open pdf file in asp.net using c# : Add text to pdf file online application Library tool html asp.net .net online 188-summer-20063-part508

2006] 
SHAKEN BABY IMPACT SYNDROME 
23 
conducting the reliability analysis and can generally use any factor that 
will help determine the expert’s reliability.
114 
This broad discretion may 
help  those  counsel  seeking  to  introduce  expert  testimony,  while 
hindering those counsel seeking to exclude testimony.    
The sixth and last Houser factor states that “[l]ogically relevant and 
reliable  expert  testimony  ‘may  be  excluded  if  its  probative  value  is 
substantially outweighed by the danger of unfair prejudice, confusion of 
the  issues,  or  misleading  the  members.’”
115 
 deceptively  simple 
argument, counsel seeking to exclude damaging expert testimony should 
not dismiss or overlook this factor. 
X.  Using MRE 702 and Daubert to Question the “Reliability” of the 
Scientific Evidence Upon which SBS/SIS is Premised 
If  the  law  has  made  you  a witness,  remain a  man  of 
science.    You  have  no  victim  to  avenge,  no  guilty  or 
innocent person to ruin or save.  You must bear witness 
within the limits of science.
116
As amended, MRE 702 requires “expert testimony be the product of 
reliable principles and methods that are reliably applied to the facts of the 
case.”
117
 To determine  the  reliability  of  the  proffered  testimony,  the 
“[C]ourt in Daubert set forth a non-exclusive checklist for trial courts to 
use in assessing the reliability of scientific expert testimony.”
118
Thus, in 
an SBS case, the question for the court is whether or not the majority 
view of SBS is based upon reliable scientific principles and means.  
Recent  military  caselaw  seems  to  support  the  majority  view  of 
SBS.
119
Consider, for example, the CAAF’s recent assertion in United 
114
See supra text accompanying note 110. 
115
Untied States v. Houser, 36 M.J. 392, 400 (C.M.A. 1993) (citing MCM, supra note 
44, M
IL
.
R.
E
VID
. 403).  
116
John Plunkett, Shaken Baby Syndrome and the Death of Matthew Eappen,
20
A
M
.
J.
F
ORENSIC 
M
ED
.
&
P
ATHOLOGY 
17 (1999) (quoting Paul H. Broussard, Chair of Forensic 
Medicine, Sorbonne, 1897). 
117
S
TEPHEN 
S
ALTZBURG ET AL
.,
M
ILITARY 
R
ULES OF 
E
VIDENCE 
M
ANUAL
185 (4th ed. 
1997 & Supp. 2002); see also supra notes 100-02. 
118
S
ALTZBURG
, supra note 117, at 181; see also supra notes 111-14.   
119
See generally United States v. Westbrook, ACM 35615, 2005 CCA LEXIS 378 (A.F. 
Ct. Crim. App. Nov. 9, 2005) (unpublished) (finding child’s injury due to SBS, not a 
short fall); United States v. Stanley, 62 M.J. 622 (2004) (finding child’s death due to 
Add text to pdf file online - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text to a pdf document; how to add text to a pdf file in preview
Add text to pdf file online - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text to pdf in acrobat; adding text to a pdf in preview
24 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
States v. Stanley:  “[T]he specific diagnosis was shaken baby syndrome 
(SBS).  This is an established medical diagnosis typically involving very 
small  children  who  are  violently  shaken.    According  to  experts  who 
testified at trial, SBS involves a constellation of injuries to the bones, 
eyes, and brain.”
120
In light of the published material that significantly 
undermines  the  shaking  alone  theory,
121
however,  it  is  difficult  to 
ascertain why the SBS majority view still prevails to the exclusion of 
other more current and sound medical theories.  
The persistence of the majority view as the prevailing view may be 
explained  by  the  military’s  penchant  for  providing  an  adequate 
substitute,  which  typically  translates  into  a  military  expert  who  is  a 
generalist  instead  of  the  requested  civilian  expert  who  typically  is  a 
specialist.
122
 The  continued  reliance  on  generalist  experts  may  limit 
practitioners’ exposure to the minority and emerging views.  Although 
the holding in Warner will open the doors to equalizing this disparity,
123
one  can  still  argue  that  the  use  of  adequate  substitutes  with  less 
experience or exposure than specialists has resulted in the military courts 
being slower to embrace the minority or emerging views of SBS/SIS.  As 
noted by Dr.  Plunkett, perhaps this  is because “scientific theories die 
slowly.”
124
Regardless  of  possible  explanations,  the  military  community’s 
acceptance of the majority view can be problematic for the defense when 
attempting  to  introduce  either  the  minority  or  emerging  view  as  an 
alternate theory of the case.  Counsel seeking to introduce the minority or 
emerging view of SBS/SIS, however, should recognize that MRE 702 
and  Daubert  are  as  much  tools  for  the  defense  as  they  are  for  the 
government.  Under Daubert, the judge, as the gatekeeper, must conduct 
a “reliability assessment” in each case where counsel seeks to introduce 
expert scientific testimony.
125
Thus, a defense counsel well versed in the 
minority and emerging views may be able to use the Daubert hearing as 
shaking as defined by SBS); United States v. Allen, 59 M.J. 515 (N.M.C.M.R. 2003) 
(noting  how  expert  “indicated  that  shaken  baby  syndrome  was  the  only  reasonable 
explanation” for the child’s injuries). 
120
Stanley, 62 M.J. at 622-23 (2004). 
121
See supra pt. IV, §§ A2, B.  
122
United States v. Warner, 62 M.J. 114, 117-19 (2005). 
123
Id. at 119. 
124
Plunkett Letter, supra note 30. 
125
Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharms. Inc., 509 U.S. 579, 594 (1993); see also supra notes 
109-14 and accompanying text. 
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
how to add text fields to pdf; how to add text to a pdf file
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file
how to enter text in pdf file; add text to pdf file
2006] 
SHAKEN BABY IMPACT SYNDROME 
25 
a means to preclude a  government  expert who strictly  adheres  to  the 
majority view of SBS. 
Recall that the first Daubert prong asks whether or not the preferred 
scientific  theory  has  been tested.
126
 A  review  of  the medical studies 
presented herein calls into debate whether or not the majority view of 
SBS  actually  meets  this  threshold.    To  the  contrary,  armed  with  the 
biomechanical  studies of  the minority and emerging  views,
127
counsel 
could demonstrate that the underlying scientific basis or premise of the 
shaking alone theory (i.e., that humans have sufficient strength to shake 
an  infant  to  the  point  of  traumatic  brain  injury)  is  “falsifiable.”
128
Remember,  as  demonstrated  by  Dr.  Duhaime  in  her  landmark  study, 
when Dr. Caffey’s theory was tested, it was falsified.
129
The second Daubert prong asks whether or not the theory has been 
published  in peer-reviewed  journals.
130
The majority  view, and more 
recently the minority and emerging views, have all enjoyed moderate to 
widespread  publication.
131
 Publication,  however,  belies  two  critical 
points with regard to the majority view.  First, “it is significant that in all 
four previously cited original papers regarding the hypothesis of shaking, 
both Guthkelch and Caffey refer to a single paper by Ommaya published 
in  1968  as  biomechanical  justification  for  this  concept.”
132
 The 
implication, of course, is that the cornerstone upon which the majority 
theory is premised is flawed.  A theory built on a flawed premise is itself 
flawed regardless of the number of times it has been published.  Second, 
as noted by the court in Daubert, “publication is not the sine qua non of 
admissibility; it does not necessarily correlate with reliability.”
133
To the 
126
Daubert, 509 U.S. at 593.  
127
See supra pt. IV, §§ A2, B.   
128
Genie Lyons, Shaken Baby Syndrome:  A Questionable Scientific Syndrome and a 
Dangerous Legal Concept, 2003 U
TAH 
L.
R
EV
. 1109, 1115; see also Daubert, 509 U.S. at 
593 (“The criterion of the scientific status or theory is its falsifiability, or refutability, or 
testability.”).  Falsifiable is defined as capable of being tested (verified or falsified) by 
experiment  or  observation.    WordReference.com,  English  Dictionary, 
http://www.wordreference.com/definition/ falsifiable (last visited Sept. 13, 2006). 
129
Duhaime et al., supra note 3, at 409, 414. 
130
Daubert, 509 U.S. at 593.  
131
See generally supra pt. IV& V.     
132
Uscinski, supra note 22, at 76-7 (referring to the following studies that are considered 
the genesis of the shaking alone theory:  Annan Guthkelch, Infantile Subdural Hematoma 
and Its Relationship to Whiplash Injuries, 2 B
RIT
.
M
ED
.
J.
430 (1971); John Caffey, The 
Parent-infant  Traumatic Stress  Syndrome,  114  AM.
J.
R
OENTGENOLOGY 
217  (1972); 
Caffey, Whiplash, supra note 2; Caffey, Theory and Practice, supra note 2). 
133
Daubert, 509 U.S. at 593.  
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to PDF; C# Protect: Add Password
add text to pdf in preview; add text box to pdf file
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
add text box in pdf; how to insert text into a pdf file
26 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
contrary, “submission  to the  scrutiny of  the scientific community is  a 
component of ‘good science’ in part because it increases the likelihood 
that substantive flaws in methodology will be detected.”
134
Arguably, the 
present  situation  is  just  the  type  of  “scrutiny”  the  court  in  Daubert 
envisioned,  with  the  minority  and  emerging  views  pointing  out  and 
critically addressing the “substantive flaws” in the majority view.
135
The third Daubert factor inquires as to the “potential rate of error” 
regarding  a  proffered  scientific  theory.
136
 Other  than  the  separate 
biomechanical  studies  performed  by  Doctors Ommaya,
137
Duhaime,
138
Goldsmith, Plunkett,
139
and Bandak,
140
which support the minority and 
emerging  views, there  are virtually no other  quantifiable studies from 
which to deduce an error rate.  In an attempt to determine the quality of 
the science supporting SBS, Dr. Mark Donohoe conducted an exhaustive 
review of the SBS literature from 1968 to 1998.
141
Dr. Donohoe “found 
the scientific evidence to support a diagnosis of shaken baby syndrome 
to be much less reliable than generally thought.”
142
More precisely, Dr. 
Donohoe opined that “the evidence for shaken baby syndrome appears
analogous to an inverted pyramid, with a very small database
(most of it 
poor  quality  original  research,  retrospective  in
nature,  and  without 
appropriate  control  groups)  spreading  to
 broad  body  of  somewhat 
divergent opinions.”
143
As such, defense could argue that the lack of an 
error rate means that the majority view of SBS fails this Daubert prong.    
The fourth Daubert prong asks if the proffered theory is generally 
accepted within the scientific field.
144
Granted, the majority view of SBS 
is generally accepted; however, “respect for precedent does not require 
courts to ignore flaws in logic.  The law must adapt when prior scientific 
theories  are  undermined  by  scientific  logic.”
145
 The  minority  and 
134
Id.; Lyons, supra note 128, at 1129. 
135
Lyons, supra note 128, at 1129. 
136
Daubert, 509 U.S. at 594.  
137
Ommaya, supra note 22.  
138
Duhaime et al., supra note 3. 
139
Goldsmith & Plunkett, supra note 26.  
140
Bandak, supra note 28. 
141
Geddes & Plunkett, supra note 8, at 719. 
142
Id. 
143
Id. at 719-20 (citing Mark Donohoe, Evidence-Based Medicine and the Shaken Baby 
Syndrome,  Part  I:    Literature  Review:  1966-1998,  24  A
M
.
J.
F
ORENSIC 
M
ED
.
&
P
ATHOLOGY
239 (2003)). 
144
Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharms. Inc., 509 U.S. 579, 594 (1993).  
145
Lyons, supra note 128, at 1132. 
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
add text field pdf; add text to pdf reader
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Also able to uncompress PDF file in VB.NET programs. Offer flexible and royalty-free developing library license for VB.NET programmers to compress PDF file.
add text to pdf document online; how to insert text into a pdf with acrobat
2006] 
SHAKEN BABY IMPACT SYNDROME 
27 
emerging  views  have  clearly  undermined  the  scientific  logic  of  the 
premise upon which the majority view of SBS is based.
146
The more 
these theories gain a foothold within the medical community, the more 
opportunities counsel have to argue that the majority view of SBS has 
lost its “general acceptance” within the medical community.   
Understanding  the  experts’  biases  is  critical.    In  this  article’s 
hypothetical, a government expert adhering to the majority view would 
likely  opine that  it was the shaking that either caused or  significantly 
aggravated the subdural hematoma, which then caused the brain to swell 
and the child to die.  Defense counsel, however, would want to contest 
the  expert’s  opinion  since  such testimony  would put  his  client  at  the 
scene of  the  crime  at  the time  the government  is likely  to  allege the 
incident  causing the traumatic brain  injury occurred.   Faced with  this 
challenge,  counsel  need  not  capitulate  when  confronted  with  a 
government expert who strictly adheres to the majority view of SBS to 
the  exclusion  of  other  sound  theories.    Instead,  counsel  can  seek  to 
disallow  an  expert  who  refuses  to  consider  either  the  minority  or 
emerging view by demonstrating how the majority view of SBS may fail 
each of the Daubert criteria and, consequently, the reliability prong of 
MRE 702.  
XI.  Current Controversies within the Realm of SBS 
There are numerous sub-controversies within the realm of SBS that 
cannot be neatly pigeonholed into the  majority, minority, or emerging 
views.  Such controversies include, but are not limited to the following:  
whether falls from short-distances can be fatal; whether diffuse axonal 
injury can be caused by events other than SBS/SIS (i.e., can being on a 
respirator for a prolonged period cause, mimic, or mask diffuse axonal 
injury); whether  a preexisting, yet  benign  subdural hematoma, can re-
bleed and turn  fatal  due to  a  subsequent,  yet  minor  head  injury;  and 
whether  certain  vaccinations  can  mimic  those  injuries  normally 
associated with SBS/SIS.
147
Two of these sub-controversies merit further 
discussion:  whether short falls can or do kill and whether a preexisting 
146
See supra pt. IV. 
147
 SBSDefense.com,  Forensic  Truth  Foundations,  Shaken  Baby  Syndrome  for 
Beginners:  Shaken Baby Syndrome-Questions and Controversies, http:// 
www.sbstruth.com/Questions%20and%20controversies.htm (last visited Sept. 14, 2006) 
[hereinafter SBSDefense.com Controversies].  
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
page PDF document file to one-page PDF files or they can separate source PDF file to smaller VB.NET PDF Splitting & Disassembling DLLs. Add necessary references
adding text fields to a pdf; add editable text box to pdf
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
page of your defined page number which starts from 0. For example, your original PDF file contains 4 pages. C# DLLs: Split PDF Document. Add necessary references
add text pdf professional; add text to pdf file reader
28 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
or  chronic  subdural  hematoma  can  re-bleed  due  to  a  subsequent  or 
second impact.   
Some experts assert that traumatic brain injury cannot be caused by 
short falls (e.g., fall out of a crib, fall off of a swing, fall off a kitchen 
stool, etc.).
148
Rather, a repeated theme proffered by these experts is that 
traumatic brain injury can only be caused by “significant force . . . such 
as  major motor vehicle crashes, falls  from a second-story  window,  or 
inflicted severe blunt force trauma.”
149
Any expert subscribing to this 
theory would automatically dismiss or discredit any alternate theory of a 
case  where  the  defendant  is  claiming  the  injury  occurred  because  of 
some  form  of  short  fall.    In  recent  years,  however,  several  credible 
studies have been published that question the theory that traumatic brain 
injury cannot be caused by short falls.
150
In one such study, “the author 
reviewed  the  January  1,  1988  through  June  30,  1999  United  States 
Consumer  Product  Safety  Commission  database  for  head  injuries 
associated with the use of playground equipment.”
151
The author’s stated 
objective was to determine if there were any “witnessed or investigated 
fatal short-distance falls that were concluded to be accidental.”
152
The 
study noted eighteen head injury fatalities from falls off of playground 
equipment ranging in height from “0.6 to 3 meters (2–10 feet).”
153
Of 
the  eighteen  fatal  falls,  twelve  were  “directly  observed  by  a 
noncaretaker”  witness.
154
 As  a  result,  the  author  concluded  “that  an 
infant or child may suffer a fatal head injury from a fall of less than 3 
meters (10 feet).”
155
Armed with this information, traumatic brain injury 
resulting  from a  drop in  the tub  certainly  seems  more  plausible  than 
previously thought.  
Another controversy surrounding SBS is the “re-bleed” or “second 
impact”  theory.    The re-bleed  theory purports  that  an otherwise  non-
148
Plunkett, supra note 6, at 1-2, tbl. 1. 
149
United States v. Buber, No. 20000777, at 8 (Army Ct. Crim. App. Jan. 12, 2005) 
(unpublished);  Goldsmith &  Plunkett, supra  note  26,  at  95  (“There  has  been  sworn 
testimony in courts of law by expert witnesses who state that trauma caused by shaking is 
equivalent to a fall from a two-story (or higher) window on to the pavement. . . .  This 
analogy of a “shaking” injury to a two-story fall is not justifiable.”).     
150
SBSDefense.com Controversies, supra note 147; Goldsmith & Plunkett, supra note 
26, at 95-96. 
151
Plunkett, supra note 6, at 1.   
152
Id. at 2. 
153
Id.  
154
Id.  
155
Id. 
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
by directly tagging the second PDF file to the target one, this PDF file merge function VB.NET Project: DLLs for Merging PDF Documents. Add necessary references
how to insert text box in pdf file; adding text to pdf form
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
in C#.NET framework. Support to add password to PDF document online or in C#.NET WinForms for PDF file protection. Able to create a
how to add text to a pdf in acrobat; how to insert text in pdf reader
2006] 
SHAKEN BABY IMPACT SYNDROME 
29 
lethal previous head injury may be exacerbated by a second, yet trivial, 
head  injury,  which  leads  to  death.
156
 A  practical  application  of  this 
theory would, for example, be a case where a child falls and suffers a 
minor subdural hematoma.  Before the minor subdural hematoma either 
dissipates or is reabsorbed by the body, the child suffers another minor 
head  injury.    This  second  injury  aggravates  the  preexisting  subdural 
hematoma  causing  it to re-bleed,  resulting  in a fatal secondary injury 
(e.g., cerebral edema).
157
The crux of this theory is not whether re-bleeds 
occur, but what amount of force is needed to cause the re-bleed,
158
and 
whether  the  subsequent  or  second  impact  has  to  be  proximate  to  the 
original  subdural  hematoma.
159
 That  is,  does  the  force  have  to  be 
extreme,  indicating  violence  or  a  non-accident,  or  can  it  be  from 
something as simple as a parent and child bumping heads while playing a 
game of  football?
160
 Several  experts believe “there is no evidence  to 
support the concept that re-bleeding of an older subdural hematoma can 
result from trivial injury and cause an infant to suddenly collapse and 
die.”
161
The emerging re-bleed theory, however, reasons that subsequent 
trauma  does  not  have  to  be  proximate  to  the  original  subdural 
hematoma
162
and that the amount of force required to initiate a re-bleed 
can be de minimus.
163
Applying the re-bleed theory to the hypothetical, 
if  the drop  in  the tub  caused a subdural hematoma,  then  perhaps  the 
father’s brief shaking of the child caused the original subdural hematoma 
to re-bleed.  The question for the court then becomes whether or not the 
father’s actions were in any way criminally negligent.  For example, did 
he  shake  the  child  forcefully  and  violently  such  that  it  could  be 
considered an assault, or did he softly shake the child (e.g., playing or 
trying to wake child up, etc.) in such a manner that no reasonable person 
would have expected an injury to occur.   
156
United States v. Buber, No. 20000777, at 9 (Army Ct. Crim. App. Jan. 12, 2005) 
(unpublished); SBSDefense.com Controversies, supra note 147.  
157
See “edema” infra app. A. 
158
SBSDefense.com Controversies, supra note 147. 
159
Goldsmith & Plunkett, supra note 26, at 97. 
160
 Buber, No. 20000777,  at  9 (noting that “testimony from the government experts 
failed to exclude the reasonable possibility that Ja’lon might have accidentally suffered a 
previous head injury during a fall down the stairs, which was exacerbated by a second 
injury, caused while playing football.”).  Id.  
161
Robert M. Reece & Robert H. Kirschner, Shaken Baby Syndrome/Shaken Impact 
Syndrome, http://dontshake.com/Audience.aspx?categoryID=9&Page 
Name=SBS_SIS.htm (last visited Sept. 14, 2006). 
162
Goldsmith & Plunkett, supra note 26, at 97. 
163
SBSDefense Controversies, supra note 147. 
30 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
As  has  been  demonstrated  through  the  hypothetical,  there  are  no 
clear-cut  answers  in  cases  where  SBS/SIS  is  alleged.    As  such, 
understanding  these  controversies  may  help  counsel  in  shaping  the 
theory of their case, in challenging an opposing expert during a Daubert 
hearing, or both.  
XII.  Conclusion 
If the issues  are  much  less
certain than  we have been 
taught  to  believe, then to admit uncertainty
sometimes 
would be appropriate for experts.  Doing so may make
prosecution  more  difficult,  but  a  natural  desire  to 
protect
children  should  not  lead  anyone  to  proffer 
opinions unsupported
by good quality science.  We need 
to reconsider the diagnostic
criteria, if not the existence, 
of shaken baby syndrome.
164
Should  one  automatically  conclude  that  a  child  who  shows 
symptoms of traumatic brain injury without any form of external cranial 
trauma is suffering from SBS?  Does the average adult have sufficient 
strength to shake a child to the point of causing traumatic brain injury?  
Or,  are  there  other  sound  medical  explanations  for  a  child  who  has 
traumatic brain injury but no corresponding external cranial trauma?  The 
answers  to  these  questions  are  nebulous  and,  as  demonstrated,  have 
divided  the  best  minds  of  the  medical  community.    As  such,  it  is 
incumbent  upon  military  practitioners  faced  with a  potential  SBS/SIS 
case to fully and independently educate themselves on the controversies 
surrounding SBS so as to ensure the administration of justice is based on 
fact and vetted scientific theories, instead of conjecture merely masked 
as  such.   As succinctly noted by Dr. Uscinski,  “[W]hile the desire  to 
protect children is laudable, it must be balanced against the effects of 
seriously harming those who are accused of child abuse solely on the 
basis of what is, at best, unsettled science.”
165
164
Geddes & Plunkett, supra note 8, at 720. 
165
Uscinski, supra note 22, at 77. 
2006] 
SHAKEN BABY IMPACT SYNDROME 
31 
Appendix A 
When  familiarizing  themselves  with  the  medical  terms  defined 
below,  practitioners  should  pay  particular  attention  to  the  specific 
causation element or triggering mechanism of each type of injury.   
Coup  Contusion:    “Coup  contusions  occur  beneath  a  site  of  cranial 
impact.  Skull imbending from cranial impact may cause direct injury to 
the brain and its surface.  Brain contusions may occur at multiple sites 
remote from the point of cranial impact under some circumstances.”
166
Contra-coup Contusion:  “Contra Coup injuries occur when there is an 
injury to the opposite side of the head from the impact site.  Contra coup 
injuries are generally thought to be an indicator of a moving head hitting 
a stationary, unyielding force or object.”
167
A contra-coup injury is a 
contusion directly opposite the impact. 
Diffuse Axonal Injury:   
[S]evere  primary  diffuse  brain  injury  may  manifest 
clinically  as  immediate  loss  of  consciousness  with 
prolonged  traumatic  coma without mass  lesions.   This 
clinical  presentation  is  frequently  associated  with 
widespread structural damage to the axons – a condition 
know as diffuse axonal injury.  Diffuse axonal injury is 
the  result  of  deep  acceleration  strain  within  the  brain 
parenchyma.    Histological  evidence  of  diffuse  axonal 
injury  includes  axonal  swelling  and  axonal  retraction 
balls.
168
[Diffuse axonal injury] is a type of diffuse brain injury, 
meaning  that  damage  occurs  over  a  more  widespread 
area  than in focal brain injury.  Diffuse axonal injury, 
which refers to extensive lesions in white matter tracts, 
is  one  of  the  major  causes  of  unconsciousness  and 
persistent  vegetative  state  after  head  trauma 
(Wasserman,  2004).    The  major  cause  of  damage  in 
diffuse axonal injury is the tearing of axons, the neural 
166
Hymel, supra note 46, at 119. 
167
SBSDefense.com, supra note 57. 
168
Hymel, supra note 46, at 120.  
32 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
processes  that  allow  one  neuron  to  communicate  with 
another.
169
Edema  (cerebral):    “[G]eneralized  swelling  caused  by  changes  in 
vascular permeability and autoregulation.”
170
Cerebral edema is an increase in brain volume caused by 
an  absolute  increase  in  cerebral  tissue  water  content.  
Diffuse  cerebral  edema  may  develop  soon  after  head 
injury.  Cerebral herniation may occur when increasing 
cranial  volume  and  ICP  overwhelms  the  natural 
compensatory  capacities  of  the  CNS.    Increased  ICP 
may be the result of posttraumatic brain swelling, edema 
formation.
171
In layman’s terms, swelling of the brain can cause death by starving the 
brain of oxygen or blood, or by herniating the brain by pushing it through 
the brain stem.
172
(see “Herniation” for a description of the relationship 
between edema and herniation). 
Epidural Hematoma:  “Epidural hematoma is a traumatic accumulation 
of blood between the inner table of the skull and the stripped-off dural 
membrane.  The inciting event often is a focused blow to the head, such 
as that produced by a hammer or baseball bat.”
173
Extravasted Blood:    “Bruising and/or free  blood  within the  epidural 
layer  (scalp).”
174
 Not  as  serious  as  an  epidural  hemorrhage;  usually 
attributable to some form of impact (can occur from minor trauma).
175
169
 Wikipedia,  The  Free  Encyclopedia,  Diffuse  Axonal  Injury, 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diffuse_axonal_injury  (last visited Sept. 14, 2006). 
170
Mary E. Case et al., Position Paper on Fatal Abusive Head Injuries in Infants and 
Young Children, 22 
A
M
.
J.
F
ORENSIC 
M
ED
.
&
P
ATHOLOGY
112, 118 (2001). 
171
 Library  of  the  National  Medical  Society,  Brain  Edema  and  Cerebra  Edema, 
http://www.medical-library.org/journals2a/brain_edema.htm (Oct. 2, 2005). 
172
Plunkett Telephone Interview, supra note 55. 
173
 Daniel  Price  &  Sharon  Wilson,  Epidural  Hemorrhages,  E
MEDICINE
http://www.emedicine.com/EMERG/topic167.htm (Jan 13, 2004).  
174
 Brain  Injury  Association  of  America,  Types  of  Brain  Injury, 
http://www.biausa.org/Pages/types_of_brain_injury.html  (last  visited  Sept.  14,  2006) 
[hereinafter BIAA]. 
175
Plunkett Telephone Interview, supra note 55. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested