open pdf file in asp.net using c# : How to insert text in pdf using preview software SDK cloud windows winforms html class 188-summer-20064-part509

2006] 
SHAKEN BABY IMPACT SYNDROME 
33 
Fractures (skull): 
Skull fractures are caused by a deformation of the skull 
due to impact of some kind. The likelihood that a child 
will suffer a skull fracture depends on the force, location 
of the impact, age of the child, and  biologic/mechanic 
characteristics/properties  of  the  skull  at  the  point  of 
impact.  Children  with  open  sutures  and  more  flexible 
skulls are not as likely to fracture in short falls as are 
older children with fully developed enclosed skulls.
176
Herniation:   
A brain  herniation is  the displacement  of brain tissue, 
cerebrospinal  fluid,  and  blood  vessels  outside  the 
compartments in the head that they normally occupy. A 
herniation can  occur  through  a  natural opening  at  the 
base  of  the  skull  (called  the  foramen  occipitalis)  or 
through  surgical  openings  created  by  a  craniotomy 
procedure.    Herniation  can  also  occur  between 
compartments inside the skull, such as  those  separated 
by  a  rigid membrane  called  the  ‘tentorium’.   A  brain 
herniation  occurs  when  pressure  inside  the  skull 
(intracranial  pressure)  increases  and  displaces  brain 
tissues.  This is commonly the result of brain swelling 
from a head injury. . . .  Brain herniations are the most 
common  secondary effect  of  expanding masses  in  the 
brain.
177
Hypoxia:  “A hypoxic brain injury results when the brain receives some, 
but not enough, oxygen.”
178
Ischemia:  “Hypoxic ischemic brain injury, also called stagnant 
hypoxia or ischemic insult-brain injury occurs because of a lack 
of blood flow to the brain because of a critical reduction in blood 
flow or blood pressure.”
179
176
SBSDefense.com, supra note 57. 
177
 University  of  Pennsylvania  Health  System,  Encyclopedia,  Brain  Herniation, 
http://pennhealth.com/ency/article/001421.htm (last visited Sept. 14, 2006). 
178
BIAA, supra note 174. 
179
Id. 
How to insert text in pdf using preview - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text to a pdf document using reader; add text to pdf online
How to insert text in pdf using preview - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text to pdf file; adding text fields to pdf
34 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
Second Impact Syndrome:    
Second  Impact  Syndrome,  also  termed  ‘recurrent 
traumatic brain injury,’ can occur when a person sustains 
a second traumatic brain injury before the symptoms of 
the first traumatic brain injury have healed.  The second 
injury may occur from days to weeks following the first 
injury.    Loss  of  consciousness  is  not  required.    The 
second impact is more likely to cause brain swelling and 
widespread damage.  Because death can occur rapidly, 
emergency  medical  treatment  is  needed  as  soon  as 
possible.
180
Subdural Hematoma:   
Is a collection of blood that pools under the dura. The 
dura is a relatively tough connective tissue (collagenous) 
membrane, about the thickness of parchment paper.  It is 
firmly attached to the under surface of the skull and in 
the spinal canal it is separated from the bony structure by 
a layer of fatty tissue.  The inner underside of the dura is 
applied  to a  much  thinner,  transparent  membrane,  the 
arachnoid,  that  overlies  the  brain  and  subarachnoid 
space.    This  interface  is easily separated,  forming  the 
subdural space.  The subdural space is referred to as a 
“potential  space”  because  a  space  is  not  generally 
created  unless  a  subdural  hematoma  or  another  space 
occupying mass is formed.  When a subdural hematoma 
forms, it is generally an indicator of a broken vein on the 
underlying surface of the brain.  If one or more of these 
veins that “bridge” the dura are injured, bleeding occurs 
into the subdural “space” causing a subdural hematoma 
(clot).
181
180
Id. 
181
SBSDefense.com, supra note 57. 
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word. Overview for How to Use XDoc.Word to preview document content without loading
add text boxes to pdf; how to add text fields in a pdf
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint. Overview for How to Use XDoc.PowerPoint to preview document content without
adding a text field to a pdf; adding text to pdf online
2006] 
SHAKEN BABY IMPACT SYNDROME 
35 
Subdural Hematomas, Types Of (acute, sub-acute, and chronic): 
A subdural hematoma (SDH) is classified by the amount 
of  time  that  has  elapsed  from  the  inciting  event,  if 
known,  to  the  diagnosis.    When  the  inciting  event  is 
unknown, the appearance of the hematoma on CT scan 
or MRI can help date the hematoma.  Acute SDHs are 
less than 72 hours old and are hyper-dense compared to 
the brain on CT scan.  Subacute SDHs are 3-20 days old 
and are  isodense  or hypodense compared to the brain.  
Chronic SDHs are older than 20 days and are hypodense 
compared to the brain.
182
When the dura is cut and removed a subdural hematoma 
may be seen. This blood will appear bright red if it is 
“acute” and the color of port wine or “crank case oil” if 
it is older. The pathologist should note if  the  blood is 
red/black, brownish, yellowish-orange, ‘machine oil’ or 
straw  colored  (or  combinations  of  all  of  these).  The 
pathologist  should  weigh  (volume),  sample  and 
photograph this blood. “Chronic” or old subdurals will 
be darker  in color  and may leave  an  iron stain on the 
dura the color of port wine, brown or yellow.
183
182
Sinson & Reiter, supra note 58 (emphasis added). 
183
SBSDefense.com, supra note 57. 
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
toolkit allows developers to specify where they want to insert (blank) PDF last page or after any desired page of current PDF document) using C# .NET
how to add a text box to a pdf; add text box in pdf document
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Supported PDF Processing Features by Using RasterEdge WinForms Viewer for C#.NET. Overview. Highlight PDF text. • Add text to PDF document in preview.
add text block to pdf; how to insert text into a pdf using reader
36 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage:  
Subarachnoid  hemorrhage  arises  from  tearing  of 
arachnoid  vessels  at  the  same time bridging  veins are 
torn,  because the  bridging  veins are  surrounded by an 
arachnoid  sheath  as  they  cross  the  subdural  space  to 
enter the inner dural layer and finally the dural sinuses.  
Tearing  of  bridging  veins  usually  produces  both 
subdural and subarachnoid hemorrhages.
184
Retinal Hemorrhages: 
Retinal Hemorrhages are small hemorrhages on the back 
of the eye.  Most experts do not agree as to the pattern, 
number,  location,  or  type  of  retinal  hemorrhages  that 
point  to  a  diagnosis  of  SBS  or  other  non-accidental 
trauma.  The mechanism(s) behind retinal hemorrhages 
in  infancy  in  the  context  of  alleged  head  trauma  are 
unknown.    Most  research  points  to  a  mechanism 
involving  rapid  increases  in  intracranial  pressure, 
cerebral venous spasm or increased venous pressure, and 
possibly  hypoxia.  .  .  .  Sometimes  the  retinal 
hemorrhages are accompanied by nerve sheath damage 
or  bleeding  in  the  subdural  space  of  the  optic  nerve.  
This  finding  has  been  considered  an  indicator  of  a 
greater degree of damage. . . .
185
184
Case et al., supra note 170, at 116. 
185
SBSDefense.com, supra note 57.  
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Features about PDF Processing Features by Using RasterEdge WPF Viewer for C#.NET. Overview. Add text to PDF document. • Insert text box to PDF file.
how to insert text box in pdf; how to enter text in pdf
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Excel. Overview for How to Use XDoc.Excel to preview document content without loading
add text in pdf file online; adding text pdf file
2006] 
SHAKEN BABY IMPACT SYNDROME 
37 
Appendix B 
Fig. 1.  Biomechanical classification of head injuries.
186
186
Bandak, supra note 28, at 73.  
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo from RasterEdge.com, this C#.NET PDF image adding Using this C# .NET image adding library control for PDF
add text pdf acrobat; how to add text to pdf file
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Insert Image to PDF Page Using VB. inputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
how to add text to pdf; adding text to pdf in preview
38 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
TIME FOR ANOTHER HAIRCUT:  A RE-LOOK AT THE USE 
OF HAIR SAMPLE TESTING FOR DRUG USE IN THE 
MILITARY 
Major Keven Jay Kercher
I.  Introduction 
The Army’s urinalysis program has made great strides in reducing 
drug use in the military ranks.
1
However, the current military operational 
tempo and the prevalence of illegal drugs in local communities
2
warrant 
a more comprehensive approach to eliminating drug use in the service.
3
An annual national drug survey by the U.S. Department of Health and 
Judge Advocate, U.S. Army.  Presently assigned to as the 6th Brigade Combat Team, 
25th Infantry Division, Ft. Riley, Kansas.  LL.M., 2006, 54th Judge Advocate Officer 
Graduate Course, The Judge Advocate General’s Legal Center & School, United States 
Army, Charlottesville, Virginia;  J.D., 2002, University of North Dakota School of Law; 
M.S., 1999, University of Missouri-Rolla; B.S., United States Military Academy, West 
Point, New York.  Previous assignments include Chief of Military Justice, Fort Leonard 
Wood, Missouri, 2004-2005; Trial Counsel, Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, 2003-2004; 
Legal  Assistance  Attorney,  Fort  Leonard  Wood,  Missouri,  2002-2003;    Battalion 
Assistant  S-3,  10th  Engineer  Battalion,  Fort  Stewart  Georgia,  1997-1998;  Company 
Executive Officer, 10th Engineer Battalion, Fort Stewart, Georgia, 1997; Support Platoon 
Leader, 10th Engineer Battalion, Fort Stewart, Georgia, 1996-1997; Assault & Obstacle 
Platoon Leader, 10th Engineer Battalion, Fort Stewart, Georgia, 1996; Platoon Leader, 
3rd Engineer Battalion, Fort Stewart, Georgia, 1995-1996.  Member of the bar of North 
Dakota.    This  article  was  submitted  in  partial  completion  of  the  Master  of  Laws 
requirements of the 54th Judge Advocate Officer Graduate Course. 
1
See United States v. Bickel, 30 M.J. 277, 284 (C.M.A. 1990) (recognizing urinalysis 
deterrent effects);  Sergeant  First Class  Kathleen  T. Rhem, A Look at Drug Use and 
Testing  Within  the  Military, A
MERICAN 
F
ORCES 
P
RESS 
S
ERVICES
http://usmilitary.about.com/od/theorderlyroom/l/bldrugtests3.htm  (last  visited  Oct.  23,  
2006) (highlighting a twenty percent drop in servicemembers admitting drug use from 
1983 to 1998).  The article references admitted drug use by servicemembers as the basis 
for this statistic.  Id. 
2
U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health 
Services  Administration,  Office  of  Applied  Studies, Results from the 2004 National 
Survey on Drug Use and Health: National Findings, http://www.drugabusesstatistics.sam 
hsa.gov/NSDUH/2k4NSDUH/2k4results/2k4results.htm#8.3 (last visited Oct. 23, 2006) 
[hereinafter SAMHSA 2004 National Drug Survey] (providing report highlights on the 
first couple pages of the report).  This web site contains any updates  to the original, 
published report.  Id. 
3
See Rhem, supra note 1 (reflecting the military’s zero tolerance policy toward drug 
use); Gerry J. Gilmore, DOD Urinalysis Test (Drug Test) Results, A
MERICAN 
F
ORCES 
P
RESS 
S
ERVICES
,  http://usmilitary.about.com/od/theorderlyroom/l/bldrugtests2.htm  (last 
visited Oct 23, 2006) (discussing the 2002 Department of Defense’s (DOD) anti-drug 
policy). 
2006] 
HAIR SAMPLE TESTING FOR DRUG USE 
39 
Human  Services’  Substance  Abuse  and  Mental  Health  Services 
Administration  reflects  the  gravity  of  the  drug  problem  in  America.
4
According to the 2004 survey, 19.1 million Americans, age twelve and 
over,  currently  use  illegal  drugs.
5
 Seventy-five  percent  of  the  16.4 
million drug users, aged eighteen and older, had current employment.
6
Since those serving in our armed forces are a cross-section of society as a 
whole, commanders can expect servicemembers to have easy access to 
people who use drugs and to people who sell drugs. 
Also,  increased  servicemember  usage  of  popular  “club  drugs”, 
especially  ecstasy,  has  left  commanders  wondering  whether  current 
urinalysis programs sufficiently ensure good order and discipline in their 
units.
7
 Several  dilution  products,  cleansing  products,  chemical 
adulterants,  and  prosthetic  devices  (e.g.,  an  artificial  penis)  currently 
exist  to  assist  servicemembers  in  avoiding  a  positive  urinalysis  test 
result.
8
An Internet Google search using the words “beat a drug test” 
provided over 1,200,000 hits.
9
Many of these sites offer to provide pills 
or  chemical  solutions  that  counter  urinalysis  tests.
10
 These  products 
claim to help avoid a positive drug test result by flushing drugs out of a 
person’s urine prior to a test.
11
4
SAMHSA 2004 National Drug Survey, supra note 2, § 2. 
5
Id.  The survey asked whether the person had used an illegal drug in the month prior to 
the survey.  Id
6
Id. at Highlights. 
7
See generally  Rhem, supra  note  1  (highlighting the  concern  over  ecstasy  use  by 
military members); Gilmore, supra note 3 (noting a modest increase in club drug use by 
servicemembers). 
8
See Kits to Circumvent Drug Tests: Testimony Before the Comm. on House Energy and 
Commerce Subcomm. on Oversight and Investigations, 109th Cong. (2005) [hereinafter 
Testimony] (statement of Robert L. Stephenson II, Director of the Division of Workplace 
Programs at the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention  in the Substance  Abuse  and 
Mental Health Services Administration of the U.S. Department of Health and Human 
Services), available at LEXIS, Federal Document Clearing House Congressional Hearing 
Summaries (defining the different methods to avoid testing positive on a drug test). 
9
See id. (describing the results of an internet search for products available to avoid 
testing  positive  on  a  drug  test).    The  author  attempted  the  same  internet  search  as 
described in the Stephenson testimony which produced similar results. 
10
E.g., Pass the Drug Test, http://www.passthedrugtest.com/ (last visited Oct. 30, 2006) 
(providing consumers with information on how to avoid testing positive on a drug test); 
MB Detox Website, http://www.mbdetox.com (last visited Oct. 23, 2006) [hereinafter 
MB Detox Website] (selling drug detoxification products). 
11
See MB Detox Website, supra note 10 (referencing their products ability to flush 
drugs from a person’s body). 
40 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
Additionally, a urinalysis can only detect, for most drugs, drug use 
occurring a few days prior to the test.
12
This inherent testing limitation 
greatly reduces a urinalysis’s ability to catch drug users.  As a result, 
servicemembers could easily avoid testing positive by abstaining from 
drug use for a short period of time prior to an expected test.
13
Drug  testing of  a  servicemember’s hair sample serves as a viable 
addition to a commander’s current arsenal of tools to combat continued 
drug use among the ranks.  Commanders should utilize drug testing of 
hair samples to curtail servicemember drug use for several reasons.  Drug 
testing of hair samples:  (1) increases the drug detection “window” to 
several months;
14
(2)  satisfies  any  Fourth  Amendment  concerns;
15
(3) 
provides commanders with reliable results;
16
and (4) requires only minor 
adjustments to current military drug testing  programs.
17
Accordingly, 
this article advocates the wide spread implementation of hair testing as a 
much  needed  and  complementary  addition  to  the  military’s  current 
urinalysis program. 
II.  A Forensic Overview of Hair Sample Testing (The Science) 
An understanding of the scientific concepts of hair drug testing will 
assist  commanders  and  military  lawyers  in  successfully  utilizing  hair 
drug testing.
18
The concepts include:  how drugs deposit in the hair; how 
authorities  collect  hair  samples;  and  how  laboratories  analyze  these 
samples.
19
These concepts will highlight hair drug testing’s advantages 
and disadvantages by explaining the biological process behind the test.
20
12
See DOD Urinalysis (Drug Test) Program, http://usmilitary.about.com/od/theorderly 
http://usmilitaryroom/l/bldrugtests.htm  (last  visited  Oct  23,  2006)  [hereinafter DOD 
Urinalysis Program] (providing drug detection windows for urine testing). 
13
See id.see also infra Part II.D (comparing the drug detection windows of urine and 
hair).  For example, a servicemember could smoke crack cocaine on Thursday night of a 
four-day  weekend,  knowing  that  by  Tuesday  morning  the  cocaine  would  have  been 
flushed from his urine.  See id. 
14
See infra Part D.  
15
See infra Part III. 
16
See infra Parts IV, V. 
17
See infra Part VI. 
18
See generally Robert W. Vinal, Admissibility and Reliability of Hair Sample Testing to 
Prove Illegal Drug Usein 47
A
M
.
J
UR
.
P
ROOF OF 
F
ACTS 
3
D
203, §§ 1-9 (2005) (providing 
a general overview of the technical background of hair drug testing). 
19
Id. §§ 3-9. 
20
See generally infra Parts II.D, E (describing the advantages and disadvantages of hair 
testing). 
2006] 
HAIR SAMPLE TESTING FOR DRUG USE 
41 
A.  Dynamics of Drug Deposits in the Hair 
When  a  servicemember  ingests  a  drug  by  injecting,  snorting, 
smoking, or other methods, the body metabolizes the drug.
21
The drug 
and  its  metabolites  then  enter  the  servicemember’s  blood  stream  and 
circulate throughout his body.
22
As the blood brings nutrients to the hair, 
the  blood  also  deposits  the  drug  and  drug  metabolites  in  the  hair 
follicles.
23
 The  drug  metabolites  and actual  drug traces come  to  rest 
permanently in the hair strand.
24
As the hair grows, the hair section containing the drug deposit grows 
beyond the skin’s surface.
25
Normally, a hair must grow for five to seven 
days before the hair containing the drug deposit emerges from the skin’s 
surface.
26
Hair grows at an average rate of about 1/2 inch (approximately 
1.3  centimeters)  per  month.
27
 Chronic  drug  use  creates  a  band-like 
pattern of drug  deposits within  the  exposed hair,  similar  to rings in a 
raccoon’s tail.
28
The hair continues to grow until it becomes dormant 
and eventually falls out of the head.
29
21
See Tom Mieczkowski et al., Testing Hair for Illicit Drug Use, in N
AT
I
NST
.
OF 
J
UST
.
1,
2 (Jan. 1993) (explaining the body’s breakdown of drugs).  
22
Proposed Revisions to Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing 
Programs, 69 Fed. Reg. 19673, 19675 (Apr. 13, 2004); Mieczkowski, supra note 21, at 2 
(defining metabolites as the “biochemical products of the breakdown of drugs within the 
body”).    For  example,  the  metabolite  for  marijuana  is  delta-9-tetrahydrocannibol-9-
carboxylic  acid  (THCA),  and  the  metabolites  for  cocaine  are  benzoylecgonine, 
norcocaine, and cocaethylene.  Proposed Revisions to Mandatory Guidelines for Federal 
Workplace Drug Testing Programs, 69 Fed. Reg. at 19675.  
23
Proposed Revisions to Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing 
Programs, 69 Fed. Reg. at 19675.  Sweat from sweat glands and sebum from sebaceous 
glands can also deposit drugs and drug metabolites on the hair shaft.  Id. 
24
Id.; Tom Mieczkowski, Hair Analysis as a Drug Detector, in
N
AT
I
NST
.
OF 
J
UST
.
1,
(Oct. 1995). 
25
See Mieczkowski, supra note 21, at
2. 
26
E-mail from Dr. Donald  J. Kippenberger, Deputy Program Manager for  Forensic 
Toxicology, United States Army Medical Command (MEDCOM), Fort Sam Houston, 
Texas, to Major Keven Kercher, Student, The Judge Advocate General’s Legal Center 
and School, U.S. Army (Oct. 25, 2005, 18:18 EST) [hereinafter Dr. Kippenberger E-mail, 
Oct.  25,  2005] (on  file  with  author);  E-mail  from  Mr. William Thistle, Senior Vice 
President and General Counsel, Psychemedics Corp., to Major Keven Kercher, Student, 
The Judge Advocate General’s Legal Center and School, U.S. Army (Nov. 3, 2005, 12:29 
EST) [hereinafter Mr. Thistle E-mail, Nov. 3, 2005] (Psychemedics Corp. is the industry-
leading hair testing company.) (on file with author). 
27
Mieczkowski, supra note 21, at 2. 
28
69 Fed. Reg. at 19675.  The drug amount in each band is proportionate to the amount 
of drug in the blood at the time of deposit.  Id.  A drug laboratory  can estimate the 
42 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
B.  Forensic Collection Procedures 
Based on a hair growth rate of 1/2 inch per month, hair collection 
procedures  usually require  a  1  1/2  inch  long  hair sample,
30
with  this  
sample size covering a three-month period.
31
The back of the crown of 
the head is the primary area used for sample collection.
32
The hair is  
collected using a pair of sterilized scissors, using a 1/2 inch wide hair 
sample taken as close to the scalp as possible.
33
Keeping the hair root 
ends of the sample aligned, the collector then deposits the hair sample 
into  a  foil  packet.
34
 Next, the  collector  places the  foil  packet  into  a 
sealed envelope secured with an integrity seal.
35
Finally, the collector 
mails  the  sample  and  accompanying  paperwork  to  the  designated 
laboratory.
36
C.  Analyzing the Test Results 
Upon arrival at the laboratory, technicians subject the hair sample to 
rigid procedures.
37
First,  the technicians  inspect the  hair sample  and 
accompanying paperwork for any existing discrepancies that may upset 
the integrity of the sample.
38
Next, the technicians wash the hair.
39
The 
washing procedures eliminate any drugs or oils that may have attached to 
the hair strands through external exposure.
40
The technicians then cut the 
approximate time of drug ingestion by measuring the band’s distance from the skin’s 
surface.  Id. 
29
See  Dr.  Kippenberger  E-mail,  Oct.  25,  2005, supra note  26  (explaining  hair 
dormancy). 
30
P
SYCHEMEDICS 
C
ORP
.,
S
AMPLE 
C
OLLECTION 
T
RAINING 
M
ANUAL
12 (2003) [hereinafter 
P
SYCHEMEDICS 
T
RAINING 
M
ANUAL
] (The phone contact for Psychemedics Corp. Client 
Services Department is 1-800-522-7424.). 
31
See Vinal, supra note 18, § 4. 
32
See P
SYCHEMEDICS 
T
RAINING 
M
ANUAL
supra note 30, at 6-7. 
33
Id. at 7-8 (providing pictures). 
34
Id. at 8.  The intent is to keep the hair strand ends that are taken closest to the scalp 
together.  Id.  The laboratory will need to know what end of the hair sample was next to 
the scalp to establish  a drug use chronology.  See infra Part II.C  (analyzing  the hair 
sample).     
35
See P
SYCHEMEDICS 
T
RAINING 
M
ANUAL
supra note 30, at 8-9.   
36
Id. at 11.   
37
See Vinal, supra note 18, § 5 (describing initial intake procedures). 
38
Id.  
39
Id. § 6. 
40
Id. (The technicians generally use a solvent that will not swell the hair to remove any 
external contamination from the hair strands.).  But see David A. Kidwell & David L. 
Blank, Environmental Exposure—The Stumbling Block of Hair Testingin D
RUG 
T
ESTING 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested