open pdf file in asp.net using c# : How to insert text box in pdf file Library software component .net wpf winforms mvc 188-summer-200610-part506

2006] 
TENTH HUGH J. CLAUSEN LECTURE 
93 
Commission (COC).
16
There is legislation proposed in reference to both 
of  these.   The House of Representatives  poses  a special problem in 
continuity  of  Congress.   Filling a House vacancy requires  a special 
election.  In the Senate, however, as a general rule, when a vacancy 
occurs, the Governor of the state can make the appointment to fill the 
seat.   
There is much public discussion about “data mining.”  A little over a 
year ago, the Defense Advance Research Projects Agency,
17
began a 
program  called  Total/terrorism  Information  Awareness  (TIA)
18
.  
Secretary  Rumsfeld appointed a committee  to look  at  privacy issues 
raised by technology and their impact on defense programs.   I was a 
member of that study group.  Data mining can be troublesome, and it is 
increasing.  With computers, it becomes hard to control. One data mining 
technique  is  radio  frequency  detection  (RFID).    RFID  began  as  an 
inventory control measure.  The device may be no larger than the head of 
a pin.  In the manufacturing process, it might be inserted into a jacket or 
belt.  When the item comes off the production line, it can be tracked to 
its final destination.   However, its use is being expanded well beyond 
inventory control measures. 
Contributing  to  the  problem  of  data  mining  is  the  fact  that 
individuals give third parities the authority to collect personal data.  For 
example, if you shop in a Food Lion or Safeway with the “bonus” card, 
you  disclose  your  shopping  preferences  when  you  check  out.  This 
shopper information is collected, and can be sold to other commercial 
interests.   
As a general rule, every successful piece of legislation in the United 
States  Congress  travels  two  roads.    First,  it  has  to  travel  the 
“authorization road” to obtain legislative approval.  Then, it must go 
back through the legislative process to obtain the money needed to fund 
the authorized project.   
To demonstrate this point, when the American Revolution, in effect, 
ended on the 19th day of October in 1781 at Yorktown by British troops 
16
Id.  
17
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, http://www.darpa.mil/ (last visited Aug. 
16, 2006).  
18
Total/Terrorism  Information  Awareness,  http://www.epic.org/privacy/profiling/tia/ 
(last visited Aug. 16, 2006).  
How to insert text box in pdf file - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text to pdf in acrobat; adding text fields to pdf acrobat
How to insert text box in pdf file - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text field to pdf acrobat; add text to pdf without acrobat
94 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
surrendering  to  Washington,  Washington  immediately  dispatched  a 
courier to Philadelphia.  The courier’s mission was to get the surrender 
news to the Congress in Philadelphia quickly. The Continental Congress, 
on receiving this news, adopted a resolution to construct a monument at 
Yorktown to honor that great victory.  On the 19th day of October 1891, 
100  years  later,  President  Chester  Arthur  unveiled  the  monument 
approved  a  century  before.    It  took  100  years  to  get  the  money 
appropriated. 
There was a reorganization of the American intelligence community 
in 1975.  This was the post Watergate era and it was a horrendous time.    
Two  Special  Congressional  committees  were formed.    One was  the 
Church committee in the Senate, chaired by Senator Church.  The House 
committee was called the Pike Committee, chaired by Representative 
Pike.  I was tasked by President Ford to chair the White House effort to 
respond to the Congressional Committees.  This effort was two-fold; 
first,  handle  the  Congressional  Committee’s  many  requests  for 
documents  and  witnesses, and  second,  develop  an Executive  Branch 
program to address abuses and prevent their reoccurrence.  The issue of 
protecting Executive Privilege was also a significant one. 
The National Security Agency (NSA)
19
does not have a statutory 
charter.  It was created by an Executive Order of President Truman in 
1952.  In the 1970’s Congress considered changing that.  This was fueled 
in part by the Watergate crises and abuses.  After the election in 1974, 
the membership of both Houses of Congress were two to one against the 
administration.  President Ford did not want to change the status of NSA 
because  its extraordinary  capabilities  in  intelligence  collection which 
benefited greatly the national security elements of the Executive Branch.  
In part, because of the reforms he mandated in Executive Order 11905, 
an understanding was reached with the Congress and a legislative charter 
for NSA was averted.   This understanding would also see the creation of 
Committees on Intelligence in both Houses of Congress. 
Let me close with an anecdote, which to me says something about 
the strength of our Republic and its commitment to the rule of law.  It 
was an event to which I was privy since I was serving Vice President 
Ford  as  his  National  Security  Advisor  and  became  aware  of  the 
developments leading to his assuming the Presidency. 
19
National Security Agency, http://www.nsa.gov/ (last visited Aug. 16, 2006).  
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Extract Field Data. Data: Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Highlight Text. Add Text. Add Text Box. Drawing Markups. PDF Print. Work with
adding text pdf; how to add text to pdf file with reader
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
with .NET PDF Library. A best PDF annotator for Visual Studio .NET supports to add text box to PDF file in Visual C#.NET project.
how to insert text box on pdf; adding text field to pdf
2006] 
TENTH HUGH J. CLAUSEN LECTURE 
95 
Early in August, it became clear that President Nixon was seriously 
considering resigning, and that Vice President Ford was advised he could 
expect a call to meet with President Nixon to discuss this.  That call 
came Thursday morning on 8 August 1974, and the two men met in the 
White House for an hour, or more. 
The Vice President returned to his office in the Executive Offices   
shortly after noon.  Mr. Ford met with his Chief of Staff, Bob Hartman, 
and me.  He told us President Nixon had decided to resign as of noon the 
next day- a Friday. 
In response to a question by Mr. Hartman, the Vice President said he 
would like to be sworn in by the Chief Justice, Mr. Warren Burger.  An 
inquiry to his court chambers in Washington indicated he was attending 
an international law conference at The Hague.  Mr. Ford spoke by phone 
with the Chief Justice, who indicated his willingness to participate but 
there was a problem in finding a commercial aircraft flight to get him to 
Washington for an event that was now less than 24 hours away. 
The fleet of official aircraft at Andrews Air Force Base are under 
White House control.  By four o’clock, I could tell the Chief Justice that 
an Air Force aircraft was enroute to The Hague.   It was double crewed, 
one crew for the flight to Europe, and the second crew, after refueling, to 
fly him back to Andrews.  At Andrews, the Chief Justice was air lifted by 
chopper and flown to the South Lawn of the White House shortly before 
the historic swearing in. 
Now, I have often thought that an international tourist who was there 
at the time and would see that plane would obviously recognize it and 
say, what is that plane, and why is it here?  The answer would be that the 
plane was sent with approval of the President of the United States to 
bring back to the United States the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, 
who had written the unanimous decision that caused the President to 
resign.   The Chief Justice would now return to America to swear in the 
Vice President of the United States to be the new President. 
I think this transition  of power demonstrates the  quality  and the 
soundness of this great Republic. 
I wish you well in your careers, and thank you for your service to our 
Country. 
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program. C#.NET: Draw Markups on PDF File.
add text pdf; how to enter text in a pdf document
C# WPF PDF Viewer SDK to annotate PDF document in C#.NET
Support to replace PDF text with a note annotation. Ability to insert a text note after selected text. Support to create a text box annotation to PDF file.
adding text to a pdf document; how to insert text box in pdf document
96 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
I
T
IME OF 
W
AR
1
R
EVIEWED BY 
C
OLONEL 
D
AVID 
A.
W
ALLACE2
Pierce O’Donnell, one of the leading  trial lawyers in the United 
States,  has  authored  a  masterful  and  spellbinding  book  about  an 
important but, until recently, obscure historical footnote from World War 
II—the  German  Saboteur  Case.
3
 O’Donnell’s  book  is  meticulously 
detailed,  thoroughly  researched,  and  highly  readable.   For the  judge 
advocate, In Time of War  proves  a  ready  source  of  background 
information to the terrorism challenges our nation faces today. 
Throughout In Time of War:  Hitler’s Terrorist Attacks on America, 
O’Donnell provides the reader with a thrilling narrative about a nearly 
forgotten episode during the early years of World War II—a precarious 
and volatile time in our nation’s history. 
The facts of the case are straightforward and undisputed but read like 
a spy novel.  In June 1942, two German U-boats, one off the coast of 
Florida and the other off Long Island, New York, landed eight Nazi 
terrorists under the cover of darkness.  Hitler and his senior advisors 
were intimately involved in planning a once-secret mission, now known 
as Operation Pastorius.
4
The mission’s purpose was to fan out across the 
United States and destroy strategic transportation, manufacturing, and 
hydroelectric plant targets in a series of attacks that would create public 
panic.
5
O’Donnell skillfully introduces the reader to each of the saboteurs.   
Although they all had different backgrounds and were from different 
segments of German society, they had one trait in common—long-term 
residency  in  America  between  the  Great  wars.
6
 Two  of  the  eight 
1
P
IERCE 
O’D
ONNELL
,
I
T
IME OF 
W
AR
(2005). 
2
U.S. Army.  Currently serving as an Academy Professor, Department of Law, U.S. 
Military Academy, West Point, New York. 
3
Ex Parte Quirin, 317 U.S. 1 (1942). 
4
O’D
ONNELL
supra note 1, at 21.  The secret mission was named for Franz Pastorius, 
the leader of the first German immigrant community in the America in the 17th Century.  
According to O’Donnell, it was not unusual for Hitler to involve himself in the planning 
of tactical missions much to the consternation of some of his senior military officers. 
5
Id
6
Id. at 23.  O’Donnell also notes that the eight “volunteers” had a strong aversion to 
service  on  the  Eastern  Front,  where  the  German  Army  was  suffering  significant 
casualties. 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
from PDF file. Read PDF metadata. Search text content inside PDF. Extract bookmark & outlines. Extract hyperlink inside PDF. PDF Write. Insert text, text box into
adding text to pdf in reader; how to insert text in pdf file
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Add text to PDF document. • Insert text box to PDF file. • Draw markups to PDF document. PDF Protection. • Add signatures to PDF document.
how to add text to a pdf in preview; how to enter text in pdf form
2006] 
BOOK REVIEWS 
97 
saboteurs were U.S. citizens and all were fluent in English.
7
Of note, 
O’Donnell’s description of the eight leaves the reader with the sense that 
Hitler’s terrorists were a motley crew, not the best of the Third Reich, yet 
surprising in their resulting terrible successes.
8
The author’s fascinating narrative brings the hapless terrorists to life 
with insights into their training at a secret saboteur school,
9
their journey 
across the ocean by submarine,
10
their landing in America and, for one of 
the teams, their chance encounter with an unarmed, twenty-one-year-old 
Coast Guard Seaman Second Class John C. Cullen.
11
Not long after 
arriving in the United States, the leader of the group, George Dasch,
12
double-crossed his comrades and reported everyone to the FBI.
13
All of 
the saboteurs were consequently and swiftly apprehended.  
Of particular interest to judge advocates, especially in light of recent 
events such as the Guantanamo Bay detainee situation, is O’Donnell’s 
account of President Roosevelt’s decision-making process on how  to 
treat the captured saboteurs.  The President’s Attorney General, Francis 
Biddle,
14
realized there were three options for disposing of the case.
15
First, the detained Germans could be treated as prisoners of war, given 
combatant  immunity,  and  imprisoned  for  the  duration  of  the  war.
16
However, treating the Germans as prisoners of war had little appeal.  
Doing so was not required under international law because the Germans 
had  been  caught  in  civilian  clothes,  thus  making  them  unlawful 
7
Id. at 4. 
8
Id. at 23. 
9
Id. at 4-5.  The training was conducted at Quenz Lake, Brandenburg, the capital of the 
state of Prussia, located approximately thirty miles from Berlin.  The campus was once a 
luxurious farm owned by a wealthy Jewish shoe manufacturer.  Alumni of the school had 
performed many other successful missions in Europe.   
10
Id. at 56-59. 
11
Id. at 60-61. 
12
Id. at 23-25.   
13
Id. at 80.  Dasch’s motive for scuttling the mission and turning in his comrades to the 
FBI is not entirely clear.  His own claim was that he always intended to sabotage the 
mission as it was a way to strike back at Hitler.  He was, by far, one of the most 
unsympathetic characters in the story.    
14
Id. at 72.  As Attorney General, Francis Biddle is one of the main characters of the 
story.  He was a graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Law School.  He was also a 
former federal appellate judge and solicitor general.  O’Donnell describes him as having 
a brilliant legal mind and being politically liberal for his day. 
15
Id. at 124. 
16
Id. 
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Add text to PDF document in preview. • Add text box to PDF file in preview. • Draw PDF markups. PDF Protection. • Sign PDF document with signature.
add text to pdf using preview; how to input text in a pdf
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF with WPF PDF Viewer for VB.NET
annotation. Ability to insert a text note after selected text. transparency. Support to create a text box annotation to PDF file in .NET project. VB
adding text to a pdf in reader; adding text to a pdf file
98 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
combatants.
17
Although President Roosevelt could accord prisoner of 
war status as a matter of “grace,” such an option was unsatisfactory.  
According to the author, Roosevelt needed a show trial to prove to the 
American people and Hitler that the United States could protect itself.
18
Also,  merely  imprisoning  the  eight  seemed  like a  weak, inadequate 
response  to  a  serious  act  of  terrorist  aggression  against  the  United 
States.
19
The second of President Roosevelt’s alternatives involved trying the 
six Germans in civilian federal court for violating a sabotage-related 
criminal  statute,  and  charging  the  two  United  States  citizens  with 
treason.
20
This option also proved unappealing to Roosevelt.  First, only 
treason was punishable by death.
21
The Espionage Act of 1917, the 
charging mechanism for the six German saboteurs, carried a maximum 
punishment of only thirty years’ confinement.
22
This assumed, of course, 
a successful prosecution.  The author astutely highlights the concerns of 
the attorney general in this regard: 
No actual acts of sabotage had ever been committed.  A 
charge  of  attempted  sabotage,  the  attorney  general 
concluded, would probably not be successful in federal 
court “on the ground that the preparations and landings 
were not close enough to the planned act of sabotage to 
constitute  attempt.”  .  .  .  And  an  attempted  act  of 
sabotage “carried a penalty grossly disproporate to their 
acts – three years.”
23
In addition to the other shortcomings associated with a trial in a 
civilian court, a public trial would expose one of the truths about the 
case—the eight Germans penetrated America’s defenses with ease and 
were only captured because Dasch proved to be a turncoat.  FBI Director 
17
Id.  
18
Id. at 125. 
19
Id.   
20
Id.   
21
Id.  Additionally, the Constitution made it difficult to establish a conviction for 
treason.  It requires a confession in open court or the testimony of two witnesses.  U.S.
C
ONST
. art. III, § 3. 
22
O’D
ONNELL
supra note 1, at 126. 
23
Id. 
2006] 
BOOK REVIEWS 
99 
J. Edgar Hoover and the FBI had orchestrated a media extravaganza 
taking credit for their “brilliant and swift” capture of the German spies.
24
Finally, the saboteurs could be tried at a special military commission 
which was authorized to impose the death penalty for alleged violations 
of the law of war.
25
According to the author, this option instinctively 
appealed to President Roosevelt for several reasons:  Roosevelt could 
appoint reliable generals to adjudicate the case; he could authorize the 
death penalty for the saboteurs; the case would be tried swiftly without 
unduly cumbersome rules of evidence and procedure; and the trial could 
be held in secret.
26
Roosevelt elected to try to saboteurs by military 
commission.
27
To ensure the secrecy of the proceedings, the trial itself was held in a 
virtual  “black  hole”  on the  fifth  floor  of  the Justice  Department in 
Washington, D.C.
28
The pseudo-courtroom was formerly used by the 
FBI as a lecture hall for training special agents.
29
The windows were 
covered with black curtains and the clear glass doors of the entrance 
were painted black.
30
O’Donnell provides a riveting and vivid picture of 
the  proceedings that  ensued.    On  the one side  of  the room  sat  the 
government’s all-star prosecution team, including the Attorney General, 
the Judge Advocate General of the Army, and the Director of the FBI.
31
On the other side, the defendants were sat alphabetically behind their 
defense team, which was led by Colonel (COL) Kenneth Royall, lead 
counsel for seven of the saboteurs.
32
Sitting in the front of the room was 
24
Id.  at  105.   In Anthony Lewis’s  introduction to  the  book, he  describes  a press 
conference held by J. Edgar Hoover after the capture of the saboteurs.  Hoover did not 
mention the real reason for the capture.  Instead, he led the press to believe that it was the 
FBI that was responsible for cracking the case with their sophisticated investigative 
techniques.  In fact, Hoover received a congressionally authorized medal for his effort.  
The true story did not emerge for years.  Id. at xiii and xiv.   
25
Id. at 126. 
26
Id. at 126-27. 
27
Id. at 127.  Arguably, the disposition of the case was not a difficult decision for 
Roosevelt.  Three days after the Nazis were in custody, Roosevelt sent a memo to his 
attorney general saying that all eight should receive the death penalty.  Id. at xiv.   
28
Id. at 141. 
29
Id
30
Id. 
31
Id. at 143. 
32
Id. at 144.  Royall did not represent George Dasch because of the conflict of interest.    
Colonel Carl Ristine represented Dasch. 
100 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
the  military  commission,  which  was  comprised  of  a  distinguished 
collection of Army general officers.
33
The  O’Donnell’s  account  leaves  the  reader  with  the  vague 
impression that the military commission was merely a kangaroo court.
34
Utilizing relaxed rules of procedure, evidence, and a seemingly biased 
“jury,”
35
the defense lost virtually every motion, ruling, or request for  
relief.  To make matters worse for the defense, the commission itself was 
only an advisory body.
36
Its role was to receive testimony and other 
evidence,  create  a  record  of  the  proceedings,  and  present  a 
recommendation  to  President  Roosevelt  on  guilt  and  punishment.  
Roosevelt alone would make the ultimate decision on the case.
37
Given 
the probable level of effort expended before the commission and the 
anticipated  lack  of a favorable result for  his  clients, Colonel  Royall 
quickly realized that the only hope for his doomed clients was the United 
States Supreme Court.
38
Colonel Royall’s Herculean effort to obtain relief from the Court 
makes for compelling reading.  Royall realized the quickest way to get 
the case to the Court was by action through a Supreme Court justice.
39
During a recess in the commission proceedings, Royall personally visited 
the  home  of  Justice  Hugo  Black,  the  only  justice  available  in  the 
Washington, D.C. area, seeking a writ of habeas corpus.
40
Justice Black 
flatly refused involvement in providing any assistance to COL Royall.
41
33
Id. at 143-44.  The president of the commission was Major General (MG) Frank 
McCoy.  He had initially retired from the Army in 1938.  During his career, he served in 
a number of interesting and important assignments including aide to Teddy Roosevelt 
during the Spanish-American War.  Additionally, he served on the court-martial that tried 
Brigadier General William “Billy” Mitchell, the outspoken advocate for airpower.  Other 
members included:  MG Blanton Winship (former judge advocate general); MG Lorenzo 
Gasser (former deputy chief of the Army);  MG Walter Grant  (former Third Corps 
commander); Brigadier General (BG) John T. Lewis (distinguished artillery officer); BG 
Guy Henry (distinguished cavalry officer); and BG John Kennedy (Congressional Medal 
of Honor winner). 
34
Id. at 147.  The term “kangaroo court” originated in Texas courts in the mid-nineteenth 
century.  In a mockery of justice, defendants were swiftly hung after a trial that had a 
preordained outcome. 
35
Id.  
36
Id. 
37
Id.  
38
Id. at 148 
39
Id. at 190. 
40
Id. at 190-94. 
41
Id. at 194. 
2006] 
BOOK REVIEWS 
101 
Although  stunned  and  disappointed  at  Black’s  response,
42
Royall 
persisted with his efforts to spark Supreme Court interest in the case.  
Colonel Royall took the extraordinary step of traveling to Justice Owen 
Robert’s farm near Philadelphia and persuading him, and eventually the 
entire Court, to hear his habeas corpus petitions.
43
Six days later, the Supreme Court convened in an unusual summer 
session to hear arguments on the petitions.
44
O’Donnell devotes an entire 
chapter of the book to the Supreme Court arguments.  Colonel Royall 
zealously  and  unswervingly  made  his  plea  at  this  unanticipated 
opportunity.    The  major  theme  of  his  argument  was  that  President 
Roosevelt  had  unconstitutionally  bypassed  well-established  criminal 
statutes.
45
Royall unapologetically contended that the Germans had a 
right to  file petitions and  the President could  not  suspend the Great 
Writ.
46
Additionally, he argued that the German saboteurs were entitled 
to trial in civilian courts with all of the normal procedural safeguards.
47
Relying, in part, on Ex parte Milligan,
48
a Civil War era Supreme Court 
precedent, Royall contended that his clients were deprived of vital civil 
rights. 
42
Id.  Throughout his career on the bench, Justice Black had a reputation for his strident 
efforts for the poor, downtrodden, and unpopular.   
43
Id. at 202-03.  Procedurally, the case could not start in the Supreme Court because it 
only has appellate jurisdiction in such matters.  Royall filed seven writs of habeas corpus 
in the district court of Washington, D.C.  In his summary rejection of Royall’s petitions, 
Judge James W. Morris’s terse order stated: 
In view of this statement of fact [by counsel], it seems clear that the 
petitioner comes within the category of subjects, citizens or residents 
of a nation at war with the United States, who by proclamation of the 
President . . . are not privileged to seek any remedy or maintain any 
proceedings in the courts of the United States. 
Id. at 203. 
44
Id. at 208. 
45
Id. at 217. 
46
Id. at 204.  The U.S. Constitution gives only Congress the power to suspend the Writ 
of Habeas Corpus.  Specifically, it provides that “the privilege of the Writ of Habeas 
Corpus shall not be suspended, unless when in Cases of Rebellion or Invasion the public 
Safety may require it.”  U.S.
C
ONST
.
art. I, § 9. 
47
O’D
ONNELL
supra note 1, at 204. 
48
71 U.S. 2 (1866).  In that case, Lambdin Milligan was accused of planning to steal 
weapons and invade Union prisoner-of-war camps.  He was sentenced to death by a 
military commission.  Milligan sought release through the federal courts with a writ of 
habeas corpus.  The Court held that the trial by military commission was unconstitutional 
because civilian courts were still operating. 
102 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
The government matched Royall’s zeal in  the presentation of its 
case.  In its submission to the Court, the government contended that Ex 
parte Milligan was distinguished from the instant case because “Milligan 
had  never worn an  enemy  uniform  or  crossed  lines in  a  theater  of 
operations; this was a total war where the theaters of operations were 
inherently  different  from  those  in  the  Civil  War.”
49
 Additionally, 
military commissions had  a  grant  of authority  from  Congress  to  try 
violations of the  law  of war  and  Articles  of  War.
50
Moreover, the 
President as Commander in Chief  had the constitutional authority  to 
convene the proceedings and prescribe the rules.
51
It did not take long  for COL Royall and his clients to get their 
answer from the Supreme Court.
52
In a cryptic, unanimous per curiam 
order, the Court upheld the military commission as lawfully constituted 
and denied the petitions for the writs of habeas corpus.
53
Remarkably, 
the Court did not provide its full opinion in the case until eighty-two 
days after the Germans were executed.
54
After the Supreme  Court’s decision, the commission proceedings 
advanced toward their inevitable conclusion on 1 August 1942.
55
The 
military commission, after nineteen days in session and three thousand 
pages  of  testimony  and  argument,  made  its  recommendations  to 
President Roosevelt on guilt and punishment—guilt for all; death for six, 
and  life  imprisonment  for  two.
56
 President  Roosevelt  approved  the 
judgment  of  the  military  commission.
57
 Within  days,  the  six  were 
executed by electrocution.
58
Both  the  author  and  Anthony  Lewis,  a  two-time  Pulitzer  Prize 
winner and author of the book’s introduction, concluded that the case 
was a stain on the history of the Supreme Court.
59
Aside from the bias 
49
Id. at 204. 
50
Id. 
51
Id.   
52
Id. at 233-34. 
53
Id.  
54
Id. at 257.  Justice Roberts told his colleagues on the bench that he believed that 
Roosevelt would execute the Germans no matter what the Court did.  Id. at xiv. 
55
Id. at 235-43. 
56
Id. at 243, 248. 
57
Id. at 249. 
58
Id.  
59
Id. at xiv, 350-51. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested