open pdf file in asp net c# : Adding text to pdf file SDK control project winforms web page .net UWP 125703777-part443

Aerosols – cirrus - contrails 
III 
55
Experiment) and many  (see a quasi-complete list of  instrumented satellites for 
Earth and Atmosphere devoted observations on [29]). The backward trajectory 
calculations and global circulation model  simulations complement the satellite 
observations. Based on measured optical properties, one may indirectly calculate 
the aerosols’ size and number  distribution based  on the  Mie theory and using 
regularization inversion method [30]. 
In the above-described context this chapter deals with the analysis of the upper 
troposphere  aerosols  and  cirrus/contrails  optical  properties  based  on  lidar 
measurements taken regularly with the JFJ-LIDAR.  
In  section  2,  the  two  main  lidar  approaches  (i.e.  Mie  and  Raman)  used  to 
determine  the  backscatter-extinction  coefficients  are  separately  discussed. 
Section 3 is reserved for a three-part presentation and discussion of the results. 
The first part refers to the definition of the free troposphere as a pure molecular 
(Rayleigh) reference based on simulated and real lidar signals and a comparison 
with  measurements  taken  by  a  sun-photometer  instrument.  The  second  part 
presents the Mie (elastic) method procedure, the EARLINET database statistical 
analysis, the comparison with the co-located sun-photometer (i.e. Precision Filter 
Radiometer  -  PFR  [23])  of  AOD  measurements  and  the  microphysics 
calculations corresponding to  the median aerosol  load situation estimated over 
two years (e.g. ~ 500 measurement series of ~30 min). The third part starts with 
a lidar-based presentation of typical observed cirrus clouds in the UT and then a 
methodology  using  the  Raman  (inelastic)  combined  with  Mie  (elastic) 
approaches  together  with  the  results  obtained  from  depolarization  studies  is 
illustrated. Finally, optical and geometrical properties and the microphysics of a 
pure contrail are addressed. The chapter conclusion will be separately formulated 
in section 4. 
2. LIDAR-based algorithms 
The determination of aerosol and clouds optical properties using the interaction 
of the atmosphere with a laser beam is based on the detection of the atmospheric 
returns  (i.e.  backscatter  light)  and  their  further  analysis.  The  emission 
(transmitter) of the laser beams and the range resolved detection (receiver) was 
realized  with  the  Jungfraujoch  multi-wavlength  lidar  system  (JFJ-LIDAR), 
largely described in the chapter II section 3.1. The basic configuration and the 
technical specifications are described also in [31, 32]. The JFJ-LIDAR system 
was  operated  regularly  since  March  2000  and  it  took  part  at  the European 
Aerosols Research Lidar Network  (EARLINET [28]) between May 2000 and  
January 2003 [33]. Further analysis, taking into account the Rayleigh, Mie and 
Raman  light-atmosphere  processes,  was  based  on  the  retrieval  algorithms 
described below. 
Adding text to pdf file - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to insert text box in pdf document; add text to pdf using preview
Adding text to pdf file - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text field to pdf; acrobat add text to pdf
Aerosols – cirrus - contrails 
III 
56
2.1  Mie and Rayleigh: elastic backscattering  
The elastic backscatter signals (i.e.
λ
D
λ
L
) are due both to the molecular (i.e. 
Rayleigh scattering) and to aerosols/clouds (i.e. Mie scattering) backscatters. The 
backscatter light is proportional to the number density of diffusers (i.e.molecules 
and aerosols) and to the volume backscatter cross-sections of Rayleigh [34-36] 
and Mie processes [37, 38]. The lidar-detected signals S(z) at 
λ
L
may be written 
cf. Eq. (3) as follows 
0
,
,
, )exp
,
,
(
)
(
) (
2
(
)
(
)
Z
t
t
L
L
L
L
L
S
Z
Z
Z
z
Z
RCS
C
dz b
λ
λ
λ
λ
λ
β
α
=
+
Eq. (3) 
where 
λ
L 
is the laser emitted – detected  wavelength (i.e. 
λ
= 355, 532 and 1064 
nm), C
S
is a system function, 
β
t
is the total backscatter coefficient, 
α
t
is the total 
extinction  coefficient  and b  is  the  background  signal  (electronic,  solar-moon 
induced noise,  light contamination sources,  homogeneous or shaped offsets  of 
the detector’s base line,  etc). The 
β
t
[m
-1
sr
-1
]  and 
α
t
[m
-1
] coefficients may be 
expressed  cf.  Eq.  (4)  as  the  sum  of  the  aerosols  (a)  and  molecular  (m) 
contributions: 
, )
, )
, )
, )
, )
, )
, )
, )
(
(
(
(
(
(
(
(
t
a
m
tracegases
L
L
L
L
t
a
m
L
L
L
L
abs
Z
Z
Z
Z
Z
Z
Z
Z
λ
λ
λ
λ
λ
λ
λ
λ
β
β
β
β
α
α
α
α
+
+
+
+
=
=
Eq. (4) 
The effect (i.e. 
β
tracegases 
and 
α
abs
) in Eq. (4) was neglected due to the very weak 
contribution  of  backscatter  and  absorption  of  trace  gases  at  the  lidar 
wavelengths. The molecular contribution 
β
m
and 
α
m
may be estimated taking into 
account  the  Rayleigh  scattering  theory  for  which  many  Rayleigh  differential 
cross-section (
π
d
σ
/d
) formulations [34-36, 39, 40] are available.  The volume 
molecular extinction coefficient may be written as  
,
,
,
(
)
8
8
(
)
(
)
( )
3
3
L
m
m
air
L
L
Z
Z
Z
d
n Z
d
π
λ
λ
λ
σ
π
π
α
β
=
=
Eq. (5) 
where the factor 8
π
/3 is the inverse of Rayleigh scattering phase function.  For 
this work we consider for the molecular backscattering differential cross-section, 
the semi-empirical formula cf. Eq. (6) given by [41] as follows: 
4.09
9
-32
d
550
= 5.45 10
d
λ
π
σ
×
Eq. (6) 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
If you want to read the tutorial of PDF page adding in C# class, we suggest you go to C# Imaging - how to insert a new empty page to PDF file.
adding text box to pdf; how to add text boxes to pdf
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Feel free to define text or images on PDF document and extract accordingly. Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB.NET program.
how to enter text into a pdf; add text to pdf acrobat
Aerosols – cirrus - contrails 
III 
57
with d
σ
/d
expressed in m
2
sr
-1
and the wavelength 
λ
in nm. The calculation of 
air number density n
air 
(Z) in [molec m
-3
] is estimated based on the US Standard 
Atmosphere 1976 [42] based on pressure P
air
(Z) and T
air
(Z) profiles initialized at 
Jungfraujoch station (see example of calculation in annex A3).  
The  aerosol  extinction  (
α
a
),  and  backscatter  (
β
a
 coefficients  at  the  three 
wavelengths may be  derived from Eq.  (3) using different  inversion techniques 
[43,  44].  In  addition  to  the  estimation  of  the  molecular  contribution  for  the 
inversion [43] of Eq. (3),  two a priori assumptions are necessary to allow the 
retrieval of 
α
a
(z) and 
β
a
(z) profiles: (i)  the guess of  the lidar  ratio (LR) value 
(extinction/backscatter) and (ii) a known reference value at a given altitude ( e.g. 
a region with a molecular value). The inversion technique in this work was based 
on the Fernald inversion [44] and uses the following derived formula [32]: 
(
)
(
)
(
)
(
)
(
)
( )
( )
( )
( )
( )
(
)
(
)
(
)
{
}
-
-
-1
- exp
, -
-
- exp
,
a
m
a
a
a
m
Z dz
Z dz
LR Z
RCS Z dz
AZ Z dz
RCS Z
S Z RCS Z S Z dz RCS Z dz
z
AZ Z dz dz
Z
Z
β
β
β
β
+
=
+
+
+
Eq. (7) 
where RCS  (Z) is the range corrected signal at  the altitude Z, LR is the lidar 
ratio, dz is the spatial resolution and A(Z, Z-1) is defined as follows: 
(
)
(
)
(
)
( )
( )
{
}
, -
-
a
m
a
m
m
m
A
LR Z dz LR
LR Z
LR
dz
ZZ dz
Z dz
Z
β
β
=
×
+
×
Eq. (8) 
where LR
m
is the molecular extinction to backscatter ratio, 
β
m
is the molecular 
backscatter coefficient. The lidar ratio value is guessed and kept constant and a 
backward  [45]  iteration  is  started  from  a  molecular  assumed  value  at  high 
altitude. The  main  criterion for  stopping  the  iteration  procedure is  reaching  a 
minimum  in  the  difference  between  the  total  extinction  and  the  molecular 
profiles along a clearly identified molecular window. Conducting the inversion 
with a variable lidar ratio value is also possible [46].  
This  above-described  algorithm  was  implemented  [32]  and  inter-compared 
within the EARLINET lidar community [33, 47, 48]). The results of these inter-
comparisons of  the lidar inversion algorithms and  software were published in 
[49]. The errors  analysis  may  be  found  in [32] and is taking  into  account the 
statistical errors due to the signal detection  and the systematic errors due to the 
estimation  of  the  lidar  ratio  (LR),  the  molecular  backscatter  coefficient,  the 
choice of the reference value, the effect of the multi-scattering and the averaging 
of data. In conclusion, this study shows two distinct cases:  (i) clear sky situation 
where the total error varies from 3 % (at 3000m) to 8 % (at tropopause) with a 
main  contribution  due  to  the  molecular  reference  (1–7  %)  and  to  the  signal 
detection (3-4 %), with the choice of the molecular reference and the lidar ratio 
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
code below to your VB.NET class program for adding text box on Dim outputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Annot_9.pdf" ' open a PDF file Dim doc
add text to pdf in preview; adding text to a pdf document acrobat
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
for adding text box to PDF document in .NET WinForms application. A web based PDF annotation application able to add text box comments to adobe PDF file online
adding text to pdf in acrobat; adding text to a pdf form
Aerosols – cirrus - contrails 
III 
58
affect the  error by  less than  0.25 % and  (ii) hazy  day situation,  in  which the 
errors can reach up to ~15 %, most of them icoming from the signal detection 
(~80  %);  however,  the  lidar  ratio  and  the  molecular  estimations  are  not 
negligible.  
2.2  Raman: inelastic backscattering  
Raman backscatter signals/shifts (i.e. 
λ
D
λ
R
λ
L
±
∆λ
R
) may also be used for 
determining  the  optical  properties  of  the  atmosphere.  The  Raman  scattering 
results from the interaction between the exciting radiation and the electric dipole 
moment of the atmospheric nitrogen, oxygen and water vapor molecules. The de-
excitation of the induced rotational and/or vibrational states (i.e. via the induced 
dipole moment  due to  the changes in  the polarisability of  the diffuser) by the 
incident electromagnetic wave produces shifted radiation both at larger (Stokes: 
λ
R
λ
L
∆λ
R
) or at smaller (anti-Stokes: 
λ
R
λ
∆λ
R
) wavelengths compared 
with the excitation one. The magnitude of the Raman shifts (
∆λ
R
) is specific to 
the excited molecule, and the amount of the detected light is proportional with 
the molecular atmospheric concentration (see details in chapter II, section 2.3). 
The Raman lidar equation [50] may be written cf.  Eq. (9) below 
(
)
,
0
( , )
( , )
(
, )exp
( , )
( , )
( )
R
Z
t
t
R
R
R
L R
L
R
S
RCS
S
Z
C
Z
Z
z
z dz b z
λ
λ
λ
β λ λ λ
α λ
α λ
=
+
+
Eq. (9) 
with the Raman backscatter coefficient  
,
( , , )
(
, )
( )
R
L
R
R
L
R
R
d
Z
Z
n Z
d
π
σ λ λ λ
β λ λ λ
=
Eq. (10)   
where R denotes the Raman channels, C
S
is the system constant, n
R
is the number 
density  of  Raman  scattering  molecule, 
π
d
σ
/d
is  the  differential  Raman 
backscatter  cross-section, 
α
t
is  the  total  extinction  coefficient  (molecular  + 
aerosols + trace gases absorption)  and b is the background signal (electronic or 
sky noise). 
This  Raman  lidar  equation  helps  solving  the  ill-posed  elastic  lidar  equation. 
Therefore analysis of this signal alone permits the determination of the aerosol 
extinction  profile 
α
a
(
λ
L
 z)  at  the  laser  emitted  wavelength  [51-53].  The 
molecular part, 
α
(
λ
L
, z) is again calculated cf. [54]. By assuming a wavelength 
dependence  of the  extinction coefficient (i.e. an Angstrom law, 
α
a
λ
-A
), the 
aerosols’ extinction 
α
(
λ
L
, Z) may be obtained. One of the most frequently used 
approaches is described in [55, 56]  and gives this formula: 
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program. C#.NET: Draw Markups on PDF File.
add text to pdf file; add text to pdf document in preview
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
By using reliable APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel
how to insert text box on pdf; add text pdf professional
Aerosols – cirrus - contrails 
III 
59
2
( )
ln
( , )
( , )
( , )
( , )
1
air
m
m
L
R
R
a
L
A
L
R
n Z
d
Z
Z
dz
z S
Z
Z
α λ
α λ
λ
α λ
λλ
=
+
Eq. (11) 
In this work a similar formulation is proposed as follows. After writing Eq. (9) 
for  a  pure  molecular  atmosphere  and  then  forming  the  ratio  of  the  two 
correspondent equations (aerosols load and pure molecular) one may extract the 
aerosol extinction as expressed in Eq. (12) 
( , )
1
( , )
ln
( , )
1
R
R
a
R
A
m
R
L
R
RCS
Z
d
Z
dz
RCS
Z
λ
α λ
λ
λλ
⎡ ⎤
⎢ ⎥
⎣ ⎦
=−
+
 Eq. (12) 
where the RCS
R
(
λ
R
, Z) and the RCS
(
λ
R
,Z) are the range corrected signals (i.e. 
RCS  =  S  x  Z
2
)  for  Raman  and  molecular  simulated  signal.  Simplification  of 
Eq. (12) is immediate in the case of pure rotational Raman signals (i.e. 
λ
λ
L
as the Angstrom correction may be neglected and the extinction coefficient may 
be calculated as below:  
( , )
1
( , )
ln
2
( , )
R
R
a
R
m
R
RCS
Z
d
Z
dz
RCS
Z
λ
α λ
λ
=−
Eq. (13) 
However, the advantages  of  using  the  Raman  signals  may  be  combined  with 
those  of  elastic  lidar  by  introducing  the  Raman-estimated  aerosol  extinction 
coefficient  in  the  elastic  lidar  equation  and  thus  allowing  a  more  realistic 
determination  of  the  backscatter  coefficient  without  using  a  constant-guessed 
value of the lidar ratio. 
The above-described  Raman  based  approaches  are  applied  in  this  work,  first 
based  on  the  rotational-vibrational  Raman  backscatters  returns  detected  from 
nitrogen at 
λ
N2
~ 387 nm (excited at 
λ
L
~355 nm), and since May 2002, based 
also on the pure Raman rotational backscatters at ~ 532 nm ([57], see chapter V).  
The depolarization at 532 nm, the Angstrom law fits and correspondent A and B 
coefficients and the determination of  microphysics (as described in chapter II, 
sub-section  2.2)  are  also  used  here  for  a  better  characterization  of  the  UT 
aerosols-cirrus-contrails.  
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages Professional VB.NET Solution for Adding Text Annotation to PDF Page in VB
add text to pdf without acrobat; how to add text to a pdf file in preview
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET read PDF, VB.NET convert PDF to text, VB.NET an (empty) page to a PDF and adding empty pages Certainly, random pages can be deleted from PDF file as well
how to insert text into a pdf file; add text to pdf using preview
Aerosols – cirrus - contrails 
III 
60
3. Results and discussions  
The JFJ-LIDAR, upper troposphere systematic measurements (see annex A 16) 
obtained for the elastic (355, 532 and 1064 nm), Raman (387 and ~532 nm) and 
depolarized (at 532 nm) were considered for this work. The proposed procedure 
for treating the corresponding lidar signals in order to obtain the backscatter and 
extinction  coefficients  are  summarized  schematically  in  the  block  diagram 
presented in the Figure 1.  
Figure 1 Block diagram representing the combined Raman-elastic approaches for retrieval of 
backscatter and extinction coefficients  
α
a
1
st
Fernald 2
nd
α
a
Re-
-
LR 
Aerosols – cirrus - contrails 
III 
61
The  above-described  protocol  is  taking  into  account  both  elastic  and  Raman 
acquired  signals and it is  integrating complementary local  meteorological  and 
regional radiosounding data
3
. Raman technique allows a preliminary estimation 
of  the  absolute  value  of  aerosol’s  extinction  coefficients.  The  obtained  low-
resolution  (i.e.  highly  smoothed  data)  extinction  profile  is  then  introduced, 
instead  of the  a priori lidar ratio  profile,  in  the Fernald inversion, in  order  to 
obtain  the  high-resolution  backscatter  coefficient.  By  reapplying  the  Fernald 
inversion  using  this  newly  determined  high-resolution  backscatter  coefficient, 
the extinction coefficient can be retrieved at the same resolution as the elastic 
backscatter. Finally this allows a  more precise determination of the lidar ratio, 
which  can  then  be used  as  a  more  realistic  approximation  in  case  of  similar 
considered atmospheric conditions.   
3.1  Molecular upper troposphere 
The  backscatter  coefficients  based  on  Eq.  (5)  and  Eq.  (6)  corrected  for  the 
Rayleigh  extinction  allow  simulation  of  the  Rayleigh  (i.e.  pure  molecular 
atmosphere) correspondent lidar signals. These molecular simulated backscatter 
signals were compared both to Raman (387 and 532 nm) and elastic (1064 nm) 
signals for clear sky situations. Simulated pure molecular lidar shows very good 
agreement with real lidar detected signals (elastic or inelastic) in the aerosol-free 
upper troposphere situation for all relevant wavelengths as shown in the example 
presented in Figure 2 (a).  
The extremely good correlation validates the proposed semi-empirical approach 
[54]  to  estimate the molecular upper  troposphere above the  Alps.  In  order to 
verify the degree of molecular purity of an apparently perfectly clear blue-sky 
day, measurements of the total optical depth (TOD) using a sun-photometer (i.e. 
RSL 10 channels Reagan,  specifications in  annex A20)  were also considered. 
The related sun-photometer measurements are plotted in annex A21. In  Figure 2 
(b) only the TOD measured at midday on May 8, 2001 (e.g. an apparently clear 
sky day) is plotted together with the calculated molecular extinction coefficients. 
Fitting a power law in ~
λ
-A
one may easily observe that despite the high visibility 
and  the  apparently  clear  sky  the  A exponent  for the  sun-photometer AOD  is       
~ 2.14, smaller than the simulated Rayleigh one ~ 4.09, suggesting the presence 
of a certain amount of small size particles in the upper troposphere. 
3
A quasi-complete set of MatLab, LabView and Delphi software routines were developed 
within the present work for implementing the proposed procedure as depicted in Figure 1. The 
main examples are illustrated in the annexes: A17 to A19. 
Aerosols – cirrus - contrails 
III 
62
Figure 2 (a) Range corrected signals*4 (RCS*) for Rayleigh simulated signals and Raman (or 
elastic for 1064 nm) in (1) 387, (2) 532, and (3) 1064 nm; (b) Rayleigh calculated extinction 
and TOD measured power law representations. 
3.2  Upper troposphere aerosols 
Regular  observations
5
taken  since  May  2000  were  used  to  determine  the 
backscatter and extinction coefficients based on the elastic signals and using a 
validated  algorithm  within  EARLINET ([44,  49]). The main limitation of  this 
data treatment algorithm is the use of a priori lidar ratio values. A case example 
of  the  elastic  inversion  at  532  nm  is  illustrated  in  Figure  3  for  an  upper 
troposphere loaded with aerosol layers and cirrus clouds. Similar inversions were 
also regularly performed for 355 nm and 1064 nm.   
4
RCS*  in  [m
-1
sr
-1
]  -  are  the  range corrected  signals  scaled  (calibrated,  normalized)  using  an  appropriate 
molecular value 
5
See the inventory of the data series represented in the annex A13; 
3000
4000
5000
6000
7000
8000
9000
10000
11000
12000
13000
14000
15000
1.E-08
1.E-07
1.E-06
1.E-05
RCS*  [sr
-1
m
-1
]
Altitude  [m ASL]
(2)
(3) 
(1)
y = 144349 x -2.14
y = 1333880 x-4.09
0.00
0.05
0.10
0.15
0.20
0.25
0.30
0.35
0.40
0.45
0.50
300 400
500 600
700 800 900 1000 1100
Wavelength [nm]
Total Optical Depth - TOD)
5.E-07
1.E-05
2.E-05
3.E-05
4.E-05
5.E-05
6.E-05
 Rayleigh Extinction Coef. [m-1]
TOD
Rayleigh Ext.Coef
Power (TOD)
Power (Rayleigh
Aerosols – cirrus - contrails 
III 
63
Figure 3 (a) Backscatter-extinction coefficients obtained using Fernald inversion algorithm 
with a LR = 10;  (b) RCS at 532 nm graph intensity time series and (c) Simulated Rayleigh 
and Elastic at 532 nm range corrected (molecularly scaled at 6000 m ASL) signals (RCS*) 
together with the total to molecular ratio6 (TMR*). 
In Figure 4 are presented the histogram plots of the aerosols optical depth (AOD 
or AOT) and the averaged extinction * (the weighted AOD*, averaged over the 
measurement vertical range) calculated from the extinction coefficient profiles at 
355A, 532A and 1064A nm. The index A indicates the fact that only the analog 
signals were considered 
6
The TMR* is the total (elastic) to molecular signal ratio after being scaled to an appropriate molecular value.  
1.E-08 1.E-06 1.E-04 1.E-02
Extinction [m
-1
], Backscatter  
[sr
-1
m
-1
] at 532nm 
Altitude [m ASL]
3580
4580
5580
6580
7580
8580
9580
10580
11580
12580
13580
14580
0
10
20
30
40
50
Lidar Ratio at 532nm
backscater
extinction
LR
1.E-07
1.E-06
1.E-05
1.E-04
RCS* at 532nm [sr
-1
m
-1
]
0.1
1
10
100
TMR* at 532nm
molecular
total
TMR*
RCS@532nm (a.u.) 
10:00
12/09
10:10
12/09
10:20
12/09
10:30
12/09
10:40
12/09
1
(b) 
(c) 
(a) 
Aerosols – cirrus - contrails 
III 
64
Extinction coef.* at 355a Frequency Distribution
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
3.5E-09
9.7E-07
1.9E-06
2.9E-06
3.9E-06
4.8E-06
5.8E-06
6.8E-06
7.7E-06
8.7E-06
9.7E-06
1.1E-05
1.2E-05
Extinction* at 355A
Frequency [#]
Extinction coef.* at 532a Frequency Distribution
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
3.5E-09
9.7E-07
1.9E-06
2.9E-06
3.9E-06
4.8E-06
5.8E-06
6.8E-06
7.7E-06
8.7E-06
9.7E-06
1.1E-05
1.2E-05
Extinction* at 532A
Frequency [#]
AOT532a Frequency Distribution
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
0.000
0.008
0.015
0.023
0.030
0.038
0.045
0.053
0.060
0.068
AOT at 532A
Frequency [#]
AOT355a Frequency Distribution
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
0.000
0.008
0.015
0.023
0.030
0.038
0.045
0.053
0.060
0.068
AOT at 355A
Frequency [#]
Extinction coef.* at 1064a Frequency Distribution
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
3.5E-09
9.7E-07
1.9E-06
2.9E-06
3.9E-06
4.8E-06
5.8E-06
6.8E-06
7.7E-06
8.7E-06
9.7E-06
1.1E-05
1.2E-05
Extinction* at 1064A
Frequency [#]
AOT1064a Frequency Distribution
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
0.000
0.008
0.015
0.023
0.030
0.038
0.045
0.053
0.060
0.068
AOT at 355A
Frequency [#]
Figure 4 Frequency distribution of the AOD and the range averaged extinction coefficient for 
~500 x 30 min data series / wavelength, taken from May 2000 to May 2002 for 355, 532 and 
1064 nm. Only the results from the inversion corresponding to analog (A) acquisition mode 
were considered. 
Statistics involving the  above used  aerosols  lidar-based  optical parameters  are 
given in the in Table 1. One notices that the minimum valid altitude is around 
500 m above the station and can reach up to 10 000 m. In order to avoid the bias 
due  to  the  presence  of  clouds  or  possible  artifacts  in  the  data  treatment  one 
proposes to consider the median value more representative than the average one. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested