open pdf file in asp net c# : How to input text in a pdf application Library cloud html asp.net azure class 125703773-part439

LIDAR-based methodology
II 
15
1. Introduction 
1.1  Atmospheric research at the Jungfraujoch station  
The Jungfraujoch
1
observatory (3580 m ASL, 46°33’ N, 7°59’ E) is located in 
the Berner Oberland region of central Switzerland, in the Jungfrau-Mönch-Eiger 
mountain chain (Figure 1). The scientific station itself is built on the top of a 
rock (“Sphinx”)  located  on the  dividing line  between the  Rhine  and Rhone 
watersheds.   
Figure 1 Geographical location of the JJF station ([1]) and a picture taken during the 
nighttime operation of the JFJ-LIDAR system. 
The scientific interest of the region was appreciated as early as 1838-1845, by 
naturalist-alpinist L. Agassiz. The first scientific experiments were performed 
here in 1912, when Jungfraujoch became the highest railway station in Europe. 
The  first  experiments  were  related  to  astronomy  (E.  Schar,  1922-1927), 
meteorology (1925), cosmic radiation (W.Kolhorster and G. von Salis, 1926), 
and ozone (D. Chalonge, 1928). A big leap in scientific research came with the 
construction of the Sphinx observatory (1930-1937). This facility grew steadily, 
including the construction of the astronomic cupola (1950-1951), the installation 
of the first solar spectrograph (M. Migeotte, L. Neven and J. Swensson), and the 
construction of a large Wilson chamber for cosmic radiation detection (P.M.S. 
1
Jungfraujoch means the “young lady pass”  (literal German translation) 
Berner Oberland 
Aletsch  glacier 
How to input text in a pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to enter text in pdf; how to input text in a pdf
How to input text in a pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text to a pdf document; add text in pdf file online
LIDAR-based methodology
II 
16
Blackett and J.G. Wilson). Further developments included the installation of a 
new solar spectrograph (L. Delbouille, L. Neven, G. Roland and M. Migeotte, 
1957-1958), and the addition of a 
φ
40 cm telescope (M. Golay, 1960), followed 
by a 
φ
76 cm telescope for systematic astronomic observations (1965-1967). 
These efforts set the foundation for the existing scientific instrumentation and 
measurement at Jungfraujoch, including long term monitoring [1].  
During the last 20-30 years the research projects on climate change, including 
monitoring of  greenhouse gases,  aerosols and  solar  radiation, have been  the 
main research priority at the station, and the new measurements presented in this 
research are part of this effort 
High resolution, solar Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) 
has been used for long-term monitoring since the 1950s. Using the Sun as light 
source, the FTIR technique measures atmospheric absorption bands/lines in the 
infrared [2]. These high resolution measurements enable the routine detection of 
column  abundances  of  more  than  20  atmospheric  constituents,  including 
stratospheric ozone depleting gases  (e.g. HCl, ClONO
2
, HNO
3
, NO, NO
2
, HF, 
COF
2
,  …),  greenhouse  gases  (e.g.  N
2
O,  CH
4
,  CO
2
,  SF
6
,  CCl
2
F2,  CHClF
2
HCFC,  …),  and  species  that  determine  the  oxidization  capacity  of  the 
troposphere (CO, C
2
H
2
, C
2
H
6
, OCS, HCN, H
2
CO). The column density of water 
vapor (H
2
O) is also measured. FTIR measurements at Jungfraujoch are part of 
global  monitoring  networks,  such  as  NDSC  (Network  for  Detecting  of 
Stratospheric Changes [3]).  
Radiation Measurements (GAW-Global Atmospheric Watch program) cover a 
series of UV-visible -IR detectors that measure direct and diffuse solar radiation 
as part of the Swiss Atmospheric Radiation Monitoring program (CHARM, [4]). 
This  program  includes  broadband  shortwave  (solar  spectrum,  also  UV 
broadband  measurements)  and  long-wave  (Earth  and  atmosphere  spectrum) 
measurements. Short  and  long-wave measurement  time  series  are  important 
components of climate research, whereas UV measurements are of particular 
interest from a public health standpoint, as they are linked to the evolution of the 
ozone  layer [5].  Broadband radiation  is measured both as global downward 
hemispheric  irradiance  and  as  direct  sun  irradiance.  In  addition,  the  direct 
spectral  irradiance  is  also  measured,  allowing  a  determination  of  the  total 
column of several atmospheric constituents. Daytime aerosol optical depth [6] 
and water vapor column [7] are routinely estimated using a 9-wavelength-band 
(UV-VIS-NIR) sun track photometer (Precision Filter Radiometer – PFR, [8]). 
UV - irradiance and actinic flux are also measured through regular and intensive 
campaigns [9]. 
Halogenated greenhouse gases (CFCs) monitoring has also been performed 
from  January  2000  using  gas  chromatography-mass  spectrometry  (GCMS). 
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
Dim intputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" ' Input password. Dim userPassword As String = "you" ' Open an encrypted PDF document.
adding text to pdf in reader; add text pdf
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
String intputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf"; // Input password. String userPassword = @"you"; // Open an encrypted PDF document.
how to add a text box in a pdf file; add editable text box to pdf
LIDAR-based methodology
II 
17
These measurements address central European emissions of a wide range of 
halogenated greenhouse and ozone depletion related gases (as defined by the 
Kyoto and Montreal protocols). The instrument is part of a network (EU-project 
SOGE)  that includes similar instruments (Monte Cimone, Italy; Spitsbergen, 
Norway;  Jungfraujoch,  Switzerland;  Mace  Head,  Ireland).  Measurements  at 
Jungfraujoch are usually analyzed using backward trajectory techniques that can 
identify potential source regions [10].  
Air  pollutant  monitoring at Jungfraujoch station provides representative 
background  air  pollution  measurements  for  Central  Europe.  These 
measurements are part of the Swiss national 16-stations air pollution monitoring 
network (NABEL-BUWAL [11]) and measure Ozone (O3), carbon monoxide 
(CO),  nitric  oxide  (NO),  and  nitrogen  dioxide  (NO2).  In addition,  selected 
Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs - alkanes, aromatics) are measured with a 
time resolution of 4 hours. Daily samples are taken for determination of gaseous 
SO2  and  for  particulate  sulphur.  Finally,  48-h  samples  of  total  suspended 
particles (TSP) are collected and analyzed for total mass as well as for lead (Pb) 
and  cadmium (Cd)  concentrations.  Annual  averages  are  derived  from  these 
measurements. 
In  situ  monitoring  of  aerosols is carried out with a set of dedicated 
instruments, most of which operate continuously for the measurement of aerosol 
properties at relative humidity  (RH) of ~10% and at temperatures (T) of  ~25°C. 
Aerosol optical properties such as the scattering coefficient are also obtained 
with a 3-wavelength (UV-VIS) nephelometer. Other aerosol instruments used 
include an aethalometer for soot determination (7 _ UV-VIS-NIR wavelengths), 
an  epiphaniometer  for  aerosol  surface  determination,  and  a  real  time 
condensation particlecounter (< 1 
µ
m) [12]. Aerosol-dedicated experiments and 
campaigns are systematically organized (e.g. CLACE 1, 2, and 3 [13]) with the 
goal of studying ambient properties of aerosols, such as hygroscopic properties 
and cloud processes [14, 15]. 
Microwave radiometry is used to determine atmospheric concentrations of 
water  vapor  and  ozone  based  on  the  microwave  (~180-200  GHz)  emission 
(rotational transitions) of stratospheric water vapor (H
2
O), ozone (O
3
), and ClO 
radical. Inversion methods permit the determination of low resolution profiles 
[16]. 
Cosmic  radiation measurements are important for climate related research. 
Neutron counting monitors provide key information about the interactions of the 
galactic  cosmic  radiation  with  the  plasma  and  the  magnetic  fields  in  the 
heliosphere, about the  Sun’s production of energetic  cosmic rays  and about 
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Description: Delete specified page from the input PDF file. Description: Delete consecutive pages from the input PDF file starting at specified position.
add text pdf file; how to insert text in pdf using preview
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
inputFilePath, Input file path, Valid pdf file path. pageIndex, The page index of the page that will be rotated. inputFilePath, Input file path, Valid pdf file path
adding text to a pdf; how to enter text in pdf form
LIDAR-based methodology
II 
18
theinteraction of these cosmic rays with various geomagnetic, atmospheric, and 
environmental phenomena [17]. 
GPS receiver that belongs to the Swiss Institute of Topography and it is part 
of the Automated GPS Network for Switzerland (AGNES, since 1998) is used 
for evaluating the atmospheric zenith total delay (ZTD). Measurements of the 
wet  delay  (WZD)  enable  derivation  of  the  water  vapor  integrated  column 
(IWV), which is used for monitoring the upper troposphere water vapor and for 
adjusting and improving weather forecast models [18, 19].   
Glaciological observations of the 25 km – length Aletsch glacier (the longest 
alpine glacier in Europe), provide information about short - and long - term 
weather  changes,  including  extreme  events  and  climate  trends.  These 
measurements are designed to predict times of break up of large ice masses from 
mother  glaciers  [1],  and  to reveal  paleo-atmospheric  chemistry  using  high-
altitude glacier firn and ice cores [20]. 
Carbon balance, 
14
C and N
2
/O
2
monitoring. Long-term observations of 
14
CO
2
at Jungfraujoch make it possible to distinguish between CO
from fossil fuel 
combustion  and  from  recent  biogenic  emissions  [21].  CO
2
and  N
2
/O
measurements reveal spatial and temporal variations of CO
2
sources and sinks 
over the European continent [22]. 
In addition to the above-mentioned experiments, other systematic observations 
are taken, including detection of radical species, radioactivity, materials testing 
under various radiation conditions, solar energy, and periodic medical tests [1].  
1.2  Basics of the LIDAR technique 
It is within this rich scientific context that a LIDAR
2
system was installed and 
has  operated  since  January  2000  (see  Figure  2,  left)  at  the  Jungfraujoch 
observatory.  Data from  this lidar system  (i.e. JFJ-LIDAR
3
) provides various 
atmospheric profiles with high spatial and temporal resolution. Profiles of the 
optical properties of  aerosols, clouds and  contrails,  upper troposphere water 
vapor mixing ratio and air temperature are obtained on a regular basis. The 
ultimate goal is to provide continuous monitoring using a remote controlled 
system. 
2
LIDAR is the acronym from LIght Detection And Ranging 
3
JFJ-LIDAR –abbreviation for the multi-wavelength Jungfraujoch LIDAR system  
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data
rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" Dim fields As field, set state to ON Dim input As AFCheckBoxInput
how to add text box to pdf document; add text to pdf reader
C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#
input = new AFCheckBoxInput(true); PDFFormHandler.FillFormField(inputFilePath, "AF_RadioButton_01", input, outputFilePath + "1.pdf"); } { fill a RadioButton
add text boxes to pdf; add text box in pdf
LIDAR-based methodology
II 
19
Figure 2 Green (532 nm) laser beam at nighttime pointing from the Jungfraujoch 
observatory (left) and a schematic setup of a lidar system  (right)  
The combination of LIDAR observations with the existing measurements at the 
JFJ station provides a unique opportunity to conduct long-term inter-calibrations 
and  complementary  or  simultaneous  monitoring  of  different  atmospheric 
parameters over various space-time scales. 
The LIDAR technique
4
is based on the detection and analysis of backscatter 
light  that  results  from  the  interaction  of  a  laser  beam  with  atmospheric 
constituents. Probing the atmosphere with a laser is similar to using radar, with 
the  difference  that  the  lidar uses  electromagnetic  radiation  (light)  from the 
optical  domain  instead of  radio  waves.  The  LIDAR  technique  is  an  active 
method because it uses an artificial light source for the retrieval of atmospheric 
parameters. This contrasts with passive methods, which use light emission from 
natural light sources (sun, moon) or thermal emission. A typical LIDAR system 
(see Figure 2, right) consists of a transmitter and a receiver. The transmitter 
emits short-time laser pulses into the atmosphere. The laser emission is specific -
- it has a small spatial divergence light beam, and it is quasi-monochromatic and 
coherent -- and it can emit very high power density, short time pulses (e.g. 100 
mJ at 532 nm, pulse width ~3 ns, laser repetition rate at 50 Hz). The laser beam 
interacts with the atmospheric constituents as it propagates through a multitude 
of  phenomena such  as elastic  light  scattering  (molecular-Rayleigh, aerosols-
4
Brief historical in annex A2 
 
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
This demo code just converts first page to jpeg image. String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg.
add text to pdf file online; how to add text to a pdf document using reader
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult.FILE_TYPE_UNMATCH: Console.WriteLine("Fail: input file is not
how to add text to a pdf in preview; how to insert text into a pdf
LIDAR-based methodology
II 
20
Mie),  and  inelastic  (molecular  –  Raman)  light  scattering,  fluorescence  and 
absorption.  A  receiving  telescope  collects  a  very  small  fraction  of  the 
backscattered light. In addition to the telescope, the receiver usually contains a 
polychromatic filter for the spectral separation, high sensitivity photodetectors, 
and  fast  sampling  rate  analog-to-digital  converters.  The  magnitude  of  the 
received  signal  is  proportional  to  the  number  density  of  the  atmospheric 
diffusers (molecules or aerosols), their intrinsic properties (i.e. probability of 
interaction with the electromagnetic radiation at the laser wavelengths, called 
cross–section  value)  and  with  the  laser  incident  energy. The  detected  light 
backscatter  power  S  (Z, 
λ
) at  the  wavelength 
λ
from  a distance  Z can be 
expressed by the so-called lidar equation cf. Eq. (1) as follows: 
0
0
2
( , ) ( , ) ( )
)
( , ) ( , ) ( , )
atm
D
L
D L
L
D
S
A
S
Z S
Z K Z
Z
Z T
Z T
Z
Z
λ
λ
δ β
λ λ
λ
λ
=
Eq. (1) 
where  S
L
(
λ
L
,Z
o
)  represents  the  mean  power  emitted  by  the  laser  source  at 
wavelength 
λ
L
. The 
λ
D
is the wavelength at which the backscattered radiation is 
detected by the  lidar receiver.  The  radiation is usually  detected at the laser 
wavelength (
λ
L
, elastic processes) but the shifted in wavelength radiation due to 
inelastic processes as the  Raman effect  may be also detected. K
s
(Z)  is the 
instrument  function  that  takes  into  account  the  transmitter  and  receiver 
efficiencies, the overlap function (the degree of spatial recovering between the 
emitted beam and the receiver field of view). A
0
is the effective receiver area 
(i.e.  area  of  the  telescope  collector  mirror)  and 
δ
z is the spatial resolution 
expressed as: 
(
)
2
D
L
P
c
Z
τ
τ
τ
δ
+ +
=
Eq. (2) 
where c [m.s
-1
] is the  light speed, 
τ
[s] is the detection  response time (i.e. 
digitizer and detector’s response), 
τ
[s] is the laser pulse width, and 
τ
[s] is the 
optical interaction process lifetime. Generally the digitizer response time, 
τ
D,
(typically ~ 10
-7
s) limits the spatial resolution (e.g. ~tens of m). Both the laser 
pulse width, 
τ
(typically ~ 3 - 10 x 10
-9
s), and the optical interaction lifetime 
τ
(typically within ~10
-9
-10
-12
s) have negligible contributions.  
The altitude (Z
i
) from which the light is scattered may be determined as: Zi = i x 
δ
Z, where i = 1 to number of acquisition channels of the laser triggered analog 
to digital converter (ADC).  For example, the use of an acquisition sampling rate 
of  ~ 20 MHz  (e.g. 
τ
~ 5 x 10
-8
s) will provide lidar backscatter signals with 
high spatial resolution (e.g. 
δ
Z ~7.5 m). As the repetition rate of the lasing is 
some ~100 Hz assuring between two laser shots to sample signals corresponding 
from remote distances  (e.g. 100 km and more). The limitation is usually due to 
How to C#: Cleanup Images
body of the image, the Shear method can adjust the text body of RasterImage img = new RasterImage(@"F:\input.png"); ImageProcess process = new ImageProcess(img
adding text to a pdf in preview; how to add text to a pdf document
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Program.RootPath+ @"\part_1.pdf"; String secondFile = SplitDocument + @"\part_2. pdf"; String thirdFile = SplitDocument + @"\part_3.pdf"; //Split input file to
how to add text box to pdf; adding text to a pdf file
LIDAR-based methodology
II 
21
the increase in the signal to noise ratio because of weak detection capacity or 
low laser power or intrinsically due to the involved process (e.g. magnitude of 
the cross section).  
T
is the atmospheric transmittance from the transmitter to the probed volume 
and T
is the atmospheric transmittance from the probed volume to the receiver, 
and they are calculated as follows: 
( , ) exp
( , )
Z
atm
L
L
Zo
T
Z
zdz
λ
α
λ
=
( , ) exp
( , )
Zo
atm
D
D
Z
T
Z
zdz
λ
α
λ
=
Eq. (3) 
where 
α
atm
(
λ
, Z) is the atmospheric extinction coefficient and may be different 
on the two directions of the laser pulses, as is the case of the Raman backscatter 
radiation (
λ
R
λ
L
). The atmospheric backscattering coefficient, 
β
atm
(
λ
, Z), is a 
key element of the lidar equation Eq. (1), and is proportional to the cross-section 
of the involved physical process 
σ
atm
(
λ
L
,
λ
D
, Z) and to the number density n (Z) 
of the atmospheric active diffusers (i.e. atoms, molecules, particles, clouds) in 
the  probed  volume.  The  subscript
5
atm
”  encompasses  all  possible  physical 
interactions  within  the  atmosphere  (main  processes  illustrated  in  Figure  3). 
Another often-used form of the lidar equation is given cf. Eq. (4) as follows:  
( )
,
( , )
( ,
)
( , )
( , )
S
atm
D
D
L
L
D
C Z
RCS
Z
Z T
Z T
Z
λ
β
λ λ
λ
λ
=
Eq. (4) 
where RCS
6
is the range corrected signal (i.e. detected signal multiplied by the 
square of the altitude) and Cs (Z) is the instrument function.  
When  the LIDAR equation is adapted to the  specific process involved (i.e. 
Rayleigh, Mie, Raman), various atmospheric properties and parameters can be 
retrieved. An ideal lidar that can explore all these processes is obviously a multi-
wavelength system.  
Section 2 is devoted to a brief description of these light-atmosphere interaction 
processes upon which the lidar methodology used in this work is based. Section 
3 includes a description of the latest configuration of the JFJ-LIDAR system (i.e. 
layout and technical specifications), signal examples and the results of two lidar 
inter - comparison campaigns. Section 4 will include a brief conclusion and 
some ideas for future perspectives.
5
Notations: atm = atmosphere, a = aerosol, m = molecular, R = Raman, L = Laser, ext = 
extinction, scat =scattering, abs = absorption, d = diameter, r = radius, z, Z – altitudes and C, 
K = constants 
6
RCS (
λ
, Z) = S (
λ
, Z) x Z
2
, range (or solid angle) corrected signal 
LIDAR-based methodology
II 
22
2. LIDAR related light - atmosphere interaction processes  
The description of the laser beam interaction with atmospheric constituents (i.e. 
molecules,  particles,  clouds)  is  based  on  the  fundamental  theory  of 
electromagnetic wave propagation in various media. The atmosphere contains a 
wide  range  of  constituents  extending from  atoms  and  molecules (Angstrom 
range d ~ 10
-3
-10
-4
µ
m) to aerosols (d ~10
-2
- 5 
µ
m), cloud water droplets and ice 
crystals (d ~1 –15 
µ
m and even larger).  
The  mixture  of  these  different  components  results  in  a  series  of  complex 
atmospheric interactions that take place with a laser beam. The intensity of the 
light resulting from these processes is proportional with the initial intensity Io, 
the number density of the active diffusers n and the differential angular cross –
section 
σ
If a quasi-parallel, monochromatic, coherent and linearly polarized light (i.e. a 
laser beam) is sent to the atmosphere, different processes may take place with 
different probabilities determined by their correspondent cross-sections, 
σ
= f 
(
λ
, process, atmospheric diffuser). The interaction may lead to elastic (Rayleigh 
and  Mie)  and  inelastic  (Raman)  scattering,  absorption,  reflection,  and/or 
diffraction.  Based  on  these  processes,  various  spectroscopic  and  non-
spectroscopic measurement techniques have been developed for monitoring the 
atmosphere [23]. The interactions may be “non-selective'', like Rayleigh, Mie or 
Raman scattering, and more or less important depending on the atmospheric 
composition (e.g. aerosol loading in the case of Mie scattering). Absorption, for 
example, is a selective process, and is dependent on the absorption cross section 
at the laser wavelength. The resonant processes (Rayleigh or Raman) are also 
selective,  meaning  that  the  laser  wavelength  radiation  matches  specific 
electronic transitions of the molecule. 
Two important microscopic scattering parameters, in addition to backscatter and 
extinction coefficients, are used to express aerosol-atmosphere interactions; the 
dimensionless size parameter (
χ
), with 
χ
= 2
π
r m 
λ
-1
(where d is the geometric 
dimension of the diffuser), and the complex refractive index (m) with m (
λ
) = 
n(
λ
) + i k(
λ
). The real and the complex part of the refraction index provide 
information about non-absorbing and absorbing aerosol capacity. For 
χ
<< 1, 
Rayleigh or molecular scattering prevails; at 
χ
~1, Mie-aerosol scattering begins 
to increase in importance, and for 
χ
>> 1, scattering is purely geometric (e.g. 
reflection by clouds). 
LIDAR-based methodology
II 
23
Figure 3 Main atmosphere-light interaction processes lidar related 
The molecular and aerosol elastic/inelastic processes involved in the use of the 
LIDAR method are the following:  
(a) N
2
, O
2
molecular elastic (
λ
D
λ
L
) light scattering; i.e. Rayleigh diffusion 
(
λ
L
>> d, where d is the molecular diameter)   
(b)  Aerosol elastic (
λ
D
λ
L
) light scattering; i.e. Mie scattering (
λ
L
~ d, 
where d is the diameter of the particle) 
(c) N
2
, O
2
and H
2
O molecular inelastic (
λ
D
λ
R
) light scattering; i.e. Raman 
scattering (
λ
L
>> d, with d the molecular dimension) 
(d) Gas  and  aerosol  absorption  (if  the  radiation  at 
λ
L
is  absorbed  by 
atmospheric molecules or by compounds forming the aerosols) 
(e) Cloud/contrail  light  scattering  (
λ
D
λ
L
 with 
λ
L
<<  d,  if  d  is  the 
droplet/ice crystal geometrical dimension)  
2.1  Elastic (Rayleigh) scattering 
In the case of the elastic light scattering process, also called Rayleigh scattering, 
the atmospheric molecules scatter the incident radiation elastically (i.e. 
λ
D
λ
L
). 
The electromagnetic incident wave induces a dipolar moment (
P
JG
G
) within the 
molecular system. 
P
E
α
= ⋅
JG
JG
E
JG
G
is the intensity of the electric field of the incident 
λ
  
Fluorescence 
λ
' >
λ
Refraction
λ
λ
Io
Absorbtion 
Light Source 
Diffraction 
Reflection (
λ
<< D) 
λ
’   
λ
Mie 
Scattering 
(Aerosols) 
Raman 
Scattering 
Molecular 
λ≈
λ
'= 
λ
±
λ
r,v  
Rayleigh 
Scattering 
(N
2
,O
2
, etc) 
λ
>>D   
D= molecule/particle diameter  
Molecules 
Aerosols 
Clouds 
(cirrus & contrails) 
I
λ
~ K I
0, 
λ
σ
(
θ
λ
, process) 
θ
LIDAR-based methodology
II 
24
electromagnetic wave and 
α
is the polarisability
7
tensor of the molecule.  For 
the atmospheric diffusers, such as nitrogen and oxygen molecules, 
α
has a 
constant  and  isotropic  component,  which  explains  the  re-emission  of  the 
radiation at the same frequency as the incident electromagnetic wave. For one 
incoming photon, one photon is re-emitted with the same energy. The elastic 
contribution always superposes itself on other non-elastic effects (e.g. Raman, 
absorbtion,…). If the excitation wavelength is much higher than the dimension 
of the atoms and molecules, the Rayleigh scattering condition is fulfilled. The 
Rayleigh backscatter is proportional to the diffusers’ number density and to the 
Rayleigh differential cross section. The air differential (angular) Rayleigh cross-
section, d
σ
m
/d
[cm
2
molecule
-1
sr
-1
], may be expressed as given by [24] and 
expressed by Eq. (5) :  
(
)
(
)
(
)
{
}
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
4 2
2
9
1
, ,
6 3
cos cos
sin
6 7
2
air
m
air
air
m
d
d
n
m
π
σ φθ θ λ
ρ
φ
θ
φ
ρ
λ
+
=
+
+
Eq. (5)                   
where 
λ
[cm] is the wavelength, n
air
[molecules cm
-3
] is the air molecule number 
density, m
air
[-] is the air complex refraction index, 
ρ
air
[-] is the depolarization 
ratio, 
φ
[rad] is the polarization angle, and 
θ
[rad] is the scattering angle (see 
Figure 4). 
The Rayleigh scattering phase function is isotropic (i.e. ratio of one direction/all 
directions backscatter powers) and is 3/8
π
leading to:   
( )
( )
8
3
m
m
π π
σ
λ
σ
λ
=
Eq. (6)   
where 
π
σ
m
is  the  backscatter  (at 
180°) molecular (correspondent to 
the  sum  of  N
2
and  O
2
 cross  - 
sections.  The  scattered  light 
intensity  pattern  is  symmetric  in 
the  forward  and  backward 
directions, and totally polarized at 
90
o
[25]. 
Figure 4 Schematic of the  incident 
and scattered light waves [26]  
Calculations of molecular cross-sections as expressed by Eq. (5) were amply 
addressed in [26] and [27]. For this work, a simpler but realistic semi-empirical 
7
The polarisability expresses the capacity of a molecule to change the distribution of its 
electrical charges under an external electromagnetic field. 
Scattered 
radiation
Incident 
radiation
y
θ
dΩ
x
z
φ 
φ
EJG
i
EJG
j
EJG
G
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested