open pdf file in asp.net using c# : How to add text fields to a pdf document software SDK cloud windows winforms html class 188-summer-20065-part510

2006] 
HAIR SAMPLE TESTING FOR DRUG USE 
43 
hair strands into 1/2 inch segments for separate testing.
41
Segmentation 
establishes a monthly  drug history;  each  segment represents  roughly 
thirty days of hair growth.
42
If a laboratory finds drug metabolite in a 
segment, the laboratory will then know that the drug use occurred within 
that thirty-day window.
43
After segmentation, the lab combines each hair sample segment with 
an  enzymatic  solution  that  breaks  down  the  hair.
44
 This  procedure 
converts the hair into liquid form for testing.
45
The laboratory technicians then further subject the hair solution to a 
radioimmunoassay  (RIA)  screening  test  and  a  subsequent  gas 
chromatography/mass spectrometry confirmatory (GC/MS) test.
46
The 
laboratory reports the drug results of both the RIA and GC/MS tests in 
nanograms per ten milligrams (NPM) of hair
47
or in picograms per one 
milligram of hair.
48
Each laboratory has established drug cut-off levels 
for each drug.
49
Although laboratory differences in drug cut-off levels for 
IN 
H
AIR
17, 52 (Pascal Kintz ed., 1996) (questioning the ability of decontamination 
procedures to remove external contamination). 
41
See Vinal, supra note 18, § 2. 
42
See Mieczkowski, supra note 21, at 2 (describing hair drug testing’s ability to create a 
“time line” of drug use). 
43
Id.  The laboratory could also use smaller segments to create a more defined timeline.  
Id.  A point to remember is that although the drug deposits create bands in the hair, the 
laboratory must dissolve the hair to determine the hair’s drug contents.  See Vinal, supra 
note 18, § 7.  Therefore, segmentation provides the only way that a laboratory can create 
a drug-use timeline.  Id.   
44
See id. § 7. 
45
Id. 
46
Id. §§ 8-9.  The DOD laboratories use the same tests to check urine for illegal 
substances.  See U.S.
D
EP
T OF 
D
EFENSE
,
I
NSTR
.
1010.16,
T
ECHNICAL 
P
ROCEDURES FOR 
THE 
M
ILITARY 
P
ERSONNEL 
D
RUG 
A
BUSE 
T
ESTING 
P
ROGRAM
paras. E1.5 & E1.6 (9 Dec. 
1994) [hereinafter DOD
D
IR
. 1010.16]. 
47
See Vinal, supra note 18, §§ 8-9. 
48
Proposed Revisions to Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing 
Programs,  69  Fed.  Reg.  19673,  19697  (Apr.  13,  2004)  (providing  proposed  drug 
detection cut-off levels for hair drug testing). 
49
See generally E-mail from Dr. Donald J. Kippenberger, Deputy Program Manager for 
Forensic Toxicology, United States Army Medical Command (MEDCOM), Fort Sam 
Houston, Texas, to Major Keven Kercher, Student, The Judge Advocate General’s Legal 
Center and School, U.S. Army (Oct. 27, 2005, 10:23 EST) (noting that laboratories can 
currently set their own cut-off levels for the amount of drug needed to reflect a positive 
test) (on file  with author). see also E-mail from  Mr.  William Thistle, Senior  Vice 
President and General Counsel, Psychemedics Corp., to Major Keven Kercher, Student, 
The Judge Advocate General’s Legal Center and School, U.S. Army (Jan. 19, 2006, 
10:36 EST) [hereinafter Mr. Thistle E-mail, Jan. 19, 2006] (on file with author).  Mr. 
How to add text fields to a pdf document - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text boxes to pdf document; add text fields to pdf
How to add text fields to a pdf document - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
acrobat add text to pdf; how to add text fields to a pdf
44 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
hair do exist, the DOD Coordinator for Drug Enforcement Policy and 
Support would likely ensure uniform drug cut off levels for hair sample 
testing across the DOD.
50
The cut off levels require the hair sample to 
contain an amount of drug or drug metabolite at or above the drug cut-off 
level  before  a  laboratory  will  report  a  positive  test  result  for  that 
particular drug.
51
D.  Advantages of Hair Sample Analysis 
The long drug detection window of hair drug testing represents the 
greatest advantage  of hair drug testing over  the currently used urine 
testing method.
52
The average hair sample allows for the detection of 
drug use within the past three months, while the detection window for 
urine testing is generally only a few days.
53
If the command tested a 
servicemember’s urine for cocaine, a urine test would only expose illegal 
cocaine use occurring in the past seventy-two hours.
54
In contrast, a hair 
drug test could show cocaine use over a three-month period.
55
As a 
Thistle explained that the hair industry established cut-off levels through research and 
instrumentation limitations.  Id.  He also noted that ninety percent of workplace hair 
testing utilizes the same cut-off levels.  Id.  A hair testing working group of experts and 
critics  established  the  hair  cut-off  levels  in  the  Proposed  Revisions  to  Mandatory 
Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programs.  Id.; Proposed Revisions to 
Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programs, 69 Fed. Reg. at 
19697. 
50
See supra note 46, DOD
D
IR
. 1010.16, paras. E1.5.3 & E1.6.2 (requiring the DOD Co- 
ordinator for Drug Enforcement Policy and Support to set the DOD cut off levels for 
initial and confirmatory urinalysis testing.
51
Drug Testing in the Workplace:  Drug Test Cut-off Levels, http://www.ipassedmydrug 
test.com/drug_cutoff_levels.asp (last visited Oct. 23, 2006). 
52
The Department of Health and Human Services’ Policy for Federal Workplace Drug 
Testing Programs: Hearing Before the Subcomm. on Oversight and Investigations of the 
H. Comm. on Commerce, 105th Cong. 21-23 (1998) [hereinafter Hearing on the Federal 
Workplace Drug Testing Program] (prepared statement of Christine Moore, Laboratory 
Director, U.S. Drug Testing Laboratories). 
53
Id. at 22; Vinal, supra note 18, § 4; P
SYCHEMEDICS 
T
RAINING 
M
ANUAL
supra note 30, 
at 12 (noting that the Psychemedics laboratory only tests the first 1.5 inches of the hair 
sample).   
54
See DOD Urinalysis Programsupra note 12 (providing the drug detection window 
for cocaine). 
55
See Cutting Edge Issues in Drug Testing and Drug Treatment: Hearing Before the 
Subcomm. on National Security, International Affairs, and Criminal Justice of the H. 
Comm. on Gov’t Reform and Oversight, 105th Cong. 10-11 (1998) [hereinafter Hearing 
on  Drug  Testing  and Drug Treatment] (statement of Robert L. Dupont, President, 
Institute for Behavior and Health) (explaining hair’s ability to create a ninety-day drug 
use history). 
VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in
featured PDF software, it should have functions for processing text, image as Add necessary references Demo Code to Retrieve All Form Fields from a PDF File in
how to enter text into a pdf; adding text to a pdf form
C# PDF Form Data Read Library: extract form data from PDF in C#.
Able to retrieve all form fields from adobe PDF file in C# featured PDF software, it should have functions for processing text, image as Add necessary references
add text pdf file acrobat; how to insert text into a pdf
2006] 
HAIR SAMPLE TESTING FOR DRUG USE 
45 
result,  the  typical  hair  test  would give  the  command  a  three-month 
“snapshot” of the servicemember’s drug use.
56
The hair drug test, like a 
urinalysis, cannot reveal exact dates of drug use, but the hair drug test 
can indicate low, moderate, or chronic use.
57
In addition to a long drug detection window, hair drug testing also 
provides several other advantages.
58
First, testing of hair samples taken 
from the head is less of an invasion of the servicemember’s privacy than 
 urine  test,  which  requires  direct  observation  of  the  urine  flow.
59
Second,  hair  drug  testing  does  not  have  the  potential  inherent 
adulteration  problems  of  urine  testing  such  as  dilution  or  usage  of 
prosthetics.
60
Third, the command can easily transport and store hair 
samples.
61
In austere environments, the command would not have to 
worry about crushed samples, contaminated samples, or the effects of 
extreme  heat  or  cold.
62
 For  example,  the  current  conflict  in  Iraq 
56
Id. 
57
See id. at 94-95 (statement of Tom Mieczkowski, Ph.D., Professor, University of 
South Florida) (explaining hair’s ability to quantify drug use). 
58
See Hearing on the Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programsupra note 51, at 22 
(listing advantages). 
59
See id. at 21; U.S.
D
EP
T OF 
A
RMY
,
R
EG
.
600-85,
A
RMY 
S
UBSTANCE 
A
BUSE 
P
ROGRAM 
(ASAP) para. E-5(l) (24 Mar. 2006) [hereinafter AR 600-85] (requiring observer to watch 
urine leave the body and enter the collection cup).  A privacy concern may arise when the 
test subject does not have enough head hair for a proper sample.  The collector would 
then need to seek hair from alternate body locations.  See P
SYCHEMEDICS 
T
RAINING 
M
ANUAL
,
supra note 30, at 6 (explaining that a hair sample can come from alternate body 
sites).    These  alternate  sites,  especially the pubic  region,  would  raise  the level  of 
intrusion.  The author proposes a strict collection protocol to reduce this intrusiveness.  
See infra p. 36 (discussing collection procedures).  The author also notes that pubic hair 
collection does not require the subject to expose his genitals to the collector or an 
observer. E-mail from Mr. William Thistle, Senior Vice President and General Counsel, 
Psychemedics Corp., to Major Keven Kercher, Student, The Judge Advocate General’s 
Legal Center and School, U.S. Army (Jan. 4, 2006, 15:39 EST) [hereinafter Mr. Thistle 
E-mail, Jan. 4, 2006] (on file with author). 
60
Hearing on the Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programsupra note 52, at 22; id. at 
9 (testimony of Harry F. Connick, District Attorney, City of New Orleans) (commenting 
on hair drug testing’s ability to defeat adulteration and substitution methods associated 
with urinalysis testing).  For example, individuals can consume solutions to dilute the 
drug concentration in their urine or use prosthetic devices that appear like real human 
anatomy (e.g. an artificial penis) to provide a clean sample.  See Testimonysupra note 8 
(providing different methods to avoid testing positive on a drug test). 
61
See Mieczkowski, supra note 21, at 2 (noting that hair samples require no special 
storage conditions); Hearing on the Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programsupra 
note 52, at 21. 
62
See Mieczkowski, supra note 21, at 2 (noting a hair sample’s physical advantages over 
a urine sample). 
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
how to insert a text box in pdf; how to add text box to pdf document
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Create high resolution PDF file without image quality losing in ASP.NET application. Add multiple images to multipage PDF document in .NET WinForms.
adding text to pdf document; how to add text to pdf document
46 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
represents such an environment, where the extreme heat could cause the 
drug concentrations in urine samples to decrease.
63
The intense heat 
could also stimulate rapid bacteria growth in the urine sample.
64
Fourth, 
the command could obtain another similar hair sample if the laboratory 
indicated a problem with the original hair sample.
65
Fifth, hair drug 
testing can help discriminate heroin users from codeine users or poppy-
seed consumers, which urine testing allegedly cannot do.
66
E.  Limitations of Hair Analysis 
Although hair drug testing has many advantages, it cannot detect a 
use  that  occurred  only  a  few  days  prior  to  a  drug  test.
67
 After  a 
servicemember  consumes  an  illegal  drug,  the  actual  drug  and  drug 
metabolite must circulate through the blood to reach the hair.
68
Once the 
drug reaches  the hair root,  the  hair must  then grow long enough  to 
63
See E-mail from Dr. Donald J. Kippenberger, Deputy Program Manager for Forensic 
Toxicology, United States Army Medical Command (MEDCOM), Fort Sam Houston, 
Texas, to Major Keven Kercher, Student, The Judge Advocate General’s Legal Center 
and School, U.S. Army (Jan. 26, 2006, 10:23 EST) [hereinafter Dr. Kippenberger E-mail, 
Jan.  26, 2006]  (on  file with the  author).    The  author proposed  a  question to Dr. 
Kippenberger, asking about the actions the Army takes to protect urine samples from 
extreme heat, especially in Afghanistan and Iraq.  Id.  Dr. Kippenberger responded that 
currently the Army does not take any additional protection measures for these types of 
samples.  Id.  The servicemember simply gets the benefit of reduced drug concentrations 
in his urine sample.  Id. 
64
See E-mail from Mr. William Thistle, Senior Vice President and General Counsel, 
Psychemedics Corp., to Major Keven Kercher, Student, The Judge Advocate General’s 
Legal Center and School, U.S. Army (Mar. 1, 2006, 14:20 EST) (explaining that urine 
samples need refrigeration to prevent bacteria growth (fermentation) which could affect 
the samples’ chemical makeup) (on file with author). 
65
See Mieczkowski, supra note 21, at 2 (noting the ease of retesting hair); Hearing on 
the Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programsupra note 52, at 21 (noting the ability to 
obtain  another hair  sample for  testing  if  testing the  original  hair  sample  produces 
problems). 
66
Hearing on the Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programsupra note 52, at 22.  Id. at 
2 (statement of the Honorable Joe Barton, Chairman of the House Subcommittee on 
Oversight and Investigations).  Mr. Barton explained that ninety percent of the time, urine 
testing incorrectly identifies the consumption of poppy seeds or the consumption of 
certain prescription drugs as heroin use.  Id.  He also noted that hair sample testing can 
identify a particular heroin component that urine testing cannot.  Id.  As a result, hair 
drug  testing  can  distinguish  between  the  consumption  of  poppy  seeds  or  medical 
prescriptions and the consumption of heroin.  Id. 
67
See Vinal, supra note 18, § 2. 
68
See supra Part II.A (explaining how drugs deposit in the hair). 
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
in C#.NET framework. Support to add password to PDF document online or in C#.NET WinForms for PDF file protection. Able to create a
add text boxes to a pdf; add text to pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
Text in any PDF fields can be copied and pasted batch converting PDF to editable & searchable text formats. Convert PDF document page to separate text file in
how to add text boxes to pdf; add text field to pdf
2006] 
HAIR SAMPLE TESTING FOR DRUG USE 
47 
expose the drug deposits above the skin’s surface.
69
Consequently, a 
commander would have to wait almost a week to obtain a hair sample 
reflecting present-day drug use.
70
Hair drug testing also might not detect a one-time use based upon 
selected,  drug  detection,  cut-off  levels.
71
 For  example,  the  average 
amount of cocaine ingested during one use is 125 mg.
72
A hair sample 
test would require the user to ingest approximately 200 mg of cocaine to 
return a positive result.
73
However, if a servicemember ingested several 
125-mg “lines” of cocaine at one time, sometimes called “binge” use, the 
hair test would detect that use.
74
Hair drug testing can also estimate the 
number of one-time drug uses over a period of time because the lab 
analyzes the cumulative amount of drug deposits in a segment of hair.
75
This limitation represents one negative aspect associated with hair drug 
testing. 
III.  The Fourth Amendment & Military Rule of Evidence (MRE) 313 
Beyond the technical benefits of hair drug testing, it also satisfies the 
legal requirements of the Fourth Amendment, which protects persons 
from  unreasonable  government  searches  and  seizures.
76
 Unless  an 
exception  applies,  the government  actor must  operate  with a  proper 
warrant issued upon probable cause to conduct a search or a seizure.
77
69
Id. 
70
Id. (noting thatdrug deposits in the hair folicle will normally take about five to seven 
days to emerge from the skin’s surface). 
71
Mr. Thistle E-mail, Nov. 3, 2005, supra note 26. 
72
Id. 
73
Id. 
74
Id.see also United States v. Bethea, 61 M.J. 184, 184-88 (2005) (involving hair 
analysis and “binge” drug use). 
75
See Werner A. Baumgartner & Virginia A. Hill, Hair Analysis for Organic Analytes: 
Methodology, Reliability, and Field Studiesin D
RUG 
T
ESTING IN 
H
AIR
223, 225 (Piscal 
Kintz ed., 1996).  From the amount of drug found in each segment, a laboratory can 
estimate the amount of uses during a particular thirty-day window.  Id.  Hair sample  
analysis has the ability to distinguish between “heavy, intermediate, and light drug use”.   
See generally Mieczkowski, supra note 21, at 2 (describing segmentation of the tested 
hair sample).  For example, if the laboratory starts at the root end of a hair sample and 
cuts the hair into 1/2 inch segments, each segment will represent about thirty days of hair 
growth.  Id.  When the laboratory tests each segment, the laboratory will determine the 
amount of drugs trapped in each segment.  Id. 
76
U.S.
C
ONST
. amend. IV. 
77
Id.  
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Merge PDF with byte array, fields. PDF page deleting, PDF document splitting, PDF page reordering and PDF page image and text extraction Add necessary references
add text to a pdf document; add text to pdf file online
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Merge PDF with byte array, fields. Merge PDF without size limitation. Add necessary references: VB.NET Demo code to Append PDF Document.
adding text to a pdf; how to add text to a pdf document using acrobat
48 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
Specifically,  the  Fourth  Amendment  applies  to  situations  where  a 
government actor intrudes into an area where a person has a reasonable 
expectation of privacy.
78
Hair drug testing raises three areas of Fourth 
Amendment concern:  (1) the seizure of the servicemember to obtain the 
hair;
79
(2) the seizure of the hair;
80
and (3) the search of the hair for 
illegal substances.
81
The Supreme Court has established certain tests for the lower courts 
to use in determining when a government official’s actions will trigger 
Fourth Amendment protections.
82
In Katz v. United States, the Supreme 
Court  created a two-part test to determine when an individual has a 
reasonable expectation of privacy in his person or in a particular place or 
item.
83
The Court will find a reasonable expectation of privacy:  (1) if 
the person believes he has a subjective expectation of privacy; and (2) if 
society accepts that expectation of privacy as objectively reasonable.
84
If 
a reasonable expectation of privacy exists, the government must possess 
a valid search authorization
85
or a search authorization exception prior to 
searching and/or seizing a particular person or item or prior to searching 
a particular place.
86
When  applying  these  rules  to  hair  drug  testing,  three  questions 
emerge.  First, does a servicemember have a reasonable expectation of 
privacy  in  his  hair?
87
 Second,  if  the  servicemember  does  have  an 
78
See Katz v. United States, 389 U.S. 347, 351 (1967) (noting that Fourth Amendment 
application focuses on a person’s intent to keep items and activities private).    
79
See United States v. Dionisio, 410 U.S. 1, 8 (1973) (explaining Fourth Amendment 
applications when collecting physical evidence from a person’s body); cf. In re Grand 
Jury Proceedings Cecil Mills, 686 F.2d 135, 136 (3rd Cir. 1982) (noting that a grand jury 
summons is not a Fourth Amendment seizure). 
80
Dionisio, 410 U.S. at 8. 
81
Id. 
82
See Katz, 389 U.S. at 347 (1967) (determining when a person has an expectation of 
privacy protected by the Fourth Amendment). 
83
Id. at 361 (Harlan, J., concurring) (explaining the test). 
84
Id. 
85
See M
ANUAL FOR 
C
OURTS
-M
ARTIAL
,
U
NITED 
S
TATES
,
M
IL
.
R.
E
VID
. 315(a), (b)(1), 
(b)(2)  (2005)  [hereinafter  MCM]  (explaining  how  the  military  utilizes  search 
authorizations instead of search warrants).  In the context of this article, the use of the 
term “search authorization” will also encompass the term “search warrant.” 
86
U.S.
C
ONST
. amend. IV; see Vernonia School Dist. 47J v. Acton, 515 U.S. 646, 652-53 
(1995) (discussing the “reasonableness” concept of the Fourth Amendment and noting 
that a reasonable search does not always need a warrant or probable cause). 
87
See Katz, 389 U.S. at 361 (Harlan, J., concurring); United States v. Dionisio, 410 U.S. 
1, 14 (stating that a person does not have a reasonable expectation of privacy in his facial 
characteristics or in the physical characteristics of his voice). 
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
allowed. passwordSetting.IsCopy = True ' Allow to assemble document. passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file.
add text box to pdf; how to add text field to pdf
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats
adding text to pdf file; add text fields to pdf
2006] 
HAIR SAMPLE TESTING FOR DRUG USE 
49 
expectation of privacy in his hair, does the government actor taking the 
hair sample have a search authorization based upon probable cause,
88
or 
does an exception to the search authorization requirement exist?
89
Third, 
is the manner in which the government actor collected the hair sample 
reasonable?
90
Hair drug testing must satisfactorily navigate these legal 
checkpoints  before  military  counsel  may  use  hair  sample  results  in 
court.
91
A.  Reasonable Expectation of Privacy 
Controversy over whether an individual has a reasonable expectation 
of privacy in his hair currently exists in both federal and state courts.
92
If 
an individual does not have an expectation of privacy in his hair, law 
88
E.g., United States v. Bethea, 61 M.J. 184, 188 (2005) (finding probable cause for a 
hair sample search authorization). 
89
E.g., Skinner v. Ry. Labor Executives’ Ass’n, 489 U.S. 602, 619-20 (1989) (utilizing 
the “special needs” exception to the warrant requirement for urine testing of railroad 
employees).   
90
See Schmerber v. California, 384 U.S. 757, 768-72 (1966) (analyzing the manner of 
the search); Bouse v. Bussey, 573 F.2d 548, 550-51 (9th Cir. 1977) (holding that the 
forcible  removal  of  pubic  hair  without  a  warrant  violated  the  defendant’s  Fourth 
Amendment rights). 
91
See Katz, 389 U.S. at 361 (Harlan, J.,  concurring) (creating a two-part test for 
determining a reasonable expectation of privacy); see also Schmerber, 384 U.S. at 768 
(recognizing the “proper manner” test for obtaining body evidence). 
92
See Coddington v. Evanko, 112 F. App’x 835, 835-38 (3rd Cir. 2004) (finding no 
reasonable expectation of privacy in hair); In re Grand Jury Proceedings Cecil Mills, 686 
F.2d 135, 139 (3rd Cir. 1982) (concluding no expectation of privacy in hair that is on 
public display); see also United States v. Ruiz, No. 33084, 1999 CCA LEXIS 219, at *2 
(A.F. Ct. Crim. App. July 26, 1999) (unpublished) (raising an argument of no reasonable 
expectation of privacy in a hair sample); United States v. De Parais, 805 F.2d 1447, 1456 
(11th Cir. 1996) overruled on other grounds by United States v. Kaplan, 171 F.3d 1351 
(11th Cir. 1999) (recognizing the debate); United States v. Bullock, 71 F.3d 171, 176 n.3 
(5th  Cir. 1995) (recognizing Fourth Amendment issues associated  with hair sample 
testing).  The courts in the following cases found a reasonable expectation of privacy in 
hair but allowed the hair sample collection under an exception to the Fourth Amendment 
requirement.  See United States v. D’Amico, 408 F.2d 331, 332-33 (2nd Cir. 1969) 
(holding that clipping hair is considered a seizure, but is reasonable); Knight v. Evanco, 
No. 02-CV-1748, 2003 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 23734, at *16 (E.D. Pa. 2003) (finding “no 
viable claim of an illegal search under the Fourth Amendment” because a “special needs” 
exception applied); Ohio v. Coyle, No. 99CA2480, 2000 Ohio App. LEXIS 1079, at *9-
14 (Ohio App. 2000) (taking a hair sample from a suspect in custody is a seizure but 
reasonable as incident of a lawful arrest); State v. Sharpe, 200 S.E. 2d 44, 49 (N.C. 1973) 
(finding a seizure but no Fourth Amendment violation). 
50 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
enforcement officials could conduct a warrantless seizure of it.
93
The 
courts often analyze whether a hair sample is more akin to a handwriting 
or voice sample, or to a blood or urine sample.
94
The Supreme Court has 
found  that  a  person  has  no  reasonable  expectation  of  privacy  in  a 
handwriting sample
95
or a voice sample.
96
However, the Court has held 
that a person does have an expectation of privacy in a blood sample
97
and  
a urine  sample.
98
The  question  then  becomes  where  a  hair  sample 
seizure would fall on this spectrum. 
Military  appellate  courts  have not  yet addressed  the question  of 
whether a servicemember has a reasonable expectation of privacy in his 
hair.
99
In United States v. Ruiz, government counsel argued that the 
accused did not have an expectation of privacy in his drug-tested hair 
sample.
100
However, the Air Force Court of Criminal Appeals (AFCCA) 
found that a valid search authorization existed in the case.
101
Therefore, 
the  Air  Force  court  avoided  confronting  the  privacy  issue.
102
 In 
comparison,  the  same  court  in United States v. Pyburn  held  that  a 
forcible taking of an uncooperative servicemember’s hair to compare the 
hair  to  a  crime  scene  hair  sample  did  not  violate  the  Fourth 
93
See Katz,  389 U.S.  at 361  (Harlan,  J.,  concurring) (explaining  that the Fourth 
Amendment protects places where people have an expectation of privacy).  See generally 
Coddington, 112 F. App’x at 838 (finding no reasonable expectation of privacy in hair); 
Sharpe, 200 S.E. 2d at 47-49 (holding that a police seizure of head and underarm hair 
without a warrant does not violate the Fourth Amendment).   
94
See In re Mills, 686 F.2d at 139 (concluding “that there is no greater expectation of 
privacy with respect to hair which is on public display than with respect to voice, 
handwriting or fingerprints”).  In Mills, a grand jury ordered Mr. Mills to provide facial 
and head hair to compare with hairs found in a robber’s abandoned mask.  Id. at 136.  Mr. 
Mills refused to provide the sample unless the grand jury obtained a valid search warrant.  
Id. at 139.  Mr. Mills filed a complaint with the district court to vacate the grand jury 
order.  Id. 
95
United States v. Mara, 410 U.S. 19, 21-22 (1973). 
96
United States v. Dionisio, 410 U.S. 1, 14 (1973). 
97
Schmerber v. California, 384 U.S. 757, 767 (1966). 
98
Nat’l Treasury Employees Union v. Von Raab, 489 U.S. 656, 678-79 (1989) (finding 
the collection of a urine sample for chemical analysis a search); Skinner v. Ry. Labor 
Executives’ Ass’n, 489 U.S. 602, 617 (1989). 
99
At press, the author’s extensive research in military case law revealed no military case 
at the appellate level that addressed the reasonable expectation of privacy issue for hair 
sample drug testing. 
100
United States v. Ruiz, No. 33084, 1999 CCA LEXIS 219, at *2 (A.F. Ct. Crim. App. 
July 26, 1999) (unpublished). 
101
Id. at *3. 
102
Id. 
2006] 
HAIR SAMPLE TESTING FOR DRUG USE 
51 
Amendment.
103
At the time of the hair seizure, the military police had 
Pyburn in custody, but did not have a search authorization.
104
Pyburn highlights the distinction between and consequent 
implications of a hair sample obtained for drug testing purposes, with 
one  obtained  for  comparison  purposes.
105
 A  hair  sample  seized  to 
compare to another hair sample more closely aligns with the expectation 
of privacy analysis associated with the taking of a handwriting sample.
106
However, a hair sample seized to chemically analyze the sample for 
drugs  arguably  correlates  more  to  a  seizure  of  a  urine  sample.
107
Therefore,  even  if  military  courts  find  no  reasonable  expectation  of 
privacy in a hair sample, the defense could still argue for the courts to 
bifurcate hair sample testing into two separate “expectation of privacy” 
categories.
108
One category, “drug testing”, would create a reasonable 
103
United States v. Pyburn, 47 C.M.R. 896, 907 (A.F.C.M.R. 1973).  Pyburn reflects a 
problem created by United States v. Katz, 389 U.S. 347 (1967).  In Katz, the Supreme 
Court focused on an individual’s reasonable expectation of privacy in a particular place 
or item.  389 U.S. 347, 361 (1967).  However, Pyburn focused on the “reasonableness” of 
obtaining  the hair  sample and  did  not  examine if the  individual  had  a  reasonable 
expectation of privacy in his pubic hair.  Pyburn, 47 C.M.R. at 907.  Justice Black 
highlighted this distinction in his dissenting opinion in Katz.  389 U.S. at 373-74.  He 
argued that the majority opinion in Katz inappropriately incorporated “right to privacy” 
language into the Fourth Amendment instead of simply interpreting the language of the 
Constitution, which prohibits “unreasonable” searches.  Id.  He feared the Court had 
given itself  broad power  to determine  what constitutes a  reasonable expectation of 
privacy instead of limiting itself to what the Constitution allowed.  Id. at 374; see also 
Minnesota v. Carter, 525 U.S. 83, 97-98 (1998) (Scalia, J., concurring) (labeling the Katz 
test as the Court’s “self-indulgent test”).  This distinction creates the problem of what 
language a court should apply to a hair seizure:  (1) should the court examine whether the 
person had an expectation of privacy in his hair sample? or (2) should the court determine 
whether the seizure was “reasonable” under the language of the Fourth Amendment?  
104
Pyburn, 47 C.M.R. at 904 (considering the search incident to a lawful apprehension). 
105
See id. at 907 (stating that the expectation of privacy associated with the taking of a 
hair sample falls somewhere between that associated with obtaining a fingerprint and  
bodily fluids). 
106
See In re Grand Jury Proceedings Cecil Mills, 686 F.2d 135, 139 (3rd Cir. 1982) 
(comparing a hair sample used for comparison purposes to a fingerprint, a handwriting 
sample, and a voice sample and finding no reasonable expectation of privacy). 
107
See generally Skinner v. Ry. Labor Executives Ass’n, 489 U.S. 602, 617 (1989) 
(considering a urine test a search). 
108
See generally Ohio v. Coyle, No. 99CA2480, 2000 Ohio App. LEXIS 1079, at *9 n.3 
(Ohio App. 2000) (analyzing the seizure and subsequent testing of the accused’s hair 
based solely on the police’s limited usage of the sample for comparison purposes).  In 
this case, the defendant argued that the authorities seized his hair sample for DNA testing 
instead of only a hair comparison.  Id.  Since the authorities only obtained and used the 
hair sample for comparison purposes, the court only analyzed the seizure for the purpose 
of comparing hairs.  Id. 
52 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
expectation of privacy.  The other category, “comparison testing”, would 
not involve a reasonable expectation of privacy. 
Separate from the test’s purpose, the hair sample removal site may 
also play a role in assessing intrusiveness.
109
Removing hair from a 
person’s head differs in level of intrusiveness from removing hair from 
the body, especially from the pubic region.
110
The seizure of a pubic hair 
sample could push a court to apply Fourth Amendment protection, where 
the seizure of a hair sample taken from the head would not.
111
This 
difference  could  create  difficulties  for  commanders  who  have 
servicemembers with short or shaved haircuts.
112
A commander may 
counter this problem by first seizing hair from a servicemember’s chest 
or underarm.
113
A commander could also require a servicemember to 
grow out the hair on his head.
114
This order would flow from the same 
logic that allows a commander to order a servicemember to drink water 
to provide a sample pursuant to a urinalysis.
115
109
See Bouse v. Bussey, 573 F.2d 548, 549-50 (9th Cir. 1977) (recognizing that clipping 
a few hairs from the defendant’s head implicates less privacy concerns than taking a hair 
sample from the defendant’s pubic region). 
110
Compare Bouse, 573 F.2d at 549-51 (pulling of a pubic hair), with United States v. 
D’Amico, 408 F.2d 331, 332-33 (2d Cir. 1969) (cutting a few strands of head hair). 
111
Bouse, 573 F.2d at 549-51; D’Amico, 408 F.2d at 332-33; cf. United States v. Millar, 
No.  32222,  1997  CCA  LEXIS  30  (A.F.  Ct.  Crim.  App.  Jan  8,  1997)  (arguing 
unsuccessfully that law enforcement’s photographing of pubic hair collection constituted 
pre-trial punishment). 
112
See Coddington v. Evanko, 112 F. App’x 835, 836 & 838 (3rd Cir. 2004) (obtaining 
hair sample from a person with short hair). 
113
See P
SYCHEMEDICS 
T
RAINING 
M
ANUAL
,
supra note 30, at 6 (explaining that a hair 
sample can come from alternative sites); cf. Mr. Thistle E-mail, Jan. 4, 2006, supra note 
58 (explaining that obtaining a pubic hair sample does not require a person to expose his 
or her genitals).  
114
See United States v. Mitchell, 15 M.J. 654 (N.M.C.R. 1983), rev’d, 16 M.J. 95 
(C.M.A. 1983) (involving an order to drink water for a urinalysis).  The order would 
focus on servicemembers who have hair that is close to the required collection length.  In 
these cases, a couple of weeks of additional growth would prevent the commander from 
having to collect hair from an alternative location.  The command could also randomly 
pick servicemembers at the present date for a future hair sample test.  The commander 
would then inform the servicemembers of their selection and require them to maintain or 
grow the required length of hair by the test date.  However, this practice would nullify the 
surprise element of the hair test and likely catch only chronic users.  
115
Id.  In Mitchell, the command randomly selected Petty Officer Flint as part of a unit 
urinalysis.  Id. at 654-55.  Since Petty Officer Flint could not provide a urine sample, the 
command directed her to the command’s library and told her to drink water until she 
could provide a urine sample.  Id. at 655.  Petty Officer Flint eventually provided a urine 
sample which tested positive.  Id.  The trial judge suppressed the urinalysis results based 
on an improper application of Military Rules of Evidence (MRE) 315 and 312, which 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested