open pdf file in asp.net using c# : Add text to pdf in preview control software utility azure windows asp.net visual studio 188-summer-20061-part505

2006] 
SHAKEN BABY IMPACT SYNDROME 
alleged  abuse.
5
 Regardless  of  the  alleged  perpetrator’s  gender,  the 
relationship  between  a  parent  or  caretaker  and  a  child  is  private  in 
nature.
6
As a result, it is not uncommon for there to be no witnesses, 
other  than  the  accused  parent  or  caretaker,  to  the  suspected  abuse.
7
Absent any eyewitnesses, practitioners rely heavily on medical evidence 
(e.g., medical  reports, autopsy reports, etc.),  medical expert assistance 
and  medical  expert testimony  (e.g., forensic neuropathologist, etc.)  to 
either  prove  or  disprove  that  traumatic  brain  injury  was  caused  by 
SBS/SIS.
8
 Therefore,  the  first  step for  any  practitioner  is to become 
intimately familiar with the medical terminology found in such evidence.  
To assist the reader, a non-exhaustive list of medical terms frequently 
used  by  the  medical  and  legal  community  when  addressing  cranial 
injuries or SBS/SIS is found at Appendix A.   
In  addition  to  being  intimately  familiar  with  the  medical  terms 
associated with these types of cases, the following hypothetical may also 
help the practitioner understand the information presented in this article: 
Hypothetical:    A  Soldier  presents  his  near  comatose 
infant  child  at  the  emergency  room.    A  computer 
tomography  scan  reveals  a  large  subacute  subdural 
hematoma.  The child is placed on a respirator but dies 
two weeks later.  A subsequent autopsy reveals diffuse 
axonal injury.  There is nothing in the autopsy to suggest 
that  the child suffered any form of recent  blunt  force 
trauma (i.e., no current contusions or external bleeding).  
5
See United  States  v. Buber, No. 20000777  (Army  Ct. Crim.  App.  Jan. 12,  2005) 
(unpublished) (finding father guilty of unpremeditated murder of his son by means of 
SBS;  murder  conviction  overturned  due  to  insufficient  evidence);  United  States  v. 
Bresnahan, 62 M.J. 137 (2005) (finding father guilty of involuntary manslaughter of his 
infant son by means of SBS); United States v. Davis, 53 M.J. 202 (2000) (finding father 
guilty of involuntary manslaughter of his daughter by means of SBS); United States v. 
Wright,  No.  32089,  1998  CCA  LEXIS  177  (A.F.  Ct.  Crim.  App.  Mar.  13,  1998) 
(unpublished) (finding mother guilty of negligent homicide of her infant son by means of 
SBS).  Interestingly, in the Bresnahan case, the court allowed the trial counsel to question 
the defense’s  expert witness  concerning two  studies:   one  claiming that  seventy-nine 
percent of SBS cases are perpetrated by males and another claiming that seventy percent 
of SBS cases are perpetrated by males.  Bresnahan, 62 M.J. at 146.    
6
John Plunkett, Fatal Pediatric Head Injuries Caused by Short-Distance Falls, 22 AM.
J.
F
ORENSIC 
M
ED
.
&
P
ATHOLOGY
1 (2001). 
7
Id.  
8
See J.F. Geddes & John Plunkett,
The Evidence Base for Shaken Baby Syndrome, 328 
B
RIT
.
M
ED
.
J. 719 (Mar. 27, 2004), available at http://bmj.bmjjournals.com/ 
cgi/content/full/328/7442/719. 
Add text to pdf in preview - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add a text box to a pdf; how to add text to a pdf document using acrobat
Add text to pdf in preview - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add text to a pdf file; add text box in pdf document
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
The  cause  of  death  is  cerebral  edema.    Because  a 
subdural hematoma and diffuse axonal injury are found, 
the  doctor  concludes  the  infant  was  shaken  to  death.  
The father admits to briefly shaking the child one day 
prior to bringing him to the emergency room, but claims 
that he did not hit the child, nor did the child’s head hit 
anything.  The day the father shook the child is the same 
day he returned from being in the field for three weeks.  
Subsequent to the child’s death, the child’s sister admits 
that  the  week  before  she  dropped  the  child  in  the 
porcelain bathtub while babysitting when “mommy was 
at work and daddy was in the field.”   
Should the government immediately file charges for unpremeditated 
murder or involuntary manslaughter against the Soldier in this case?  The 
answer requires a close look at the available evidence. 
III.  Shaken Baby Syndrome/Shaken Impact Syndrome―What Is It? 
Guard well your baby’s precious head; Shake, jerk and 
slap it never; Lest you bruise his brain and twist his 
mind; Or whiplash him dead forever.
9
Shaken  Baby  Syndrome/Shaken  Impact  Syndrome  is  generally 
defined  as  traumatic  brain  injury  consisting  of  “a  combination  of 
subdural hematoma (brain hemorrhage), retinal hemorrhage, and diffuse 
axonal injury (diffuse injury of nerve cells in brain and/or spinal cord)”
10
in  infants  and  toddlers  with  little  to  no  evidence  of  external  cranial 
trauma, the effects of which cause death or significant physical injury.
11
Referred  to  within the  medical  community as  the “triad of  diagnostic 
criteria,”
12
medical practitioners who find at least two of these symptoms 
9
 Caffey,  Whiplash,  supra  note  2,  at  403
(quoting  a  proposed  national  educational 
campaign poem used by Dr. Caffey to close the referenced article).  
10
 Harold  E.  Buttram,  Woodland  Healing  Research  Center,  Shaken  Baby/Impact 
Syndrome:  Flawed Concepts and Misdiagnosis, Sept. 3, 2002, http:// 
www.woodmed.com. 
11
G.F. Gilliland & Robert Folberg, Shaken Baby―Some Have No Impact Injuries, 41 J.
F
ORENSIC 
S
CI
. 114 (Jan. 1996). 
12
Buttram, supra note 10.  
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Highlight PDF text. • Add text to PDF document in preview. • Add text box to PDF file in preview. • Draw PDF markups. PDF Protection.
add text to pdf in preview; how to add text fields in a pdf
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
PDF Annotation. • Add sticky notes to PDF document. • Highlight PDF text in preview. • Add text to PDF document. • Insert text box to PDF file.
add text pdf reader; how to add a text box in a pdf file
2006] 
SHAKEN BABY IMPACT SYNDROME 
often conclude that the child has suffered intentional abuse as opposed to 
some form of accidental injury.
13
IV.  Shaken Baby Syndrome/Shaken Impact Syndrome―The Clash of 
the Experts 
In recent years, the term battered baby has given way to 
the  term  shaken baby  as a label for  infants or young 
children who have apparently suffered inflicted injuries 
at  the  hands  of  parents,  caregivers,  or  others.  The 
assertion is  broadly held  by  many  physicians  that  the 
physical act of shaking  an infant may, by itself,  cause 
serious  or  fatal  injuries  but  may  be  accompanied  by 
impacts,  referred  to  by  some as  the  “shaken  impact” 
syndrome . . . .  Currently, there are wide differences of 
opinion  regarding  the  supposed  syndrome  within  the 
medical and legal communities.
14
A.  The Majority and Minority Views  
There are generally two primary schools of thought concerning the 
degree and type of force needed to cause the above-mentioned injuries.
15
The majority view believes shaking alone is sufficient to cause traumatic 
brain injury, whereas the minority view posits that shaking plus some 
form  of  cranial  impact  is  required  to  cause  traumatic  brain  injury.
16
Military practitioners, however, should be aware that within the military 
justice  system,  the  terms  associated  with  each  are  sometimes  used 
interchangeably  despite  their  different  implications.
17
 Such  an 
13
Id. 
14
Jan Leestma, Case Analysis of Brain-Injured Admittedly Shaken Infants in 54 Cases, 
1969–2001, 26 A
M
.
J.
F
ORENSIC 
M
ED
.
&
P
ATHOLOGY 
199
(Sept. 2005). 
15
John Plunkett, Letter to the Editor-Author’s Reply, 101 A
M
.
A
CAD
.
P
EDIATRICS
200 
(Feb. 1998) (“The majority opinion (the specificity of retinal and subdural hemorrhage 
for inflicted trauma, non-lethality of short distance falls, and absence of lucid interval in 
ultimately fatal head injury) is certainly on their side.  I wrote the article to encourage 
consideration of a minority view supported by biomechanical analysis and nontautologic 
reasoning.”).    
16
Id.; Ronald Uscinski, Shaken Baby Syndrome:  Fundamental Questions, 16 B
RIT
.
J.
N
EUROSURGERY
217 (2002). 
17
See, e.g., United States v. Allen, 59 M.J. 515, 526 (2003) (noting government experts 
used both SBS and SIS as bases for their opinions―e.g., “Lastly, as for CPT Craig, she 
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
With the SDK, you can preview the document content according to the preview thumbnail by the ways as following. C# DLLs for Word File Preview. Add references:
add text to pdf reader; how to add text box to pdf document
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
C# DLLs: Preview PowerPoint Document. Add necessary XDoc.PowerPoint DLL libraries into your created C# application as references. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
adding text to a pdf in acrobat; adding text to pdf document
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
oversimplification or generalization of an otherwise complex syndrome 
ignores  the  critical  nuances  of  each  view—nuances  that  may  well 
determine the guilt or innocence of an accused. 
1.  The Majority View—Shaking Alone 
The majority view holds that most adults possess sufficient strength 
to shake an infant or toddler to the point of causing intracranial injuries 
that can ultimately cause death or grievous bodily harm without any form 
of  cranial  impact  or  blunt  force  trauma.
18
 This  view  first  gained  a 
foothold within the medical community in 1974 when Dr. John Caffey 
postulated  the  “whiplash  shaken  baby  syndrome”  theory,  stating  that 
shaking alone could produce the forces sufficient to cause both subdural 
hematomas and retinal hemorrhages in small children.
19
Dr. Caffey then 
took  his  theory  one  step  further  and  opined  that  finding  a  subdural 
hematoma and retinal hemorrhages in an infant with no external signs of 
cranial  trauma  was  pathognomonic
20
(i.e.,  absolutely  and  exclusively 
diagnostic) of child abuse.
21
In order to support his theory, Dr. Caffey relied primarily on a 1968 
biomechanical study conducted by Dr. Ayub Ommaya.
22
In his study, 
Dr. Ommaya used primates strapped into a piston-activated rail chair to 
specifically simulate  rear-end collision whiplash (i.e., no head impact) 
too  opined  that CJ’s injuries were the direct  result  of shaken baby  or shaken-impact 
syndrome.”).   
18
Plunkett, supra note 15, at 200; Uscinski, supra note 16, at 217-18; Elaine W. Sharp, 
The Elephant on the Moon, W
ARRIOR 
M
AG
.-J.
T
RIAL 
L
AW
.
C.,
Fall 2003, at 31 (“that 
another  human  being,  by  violently  shaking  a  baby,  can  inflict  one  or  more  of  the 
following injuries”).   
19
Caffey, Whiplash, supra note 2, at 396.  
20
Mark Donohoe, Shaken Baby Syndrome (SBS) and Non-Accidental Injuries (NAI), 
http://www.whale.to/v/sbs.html (last  visited Sept. 11, 2006) (Dr. Donohoe states “The 
term pathognomonic implies a two-way relationship between the symptoms and signs on 
one hand, and the disease in question on the other hand.  Pathognomonic symptoms or 
signs not only allow recognition of the disease, but differentiate it from all other diseases 
or disorders.”).   
21
Caffey, supra note 2, at 397. 
22
Ronald Uscinski, The Shaken Baby Syndrome, 9 J.
A
M
.
P
HYSICIANS 
&
S
URGEONS 
76
(Fall  2004);  see  Ayub  K.  Ommaya,  Whiplash  Injury  and  Brain  Damage:  An 
Experimental  Study,  20  JAMA  285  (1968)  (Dr.  Ommaya’s  tests  were  designed  to 
determine what threshold or quantitative force (i.e., measurable amount of force) was 
necessary to cause certain types of internal brain injuries such as subdural hematomas.). 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. Also a preview component enables compressing and
adding text to pdf reader; how to add text to a pdf file in reader
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
viewer component supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe Insert images into PDF form field. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo
add text box in pdf; add text to pdf using preview
2006] 
SHAKEN BABY IMPACT SYNDROME 
injuries.
23
Through this landmark study, Dr. Ommaya determined two 
things.  First, he determined that when the primate’s head was subjected 
to  sufficient  angular  or  rotational  acceleration  (e.g.,  whiplash)  force, 
traumatic  brain injury  would  occur  regardless of whether  or not skull 
impact occurred.
24
 Second,  he determined  that traumatic brain injury, 
subdural  hematomas,  or  diffuse  axonal  injury  did  not  occur  until  the 
primate experienced approximately 155 gs
25
of acceleration force.
26
In 
other  words,  Dr.  Ommaya  “demonstrated  the  concept  of  an  injury 
threshold  for  neural  tissue.”
27
 In  postulating  his  whiplash  shaking 
theory, however, some experts argue that Dr. Caffey relied solely on Dr. 
Ommaya’s finding that cranial injuries occurred without impact, while 
specifically ignoring the amount or degree of force Dr. Ommaya (i.e., 
155 “g” forces) determined necessary to actually cause traumatic brain 
injury.
28
23
Ommaya, supra note 22, at 285-86.  
24
Id. 
25
“The term g force or gee force refers to the symbol 
g
, the force of acceleration due to 
gravity at the earth's surface”  Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, Acceleration Due to 
Gravity,  http://www.factbook.org/  wikipedia/en/g/ge/gee.html  (last  visited  Sept.  11, 
2006)  (“The  acceleration  due  to  gravity  denoted  g  (also  gee)  is  a  non-SI  unit  of 
acceleration defined as exactly 9.80665 m/s
−2
or 9.80665 m/s^2 (almost exactly 32.174 
ft·s
−2
.”).  Id.   (Gravity due to the earth is experienced the same as being accelerated 
upward with an acceleration of 1 g.  The total g-force is found by vector addition of the 
opposite of the actual acceleration (in the sense of rate of change of velocity) and a vector 
of 1 g downward for the ordinary gravity (or in space, the gravity there.)).  Id. 
26
 Werner  Goldsmith  &  John  Plunkett,  A  Biomechanical  Analysis  of  the Causes  of 
Traumatic Brain Injury in Infants and Children, 25 A
M
.
J.
F
ORENSIC 
M
ED
.
&
P
ATHOLOGY 
89,
91
(June  2004)  (stating  that  Dr.  Ommaya  measured  force  in  units  of  angular 
acceleration using the formula radians per second-per second.  Goldsmith and Plunkett 
convert this measurement to “g” forces which, arguably, is more recognizable by both 
legal practitioners and juries.).  
27
Uscinski, supra note 22, at 76-7.  
28
 Faris  Bandak,  Shaken  Baby  Syndrome:  A  Biomechanics  Analysis  of  Injury 
Mechanisms,  151  F
ORENSIC 
S
CI
.
I
NT
71,  76  (2005)  (“Caffey  translated  Ommaya’s 
results without considering injury biomechanics, into an explanation for a confession of 
shaking.”); Sharp, supra note 18, at 35.   
Caffey concluded that  just as  acceleration-deceleration without  an 
impact  (i.e.,  free  shaking  or  ‘whiplash’)  damaged  the  monkeys’ 
brains, this also explained how parents inflicted brain injuries on their 
babies.  [Caffey] actually telephoned Ommaya to thank him for the 
article.    Today,  Ommaya  is  adamant  that  he  told  Caffey  that 
acceleration-deceleration forces involved in the monkey experiment 
were much greater than he believed could be generated by a human.   
Id.  
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
adding text fields to a pdf; acrobat add text to pdf
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
following. C# DLLs: Preview Excel Document without Microsoft Office Installed. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
adding text to a pdf in acrobat; adding text to pdf
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
For roughly the next fifteen years, Dr. Caffey’s shaking-alone theory 
circulated  through  both  the  medical  and  legal  communities  and  went 
virtually unchecked without the benefit of any significant peer review.
29
As a result, Dr. Caffey’s theory became firmly ingrained as an accepted 
medical syndrome.
30
2.  The Minority View—Shaking Plus Impact 
It  was  not  until  approximately  1987  that  the  first  skeptics  began 
questioning the accuracy of Dr. Caffey’s study and his theory.
31
One of 
the first to question Dr. Caffey’s theory was Dr. Ann-Christine Duhaime 
who  observed  that  “[w]hile  the  term  ‘shaken  baby  syndrome’  has 
become  well  entrenched  in  the  literature  of  child  abuse,  it  is 
characteristic of the syndrome that a history of shaking in such cases is 
lacking.”
32
 As  a  result  of her  observation, Dr.  Duhaime  conducted  a 
biomechanical study to determine whether an adult could, by means of 
shaking alone, exert sufficient force to produce traumatic brain injury in 
29
Sharp, supra note 18, at 35.   
30
Uscinski, supra note 22, at 76 (“Two further papers by Caffey over the next two years 
emphasized shaking  as a means of  inflicting intracranial bleeding  in  children.   After 
publication of these papers, shaken baby syndrome became widely accepted as a clinical 
diagnosis for inflicted head injury in infants.”); Letter from John Plunkett, M.D., forensic 
pathologist,  Regina  Medical  Facility,  to  American  Journal of  Forensic  Medicine  and 
Pathology, Shaken Baby  Syndrome  and  Other  Mysteries  (Spring 1998)  (on file  with 
author) [hereinafter Plunkett Letter].   
I suspect that Caffey and others evaluating head injuries in the ‘40s, 
‘50s and ‘60s asked a number of caretakers if the infant had been 
‘shaken’ and were told ‘yes’ in at least some cases.  The caretakers 
were never asked about an ‘impact’ because direct trauma was not 
part  of  the  theory.    Scientific  theory  was  quickly  accepted  as 
scientific fact:  Subdural hemorrhage and retinal hemorrhage in an 
unconscious  or dead  child is a shaken infant; there is  no need  to 
‘prove otherwise,’ only a fall from a two story building or a motor 
vehicle accident  could cause  such  an  injury,  if  it was  not  due  to 
shaking.  Studies critically evaluating the biomechanics of rotational 
brain injury and a subdural hematoma, available from experiments 
performed for (among others) the automotive industry and the space 
program, were forgotten, not sought or ignored. 
Id. 
31
Duhaime et al., supra note 3, at 409, 414.  
32
Id. at 409.  
2006] 
SHAKEN BABY IMPACT SYNDROME 
infants.
33
Using infant  models,  Dr.  Duhaime  and  her team  subjected 
proportionately  correct models to  a  series  of  shaking  events, some  of 
which were followed by an impact.
34
Using Dr. Ommaya’s 155 gs as the 
threshold for  when  traumatic  brain  injuries  (e.g.,  subdural hematoma, 
retinal  hemorrhages,  diffuse  axonal  injury)  manifest  themselves,  Dr. 
Duhaime observed that shaking alone produced at most only 9.3 gs
35
of 
force, a mere fraction of the force Dr. Ommaya determined was required 
to  cause  subdural  hematomas,  retinal  hemorrhages,  or  diffuse  axonal 
injury.  However, when the “shakers” were asked to create an impact by 
“slamming” the models’ heads into a fixed object, Dr. Duhaime observed 
that  the  force  produced  was equivalent  to  almost  428 gs, an  increase 
fifty-times greater than that of shaking alone.
36
As a direct result, Dr. 
Duhaime and her team concluded that “severe head injuries commonly 
diagnosed as shaking injuries require impact to occur and that shaking 
alone in an otherwise normal baby is unlikely to cause the shaken baby 
syndrome.”
37
As a result of  this questioning,  the minority view―the 
shaken-impact syndrome―emerged.
38
33
Id. 
34
Id. at 409-11. 
35
Id. at 413. 
36
Id. at 413. 
37
Id. at 409.   
It is our conclusion that the shaken baby syndrome, at least in its 
most  severe  acute  form,  is  not  usually  caused  by  shaking  alone.  
Although shaking may in fact be part of the process, it is more likely 
that such infants suffer blunt impact.  The  most common scenario 
may be a child who is shaken, then thrown into or against a crib or 
other surface, striking the back of the head and thus undergoing a 
large, brief deceleration.  This child has both types of injuries-impact 
with its resulting focal damage, and severe acceleration-deceleration 
effects associated with impact causing shearing effects on the vessels 
and parenchyma. 
Id. at 414. 
38
Ann-Christine Duhaime, et al., Nonaccidental Head Injury in Infants-The “Shaken 
Baby Syndrome,” 338 N
EW 
E
NG
.
J.
M
ED
.
1822 (1998) (“Thus, the term ‘shaking-impact 
syndrome’  may  reflect  more  accurately  than  ‘shaken-baby  syndrome’  the  usual 
mechanism responsible for these injuries.”).   
10 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
B.  The Emerging View—Shaking Without a Corresponding Neck Injury 
Proves Shaking Plus Impact  
In recent years, numerous published medical studies have strongly 
supported the minority position.
39
In 2002, Dr. Ommaya published an 
article postulating that if it were possible for an infant to suffer traumatic 
brain injury by shaking alone, the infant would also suffer a significant 
corresponding neck injury.
40
He further concluded that the “[a]bsence of 
cervical spinal cord injury would indicate a component of impact in the 
presence of hemorrhagic brain lesions.”
41
In February 2005, Dr. Bandak, 
using Dr. Ommaya’s injury threshold criteria, postulated that if an infant 
was shaken hard enough to cause traumatic brain injury, the infant would 
almost certainly have some form of significant neck injury.
42
Or to put it 
plainly, absent a corresponding neck injury, the child was not shaken to 
the point of traumatic brain injury.
43
C.  Why Practitioners Should Know the Divergent Views 
Practitioners should be aware of the minority and emerging views for 
two primary reasons.  First, an understanding of the medical literature in 
this  area  will  assist  practitioners  in  effectively  questioning  witnesses.  
Second,  understanding  the  minority  or  emerging  views  may  assist 
defense  counsel  in  making  a  motion  to  request  expert  assistance,  to 
disqualify  a  proffered  government  witness  from  being  considered  an 
expert, or to challenge the scientific basis upon which an alleged expert 
is relying.
44
39
 See  Leestma,  supra  note  14;  Bandak,  supra  note  28;  Ayub  Ommaya,  Werner 
Goldsmith, &  L.  Thibault, Biomechanics and Neuropathology of  Adult and Pediatric 
Head Injury, 16 B
RIT
.
J.
N
EUROSURGERY
220 (2002). 
40
Ommaya et al., supra note 39, at 220-21. 
41
Id. at 228-29 (“At these levels of inertial loading, induced impulsively without contact, 
the neck torque in the infant would cause severe injury to the high cervical cord and spine 
long before the onset of cerebral concussion.”).   
42
Bandak, supra note 28, at 71 (“We have determined that an infant head subjected to 
the levels of rotational velocity and acceleration called for in the SBS literature, would 
experience forces on the infant neck far exceeding the limits for structural failure of the 
cervical spine.”).   
43
Id. 
44
 See  M
ANUAL  FOR 
C
OURTS
-M
ARTIAL
,  U
NITED 
S
TATES
,  R.C.M.  703(d)  (2005) 
[hereinafter MCM]; M
ANUAL FOR 
C
OURTS
-M
ARTIAL
, U
NITED 
S
TATES
, M
IL
.
R.
E
VID
. 702 
(2002); see also Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharms., 509 U.S. 579 (1993); United States v. 
Warner, 62 M.J. 114 (2005); United States v. Houser, 36 M.J. 392 (C.M.A. 1993).  These 
resources are the starting point for seeking expert assistance or expert witness testimony. 
2006] 
SHAKEN BABY IMPACT SYNDROME 
11 
V.  Types of Injuries Caused by SBS/SIS  
Experts differ regarding the degree and type of force (i.e., shaking 
alone  or  shaking  plus  impact)  necessary  to  trigger  traumatic  brain 
injury.
45
 Regardless  of  their  biases  concerning  injury  thresholds, 
however, most experts agree on the types of injuries shaking or impact 
can inflict.  These injuries are generally broken down into the following 
two categories:  primary injuries and secondary injuries.
46
Primary  cranial  injuries  consist  of  subdural  hematomas,  epidural 
hematomas, subarachnoid hemorrhage, retinal hemorrhages, and diffuse 
axonal injury.
47
In cases involving cranial impact, the following injuries 
may also be present:  external scalp bruising under the point of impact, 
extravasted  blood  under  the  point  of  impact  (i.e.,  blood  within  the 
epidural layer (scalp)), skull fracture(s), coup contusions (i.e., bruising or 
injury  beneath  the  site  of  impact),  and  contra-coup  contusions  (i.e., 
bruising  or  injury  directly  opposite  the  impact).
48
Secondary  injuries 
consist  of  brain  hypoxia (i.e.,  insufficient  oxygen  flow  to  the  brain), 
brain ischemia (i.e., insufficient blood flow to the brain), and cerebral 
edema  (i.e.,  swelling  of  the  brain).
49
 With  the  exception  of  diffuse 
axonal  injury,  the  primary  injuries  listed  above  usually  do  not  cause 
death.
50
A significant primary injury, however, may trigger a secondary 
injury (e.g., such as cerebral edema), which can cause death.
51
“Primary injury occurs at the time of impact, either by a direct injury 
to the brain parenchyma or by an injury to the long white matter tracts 
through acceleration-deceleration forces . . . .  The secondary injury is 
represented by systemic and intracranial events that occur in response to 
the primary  injury and further contribute to neuronal damage and cell 
death.”
52
Put another way, a primary injury is the injury that is caused by 
or directly results from the act inflicting the trauma, whereas a secondary 
injury is the injury that results from or is the byproduct of the primary 
45
 See  Leestma,  supra  note  14;  Plunkett,  supra  note  15;  Uscinski,  supra  note  22; 
Goldsmith & Plunkett, supra note 26; Bandak, supra note 28.  
46
 Lieutenant  Colonel  Kent  Hymel,  Abusive  Head  Trauma?  A  Biomechanics-Based 
Approach, 3 C
HILD 
M
ALTREATMENT 
116-17 (May 1998). 
47
Id.  
48
Id. at 117, 119; see also infra app. A. 
49
Bandak, supra note 28, at 79; see also infra app. A.   
50
Wilkins, supra note 1, at 394.  
51
Hymel, supra note 46, at 118.  
52
Arabela Stock, Emedicine-Access to the Minds of Medicine, Head Trauma (Sept. 15, 
2004), http://www.emedicine.com/ped/topic929.htm. 
12 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
injury.  Consider the following example:  Joe is punched in the face and 
his jaw is broken.  As a result, Joe’s  mouth swells up and blocks his 
airway.  The broken jaw is the primary injury which, in turn, caused the 
secondary injury of the blocked airway.  
VI.  Why the Lesson in Primary and Secondary Injuries? 
The  legal  practitioner  must  be  able  to  recognize  and  distinguish 
primary  versus  secondary  injuries  for  two  important  reasons.    First, 
primary injuries can be linked to their biomechanical origins (i.e., their 
direct  causes),
53
whereas secondary  injuries generally cannot.
54
Thus, 
certain  injuries  are  indicative  of  specific  acts,  such  as  an  epidural 
hemorrhage being specifically  indicative of an impact.
55
 secondary 
injury, however, may have many different causes and is not indicative of 
any specific, telltale act, origin, or cause.
56
For example, cerebral edema 
is a secondary injury.  Cerebral edema can occur with blunt force trauma, 
with whiplash, because a large subdural hematoma displaces the brain 
cutting off oxygen and causing it to swell, or from extended attachment 
to  or reliance upon  a respirator.
57
None of these examples,  however, 
indicate the specific act or incident that caused the primary injury which, 
in turn, triggered the cerebral edema (the secondary injury).   
Second, in addition to identifying the cause of the injury, primary 
injuries can, to a certain degree, often be used to date or time stamp when 
an injury occurred.
58
A subdural hematoma (SDH) is classified by the amount 
of time that has elapsed from the inciting event, if 
53
Ayub Ommaya, Head Injury Mechanisms and the Concept of Preventive Management, 
12 J.
N
EUROTRAUMA
, 527-28 (1995); Bandak, supra note 28, at 72. 
54
 Bandak,  supra note  28, at 72 (“Primary  injuries are those caused directly by the 
mechanical insult and secondary injuries result as part of the pathophysio 
logical progression following primary injury.”). 
55
Telephone Interview with John M. Plunkett, Forensic Pathologist and Coroner, Regina 
Medical Facility (Dec. 4, 2005) [hereinafter Plunkett Telephone Interview].   
56
Bandak, supra note 28, at 72, 78-9. 
57
 SBSDefense.com,  “Shaken  Baby  Syndrome”-  A  Tutorial  and  Review  of  the 
Literature,  http://www.sbsdefense.com/SBS_101.htm  (last  visited  Sept.  12,  2006) 
[hereinafter  SBSDefense.com]  (noting  that  some  experts  claim  prolonged  use  of  a 
respirator can mask or mimic the finding of diffuse axonal injury). 
58
 Grant  Sinson  &  Tim  Reiter,  Emedicine,  Subdural  Hematomas,  Jan.  12,  2002, 
http://www.emedicine.com/ med/topic2885.htm. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested