open pdf file in asp net c# : How to insert text into a pdf using reader control application platform web page html azure web browser 168150-cambridge-english-preliminary-teachers-handbook2-part463

19
CAMBRIDGE ENGLISH: PRELIMINARY HANDBOOK FOR TEACHERS
EXAM  |  LEVEL  |  PAPER
SAMPLE PAPER
PAPER 1  |  READING AND WRITING
PAPER 1: READING AND WRITING  
|
SAMPLE PAPER
How to insert text into a pdf using reader - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to insert text into a pdf using reader; add text boxes to a pdf
How to insert text into a pdf using reader - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text fields to a pdf; how to add text to a pdf document
20
CAMBRIDGE ENGLISH: PRELIMINARY HANDBOOK FOR TEACHERS
PAPER 1  |  READING AND WRITING
PAPER 1: READING AND WRITING  
|
SAMPLE PAPER AND ANSWER KEY
Q
Part 1
A
C
A
4
C
B
Q
Part 2
6
H
7
C
8
B
9
A
10 F
Q
Part 3
11 B
12 A
13 B
14 A
15 B
16 B
17 A
18 A
19 B
20 B
Q Part 4
21 C
22 B
23 A
24 B
25 D
Q Part 5
26 B
27 D
28 A
29 B
30 C
31 C
32 B
33 D
34 B
35 A
Q
Part 1
you live
far (away) 
from
large/big as
4
paint
such
Answer key
READING 
WRITING
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
to add & insert an (empty) page into an existing to specify where they want to insert (blank) PDF page or after any desired page of current PDF document) using
adding text to a pdf in preview; add text boxes to pdf document
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
page adding in C# class, we suggest you go to C# Imaging - how to insert a new empty page to PDF file DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class.
how to add text to pdf; add text pdf
21
CAMBRIDGE ENGLISH: PRELIMINARY HANDBOOK FOR TEACHERS
PAPER 1: READING AND WRITING  
|
ASSESSMENT AND SAMPLE ANSWERS WITH EXAMINER COMMENTS
Assessment of Writing Part 2
Mark scheme for Writing Part 2
Band
5 • Very good attempt at the task.  
• No effort is required of the reader.  
• All elements of the message are fully communicated.
4 • Good attempt at the task.  
• Minimal effort is required of the reader.  
• All elements of the message are communicated. 
3 • Satisfactory attempt at the task.  
• Some effort is required of the reader.  
• All elements of the message are communicated.  
OR  
• One content element omitted but others clearly communicated. 
2 • Inadequate attempt at the task.  
• Significant effort may be required of the reader.  
•  Content elements omitted, or unsuccessfully dealt with, so the message is only 
partly communicated.
1 • Poor attempt at the task.  
• Excessive effort is required of the reader.  
• Very little of the message is communicated.
0 • Content is totally irrelevant or incomprehensible.  
OR 
• Too little language to assess. 
Sample answers
Part 2
Candidate A
Pat, I have a bad news for you. I have lost sunglasses that you 
borrowed me. Yesterday I went to the swimming-pool and when I 
was swimming someone took your sunglasses from my bag. Sorry 
but I will buy you a new ones. What is your favorite model?
Mark and Commentary 
5 marks
A very good attempt at the task. All elements of the task are fully 
communicated and no effort is required of the reader.
Candidate B
Hi Pat, how are you. I’m writting for sorry I lost the your 
sunglasses when swim in the beach but I can to buy news for you if 
like. Sorry bye
Mark and Commentary 
3 marks
Satisfactory attempt at task. All elements of the message are 
communicated but some effort is required by the reader.
Candidate C
Hello, how do you feel? I right you to say that I lost my favorite 
sunglasses in the bedroom on the small tabe and I’d like have some 
new ones.thiks a lot.
Mark and Commentary 
2 marks
An inadequate attempt. The first content element has been omitted, 
the second is unclear and the third has been unsuccessfully dealt 
with. The message is only partly communicated. Significant effort is 
required of the reader.
Assessment of Writing Part 3
Examiners and marking
Writing Examiners (WEs) undergo a rigorous process of training and 
certification before they are invited to mark. Once accepted, they are 
supervised by Team Leaders (TLs) who are in turn led by a Principal 
Examiner (PE), who guides and monitors the marking process.
WEs mark candidate responses in a secure online marking 
environment. The software randomly allocates candidate responses 
to ensure that individual examiners do not receive a concentration of 
good or weak responses, or of any one language group. The software 
also allows for examiners’ marking to be monitored for quality and 
consistency. During the marking period, the PE and TLs are able 
to view their team’s progress and to offer support and advice, as 
required.
Assessment scales
Examiners mark tasks using assessment scales that were developed 
with explicit reference to the Common European Framework of 
Reference for Languages (CEFR). The scales, which are used across 
the spectrum of the Cambridge English General and Business English 
Writing tests, consist of four subscales: Content, Communicative 
Achievement, Organisation, and Language:
•  Content focuses on how well the candidate has fulfilled the task, 
in other words if they have done what they were asked to do.
•  Communicative Achievement focuses on how appropriate the 
writing is for the task and whether the candidate has used the 
appropriate register.
•  Organisation focuses on the way the candidate puts together the 
piece of writing, in other words if it is logical and ordered.
•  Language focuses on vocabulary and grammar. This includes the 
range of language as well as how accurate it is.
Responses are marked on each subscale from 0 to 5.
When marking the tasks, examiners take into account length of 
responses and varieties of English:
•  Guidelines on length are provided for each task; responses 
which are too short may not have an adequate range of language 
and may not provide all the information that is required, while 
responses which are too long may contain irrelevant content and 
have a negative effect on the reader. These may affect candidates’ 
marks on the relevant subscales.
•  Candidates are expected to use a particular variety of English 
with some degree of consistency in areas such as spelling, and 
not for example, switch from using a British spelling of a word to 
an American spelling of the same word.
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo, scanned signature or logo into PDF document page in from RasterEdge.com, this C#.NET PDF image adding
add text to pdf acrobat; how to insert text box in pdf file
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Insert images into PDF form field in VB.NET. Insert Image to PDF Page Using VB. Dim doc As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
add text to pdf document online; add text pdf file acrobat
22
CAMBRIDGE ENGLISH: PRELIMINARY HANDBOOK FOR TEACHERS
PAPER 1: READING AND WRITING  
|
ASSESSMENT OF WRITING PART 3
The subscale Content is common to all levels:
Content
5
All content is relevant to the task. 
Target reader is fully informed.
3
Minor irrelevances and/or omissions may be present. 
Target reader is on the whole informed.
1
Irrelevances and misinterpretation of task may be present. 
Target reader is minimally informed.
0
Content is totally irrelevant 
Target reader is not informed.
The remaining three subscales (Communicative Achievement, 
Organisation, and Language) have descriptors specific to each 
CEFR level: 
CEFR 
level
Communicative Achievement
Organisation
Language
Demonstrates complete command of the 
conventions of the communicative task. 
Communicates complex ideas in an effective 
and convincing way, holding the target 
reader’s attention with ease, fulfilling all 
communicative purposes.
Text is organised impressively and 
coherently using a wide range of 
cohesive devices and organisational 
patterns with complete flexibility.
Uses a wide range of vocabulary, including 
less common lexis, with fluency, precision, 
sophistication, and style.
Use of grammar is sophisticated, fully controlled 
and completely natural.
Any inaccuracies occur only as slips.
C2
Uses the conventions of the communicative 
task with sufficient flexibility to 
communicate complex ideas in an effective 
way, holding the target reader’s attention 
with ease, fulfilling all communicative 
purposes.
Text is a well organised, coherent 
whole,using a variety of cohesive 
devices and organisational patterns 
with flexibility.
Uses a range of vocabulary, including less 
common lexis, effectively and precisely.
Uses a wide range of simple and complex 
grammatical forms with full control, flexibility 
and sophistication.
Errors, if present, are related to less common 
words and structures, or occur as slips.
C1
Uses the conventions of the communicative 
task effectively to hold the target reader’s 
attention and communicate straightforward 
and complex ideas, as appropriate.
Text is well-organised and coherent, 
using a variety of cohesive devices and 
organisational patterns to generally 
good effect.
Uses a range of vocabulary, including less 
common lexis, appropriately.
Uses a range of simple and complex grammatical 
forms with control and flexibility.
Occasional errors may be present but do not 
impede communication.
B2
Uses the conventions of the communicative 
task to hold the target reader’s attention and 
communicate straightforward ideas.
Text is generally well organised and 
coherent, using a variety of linking 
words and cohesive devices.
Uses a range of everyday vocabulary 
appropriately, with occasional inappropriate use 
of less common lexis.
Uses a range of simple and some complex 
grammatical forms with a good degree of control.
Errors do not impede communication.
B1
Uses the conventions of the communicative 
task in generally appropriate ways to 
communicate straightforward ideas.
Text is connected and coherent, using 
basic linking words and a limited 
number of cohesive devices.
Uses everyday vocabulary generally 
appropriately, while occasionally overusing 
certain lexis.
Uses simple grammatical forms with a good 
degree of control.
While errors are noticeable, meaning can still be 
determined.
A2
Produces text that communicates simple 
ideas in simple ways.
Text is connected using basic, high-
frequency linking words.
Uses basic vocabulary reasonably appropriately.
Uses simple grammatical forms with some 
degree of control.
Errors may impede meaning at times.
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
options, outputOps); Divide PDF File into Two Using C#. This is an C# example of splitting a PDF to two new PDF files. String inputFilePath
how to add a text box in a pdf file; adding text to a pdf document acrobat
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
outputOps). Divide PDF File into Two Demo Code Using VB.NET. This is an VB.NET example of splitting a PDF to two new PDF files. Dim
adding text to pdf reader; add text field pdf
23
CAMBRIDGE ENGLISH: PRELIMINARY HANDBOOK FOR TEACHERS
PAPER 1: READING AND WRITING  
|
ASSESSMENT OF WRITING PART 3
Cambridge English: Preliminary Writing Examiners use the following assessment scale, extracted from the one on the previous page:
B1
Content
Communicative Achievement
Organisation
Language
5
All content is relevant to the 
task.
Target reader is fully informed.
Uses the conventions of 
the communicative task 
to hold the target reader’s 
attention and communicate 
straightforward ideas.
Text is generally well-
organised and coherent, using 
a variety of linking words and 
cohesive devices.
Uses a range of everyday vocabulary 
appropriately, with occasional 
inappropriate use of less common lexis.
Uses a range of simple and some 
complex grammatical forms with a good 
degree of control.
Errors do not impede communication.
4
Performance shares features of Bands 3 and 5.
3
Minor irrelevances and/or 
omissions may be present.
Target reader is on the whole 
informed.
Uses the conventions of 
the communicative task in 
generally appropriate ways to 
communicate straightforward 
ideas.
Text is connected and 
coherent, using basic linking 
words and a limited number 
of cohesive devices.
Uses everyday vocabulary generally 
appropriately, while occasionally 
overusing certain lexis.
Uses simple grammatical forms with a 
good degree of control.
While errors are noticeable, meaning can 
still be determined.
2
Performance shares features of Bands 1 and 3.
1
Irrelevances and 
misinterpretation of task may 
be present.
Target reader is minimally 
informed.
Produces text that 
communicates simple ideas in 
simple ways.
Text is connected using basic, 
high-frequency linking words.
Uses basic vocabulary reasonably 
appropriately.
Uses simple grammatical forms with 
some degree of control.
Errors may impede meaning at times.
0
Content is totally irrelevant.
Target reader is not informed.
Performance below Band 1.
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
PDF document splitting, PDF page reordering and PDF page image and text extraction. C# Demo Code: Combine and Merge Multiple PDF Files into One in .NET.
how to add text to a pdf document using acrobat; how to add text to pdf file
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
Among all the DLL components, there is a PDF processing library which enables developers to convert PDF document into text file using Visual Basic .NET
add text to pdf reader; adding text fields to pdf
24
CAMBRIDGE ENGLISH: PRELIMINARY HANDBOOK FOR TEACHERS
PAPER 1: READING AND WRITING  
|
WRITING MARK SCHEME
Writing Mark Scheme
Glossary of terms
1. GENERAL
Generally
Generally is a qualifier meaning not in every way or instance. Thus, 
‘generally appropriately’ refers to performance that is not as good 
as ‘appropriately’.
Flexibility
Flexible and flexibly refer to the ability to adapt – whether 
language, organisational devices, or task conventions – rather than 
using the same form over and over, thus evidencing better control 
and a wider repertoire of the resource. Flexibility allows a candidate 
to better achieve communicative goals.
2. CONTENT
Relevant
Relevant means related or relatable to required content points and/
or task requirements.
Target reader
The target reader is the hypothetical reader set up in the task, e.g. a 
magazine’s readership, your English teacher.
Informed
The target reader is informed if content points and/or task 
requirements are addressed and appropriately developed. Some 
content points do not require much development (e.g. “state what 
is x”) while others require it (“describe”, “explain”).
3. COMMUNICATIVE ACHIEVEMENT
Conventions 
of the 
communicative 
task
Conventions of the communicative task include such things 
as genre, format, register, and function. For example, a personal 
letter should not be written as a formal report, should be laid out 
accordingly, and use the right tone for the communicative purpose.
Holding target 
reader’s 
attention
Holding the target reader’s attention is used in the positive sense 
and refers to the quality of a text that allows a reader to derive 
meaning and not be distracted. It does not refer to texts that force 
a reader to read closely because they are difficult to follow or make 
sense of.
Communicative 
purpose
Communicative purpose refers to the communicative 
requirements as set out in the task, e.g. make a complaint, suggest 
alternatives.
Straightforward 
and complex 
ideas
Straightforward ideas are those which relate to relatively limited 
subject matter, usually concrete in nature, and which require simpler 
rhetorical devices to communicate. Complex ideas are those which 
are of a more abstract nature, or which cover a wider subject area, 
requiring more rhetorical resources to bring together and express.
4. ORGANISATION
Linking words, 
cohesive 
devices and 
organisational 
patterns
Linking words are cohesive devices, but are separated here to refer 
to higher frequency vocabulary which provides explicit linkage. They 
can range from basic high-frequency items (such as “and”, “but”) to 
basic and phrasal items (such as “because”, “first of all”, “finally”).
Cohesive devices refers to more sophisticated linking words and 
phrases (e.g. “moreover”, “it may appear”, “as a result”), as well 
as grammatical devices such as the use of reference pronouns, 
substitution (e.g. 
There are two women in the picture. The one on 
the right…
), ellipsis (e.g. 
The first car he owned was a convertible, 
the second a family car
), or repetition.
Organisational patterns refers to less explicit ways of achieving 
connection at the between sentence level and beyond, e.g. 
arranging sentences in climactic order, the use of parallelism, using 
a rhetorical question to set up a new paragraph.
5. LANGUAGE
Vocabulary
Basic vocabulary refers to vocabulary used for survival purposes, 
for simple transactions, and the like.
Everyday vocabulary refers to vocabulary that comes up in 
common situations of a non-technical nature in the relevant 
domain.
Less common lexis refers to vocabulary items that appear less 
often in the relevant domain. These items often help to express 
ideas more succinctly and precisely. 
Appropriacy of 
vocabulary
Appropriacy of vocabulary: the use of words and phrases that 
fit the context of the given task. For example, in 
I’m very sensible 
to noise
, the word 
sensible
is inappropriate as the word should 
be 
sensitive
. Another example would be 
Today’s big snow makes 
getting around the city difficult
. The phrase 
getting around
is well 
suited to this situation. However, 
big snow
is inappropriate as 
big
and 
snow
are not used together. 
Heavy snow
would be appropriate.
Grammatical 
forms
Simple grammatical forms: words, phrases, basic tenses and 
simple clauses.
Complex grammatical forms: longer and more complex items, e.g. 
noun clauses, relative and adverb clauses, subordination, passive 
forms, infinitives, verb patterns, modal forms and tense contrasts.
Grammatical 
control
Grammatical control: the ability to consistently use grammar 
accurately and appropriately to convey intended meaning.
Where language specifications are provided at lower levels as in 
Cambridge English: Key
(KET)
and 
Cambridge English: Preliminary
(PET)
, candidates may have control of only the simplest exponents 
of the listed forms.
Range
Range: the variety of words and grammatical forms a candidate 
uses. At higher levels, candidates will make increasing use 
of a greater variety of words, fixed phrases, collocations and 
grammatical forms.
Overuse
Overuse refers to those cases where candidates repeatedly use the 
same word because they do not have the resources to use another 
term or phrase the same idea in another way. Some words may 
unavoidably appear often as a result of being the topic of the task; 
that is not covered by the term overuse here.
Errors and slips
Errors are systematic mistakes. Slips are mistakes that are non-
systematic, i.e. the candidate has learned the vocabulary item or 
grammatical structure, but just happened to make a mistake in this 
instance. In a candidate’s response, where most other examples of 
a lexical/grammatical point are accurate, a mistake on that point 
would most likely be a slip.
Impede 
communication
Impede communication means getting in the way of meaning. 
Meaning can still be determined indicates that some effort is 
required from the reader to determine meaning.
25
CAMBRIDGE ENGLISH: PRELIMINARY HANDBOOK FOR TEACHERS
PAPER 1: READING AND WRITING  
|
SAMPLE ANSWERS WITH EXAMINER COMMENTS
Part 3 – Letter
Candidate A
Dear Martin,
That’s great! Your grandmother is very kind and nice.
However, I can see you have a difficult decision to make. If I were you I would try to use some of the money for the holiday and save the rest 
(although I don’t know how much you have or how much the holiday costs). What do you think? The camera could be a good idea, but how often 
do you use a camera? And you can ask your friends to take photos on the holiday so you still have some! 
Anyway, write to me and tell me what you do.
Love Martina.
Examiner comments
Subscale
Mark Commentary
Content
5
All content is relevant to the task with appropriate expansion.
The target reader is fully informed. 
Communicative 
Achievement
5
The target reader’s attention is held throughout. The format is consistently appropriate to the task. 
Organisation
5
The text is well organised and coherent, with a variety of linking words (but; And; so) and cohesive devices (However; 
save the rest; although; Anyway).
Language
5
A good range of everyday and some less common lexis (a difficult decision to make; save the rest; take photos) is used 
appropriately.
A range of simple and more complex grammatical forms is used with a good degree of control (If I were you I would try 
to use some of the money; The camera could be a good idea,).
There are no errors.
Candidate B
Hellow Cris,
That good new! Your grandmother is good. With the money you can to buy a camera or may be go holidays. May be you can visit me! You can to 
save money to, good idea! What your parents think? I think yes camera good idea you can make fotos and send me.
Have nice time and tell me your decide what you do.
I wait your answer.
Kiss Ana
Examiner comments
Subscale
Mark Commentary
Content
4
Although there is some irrelevance at the start when the candidate repeats the situation rather than offering advice, 
the task has been addressed. The target reader is informed.
Communicative 
Achievement
3
Straightforward ideas are communicated in generally appropriate ways. 
The letter format is attempted. 
Organisation
2
The letter is connected and coherent. 
Sentences tend to be short and are connected with a limited number of basic linking words (or; and) and cohesive 
devices (That good new; With the money). 
Language
3
Everyday vocabulary is used appropriately.
Simple grammatical forms are used with reasonable control. 
Several errors are present, but meaning can still be determined (That good new; you can to buy; make fotos; tell me your 
decide).
PAPER 1  |  READING AND WRITING  |  SAMPLE ANSWERS WITH EXAMINER COMMENTS
26
CAMBRIDGE ENGLISH: PRELIMINARY HANDBOOK FOR TEACHERS
PAPER 1: READING AND WRITING  
|
SAMPLE ANSWERS WITH EXAMINER COMMENTS
Part 3 – Story
Candidate A
A Lucky Escape
When I was young, I saw a lucky escape. I was playing in the garden with some friends who lived in the same street, when a police car arrived. We 
were a bit scared and didn’t know why the car had come to my house. Maybe they were checking something or looking for someone. 
The policeman got out and started speaking to one of my friends. 
While the policeman was asking questions, I suddenly saw a strange person going out at the back of my neighbour’s house. My neighbour was on 
holiday, so the house was empty. I had never seen this person before. Suddenly he started to run. I didn’t know what to do, so I shouted to the 
police, but the man could run very fast and he got away. That was a lucky escape!
Examiner comments
Subscale
Mark Commentary
Content
5
The story is clearly connected to the title given. 
The target reader would be able to follow the story easily. There is a clear beginning, middle and end.
Communicative 
Achievement
5
The story holds the target reader’s attention and follows the conventions of storytelling.
Organisation
5
The text is well organised and coherent with a range of appropriate linking words (when; and; suddenly; so) and 
cohesive devices (some friends who lived in the same street; this person; he got away; That was a lucky escape!).
Language
5
A range of everyday and some less common lexis (a bit scared; got away) is used appropriately.
A range of simple and complex grammatical forms is used with a good degree of control. There is effective use of a 
good range of narrative tenses (I was playing in the garden … when a police car arrived; … didn’t know why the car had come 
to my house).
Errors are minimal and do not impede communication. 
Candidate B
A Lucky Escape
I had a lucky escape yesterday. I was at school in the class and the teacher nearly catched me. We had a English test and i’m not good in 
English the test was very difficult for me, too bad. Lots of questions for gramma and writting and spelling. What can I do? I need good grade. I 
see a boy near me and he is writting lotta answers. Good! I think OK I can just see maybe what is he writting and do same. Good idea! So this I 
did but teacher sudenly looked and nearly catched me but I had lucky escape becos she didn’t see me looking at boy near me, just I writting.
Lucky escape!
Examiner comments
Subscale
Mark Commentary
Content
5
The story is clearly related to the title. The target reader would be able to follow the story, which has a clear beginning, 
middle and end, easily.
Communicative 
Achievement
4
The format is appropriate for the task. 
The target reader can follow the story with reasonable ease although some effort is required due to the shift in tenses.
Organisation
3
The story is coherent and connected with basic linking words (and; So; sudenly; but) and a limited number of cohesive 
devices (he is writting; this I did; she didn’t see me).
There are some punctuation errors but they do not affect comprehension. 
Language
3
Everyday vocabulary is used appropriately. There are some errors with spelling (gramma; writting; sudenly; becos), but 
these do not impede the meaning.
Simple grammatical forms are used with reasonable control. There are some errors with using and forming the simple 
past tense (catched; What can I do?; I see a boy) although there is evidence of success with this grammar point.
A number of minor errors are present but they do not impede communication. 
PAPER 1  |  READING AND WRITING  |  SAMPLE ANSWERS WITH EXAMINER COMMENTS
27
CAMBRIDGE ENGLISH: PRELIMINARY HANDBOOK FOR TEACHERS
PAPER 1: READING AND WRITING  
|
SAMPLE ANSWERS WITH EXAMINER COMMENTS
Candidate C
Lucky escape 
I never no had lucky escape all time but my Mum do every day. She very lucky. She go work evry day on bus and alway luky. She work nurse in 
hospital. Usually she loss bus so big problem. What you think? Evry day her friend pass so go and work with friend and no problem again. My 
Mum very luky and big excape. Good friend. Boss always happy and no problem. Evry day same. 
Examiner comments
Subscale
Mark Commentary
Content
1
The task has been misinterpreted and the candidate has not written a story. The target reader would not be able to 
follow a storyline.
Communicative 
Achievement
2
Ideas are relatively simple, but an attempt has been made to communicate using a range of structures. 
Organisation
2
The text is connected and largely coherent using a range of basic linking words (but; and; Usually; so). Sentences tend 
to be short, but referencing pronouns (she) are used to improve coherence. 
Language
1
Basic vocabulary is used reasonably appropriately although there are frequent slips with spelling (evry; luky; excape).
Simple grammatical forms are used but there is a lack of control, particularly with verb forms (my Mum do every day; 
She very lucky; Boss always happy).
Errors impede meaning at times (I never no had lucky escape all time; Evry day her friend pass so go and work with friend 
and no problem again).
PAPER 1  |  READING AND WRITING  |  SAMPLE ANSWERS WITH EXAMINER COMMENTS
28
CAMBRIDGE ENGLISH: PRELIMINARY HANDBOOK FOR TEACHERS
PAPER 1: READING AND WRITING  
|
CANDIDATE ANSWER SHEETS
Part 1: 
Write your answers below.
2
1
0
1
0
1
1
2
Do not 
write here
4
3
0
1
0
1
3
4
5
0
1
5
Part 2 (Question 6): Write your answer below.
.
Put your answer to Writing Part 3 on Answer Sheet 2
0
1
Do not write below (Examiner use only).
2
3
4
5
6
For 
Writing (Parts 1 and 2): 
Write your answers clearly in the spaces provided.
Continue on the other side of this sheet
Supervisor:
PET Paper 1 Reading and Writing  Candidate Answer Sheet 1
0
0
0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Candidate Name
If not already printed, write name
in CAPITALS and complete the
Candidate No. grid (in pencil). 
Candidate Signature
Examination Title
Centre
If the candidate is ABSENT or has WITHDRAWN shade here
Candidate No.
Centre No.
Examination 
Details
Instructions
Use a PENCIL (B or HB). 
Rub out any answer you want to change with an eraser.
For Reading: 
Mark ONE letter for each question.
For example, if you think A is the right answer to the 
question, mark your answer sheet like this:
Part 1
2
1
A
B
C
A
B
C
4
3
5
0
A
B
C
D
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
Part 2
7
6
A
B
C
A
B
C
9
8
10
D
D
E
E
F
F
G
G
H
H
A
B
C
A
B
C
D
D
E
E
F
F
G
G
H
H
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
Part 3
12
11
A
B
A
B
14
13
15
A
B
A
B
A
B
Part 5
27
26
A
B
C
A
B
C
29
28
30
D
D
A
B
C
A
B
C
D
D
A
B
C
D
Part 4
22
21
A
B
C
A
B
C
24
23
25
D
D
A
B
C
A
B
C
D
D
A
B
C
D
16
17
A
B
A
B
31
32
A
B
C
D
A
B
C
D
18
19
A
B
A
B
33
34
A
B
C
D
A
B
C
D
20
A
B
35
A
B
C
D
 
PET RW 1
DP743/389
PAPER 1  |  READING AND WRITING
Candidate answer sheet 1
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested