open pdf file in asp.net using c# : How to insert text into a pdf Library application class asp.net html azure ajax 188-summer-20062-part507

2006] 
SHAKEN BABY IMPACT SYNDROME 
13 
known, to the diagnosis.  When the inciting event is 
unknown, the appearance of the hematoma on 
[computed tomography or CT] scan or [magnetic 
resonance imaging or MRI] can help date the hematoma.  
Acute SDHs are less than 72 hours old and are 
hyperdense compared to the brain on CT scan.  Subacute 
SDHs are 3-20 days old and are isodense or hypodense 
compared to the brain.  Chronic SDHs are older than 20 
days and are hypodense compared to the brain.
59
VII.  Putting It All Together 
Should the Soldier in the hypothetical be charged with the death of 
the child?  When the medical evidence is applied to the facts, perhaps 
not.   First,  the child taken to the emergency  room  showed  no current 
signs  of  cranial impact  or  neck  injury.   An expert  subscribing  to  the 
minority  or  emerging  view  would  likely  state  that  the  child  was  not 
shaken to the point of traumatic brain injury.  One must also remember 
that several experts are of the opinion that prolonged use of a respirator 
can  either  mimic  diffuse  axonal  injury  or  mask  or  taint  a  finding  of 
diffuse axonal injury.
60
As such, a strong argument can be made that 
because of the respirator, the diffuse axonal injury is not conclusive (i.e., 
pathognomonic) of either the drop in the tub or the shaking.
61
Thus, the 
diffuse axonal injury cannot indicate anything other than that the child’s 
brain suffered some form of injury.
62
Most experts, however, will agree 
as  to  the  timing  of  a  subdural  hematoma.
63
In this  hypothetical,  the 
doctor  concluded that  the  subdural  hematoma  was  subacute,  meaning 
between three and twenty days old.
64
Thus, since the father was in the 
field during this period, the evidence tends to suggest that the drop in the 
tub caused the fatal injury instead of the father’s shaking of the child.   
There is much more investigation and evidence collection that must 
occur, however, before a charging decision can be  made in the above 
59
Id.  
60
SBSDefense.com, supra note 57. 
61
Sharp, supra note 18, at 38 (“It’s critical to note that in forensic medicine, the finding 
of axonal pathology is ‘non-specific,’ meaning that one cannot infer anything about its 
origin or cause.”).     
62
See id. 
63
Sinson & Reiter, supra note 58. 
64
Id.  
How to insert text into a pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to insert pdf into email text; add text pdf reader
How to insert text into a pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add text to a pdf file in reader; how to add text field to pdf form
14 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
hypothetical.    For  example,  was  the  child  displaying  symptoms  of  a 
serious injury, such as lethargy or vomiting, after the drop in the tub?  
Based  upon  the  above  information,  the  practitioner  should  now  be 
generally familiar with the signs to look for, questions to ask, evidence to 
collect, and issues to resolve before charging the Soldier with murder. 
As can be seen from the hypothetical, understanding these nuances is 
essential to preparing a SBS/SIS case.  Doing so allows the practitioner 
to  critically  review  and  challenge  the  purported  experts’  conclusions 
concerning both the causation of an injury and its respective timing.  In 
addition,  appreciating  the  differences  between  primary  and  secondary 
injuries and their respective timing will aid either the defense counsel in 
corroborating  his  client’s  version  of  the  facts  or  the  trial  counsel  in 
ascertaining the actual sequence of events.   
VIII.  Expert Assistance or Expert Consultation for the Defense 
A.  Acquiring Expert Assistance 
Due to the medical complexities inherent in any case where SBS/SIS 
is alleged, both trial and defense counsel should consider retaining an 
expert consultant for “evaluating, identifying, and developing evidence” 
and “to test and challenge” the opposing party’s case.
65
Further, because 
traumatic brain injuries can manifest themselves differently in children 
than  in  adults,
66
counsel  should  pursue  the  assistance  of  highly-
65
United States v. Warner, 62 M.J. 114, 118 (2005).   
One important role of expert consultants is to help counsel develop 
evidence.  Even if the defense-requested expert consultant would not 
have become an expert witness, he would have assisted the defense in 
evaluating, identifying, and developing evidence.  Another important 
function of defense experts is to test and challenge the Government’s 
case. 
Id.  
66
 Due  to  the  developing  nature of  childrens’  brains  and skulls, a  head  injury can 
manifest itself differently in a child when compared to the brain and skull of an adult.  
Also,  practitioners  should  appreciate  the  differences  between  highly-specialized 
physicians and general practitioners.  For example, a pediatrician is typically trained only 
to diagnosis and treat a child’s injury.  A forensic pediatrician, however, is trained to 
diagnose and treat the injury and to assess and determine the underlying causation and 
mechanics of the injury.  Further, whereas a radiologist will have some basic knowledge 
of how to interpret a child’s MRI or CT scan, a neuro-pediatric radiologist will have 
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
editor library control, RasterEdge XDoc.PDF, offers easy & mature APIs for developers to add & insert an (empty) page into an existing PDF document file.
how to add text fields to a pdf document; how to add text box to pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
of PDF page adding in C# class, we suggest you go to C# Imaging - how to insert a new empty page to PDF file. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET
adding text box to pdf; how to enter text into a pdf form
2006] 
SHAKEN BABY IMPACT SYNDROME 
15 
specialized  experts as  opposed to generalists.
67
 For example, counsel 
should  consider  using  a  forensic  pediatrician  instead  of  a  general 
pediatrician  or using  a  pediatric-neuro  radiologist  in  lieu of a  general 
radiologist.
68
For defense counsel, however, acquiring a government-funded expert 
consultant,  much  less  a  highly-specialized  expert  consultant,  can  be 
difficult and burdensome.  The defense is not entitled to a government-
funded  expert  consultant  by  merely  “noting  that  the  prosecution  has 
employed expert assistance to prepare its case.”
69
Rather, as held by the 
Court  of  Military  Appeals  in  United  States  v.  Robinson,  the  “Equal 
Protection Clause, the Due Process Clause, and the Manual for Courts-
Martial  provide  that  servicemembers  are  entitled  to  expert  assistance 
when  necessary  for  an  adequate  defense.”
70
 In  elaborating  on  this 
entitlement,  the  Court  of  Appeals  for  the  Armed  Forces  (CAAF)  in 
United States v. Bresnahan stated:   
An accused  is  entitled to an expert’s assistance  before 
trial  to  aid  in  the  preparation  of  his  defense  upon  a 
demonstration of necessity.  But necessity requires more 
than the mere possibility of assistance from a requested 
expert.  The  accused  must  show  that  a  reasonable 
probability  exists  both  that  an  expert  would  be  of 
assistance  to  the  defense  and  that  denial  of  expert 
assistance would result in a fundamentally unfair trial.
71
As the court stated in Gonzalez, “There are three aspects to showing 
necessity.   First,  why  the expert  assistance is  needed.    Second, what 
would the expert assistance accomplish for the accused.  Third, why is 
the defense counsel unable to gather and present the evidence that the 
specific,  detailed  training  on  neural  imaging  diagnostics  in  children  and  will  be 
significantly better suited to interpreting an MRI or CT scan involving a child’s brain or 
head.  See Plunkett Telephone Interview, supra note 55.   
67
See United States v. McAllister, 55 M.J. 270, 275 (2001) (noting that “[w]ith the 
growth of forensic-science techniques, it has become increasingly apparent that complex 
cases  require more than generalized practitioners.”); see also Warner,  62 M.J. at 114 
(discussing, among other things, the value of a specialist as opposed to a generalist). 
68
Plunkett Telephone Interview, supra notes 55, 66.  
69
United States v. Washington, 46 M.J. 477, 480 (1997). 
70
United States v. Robinson, 39 M.J. 88, 89 (C.M.A. 1989). 
71
United States v. Bresnahan, 62 M.J. 137, 143 (2005) (emphasis added). 
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Merge several images into PDF. Insert images into PDF form field. Access to freeware download and online C#.NET class source code.
adding text pdf files; how to add a text box in a pdf file
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Insert images into PDF form field in VB.NET. Insert Image to PDF Page Using VB. Dim doc As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
how to add text to a pdf file in acrobat; add text pdf acrobat professional
16 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
expert assistant  would be able  to develop.”
72
When requesting expert 
assistance  and  in  meeting  this  necessity  test,  counsel  should,  at  a 
minimum, specifically address the following factors set forth by the court 
in Allen: 
In particular, the defense must show what it expects to 
find, how and why the defense counsel and staff cannot 
do  it,  how  cross-examination  will  be  less  effective 
without  the  services  of  the  expert,  how  the  alleged 
information  would  affect  the  government’s  ability  to 
prove guilt, what the nature of the prosecution’s case is, 
including  the  nature  of  the  crime  and  the  evidence 
linking him to the crime, and how the requested expert 
would otherwise be useful.
73
Within the realm of SBS/SIS, a defense counsel attempting to meet 
the necessity test outlined above could, by way of example, argue that 
expert assistance is needed to understand or rebut an autopsy report, to 
determine whether the medical evidence supports the medical examiner’s 
findings and conclusions, or to adequately evaluate medical records that 
the  defense  has  neither  the  experience  nor  the  expertise  to  properly 
assess.   
A defense  request for  government-funded expert assistance should 
first be submitted to the convening authority and, at a minimum, should 
include a “complete statement of reasons why employment of the expert 
is  necessary.”
74
 Rule for  Courts-Martial 703(d)  does  not specifically 
require  the  request  to  demonstrate  how  or  why  counsel  feels  the 
“necessity test” outlined in Gonzalez and Allen
75
has been met.  It is good 
practice, however, to draft any request as if it was going before the court 
since “a request denied by the convening authority may then be renewed 
before the military judge who shall determine whether the assistance of 
the expert is necessary and, if so, whether the Government has provided 
or  will  provide  an  adequate  substitute.”
76
 Accordingly,  tactical 
72
United States v. Gonzalez, 39 M.J. 459, 461 (1994) (citing Untied States v. Allen, 31 
M.J. 572, 623 (N.M.C.M.R.), aff’d, 33 M.J. 209 (C.M.A. 1991)). 
73
United States v. Allen, 31 M.J. 572, 623-24 (N.M.C.M.R.), aff’d, 33 M.J. 209 (C.M.A. 
1991);
MCM, supra note 44, R.C.M. 703(d). 
74
MCM, supra note 44, R.C.M. 703(d).  
75
Gonzalez, 39 M.J. at 461; Allen, 31 M.J. at 623-24.   
76
United States v. Ndanyi, 45 M.J. 315, 320 (1996) (citing
MCM, supra note 44, R.C.M 
703(d)). 
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Divide PDF File into Two Using C#. This is an C# example of splitting a PDF to two new PDF files. Split PDF Document into Multiple PDF Files in C#.
how to insert text in pdf using preview; add text pdf file
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Split PDF file into two or multiple files in ASP.NET webpage online. Split PDF Document into Multiple PDF Files Demo Code in VB.NET.
add text to pdf document in preview; adding text to pdf reader
2006] 
SHAKEN BABY IMPACT SYNDROME 
17 
considerations  notwithstanding,  counsel  should  put  forth  his  best 
necessity  argument  from  the  very  beginning.    Doing  so  should  not 
jeopardize the defense theory of the case since communications between 
a lawyer and  any  expert  consultant assigned to assist counsel in both 
preparing for trial or during trial are considered protected.
77
B.  The Dreaded “Adequate Substitute” Rule―Not So Dreaded 
Anymore!  
A “request for the services of a consultant differs from a request that 
 specific  expert  witness  be  produced  for  the  defense”  because  the 
defense  “has  no  right  to  demand  that  a  particular  individual  be 
designated.”
78
That is, if the convening authority or court  agrees that 
expert assistance is necessary for the defense, the Government may deny 
the specific requested expert “if [the government] provides an adequate 
substitute.”
79
The “Government in general, and . . . trial counsel in particular, . . . 
play  key  roles”  in  selecting  and  proffering  an  adequate  substitute.
80
Thus, it is the government and not the defense who, for all intents and 
purposes, selects the adequate substitute.  This “absence of . . . parity 
opens the military justice system to abuse” by providing the government 
an opportunity to “obtain an expert vastly superior to the defense’s.”
81
United States v. Warner, a recent SBS/SIS case, dealt directly with 
this disparity issue.
82
In Warner, the government secured the assistance 
of “one of the Air Force’s preeminent experts concerning shaken baby 
syndrome as its own witness.”
83
Both the convening authority and the 
military  judge,  however,  denied  the  defense’s  request  for  the 
appointment of a specific civilian expert consultant whom the defense 
77
MCM, supra note 44, M
IL
.
R.
E
VID
. 502; see infra pt. IX, § A. 
78
United States v.  Tornowski, 29  M.J.  578, 579  (A.F.C.M.R. 1989)  (citing Ake  v. 
Oklahoma, 470 U.S. 68, 83 (1985) (holding a criminal defendant’s right to a competent 
psychiatrist does not include “a constitutional right to choose a psychiatrist of his own 
personal liking”)). 
79
United States v. Warner, 62 M.J. 114, 118 (2005) (quoting United States v. Ford, 51 
M.J. 445, 455 (1999) (citing MCM, supra note 44, R.C.M. 703(d)).  
80
Id. at 120. 
81
Id.  
82
Id. at 114. 
83
Id. at 118. 
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
Among all the DLL components, there is a PDF processing library which enables developers to convert PDF document into text file using Visual Basic .NET
add text to pdf; adding text to a pdf document acrobat
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
PDF document splitting, PDF page reordering and PDF page image and text extraction. Description: Combine the source PDF streams into one PDF file and save
how to add text box in pdf file; how to add text to a pdf in reader
18 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
felt  had  the  requisite  qualifications.
84
 In  his  stead,  the  government 
proffered and the military judge appointed an alleged adequate substitute 
who, according to the defense, had some knowledge of SBS, but vastly 
inferior  qualifications  when  compared  to  those  of  the  government 
expert.
85
Agreeing  with  the  defense,  the  CAAF  found  that  the  appointed 
adequate substitute was a “generalist with no apparent expertise” in the 
area of SBS, whereas the government had secured the “leading shaken 
baby  expert  for  the  prosecution  team.”
86
 The  government,  however, 
argued it had  met  its  due process obligation  of providing an adequate 
substitute,  asserting  that all  it  is required  to  provide  the defense  is  a 
competent, not “comparable,” expert.
87
Disagreeing  with  the  government,  the  CAAF  noted  that  while 
“[p]roviding  the  defense  with  a  ‘competent’  expert  satisfies  the 
Government’s due process obligations . . .”, doing so, however, “may 
nevertheless  be  insufficient  to  satisfy  Article  46  if  the  Government’s 
expert  concerning  the  same  subject  matter  area  has  vastly  superior 
qualifications . . . .”
88
Relying on the plain wording of Article 46 of the 
Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ),
89
the court went on to hold 
“Article 46 requires that an ‘adequate substitute’ . . . have qualifications 
reasonably similar to those of the Government’s expert . . . .”
90
Although  the  court  did  not  define  what  it  meant  by  “reasonably 
similar”  qualifications,  it  did  offer  some  parameters  counsel  should 
consider  when  seeking  a  comparable  expert.    Specifically,  the  court 
noted:   
Article 46  is  a clear  statement of congressional  intent 
against  Government  exploitation  of  its  opportunity  to 
obtain  an  expert  vastly  superior  to  the  defense’s.  
Requiring  that  an  “adequate  substitute”  for  a  defense 
84
Id. at 117. 
85
Id. 
86
Id. at 117-18. 
87
Id. at 119. 
88
Id.  
89
Id. at 115 (citing UCMJ art. 46 (2005), which states in part “trial counsel, defense 
counsel, and the court-martial shall have equal opportunity to obtain witnesses and other 
evidence”).   
90
Id. at 119. 
2006] 
SHAKEN BABY IMPACT SYNDROME 
19 
requested expert have professional qualifications at least 
reasonably  comparable  to  those  of  the  Government’s 
expert  is  a  means  to  carry  out  that  intent  where  the 
defense  seeks  an  expert  dealing  with  subject  matter 
similar to a Government expert’s area of expertise and 
where the defense expert is otherwise adequate for the 
requested purpose.
91
The CAAF’s holding in Warner is a shot across the bow for any trial 
counsel or military judge who attempts to leave the “defense without the 
adequate tools to analyze and possibly challenge or rebut the opinion” of 
 government  expert.
92
 Accordingly,  when  submitting  a  request  for 
expert assistance, defense counsel, in addition to addressing the Gonzalez 
necessity test,
93
should consider  explaining why their requested  expert 
has  “reasonably  comparable  qualifications”  when  compared  to  the 
government expert.  Providing this explanation may secure the services 
of  the  requested  expert  instead  of  a  government  selected  adequate 
substitute.    At  a  minimum,  by  including  a  “reasonably  comparable 
qualifications”  argument  in  the  initial  request  for  expert  assistance, 
counsel  may  convince  either  the  convening  authority  or  the  military 
judge that only a specialist, as opposed to a generalist, will suffice as an 
adequate substitute.
94
IX.  Expert Witnesses 
As  this  article  has  demonstrated, complex medical evidence  is an 
indispensable part of litigating a SBS/SIS case.  Accordingly, the use of 
an expert witness at trial may assist counsel in explaining or presenting 
these complexities to the fact-finder or, for the defense, in presenting an 
alternate theory of the case.  When acquiring and using expert witnesses, 
counsel  should  consider  the  following  two  important  issues:    how  to 
request  an  expert  witness  and  how  to  introduce  testimony  from  that 
expert witness.  
91
Id. at 120. 
92
See id. at 123.  
93
United States v. Gonzalez, 39 M.J. 459, 461 (1994). 
94
United States v. Warner, 62 M.J. 114, 118-19 (2005). 
20 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
A.  Acquiring Expert Witnesses 
The  methodology  for  requesting  an  expert  witness  is  virtually 
identical to requesting an expert consultant.  There  are,  however, two 
critical distinctions worth noting.  First, as with an expert consultant, the 
government has the opportunity to offer an “adequate substitute” for the 
defense requested expert witness.
95
In doing so, however, the proffered 
“adequate  substitute”  must  not  only  have  “similar  professional 
qualifications” as that of the requested expert, but must also be able “to 
testify to the same conclusions and opinions” as the defense requested 
expert.
96
“[W]here there are divergent scientific views, the Government 
cannot select a witness whose views are very favorable to its position and 
then  claim  that  this  same  witness  is  ‘an  adequate  substitute’  for  a 
defense-requested expert of a different viewpoint.”
97
Second, unlike an 
expert  consultant,  there  is  no  privileged  or  protected  communication 
between counsel and their expert witness,
98
meaning an expert witness is 
subject to interview and cross-examination by the opposing counsel.
99
B.  Introducing the Testimony of Expert Witnesses 
Prior  to  an  expert  being  permitted  to  testify,  the  judge  must  be 
satisfied  that  the  testimony  is  both  relevant  and  reliable  to  the 
proceedings.  There are numerous Military Rules of Evidence (MRE) to 
consider when determining relevance and reliability.  
The primary rules governing the relevance and reliability 
of  expert  witnesses  are  Military  Rules  of  Evidence 
(MRE) 104, 401,  402, 403, 702, 703, and 704.  MRE 
401  defines  relevant  evidence,  MRE  402  states  that 
relevant  evidence  is  admissible,  and  MRE  403 
establishes the test for balancing the probative value of 
95
United States v. Guitard, 28 M.J. 952-53 (N.M.C.M.R 1989). 
96
Id. at 954 (citing United States v. Robinson, 24 M.J. 649, 652 (C.M.A. 1989) (citing 
Ake v. Oklahoma, 470 U.S. 68 (1985)). 
97
United States v. Van Horn, 26 M.J. 434, 439 (N.M.C.M.R 1988); see also Major 
Christopher Behan, Expert  Testimony  & Expert  Assistance,
in  T
HE 
J
UDGE 
A
DVOCATE 
G
ENERAL
S
CHOOL
, 54
TH 
G
RADUATE 
C
OURSE 
C
RIMINAL 
L
AW 
D
ESKBOOK 
A-21
(2005)
(citing United States v. Robinson, 24 M.J. 649, 652 (N.M.C.M.R 1987) and United States 
v. Van Horn, 26 M.J. 434 (N.M.C.M.R 1988)). 
98
United States v. True, 28 M.J. 487-88 (C.M.A. 1989).   
99
Id. at 488-89; see also United States v. McAllister, 55 M.J. 270, 273 (2001). 
2006] 
SHAKEN BABY IMPACT SYNDROME 
21 
evidence against its prejudicial impact.   MRE 702  has 
three  requirements  for  expert  testimony:    1)  the 
testimony must be based upon sufficient facts or data; 2) 
the testimony must be the product of reliable principles 
and methods; and  3) the expert must have applied the 
principles and methods reliably to the facts of the case.  
MRE 703 discusses the basis for an expert’s testimony 
and MRE 704 establishes the scope of the testimony.
100
The  thrust  of  any  expert  analysis,  however,  is  the  second  or 
reliability  prong  of  MRE  702.    When  determining  if  the  proffered 
testimony is  the product  of reliable scientific principles  and  methods, 
counsel  must  validate  the  expert’s  qualifications  by  establishing  the 
following six factors from United States v. Houser:  
(1) the qualifications of the expert; (2) the subject matter 
of  the  expert  testimony;  (3)  the  basis  for  the  expert 
testimony; (4) the legal relevance of the evidence; (5) the 
reliability  of  the  evidence;  and  (6)  that  the  probative 
value  of  the  expert’s  testimony  outweighs  the  other 
considerations outlined in M.R.E. 403.
101
Concerning the first Houser factor, MRE 702 specifically states that 
an expert may be qualified by his or her “knowledge, skill, experience, 
training, or education,”
102
allowing a person to qualify as an expert under 
numerous  foundational  bases  (e.g.,  work  experience,  professional 
memberships, publications).
103
The key to the second Houser factor—
the  subject  matter  of  the  expert  testimony—“is  whether  or  not  the 
testimony would assist  or be helpful to the  fact finder.”
104
The third 
Houser factor “concerns itself with the expert’s methods as applied to the 
facts of the case.”
105
That is, the expert must have an adequate basis 
(e.g., “is this the type of information that other experts in the field rely 
on,” etc.) to render an opinion, as opposed to “just a bare opinion with no 
100
 Major  Christopher  Behan,  Determining Admissibility of  Expert Testimony (2005) 
(working paper on file with Criminal Law Department, The Judge Advocate General’s 
School and Legal Center). 
101
United States v. Billings, 61 M.J. 163, 166 (2005) (citing United States v. Houser, 36 
M.J. 392, 397-00 (C.M.A. 1993)). 
102
MCM, supra note 44, M
IL
.
R.
E
VID
. 702.  
103
See Behan, supra note 100. 
104
Id.  
105
Id. 
22 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
relationship to the facts of the case.”
106
With regard to the fourth Houser 
factor,  “before  expert  testimony  is  admitted,  the  military  judge  must 
determine that the evidence is relevant . . . to the case at hand.”
107 
In 
other words, the evidence “must have a connection to the theory of the 
case.”
108
The  fifth  Houser  factor  requires  the  military  judge  to  conduct  a 
reliability analysis to determine if the expert’s “testimony is the product 
of  reliable  principles  and  methods.”
109
 The  reliability  analysis  is 
contingent on the type of expert proffered—nonscientific
110
or scientific.  
The Supreme Court in United States v. Daubert provided the following 
nonexclusive list of factors the judge should consider when evaluating 
the reliability of scientific evidence:
111
(1) whether the theory or technique can be or has been 
tested;  (2)  whether  the  theory  or  technique  has  been 
subjected to peer review and publication; (3) the known 
or potential rate of error in using a particular scientific 
technique and the standards controlling the technique’s 
operation; and (4) whether the theory or technique has 
been generally accepted in the scientific field.
112
As noted, these factors are nonexclusive.
113
The military judge, as 
the  “gatekeeper”  of  the  evidence,  has  a  great  deal  of  discretion  in 
106
Id. 
107
Id. 
108
Id. 
109
MCM, supra note 44, R.C.M. 702. 
110
Kumho Tire v. Carmichael, 526 U.S. 137 (1999).   
Daubert’s  general  holding―setting  forth  the  trial  judge’s  general 
“gatekeeping” obligation―applies  not  only  to  testimony  based  on 
“scientific knowledge,” but also  to testimony  based on “technical” 
and  “other specialized”  knowledge.   We  also conclude that a  trial 
court may consider  one or  more of  the  more specific  factors that 
Daubert  mentioned  when  doing  so  will  help  determine  that 
testimony’s reliability.  But, as the Court stated in Daubert, the test of 
reliability is “flexible,” and Daubert’s list of specific factors neither 
necessarily nor exclusively applies to all experts or in every case. 
Id. at 141.  
111
Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharms. Inc., 509 U.S. 579 (1993). 
112
United States v. Billings, 61 M.J. 163, 168 (2005). 
113
Daubert, 509 U.S. at 593. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested