is characterized by an increase of the temper-
ature with the altitude. It ends with the stratopause at an altitude of approximately 50 km 
where the temperature reaches a maximum at about 270 K (the highest temperature at the 
stratopause is reached in the polar regions during their ''local'' summer, when the insolation is 
permanent). This temperature increase is the result of the solar UV absorption, mainly due to 
the ozone which reaches a maximal concentration in the stratosphere. This creates a tempera-
ture gradient inversion, with warmer stratospheric air above the colder air of the top of tropo-
sphere. Consequently, this restricts considerably the vertical mixing both in the stratosphere 
itself  and  between  the  troposphere  and  the  stratosphere.  Due  to  the  low  tropopause 
temperature and this temperature inversion, a water vapor trap is created that explains the low 
level of water vapor content in the stratosphere. Beyond the stratopause the infrared emission 
by CO
2
, which is a minor constituent, is sufficient to induce a temperature decrease. This 
region, named mesosphere, extends from 50 km till the mesopause at an altitude of about 
85 km where the temperature reaches a minimum. Unlike what occurs in the stratopause, the 
mesopause temperature reaches its highest value (about 210 K) in the polar regions during 
their ''local'' winter, and the lowest value (150 K) in the polar regions during their ''local'' 
summer. This strange behavior is contradictory with the insolation conditions but can be 
explained by the existence of a meridian circulation that permits an energy transport from the 
''summer'' polar mesopause to the ''winter'' polar mesopause. 
The last region is the thermosphere which extends after the mesopause, and where the atmo-
sphere  is  warmed  by  the  UV  solar  radiation  with  wavelength  lower  than  175 nm.  The 
temperature constantly increases (855 K at 200 km, 1000 K at 750 km) till the thermopause 
where  the  temperature  gradient  starts  to  become  negligible  and  gives  a  quite  constant 
temperature value. The altitude of the thermopause is strongly linked to the solar activity. 
In term of the chemical composition and the dynamic state we speak about the homosphere  
which is the atmospheric region where the mixing phenomenons like winds, convection and 
turbulence are rapid and important enough to allow a constant volume composition of the 
main  constituents  (like O
2
 N
2
, Ar, but  not  for  minor constituents like  O
3
for  example) 
according  to  the  altitude.  This  homogeneity  stops  at  approximately  80 km,  with  the 
homopause or turbopause, which is a transitional region with the  heterosphere where 
turbulence starts to be weak and then does not allow a perfect mixing. In this region the earth 
gravity induces a molecular diffusion of the main constituents (in the homosphere too, but 
hidden by the ''turbulence-mixing'') and then it gives a variable volume composition of the 
main constituents. At a certain altitude, depending on the solar activity and the geomagnetism, 
is the heteropause or exobase where the particle concentrations start to be very low and where 
each particle can be approximated to a single one. Beyond in the exosphere, rules can be quite 
different than our usual ones. The radio physicists often use the second one. It begins with the 
neutrosphere, a region characterized by a very low concentration in free electrons and ending 
at about 60-70 km with the neutropause which makes a separation with the ionosphere where 
the free electron concentration start to be important. Above 750 km the molecular mean free 
pass starts to be so high that each molecule can be considered as a ballistic particle and then 
the normal gas physic law is no more valid. This region is called exosphere and extends till 
approximately 2000 km. In the last region the terrestrial magnetism supplants the terrestrial 
gravity and ions and protons are in majority. It is called magnetosphere or protosphere
A 2  LIDAR: brief historic 
The use of the lasers has the basis already in 1917 when Albert Einstein studied the quantum 
transitions between two energy levels and explained the spontaneous emission and predicted 
the stimulated emission phenomenon. Later, in the 50's, the physicist Alfred Kastler obtained 
Annexes  
IX   
192
the first inversion of population by optical pumping. In 1954, Townes built the first MASER 
(Microwave Amplifier by Stimulated Emission of Radiation), based on a transition of the 
ammoniac molecule, the precursor of the laser. After further theoretical investigation, Townes 
and Schawlow concluded, in 1958, that it was possible to build such a MASER system at 
higher frequency, i.e. in the visible spectral range [Schawlow and Townes, 1958] and Maiman 
was the first in 1960 to build an optical maser with ruby [Maiman, 1960]. Then there was an 
exponential increasing of the research and applications in this field, and the name changed to 
LASER for Light Amplifier by Stimulated Emission of Radiation.  As the ''laser sounding'' 
era did not start because of the unavailability of lasers, some attempts were made by means of 
searchlight probing technique in 1952 [Elterman, 1954], to retrieve temperature, density and 
pressure  in the atmosphere,  followed in 1962  by experiments with  a similar  giant  pulse 
technique [Mc Clung and Hellworth, 1962]. First laser soundings on aerosols with a ruby 
laser were made in the stratosphere [Fiocco and Smullin, 1963], to study volcanic compounds. 
A similar system for the troposphere was made [Ligda, 1963]. This so called lidar technique 
has then expanded and stimulated research into many fields: laser sources, optics, electronics, 
atmospheric chemistry, and more. The main advantage of this technique is the ability for 
range resolved probing of the atmosphere at distance in real time. No other systems, even 
today, can compete with this feature. This system has also some limitations due to the optical 
concept, the most commonly known are clouds or big aerosol loading. From the 60’s different 
techniques were investigated for detecting, with higher resolution, more and more types of 
molecules, pollutants, clouds or physical process like wind. Among all one may cite: Rayleigh 
lidar, which is usually used for determining temperature above 30 km [Hauchecorne et al., 
1991]. The feasibility of atmospheric temperature measurement down to 1 km has been also 
shown [She et al, 1992]. The  DIAL is based on a  different absorption, by  the molecule 
studied, of the pump beam. This technology is classic but the emitting system is complicate. It 
permits the measurement of various constituents [Uchiumi et al., 1994], but the most classical 
use is for the ozone concentration retrieval [Browell et al., 1985], [Calpini et al., 1997]. The 
water vapor case is quite difficult with this method, and numerous problems occur [Browell et 
al., 1979]. Shot per shot lidar is tested to retrieve wind and ozone fluxes [Fiorani et al.
1998]. The Raman lidar vibrational [Renaut and Capitini, 1988] (water vapor in the boundary 
layer), rotational [Arshinov et al., 1983] (temperature under 1 km), or resonant form [Rosen et 
al., 1975] (SO
2
and  NO
2
concentrations  under  1 km,  with  eyes  safety  considerations), 
[Hochenbleicher et al., 1976] (conditions of application) are some examples. Fluorescence 
lidar, used for mesospheric temperature measurement, where quenching is small [She et al., 
1992] or a pump and probe lidar to estimate the OH radical concentration [Jeanneret et al., 
2000] are quite unique applications. The idea of using the Raman effect for lidar, came in 
1967 [Leonard, 1967], when the first Raman shifts from the atmospheric oxygen and nitrogen 
were observed, and the advantage of this novel technique was pointed out. Several pioneering 
groups then worked in this promising way: Cooney [Cooney, 1968] measured atmospheric 
density profiles from N
2
, Inaba [Inaba and Kobayashi, 1969] theoretically showed that it was 
possible to monitor atmospheric gases or pollutants and proposed a diagram for the lidar to be 
built. The first observation of the water vapor mixing ratio with a Raman technique was 
reported by Melfi [Melfi et al., 1969]. 
A 3  US-Standard-Atmosphere 1976 
The US-Standard-Atmosphere 1976 is an idealized, steady state representation of the earth's 
atmosphere from the surface to 100 km, as it is assumed to exist in a period of moderate solar 
activity.  The  air  is  assumed to  be  dry,  and below  86  km  homogeneously  mixed  with  a 
relative-volume composition leading to a mean molecular weight. The temperature and the 
Annexes  
IX   
193
pressure at a given altitude z [m] above the Jungfraujoch station
1
(3580 m ASL) may be thus 
calculated by the following equations:  
( )
(
)
(
)(
)
( )
(
)
(
)(
)
1
3580
3580
3580
1
3580
3580
3580
( )
( )
( )
g
dT
T
R
dr
r
air
B
dT
dz
T z
T
m
T
m z
dT
dr
P z
P
T
m r
P z
n z
KT z
=
=
=
The standard atmosphere is divided in five layers: from 0 to the altitude of the tropopause, 
from this altitude to 20km, from 20 to 35km and from 35 to 50km with gradients of tempera-
ture dT/dz of -0.65K/100m, +0.0K/100m0.1K/100m and +0.24K/100m, respectively.  
Example of calculation: 
T (3580m) = 260 K (-13°C) 
P (3580m) = 660 hPa 
R = 8.3143 x 10
3
J K
-1
g(z) ~ 9.81 ms
-2
K
B
=1.381 x 10
-23
J K
-1
molecule
-1
1
Observation: the local P and T at Jungfraujoch station may vary during the year from: -30°C to 12°C and 650-
675 hPa, from personal observations during the lidar operation time. 
Annexes  
IX   
194
A 4  Lidar system related pictures 
(1) Nd: YAG laser head 
(2) Laser power suppy 
(3) PMTs power supply 
(4) Newtonian telescope  
(5) Filter polychromator 
(6) LICEL (Tr. Recorders) 
(1)
(2)
(4)
(5)
(3)
(6)
(8)
(7)
(9)
(10)
(8)
(7) Diaphragm 
(8) Dichroic beam splitters 
(9) Hamamatsu PMT355nm 
(10)ThornEmi PMT387nm 
(11)ThornEmi PMT407nm 
(12) APD 1064 nm 
(13) ThornEmi 607nm 
(14) Optical fiber head for  
532 nm 
DGP 
(15) DGP optical fiber 
bending protection 
(16) Optical coupling 
(polychromator - telescope) 
(17) Filters Combinations 
(18) Optical fibers
DGP 
(11) 
(12) 
(13) 
(14) 
(15) 
(17) 
(16) 
(18) 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested