open pdf file in asp net c# : How to insert text in pdf using preview Library SDK class asp.net wpf .net ajax 125703776-part442

LIDAR-based methodology
II 
45
9. 
Blumthaler, M., M. Huber, and J. Schreder. Spectral measurements of vertically and 
horizontally  polarized  UV  sky  distribution. in  Remote  Sensing  of  the 
AtmosphereOcean, Environment, and Space. 2002. Hangzhou, China: SPIE. 
10.  Schaub, D., S. Reimann, K. Stemmler, A.K. Weiss, B. Buchmann, and P. Hofer. 
Potential Source Regions of Trace Gases Observed at Jungfraujoch,. in 3rd GAW-CH 
Conference. 2002. Zurich-Switzerland: SAEFL Environmental Documentation. 
11. 
NABEL, Luftbelastung 2001:Schriftenreihe Umwelt.  2001,  Luft,  Bundesamt  für 
Umwelt Wald und Landschaft: Bern. 
12. 
PSI-GAW, In situ aerosols monitoring at Jungfraujoch station. 2004, PSI-LAC. 
13. 
Nessler,  R.,  N.  Bukowiecki,  S.  Henning,  E.  Weingartner,  B.  Calpini,  and  U. 
Baltensperger, Simultaneous dry and ambient measurements of aerosol size 
distributions  at  the  Jungfraujoch. Tellus Series B-Chemical and Physical 
Meteorology, 2003. 55(3): p. 808-819. 
14. 
Baltensperger, U., Analysis of aerosols. Chimia, 1997. 51(10): p. 686-689. 
15. 
Weingartner, E., M. Gysel, and U. Baltensperger, Hygroscopicity of aerosol particles 
at low temperatures. 1. New low-temperature H-TDMA instrument: Setup and first 
applications. Environmental Science & Technology, 2002. 36(1): p. 55-62. 
16.  Gerber, D., I. Balin, D. Feist, N. Kämpfer, V. Simeonov, B. Calpini, and H. van den 
Bergh, Ground-based water vapour soundings by microwave radiometry and Raman 
lidar on Jungfraujoch (Swiss Alps). Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions, 
2003. 3: p. 4833-4856. 
17. 
Flückiger,  E.O.,  R.  Bütikofer,  and  M.R.  Moser. Cosmic Ray Measurements at 
Jungfraujoch  and  Gornergrat. in  Workshop  on  ‘Atmospheric  Research  at  the  
Jungfraujoch and in the Alps. 2002. Davos, Switzerland: Swiss Academy of Sciences. 
18. 
Guerova, G., E. Brockmann, J. Quiby, F. Schubiger, and C. Matzler, Validation of 
NWP  mesoscale  models  with  Swiss  GPS  Network  AGNES. Journal of Applied 
Meteorology, 2003. 42(1): p. 141-150. 
19. 
SwissTopo, Website of Swiss Institute of Topopgraphy. 2004. 
20. 
Ginot, P., F. Stampfli, D. Stampfli, F. Schwikowski, and H.W. Gäggeler. FELICS, a 
new ice core drilling system for high-altitude glaciers. in Ice Drilling Technology 
2000. 2000: Memoirs of National Institute of Polar Research. 
21. 
Levin, I. and V. Hesshaimer, Radiocarbon – a unique tracer of global carbon cycle 
dynamics. Radiocarbon, 2000. 42: p. 69-80. 
22. 
AEROCAB, Airborne European Regional Observations of the Carbon Balance. 2004. 
23.  Sigrist, M., Air Monitorinc by Spectroscopic Techniques. Chemical Analysis. Vol. 
127. 1994: John Willey&Sons, Inc. 
24. 
Penndorf, R., Tables of the refractive index for standard air and the Rayleigh 
scattering coefficient for the spectral region between 0.2 and 20.0 
µ
m and their 
application to atmospheric optics. Journal of the Optical Society of America, 1957. 
47: p. 176-182. 
25. 
Bodhaine, B.A., On Rayleigh Optical Depth Calculations. American Meteorological 
Society, 1999. 16: p. 1854-1861. 
26. 
Lazzaraotto, B., Ozone and Water Vapor Measurements by RAMAN lidar in the 
Planetary Boundary layer, in DGR. 2001, EPFL. 
27. 
Larcheveque, G., Development of the Junfraujoch multi-wavelenght lidar system for 
continous observations of the aerosols optical properties in the free troposphere, in 
Environmental and Engineering Dpt. 2002, EPFL: Lausanne. 
28.  Collis, R.T.H. and P.B. Russell, Lidar Measurement of Particles and Gases by Elastic 
Backscattering and Differential Absorption. Laser Monitoring of the Atmosphere, ed. 
E.D. Hinkley. 1976: Springer Verlag. 
How to insert text in pdf using preview - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text fields to pdf; add text pdf reader
How to insert text in pdf using preview - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text to pdf file; how to add text box in pdf file
LIDAR-based methodology
II 
46
29. 
NOAA, NASA, and USAF, U.S. standard atmosphere (76). 1976, U.S. government 
Printing Office: Washington / USA. 
30. 
Hinkley, E.D., Laser Monitoring of the Atmosphere. Topics in Applied Physics, ed. 
E.D. Hinkley. Vol. 14. 1976: Springer-Verlag. 
31.  Mc Cartney, E.J., Optics of the Atmosphere. 1976: Wiley. 408. 
32. 
Harrison, R.M., and van Grieken, R. E., Atmospheric particles. IUPAC series on 
analytical and physical chemistry of environmental systems, ed. J. Buffle, and van 
Leeuwen H. P. Vol. Volume 5. 1998, New-York: John Wiley & Sons. Ltd. 
33. 
Angström, A., On the atmospheric transmission of sun radiation and on dust in the 
atmosphere. Geogr. Ann., 1929. 11: p. 156-166. 
34. 
Finlayson-Pitts, B.J. and J.N.J. Pitts, Atmospheric Chemistry : Fundamentals and 
Experimental Techniques. 1986: Wiley Interscience. 1098. 
35. 
Moulin, C., F. Dulac, C.E. Lambert, and U. Dayan, Control of atmospheric export of 
dust from North America by the North Atlantic Oscillation. Nature, 1997. 387: p. 691-
694. 
36. 
Seinfeld, J.H. and S.N. Pandis, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, ed. J.W.S. ed. 
1998: Wiley Interscience. 1326. 
37. 
Sassen, K., The depolarization lidar technique for cloud research: a review and 
current assessment. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 1991. 72(12): p. 
1848-1866. 
38. 
Biele,  J.,  G.  Beyerle,  and  G.  Baumgarten, Polarization lidar: Corrections of 
instrumental effects. Optics Express, 2000. 7(12): p. 427-435. 
39.  McNeil, W.R., and Carswell, A. I., Lidar polarization studies of the troposphere. 
Applied Optics, 1975. 14(9): p. 2158-2168. 
40. 
Murayama, T., H. Okamoto, N. Kaneyasu, H. Kamataki, and K. Miura, Application of 
lidar depolarization measurement in the atmospheric boundary layer: Effects of dust 
and  sea-salt  particles. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, 1999. 
104(D24): p. 31781-31792. 
41. 
Bockmann,  C., Hybrid regularization method for the ill-posed inversion of 
multiwavelength lidar data in the retrieval of aerosol size distributions. Applied 
Optics, 2001. 40(9): p. 1329-1342. 
42. 
Mironova, I., C.  Bockmann, and  R. Nessler. Microphysical Parameters from 3-
Wavelength Raman Lidar. in ILRC. 2002. Quebec: R&D Defence Library Services. 
43.  Yoshiyama, H., Ohi, A., and Ohta, K., Derivation of the aerosol size distribution from 
a bistatic system of a multiwavelength laser with the singular value decomposition 
method. Applied Optics, 1996. 35(15): p. 2642-2648. 
44. 
Rajeev,  K.,  and  Parameswaran,  k., Iterative method for the inversion of 
multiwavelength lidar signals to determine aerosol size distribution. Applied Optics, 
1998. 37(21): p. 4690-4700. 
45.  Detlef, M., Wagner, F., Wandiger, U., Ansmann, A., Wendisch, M., Althausen, D., 
and Hoyningen-Huene, W., Microphysical particle parameters from extinction and 
backscatter lidar data by inversion with regularization: experiment. Applied Optics, 
2000. 39(12): p. 1879-1892. 
46. 
Herzberg, G., Molecular Spectra and  Molecular, vol.3 : Electronic Spectra and 
Electronic  Structure  of  Polyatomic  Molecules. 1966, New-York: Van Nostrand 
Reinhold Company. 745. 
47. 
Placzek, G., Rayleigh -streuung und Raman-effekt, in Handbuch der radiologie, G. 
Marx, Editor. 1934. p. 205. 
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word. Overview for How to Use XDoc.Word to preview document content without loading
add text field pdf; how to add text field to pdf form
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint. Overview for How to Use XDoc.PowerPoint to preview document content without
how to insert text into a pdf file; add text to pdf
LIDAR-based methodology
II 
47
48. 
Inaba, H. and T. Kobayashi, Laser-Raman Radar -Laser-Raman scattering methods 
for remote detection and analysis of atmospheric pollution-. Opto-Electronics, 1972. 
4: p. 101-123. 
49. 
Inaba, H., Laser Monitoring of the Atmosphere. Topics in Applied Physics: Detection 
of atoms and molecules by Raman scattering, ed. E.D. Hinkley. Vol. 14. 1976: 
Springer-Verlag. 153-232. 
50. 
Measures, R.M., Laser Remote Sensing. Fundamentals and Applications, ed. J.W.a. 
Sons. 1992, New-York: Krieger. 510. 
51.  Browell, E., S. Ismail, and S.T. Shipley, Ultraviolet DIAL measurements of O
3
profiles 
in regions of spatially inhomogeneous aerosols. Applied Optics, 1985. 24: p. 2827-
2836. 
52. 
Esposito, S.T. and C.R. Philbrick. Raman/DIAL Technique for Ozone Measurements. 
in 19 th ILRC. 1998. USA. 
53. 
Simeonov, V., B. Lazzarotto, G. Larchevêque, P. Quaglia, and B. Calpini, UV Ozone 
DIAL based on a Raman Cell Filled with Two Raman Actives Gases. SPIE Europto 
series "Environmental Sensing and Applications", 1999. 3821: p. 54-61. 
54. 
Simeonov, V., B. Calpini, I. Balin, P. Ristori, R. Jimenez, and H. van den Bergh. UV 
ozone DIAL based on a N2 Raman converter, design and results during ESCOPMTE 
field campaign. in 21st International Laser Radar Conference Quebec Canada. 2002. 
Quebec Canada. 
55. 
Simeonov, V., B. Lazzarotto, P. Quaglia, H. Van den Bergh, and B. Calpini. Three 
Wavelength UV Ozone DIAL based on a Raman Cell Filled with Two Raman Active 
Gases. in Extended Abstract of the 20th ILRC. 2000. 
56. 
Jimenez,  R., Uv-Vis and M-IR spctroscopic techniques for air pollution 
measurements, in SSIE. 2004, EPFL: Lausanne. 
57.  Platt, U., Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), in Chem. Anal. Series
1994. p. 27 - 83. 
58. 
Balin,  I.,  R.  Jimenez,  v.d.B.  H.,  and  B.  Calpini, DOAS: Differential Optical 
Absorbtion Spectroscopy Techniquefor Air Pollution Measurements. 1999. 
59.  Jimenez, R., A. Martilli, I. Balin, H. Van den Bergh, B. Calpini, B. Larsen, G. Favaro, 
and D. Kita, Measurement of formaldehyde (HCHO) by DOAS : Intercomparison to 
DNPH  measurements  and  interpretation  from  Eulerian  model  calculations. 
Proceedings of A&WMA 93rd Annual Conference, Salt Lake City (UT), 2000: p. 
Paper # 829. 
60.  Whiteman,  D.N.,  S.H.  Melfi,  and  R.A.  Ferrare, Raman Lidar System for the 
Measurement of Water-Vapor and Aerosols in the Earths Atmosphere. Applied Optics, 
1992. 31(16): p. 3068-3082. 
61. 
Bukowiecki, N., S. Henning, A. Hoffer, E. weingartner, and U. Baltensperger. Cloud 
and Aerosol Characterization Experiment in the free troposphere (CLACE) - a field 
experiment at the Jungfraujoch (3580 m asl). in European Aerosol Conference. 2000. 
Dublin: Aerosol Sci. 
62. 
Larcheveque, G., I. Balin, R. Nessler, P. Quaglia, V. Simeonov, H. van den Bergh, 
and B. Calpini, Development of a multiwavelength aerosol and water-vapor lidar at 
the Jungfraujoch Alpine Station (3580 m above sea level) in Switzerland. Applied 
Optics, 2002. 41(15): p. 2781-2790. 
63. 
Simeonov, V., G. Larchevêque, P. Quaglia, H. Van den Bergh, and B. Calpini, The 
influence of the photomultiplier spatial uniformity on lidar signals. Applied Optics, 
1999. 38: p. 5186-5190. 
64.  Matthias, V., V. Freudenthaler, A. Amodeo, I. Balin, D. Balis, J. Bosenberg, A. 
Chaikovsky, G. Chourdakis, A. Comeron, F. de Tomasi, R. Eixmann, A. Hagard, L. 
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
toolkit allows developers to specify where they want to insert (blank) PDF last page or after any desired page of current PDF document) using C# .NET
how to enter text in pdf file; adding text to pdf document
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Supported PDF Processing Features by Using RasterEdge WinForms Viewer for C#.NET. Overview. Highlight PDF text. • Add text to PDF document in preview.
adding text pdf file; how to insert text box in pdf
LIDAR-based methodology
II 
48
Komguem, S. Kreipl, R. Matthey, V. Rizi, J.A. Rodrigues, U. Wandinger, and X. 
Wang, Aerosol lidar intercomparaison in the framework of EARLINET: Part I - 
instruments. Applied Optics, 2004. 43(4): p. 961-976. 
65. 
Adam, M., M. Pahlow, V. Kovalev, J. Ondov, I. Balin, V. Simeonov, H. van den 
Bergh, and M. Parlange. Determination of the Vertical Extinction Coefficient Profile 
in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer and the Free Troposphere. in EGS-AGU-EUG
2003. Nice France. 
66. 
Bösenberg, J., and al., EARLINET: A European Aerosol Research Lidar Network. 
Advances in Laser Remote Sensing, ed. J. Pelon, Loth, C., Dabas, A. 2001, Palaiseau: 
Editions de l'Ecole polytechnique. 
67. 
Bosenberg, J. and V.  Matthias, EARLINET:A European Aerosol Research Lidar 
Network to Establish an Aerosol Climatology (final repport). 2003. 
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Features about PDF Processing Features by Using RasterEdge WPF Viewer for C#.NET. Overview. Add text to PDF document. • Insert text box to PDF file.
how to add text fields to a pdf document; add text field to pdf acrobat
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Excel. Overview for How to Use XDoc.Excel to preview document content without loading
add text pdf acrobat professional; add text block to pdf
Aerosols – cirrus - contrails
III 
49
Chapter III 
Upper troposphere aerosols-cirrus-contrails optical properties 
The  effects of  aerosols on the Earth’s radiative  balance  (direct,  indirect  via 
clouds or semi-direct) are still unknown both in terms of sign and magnitude.  
Global models’ uncertainties due to the aerosols’ effects are unacceptably high. 
In particular, the radiative forcing due to natural and aviation-induced (contrails) 
cirrus clouds is still poorly known.  
As a contribution to this much-needed knowledge, this chapter deals with the 
optical properties of aerosols and cirrus clouds in the upper troposphere (UT) 
region based on a multi wavelength lidar measurement. These addressed optical 
properties  refer  to  high-resolution  vertical  profiles  of  the  backscatter               
(
β
a
 and  extinction  (
α
a
)  coefficients  and  their  integrated  column  extinction 
(AOD- aerosols optical depth). These retrievals may be estimated by using both 
elastic (Mie) lidar signals (355, 532 and 1064 nm) and inelastic (Raman) lidar 
signals  (387  and  532 nm)  in  a combined methodology.  A  2-year  statistical 
analysis of the regular measurements within the EARLINET project is discussed 
based on the  determination  of UT aerosol optical  properties using only the 
elastic (Mie) lidar signals. The comparisons with the co-located sun photometer 
measurements (PFR) show relatively good and realistic agreement in terms of 
AOD and Angstrom coefficients. The use of the Angstrom law on lidar and 
complementary sun-photometer retrievals made it possible to distinguish and to 
define different UT aerosol load degrees:  aerosol-free reference, typical UT 
aerosols, and cirrus-contrails load. 
Range corrected signals, Mie-Raman combined methods, and measures of the 
depolarization ratio at 532 nm allow a lidar-based classification of the UT cirrus 
clouds. A pure contrail case study that examines its geometrical, optical, and 
microphysical properties is also presented.  
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo from RasterEdge.com, this C#.NET PDF image adding Using this C# .NET image adding library control for PDF
how to add text to a pdf in reader; adding text fields to a pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Insert Image to PDF Page Using VB. inputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
how to insert text in pdf reader; add text boxes to a pdf
Aerosols – cirrus - contrails 
III 
51
1. Introduction 
1.1  Aerosols and cirrus clouds: climatic significance  
Aerosols
1
are  liquid  or  solid  particles,  10
-3
10 
µ
m,  suspended  in  the 
atmosphere. Particles larger than 2.5 
µ
m (i.e. coarse mode) are easily removed 
by wet and dry deposition from the atmosphere. Particles between 0.1 to 2.5 µm 
(i.e.  accumulation  mode)  form  the  largest  amount  of  atmospheric  aerosols. 
Particles smaller than 0.1 
µ
m (i.e. Aitken nuclei mode) serve as condensation 
nuclei  for  forming  larger particles  and  then  they will finally  migrate  to  the 
accumulation mode. These particles remain longer in the atmosphere, and they 
have  various  origins  and  types.  One  may  divide  the  aerosols  sources  into 
anthropogenic  (particles  from  industrial  emissions  and  photochemical 
transformation in urban pollution plumes), and natural (stratospheric aerosols of 
sulphuric acid, mainly from volcanic  eruptions,  tropospheric marine aerosols 
from the oceans, mineral aerosols from desert or semi-desert areas, forest fires, 
pollens, etc). An important topic in the Global Change program [1] is the study 
of  the  biogeochemical  cycle  of  tropospheric  aerosols,  and  specifically  the 
generation of aerosols from the surface, their uplift and transport as well as their 
interaction with other cycles [1, 2]. The aerosols have both a direct and indirect 
impact on climate. Their impact is direct through the diffusion and absorption of 
solar  radiation,  leading  to  cooling  (e.g  sulfuric)  or  warming  effects  (e.g 
carbonaceous).  The  indirect  effect  is  related  to  their  role  in  forming  and 
interacting  with  clouds.  Aerosols  act  as  condensation  nuclei  and  affect  the 
microphysical properties of clouds, which in turn modulate the Earth's radiation 
budget  (i.e.  brighter  clouds  formed  in  this  way  would  reflect  more  solar 
radiation) [3]. The aerosols decrease precipitation efficiency by increasing the 
number of droplets in warm clouds thereby increasing the clouds’ lifetimes and 
enhancing the indirect radiative forcing associated with these changes in cloud 
properties [4].  There is also a semi - direct effect that is related to the aerosols 
capacity to absorb the solar radiation and produce local heating, which in turn 
will evaporate the surrounding clouds.  
The aerosols have different physical and optical properties, depending on their 
chemical  composition,  size,  and  other  intrinsic  factors  as  their  hygroscopic 
behavior.  Condensation  of  water  vapor  on  atmospheric  aerosol  particles 
significantly affects the size, shape, and chemical composition of these particles, 
and therefore modifies their optical properties and thus further affects the direct 
radiative forcing. As the distribution of aerosol concentrations is highly space - 
time dependent, with short atmospheric lifetimes (i.e. days to weeks) they cannot 
be considered responsible for a long-term offset to the warming such as in the 
case with the greenhouse gases (i.e. CO
2
, NO
2
, CH
4
, CFC, etc).  
1
See diagram in annex A12  
Aerosols – cirrus - contrails 
III 
52
Cirrus/contrails are aggregations of particles of water or ice suspended in the air, 
formed when air containing water vapor is cooled below a critical temperature 
(i.e.  dew  point)  and  the  moisture  condenses  into  droplets  on  microscopic 
particles (condensation nuclei) in the atmosphere. The air is cooled either by 
expansion during the upward convection resulting from intense solar heating of 
the ground; by a cold wedge of air (cold front) near the ground causing a mass of 
warm air to be forced aloft; by orographic movements, and occasionally by a 
reduction of pressure aloft or by the mixing of warmer and cooler air currents 
(i.e. aircraft exhausts) [5]. Cloudiness (the proportion of the sky covered by any 
form of cloud), measured in tenths, is a key element in the estimation of radiative 
global forcing. One may observe high clouds (6-12 km, cirrus, cirrostratus and 
cirrocumulus);  intermediate  clouds  (2-6  km,  cumulus,  altostratus  and 
altocumulus); low clouds (<  2 km,  stratus, nimbostratus, stratocumulus) and 
clouds with vertical development, (0.5–6 km, cumulonimbus) [6].  The effect of 
the upper troposphere clouds (i.e. natural cirrus or contrails) on chemistry and 
radiative forcing has recently become a focus of scientific interest. Cirrus clouds 
are increasing  the Earth's albedo and  at the same time trapping the infrared 
radiation that the Earth is emitting to space. The warming or cooling effects are 
both possible depending on clouds location, cover, composition and structure. 
The greenhouse effect is weak for low altitude clouds, so their albedo effect 
dominates and they have a net cooling effect on the Earth's climate. In contrast, 
cold high altitude cirrus clouds may either cool or warm the air. They have a 
strong greenhouse effect, which may outweigh their albedo effect [7]. Generally 
the cirrus greenhouse effect (warming) is expected to prevail over the albedo 
effect (cooling). In addition, the effect of the multiple scattering within a cloud is 
more important for the long wavelength waves (i.e. albedo 0.4-0.7) augmenting 
the warming effect in the lower atmosphere by as much as 2° [8]. Cirrus clouds 
may  also  play  a  role  in  heterogeneous  chemistry  in  the  upper  troposphere, 
particularly in mid-latitude ozone depletion. The  tropopause cirrus may also 
contribute  to  the  adiabatic  heating  of  the  upper  troposphere,  modifying  the 
temperature profile at the tropopause regions [9]. 
It is thought that cirrus clouds form naturally in the upper troposphere, when 
highly dilute sulfate aerosols cool and become supersaturated with respect to ice. 
These cloud particles freeze homogeneously when water vapor reaches ice super-
saturations of around 150%.  It has been shown (i.e. MOZAIC experiment, [10]) 
that the free upper troposphere contains regions which present a super-saturation 
state with respect to the ice. Thus it is important to analyze the relationships 
between the number, concentration, and type of aerosols as well as temperature 
and  relative  humidity  conditions  when  examining  the  homogeneous  or 
heterogeneous freezing (condensation) processes with respect to ice or  water 
saturation pressure [11]. It has been suggested that cirrus clouds could also be 
formed  from  heterogeneous  nucleation  on  insoluble  solids  (e.g  sulfates).  A 
Aerosols – cirrus - contrails 
III 
53
recent focus has thus been made on the formation of ice clouds on soot particles 
which are by-products of  fossil fuel combustion at the Earth surface and of 
aircraft emissions throughout the atmosphere [12].   
Contrails  are aircraft trace plumes  producing  a cloudiness up to  ~ 0.1-0.2% 
(1992). This is estimated to increase up to ~0.5-0.8% by the year 2050 [8]. Their 
formation and influence on the  radiation  budget  are becoming an important 
scientific topic. Like natural cirrus, the contrails reflect short wave (0.2-5 
µ
m) 
and they absorb long wave (5-50 
µ
m) radiation having thus an overall positive 
effect (warming). The contrails’ formation and persistence is due to the injection 
of  the  warm  water  vapor,  soot,  nitrogen  oxides,  sulfates,  carbon  dioxide, 
unburned hydrocarbons, metallic particles, etc in the supersaturated over ice (~ 
125-150 %) upper troposphere regions. These emissions may enhance the ozone 
formation and the decrease in methane. The carbon dioxide emitted is ~ 2% of 
the total amount produced by anthropogenic activities. Large numbers (about 
1017 particles/kg fuel) of small (radius 1 to 10 nm) volatile particles are formed 
in the exhaust plumes of cruising aircraft (8 -13 km ASL altitudes), as shown by 
in situ observations and model calculations [8, 13]. The global radiative forcing 
by persistent contrails was estimated to be some ~ 0.02 Wm
-2
in 1992 increasing 
to ~ 0.1 Wm
-2
in 2050 [14]. Their impact on increasing the daytime maxima and 
decreasing the nighttime minima of temperatures was observed during the 11 
September aviation traffic break [15]. Extensive aircraft-induced cirrus clouds 
have been observed  after the formation  of persistent contrails.  However,  the 
mechanisms associated with increases in cirrus cover are not well understood 
and need further investigation. 
1.2  Optical properties of aerosols and cirrus clouds: considerations 
The extremely variable nature  of physical  and chemical  properties and  their 
distribution over time and space make the study of aerosols and cirrus clouds 
quite complex. In addition to laboratory measurements of their chemical and 
physical properties, climate models require “real atmosphere” measurements of 
aerosol size distribution and optical properties for their radiative budget (forcing) 
calculations cf. [7]. Global measurements  are not available for many  aerosol 
properties, so models must be used to interpolate and extrapolate the available 
data. Such models now include the types of aerosols that are most important for 
climate change, but there are large discrepancies between the different models 
concerning the estimation of sources and spatial distribution of different types of 
aerosols.  Despite  this  complex  but  essential  influence  there  is  still  a  big 
uncertainty  on the direct  and indirect  effects that  aerosols have  on radiative 
forcing, as concluded in the last IPCC report [16]. The models’ uncertainty is 
due to: (a) extrapolation of experimentally determined source strengths to other 
regions  and  seasons,  (b)  secondary  aerosols  (precursors  and  atmospheric 
processes),  (c)  optical  properties  and  (d)  aerosol-cloud  interaction.  More 
Aerosols – cirrus - contrails 
III 
54
scientific  investigations  (e.g.  field  measurements)  concerning  chemical  and 
physical properties of aerosols and their involved processes [17] are required to 
estimate and predict direct and indirect climate forcing. 
The aerosols – light interaction can be quantified based on a set of measured or 
estimated  parameters
2
 the  extinction  (
α
a
),  the  scattering  (
α
a
scat
),  the 
backscattering  (
β
a
), the lidar ratio (LR, i.e. the extinction to backscatter ratio), 
the single-scattering albedo (
ω
o
α
a
scat
/
α
a
, i.e. the scattering to extinction ratio), 
the absorption coefficient (
α
abs
(z) = 
α
a
α
a
scat
), the functional dependence of 
light-scattering on relative humidity (i.e. f(RH)), the complex refractive index 
(m), the asymmetry parameter (g), …([18] and chapter II, section 2.2 for more 
details and definitions). One of the most often-used parameters is the aerosols’ 
optical depth or thickness (AOD or AOT), which is the extinction coefficient 
integrated  on  an  atmosphere  path cf.  Eq.  (1)  generally  scaled  at the zenith 
direction.  
( )
Z
a
Zo
AOD
D
zdz
α
=
Eq. (1) 
The clouds’ albedo depends on their AOD, the droplet effective radius (r
eff
) and 
the geometrical thickness [3].   
The wavelength  dependence of  these parameters  is  critical  and  is  generally 
known as Ångstrom’s [19] turbidity formula cf. Eq. (2) described already in the 
chapter II section 2.2.2.  
a
A
B
α
λ
=
Eq. (2) 
The measurement of the light depolarization degree (
ϕ
), see chapter II section 
2.2.3  by  aerosols/cirrus  is  giving  a  good  estimation  of  the  particles  shape 
(spherical or non-spherical) and indirectly of their physical phase (water or ice 
content). 
The above-defined aerosol parameters are measured via various complementary 
techniques  at global (i.e. satellites)  and local (i.e. ground based) scales. The 
ground  based  measurements  can  be  realized in situ  (e.g.  nephelometer  [20], 
aethalometer [21], epiphaniometer [22] on a atmospheric  integrated path (e.g. 
sun photometer  [23]), atmospheric profiling (i.e. lidar and radar techniques [24-
26]). Generally the ground based observations are made within a network (e.g. 
AERONET [27], EARLINET [28]). At the global scale these observations are 
performed via various satellite observations such as AVHRR (Advanced Very 
High  Resolution  Radiometer)  Ångström  coefficient,  TOMS  (Total  Ozone 
Mapping Spectrometer) aerosol index (AI) and MODIS (Moderate Resolution 
Imaging Spectroradiometer) AOT data, SAGE (Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas 
2
Indexes: a = aerosol, m = molecular, t = total, scat = scattering, abs = absorption 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested