open pdf file in asp net c# : How to add text to a pdf file in acrobat application Library tool html .net wpf online 168150-cambridge-english-preliminary-teachers-handbook4-part465

39
CAMBRIDGE ENGLISH: PRELIMINARY HANDBOOK FOR TEACHERS
EXAM  |  LEVEL  |  PAPER
SAMPLE PAPER
PAPER 2  |  LISTENING
PAPER 2: LISTENING  
|
ANSWER KEY AND CANDIDATE ANSWER SHEET
Q
Part 1
1
B
2
C
3
B
4
C
5
B
6
A
7
C
Q
Part 2
8
B
9
C
10
A
11 B
12 B
13 C
Q
Part 3
14
elephant(s)
15
14(th) May
16
night
17
France
18
Beechwood
19
0163 55934
Brackets ( ) indicate optional 
words or letters
Q
Part 4
20 B
21 A
22 A
23 B
24 B
25 A
Answer key
Candidate answer sheet
Supervisor:
PET Paper 2 Listening  Candidate Answer Sheet
0
0
0
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Candidate Name
If not already printed, write name
in CAPITALS and complete the
Candidate No. grid (in pencil). 
Candidate Signature
Examination Title
Centre
If the candidate is ABSENT or has WITHDRAWN shade here
Candidate No.
Centre No.
Examination 
Details
Instructions
Use a PENCIL (B or HB). 
Rub out any answer you want to change with an eraser.
For Parts 1, 2 and 4: 
Mark ONE letter for each question.
For example, if you think A is the right answer to the 
question, mark your answer sheet like this:
Part 3
17
16
0
1
0
1
16
17
Part 1
2
1
A
B
C
A
B
C
4
3
6
5
7
19
18
0
1
0
1
18
19
Do not 
write here
0
A
B
C
For Part  3: 
Write your answers clearly in the spaces next 
to the numbers (14 to 19) like this:
15
14
0
1
0
1
14
15
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
Part 2
9
8
A
B
C
A
B
C
11
10
13
12
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
A
B
C
Part 4
21
20
A
B
A
B
23
22
25
24
A
B
A
B
A
B
A
B
You must transfer all your answers from the Listening Question Paper to this answer sheet. 
0
PET L
DP744/391
How to add text to a pdf file in acrobat - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text to a pdf file; add text to pdf online
How to add text to a pdf file in acrobat - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text pdf reader; add text to pdf using preview
40
CAMBRIDGE ENGLISH: PRELIMINARY HANDBOOK FOR TEACHERS
Structure and tasks
PART 1
TASK TYPE  
AND FORMAT
Each candidate interacts with the interlocutor. 
The interlocutor asks the candidates 
questions in turn, using standardised 
questions.
FOCUS
Giving information of a factual, personal kind. 
The candidates respond to questions about 
present circumstances, past experiences and 
future plans.
TIMING
2–3 minutes
PART 2
TASK TYPE  
AND FORMAT
Simulated situation. Candidates interact with 
each other.  
Visual stimulus is given to the candidates to 
aid the discussion task. The interlocutor sets 
up the activity using a standardised rubric.
FOCUS
Using functional language to make and 
respond to suggestions, discuss alternatives, 
make recommendations and negotiate 
agreement.
TIMING
2–3 minutes
PART 3
TASK TYPE  
AND FORMAT
Extended turn.  
A colour photograph is given to each 
candidate in turn and they are asked to talk 
about it for approximately one minute. Both 
photographs relate to the same topic.
FOCUS
Describing photographs and managing 
discourse, using appropriate vocabulary, in a 
longer turn.
TIMING
3 minutes
PART 4
TASK TYPE  
AND FORMAT
General conversation. Candidates 
interact with each other. The topic of 
the conversation develops the theme 
establishedin Part 3.  
The interlocutor sets up the activity using a 
standardised rubric.
FOCUS
The candidates talk together about their 
opinions, likes/dislikes, preferences, 
experiences, habits, etc.
TIMING
3 minutes
General description
PAPER FORMAT
The paper contains four parts.
TIMING
10–12 minutes per pair of candidates.
INTERACTION 
PATTERN
The standard format is two 
candidates and two examiners.  
One examiner acts as interlocutor 
and manages the interaction 
by asking questions and setting 
up the tasks. The other acts as 
assessor anddoes not join in the 
conversation.
TASK TYPES
Short exchanges with the 
interlocutor; a collaborative task 
involving both candidates; a 
1-minute long turn and a follow-up 
discussion.
MARKS
Candidates are assessed on their 
performance throughout the test. 
There are a total of 25 marks for 
Paper 3, making 25% of the total 
score for the whole examination.
Paper 3 
Speaking
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Add, insert PDF native annotations to PDF file. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print
adding text to pdf in acrobat; add text to a pdf document
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file. other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. developers to conduct high fidelity PDF file conversion in
add text to pdf without acrobat; add text to pdf
PAPER 3: SPEAKING  
|
PREPARATION
41
CAMBRIDGE ENGLISH: PRELIMINARY HANDBOOK FOR TEACHERS
Preparation
General
•  In the Cambridge English: Preliminary Speaking test, candidates 
are examined in pairs by two examiners. One of the examiners 
acts as an interlocutor and the other as an assessor. The 
interlocutor directs the test, while the assessor takes no part 
in the interaction. Examiners change roles during the course of 
an examining session, but not during the examining of one pair. 
There are a number of different ‘packs’ of material that examiners 
can use.
•  The test takes between 10 and 12 minutes and consists of four 
parts which are designed to elicit a wide range of speaking 
skills from the candidates. Where there is an uneven number of 
candidates at a centre, the final Speaking test will be a group of 
three rather than a pair. The group-of-three test is not an option 
for all candidates, but is only used for the last test in a session, 
where necessary.
By part
PART 1
•  The test begins with a general conversation led by the 
interlocutor, who asks the candidates questions about their 
personal details, daily routines, likes and dislikes, etc. Candidates 
are addressed in turn and are not expected to talk to each other 
at this stage. At the beginning of the test, candidates are asked to 
spell all or part of their name.
•  The purpose of this conversation is to test the language of simple 
social interaction, and to enable each candidate to make an initial 
contribution to the test, using simple everyday language. As 
they are talking about themselves using familiar language, this 
conversation should help to settle the candidates, enabling them 
to overcome any initial nervousness.
•  Although the interlocutor’s questions are designed to elicit 
short rather than extended responses, candidates should be 
discouraged from giving one-word answers in this part. Especially 
when asked about their daily routines or their likes and dislikes, 
candidates should be encouraged to extend their answers with 
reasons and examples.
•  This part of the test assesses the candidates’ ability to take 
part in spontaneous communication in an everyday setting. 
Candidates who find opportunities to socialise with others in an 
English-speaking environment will be well prepared for this part 
of the test. Where this is not possible, however, such situations 
need to be recreated in the classroom through structured 
speaking tasks that practise appropriate language in a similar 
context. Candidates should be discouraged, however, from 
preparing rehearsed speeches as these will sound unnatural and 
will probably fail to answer the specific questions asked.
PART 2
•  This part of the test takes the form of a simulated situation where 
the candidates are asked, for example, to make and respond 
to suggestions, discuss alternatives, make recommendations 
and negotiate agreement with their partner. It is not a role-play 
activity, however, as candidates will always be giving their own 
views and opinions about an imaginary situation, rather than 
assuming an unfamiliar role.
•  In this part of the test, the candidates speak to each other. 
The interlocutor sets up the task, repeating the instructions 
whilst candidates look at the prompt material. The interlocutor 
then takes no further part in the interaction. In the event of a 
complete breakdown in the interaction, the interlocutor may 
subtly intervene to redirect the students, but will not take part in 
the task itself. Candidates are expected to engage with the task 
independently, negotiating turns and eliciting opinions from each 
other.
•  A sheet of visual prompts is given to the candidates which 
is designed to generate ideas and provide the basis for the 
discussion. Candidates may, however, introduce their own ideas 
if they wish. Candidates are assessed on their ability to take 
part in the task, rather than on the outcome of their discussions, 
and so it is not necessary for them to complete the task in the 
time given. Candidates are assessed on their use of appropriate 
language and interactive strategies, not on their ideas.
•  All classroom discussions in pairs and groups will provide 
preparation for this part of the test. Candidates should be 
encouraged to make positive contributions that move the 
discussion forward by picking up on each other’s ideas. 
Candidates should learn to discuss the situation fully with 
their partners, using the range of visual prompts to extend the 
discussion, before coming to a conclusion. It is useful to point out 
to candidates that if they rush to reach a conclusion too soon, 
opportunities to demonstrate their language skills may be lost 
– and it is these skills rather than the outcome of the discussion 
which are being assessed.
PART 3
•  In this part of the test, each candidate is given one colour 
photograph to describe. The photographs will depict everyday 
situations and candidates are asked to give a simple description 
of what they can see in their photograph.
•  This part of the test allows candidates to demonstrate both their 
range of vocabulary and their ability to organise language in a 
long turn. Their descriptions are expected to be simple, however, 
and candidates at this level are not expected to speculate about 
the context or talk about any wider issues raised by the scenes 
depicted.
•  Candidates should be encouraged to describe the people and 
activities in the photographs as fully as possible. They should 
imagine that they are describing the photograph to someone who 
can’t see it, naming all the objects and including illustrative detail 
such as colours, people’s clothes, time of day, weather, etc.
•  Whilst the photographs will not call for difficult or specialised 
vocabulary, candidates will be given credit for the ability to use 
paraphrase or other appropriate strategies to deal with items 
of vocabulary which they do not know or cannot call to mind. 
Candidates should therefore be given plenty of classroom 
practice in both the language of description and strategies for 
dealing with unknown vocabulary.
•  The photographs will have a common theme, which candidates 
will be told, but will differ in terms of their detailed content. 
Although this theme establishes a common starting point for 
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. you may easily achieve the following PowerPoint file conversions PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
how to insert text box in pdf; how to insert text into a pdf file
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. you may easily achieve the following Word file conversions. Word to PDF Conversion.
adding text to pdf document; add text box in pdf document
42
CAMBRIDGE ENGLISH: PRELIMINARY HANDBOOK FOR TEACHERS
Part 4, the photographs are returned to the interlocutor at the 
end of Part 3 and play no further part in the test.
PART 4
•  In this part of the test, the candidates speak to each other. The 
interlocutor sets up the task, then takes no further part. The 
theme established in Part 3 is now used as the starting point 
for a general conversation in which the candidates discuss 
their own likes and dislikes, experiences, etc. Candidates are 
expected to engage with the task independently, negotiating 
turns and eliciting opinions from each other. In the event of a 
complete breakdown in the interaction, the interlocutor may 
subtly intervene to redirect the students with further prompts, 
but will not take part in the task itself. Candidates should be able 
to talk about their interests and enthusiasms and give reasons 
for their views and preferences. Credit will be given for the use 
of appropriate interactive strategies and candidates should be 
encouraged to elicit the views of their partner(s), pick up on their 
partner’s points and show interest in what their partner(s) is/are 
saying, as well as talking about themselves.
•  If, at any time during the test, candidates have difficulty in 
understanding an instruction, question or response, they should 
ask the interlocutor or their partner to repeat what was said. 
Marks will not normally be lost for the occasional request for 
repetition.
PAPER 3: SPEAKING  
|
PREPARATION
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
Using this VB.NET Imaging PDF Watermark Add-on, you simply create a watermark that consists of text or image And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no
how to add text to pdf document; add text pdf acrobat
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. library toolkit in C#, you can easily perform file conversion from Convert to PDF.
add text in pdf file online; how to add text fields in a pdf
43
CAMBRIDGE ENGLISH: PRELIMINARY HANDBOOK FOR TEACHERS
PAPER 3: SPEAKING  
|
SAMPLE PAPER
PAPER 3  |  SPEAKING
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS hand, free hand line, rectangle, text, hotspot, hotspot Users need to add following implementations to
add text to a pdf document; add text to pdf acrobat
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. you may easily achieve the following Excel file conversions. Excel to PDF Conversion.
how to insert text box in pdf; add text box in pdf document
44
CAMBRIDGE ENGLISH: PRELIMINARY HANDBOOK FOR TEACHERS
EXAM  |  LEVEL  |  PAPER
SAMPLE PAPER
Speaking Test 1 (Holiday present) 
Part 2 (2-3 minutes) 
Interlocutor 
Say to both 
candidates: 
I’m going to describe a situation to you. 
A young man on holiday in North America wants to buy a present to take 
home to his parents
. Talk together about the different presents he could 
buy, and say which would be best. 
Here is a picture with some ideas to help you. 
Place Part 2 booklet, open at Task 1, in front of candidates. 
Pause 
I’ll say that again. 
A young man on holiday in North America wants to buy a present to take 
home to his parents
. Talk together about the different presents he could 
buy, and say which would be best. 
All right? Talk together. 
Allow the candidates enough time to complete the task without intervention.  
Prompt only if necessary. 
Thank you. (Can I have the booklet please?) 
Retrieve Part 2 booklet. 
 
About 2-3 minutes (including time to assimilate the information) 
PAPER 3  |  SPEAKING
PAPER 3: SPEAKING  
|
SAMPLE PAPER
PDF to WORD Converter | Convert PDF to Word, Convert Word to PDF
No need for Adobe Acrobat and Microsoft Word; Has built losing will occur during conversion by PDF to Word Open the output file automatically for the users; Offer
how to input text in a pdf; how to add text to a pdf document using reader
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
No need for Adobe Acrobat Reader; Seamlessly integrated into RasterEdge .NET Image to PDF with amazingly high speed; Get a compressed PDF file after conversion;
how to enter text into a pdf form; how to add text to a pdf in acrobat
CAMBRIDGE ENGLISH: PRELIMINARY HANDBOOK FOR TEACHERS
PAPER 3: SPEAKING  
|
SAMPLE PAPER
 Speaking Test 1 (People reading and writing) 
Part 3 (3 minutes) 
Interlocutor 
Say to both 
candidates: 
Now, I’d like each of you to talk on your own about something. I’m going to give 
each of you a photograph of people reading and writing. 
Candidate A, here is your photograph. (Place Part 3 booklet, open at Task 1A, in 
front of Candidate A.)
 Please show it to Candidate B, but I’d like you to talk about it.  
Candidate B, you just listen. I’ll give you your photograph in a moment. 
Candidate A, please tell us what you can see in the photograph. 
(Candidate A) 
 Approximately one minute 
If there is a need to intervene, prompts rather than direct questions should be used. 
Thank you. (Can I have the booklet please?) 
Retrieve Part 3 booklet from Candidate A. 
Interlocutor 
Now, Candidate B, here is your photograph. It also shows people reading and 
writing. (Place Part 3 booklet, open at Task 1B, in front of Candidate B.) Please 
show it to Candidate A and tell us what you can see in the photograph. 
(Candidate B) 
 Approximately one minute 
Thank you. (Can I have the booklet please?) 
Retrieve Part 3 booklet from Candidate B. 
Part 4 (3 minutes) 
Interlocutor 
Say to both 
candidates: 
Your photographs showed people reading and writing. Now, I’d like you to talk 
together about the different kinds of reading and writing you did when you were 
younger, and the kinds you do now. 
Allow the candidates enough time to complete the task without intervention.   
Prompt only if necessary. 
Thank you. That’s the end of the test. 
 
Parts 3 & 4 should take about 6 minutes together. 
PAPER 3  |  SPEAKING
45
46
CAMBRIDGE ENGLISH: PRELIMINARY HANDBOOK FOR TEACHERS
Assessment of Speaking
Examiners and marking
The quality assurance of Speaking Examiners (SEs) is managed 
by Team Leaders (TLs). TLs ensure all examiners successfully 
complete examiner training and regular certification of procedure 
and assessment before they examine. TLs are in turn responsible 
to a Professional Support Leader (PSL) who is the professional 
representative of Cambridge English Language Assessment for the 
Speaking tests in a given country or region. 
Annual examiner certification involves attendance at a face-to-face 
meeting to focus on and discuss assessment and procedure, followed 
by the marking of sample Speaking tests in an online environment. 
Examiners must complete standardisation of assessment for all 
relevant levels each year and are regularly monitored during live 
testing sessions.
Assessment scales
Throughout the test candidates are assessed on their own individual 
performance and not in relation to each other. They are awarded 
marks by two examiners; the assessor and the interlocutor. The 
assessor awards marks by applying performance descriptors from the 
analytical assessment scales for the following criteria:
•  Grammar and Vocabulary
•  Discourse Management
•  Pronunciation
•  Interactive Communication.
The interlocutor awards a mark for global achievement using the 
global achievement scale.
Assessment for Cambridge English: Preliminary is based on 
performance across all parts of the test, and is achieved by applying 
the relevant descriptors in the assessment scales. The assessment 
scales for Cambridge English: Preliminary (shown on page 47) are 
extracted from the overall Speaking scales on page 48.
PAPER 3: SPEAKING  
|
ASSESSMENT
47
CAMBRIDGE ENGLISH: PRELIMINARY HANDBOOK FOR TEACHERS
PAPER 3: SPEAKING  
|
ASSESSMENT
Cambridge English: Preliminary Speaking Examiners use a more detailed version of the following assessment scales, extracted from the overall 
Speaking scales on page 48.
B1
Grammar and Vocabulary
Discourse Management
Pronunciation
Interactive Communication
5
Shows a good degree of control 
of simple grammatical forms, 
and attempts some complex 
grammatical forms. 
Uses a range of appropriate 
vocabulary to give and exchange 
views on familiar topics.
Produces extended stretches of 
language despite some hesitation.
Contributions are relevant despite 
some repetition.
Uses a range of cohesive devices.
Is intelligible.
Intonation is generally 
appropriate.
Sentence and word stress is 
generally accurately placed.
Individual sounds are generally 
articulated clearly.
Initiates and responds 
appropriately.
Maintains and develops the 
interaction and negotiates 
towards an outcome with 
very little support.
4
Performance shares features of Bands 3 and 5.
3
Shows a good degree of control of 
simple grammatical forms. 
Uses a range of appropriate 
vocabulary when talking about 
familiar topics.
Produces responses which are 
extended beyond short phrases, 
despite hesitation. 
Contributions are mostly relevant, 
but there may be some repetition. 
Uses basic cohesive devices.
Is mostly intelligible, and has 
some control of phonological 
features at both utterance and 
word levels.
Initiates and responds 
appropriately.
Keeps the interaction going 
with very little prompting 
and support.
2
Performance shares features of Bands 1 and 3.
1
Shows sufficient control of simple 
grammatical forms.
Uses a limited range of 
appropriate vocabulary to talk 
about familiar topics.
Produces responses which are 
characterised by short phrases 
and frequent hesitation.
Repeats information or digresses 
from the topic.
Is mostly intelligible, despite 
limited control of phonological 
features.
Maintains simple 
exchanges, despite some 
difficulty.
Requires prompting and 
support.
0
Performance below Band 1.
B1
Global Achievement
5
Handles communication on familiar topics, despite some hesitation.
Organises extended discourse but occasionally produces utterances that lack 
coherence, and some inaccuracies and inappropriate usage occur.
4
Performance shares features of Bands 3 and 5.
3
Handles communication in everyday situations, despite hesitation.
Constructs longer utterances but is not able to use complex language except 
in well-rehearsed utterances.
2
Performance shares features of Bands 1 and 3.
1
Conveys basic meaning in very familiar everyday situations.
Produces utterances which tend to be very short – words or phrases – with 
frequent hesitation and pauses.
0
Performance below Band 1.
48
CAMBRIDGE ENGLISH: PRELIMINARY HANDBOOK FOR TEACHERS
PAPER 3: SPEAKING  
|
ASSESSMENT
Grammatical Resource
Lexical Resource
Discourse Management
Pronunciation
Interactive Communication
• Maintains control 
of a wide range of 
grammatical forms 
and uses them with 
flexibility.
• Uses a wide range of 
appropriate vocabulary 
with flexibility to give 
and exchange views on 
unfamiliar and abstract 
topics.
• Produces extended stretches of language 
with flexibility and ease and very little 
hesitation.
• Contributions are relevant, coherent, 
varied and detailed.
• Makes full and effective use of a wide 
range of cohesive devices and discourse 
markers.
• Is intelligible.
• Phonological features are used effectively 
to convey and enhance meaning.
• Interacts with ease by skilfully 
interweaving his/her contributions into 
the conversation.
• Widens the scope of the interaction and 
develops it fully and effectively towards a 
negotiated outcome.
C2
• Maintains control 
of a wide range of 
grammatical forms.
• Uses a wide range of 
appropriate vocabulary 
to give and exchange 
views on unfamiliar and 
abstract topics.
• Produces extended stretches of language 
with ease and with very little hesitation.
• Contributions are relevant, coherent and 
varied.
• Uses a wide range of cohesive devices 
and discourse markers.
• Is intelligible.
• Intonation is appropriate.
• Sentence and word stress is accurately 
placed.
• Individual sounds are articulated clearly.
• Interacts with ease, linking contributions 
to those of other speakers.
• Widens the scope of the interaction and 
negotiates towards an outcome.
C1
• Shows a good degree 
of control of a range 
of simple and some 
complex grammatical 
forms.
• Uses a range of 
appropriate vocabulary 
to give and exchange 
views on familiar and 
unfamiliar topics.
• Produces extended stretches of language 
with very little hesitation.
• Contributions are relevant and there is a 
clear organisation of ideas.
• Uses a range of cohesive devices and 
discourse markers.
• Is intelligible.
• Intonation is appropriate.
• Sentence and word stress is accurately 
placed.
• Individual sounds are articulated clearly.
• Initiates and responds appropriately, 
linking contributions to those of other 
speakers.
• Maintains and develops the interaction 
and negotiates towards an outcome.
Grammar and Vocabulary
B2
• Shows a good degree of control of simple grammatical 
forms, and attempts some complex grammatical 
forms. 
• Uses appropriate vocabulary to give and exchange 
views, on a range of familiar topics.
• Produces extended stretches of language 
despite some hesitation.
• Contributions are relevant and there is 
very little repetition.
• Uses a range of cohesive devices.
• Is intelligible.
• Intonation is generally appropriate.
• Sentence and word stress is generally 
accurately placed.
• Individual sounds are generally 
articulated clearly.
• Initiates and responds appropriately.
• Maintains and develops the interaction 
and negotiates towards an outcome with 
very little support.
B1
• Shows a good degree of control of simple grammatical 
forms. 
• Uses a range of appropriate vocabulary when talking 
about familiar topics.
• Produces responses which are extended 
beyond short phrases, despite hesitation. 
• Contributions are mostly relevant, but 
there may be some repetition. 
• Uses basic cohesive devices.
• Is mostly intelligible, and has some 
control of phonological features at both 
utterance and word levels.
• Initiates and responds appropriately.
• Keeps the interaction going with very 
little prompting and support.
A2
• Shows sufficient control of simple grammatical forms.
• Uses appropriate vocabulary to talk about everyday 
situations.
• Is mostly intelligible, despite limited 
control of phonological features.
• Maintains simple exchanges, despite 
some difficulty.
• Requires prompting and support.
A1
• Shows only limited control of a few grammatical 
forms. 
• Uses a vocabulary of isolated words and phrases.
• Has very limited control of phonological 
features and is often unintelligible.
• Has considerable difficulty maintaining 
simple exchanges.
• Requires additional prompting and 
support.
Overall Speaking scales
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested