open pdf file in asp.net using c# : Add text block to pdf control Library platform web page .net html web browser 188-summer-20066-part511

2006] 
HAIR SAMPLE TESTING FOR DRUG USE 
53 
The method of hair collection method may also affect the reasonable 
expectation of privacy analysis.
116
In Coddington v. Evanko the Third 
Circuit Court of Appeals examined the hair collection method used.
117
The  court  held  that  Officer  Coddington  did  not  have  a  reasonable 
expectation of  privacy in  his head,  neck,  and back hair because the 
government  official  clipped  hair  that  was  in  plain  view.
118
 The 
Coddington court found no reasonable expectation of privacy in a hair 
sample  that  was  “above the  body  surface and on public display.”
119
However, the court noted that plucking the hair from the root may raise 
an  expectation  of  privacy.
120
 Consequently,  the  court  created  an 
expectation of privacy for subsurface hair but not for surface hair.
121
The 
court equated the clipping of hair to obtaining fingerprints or handwriting 
exemplars  and  the  plucking  of  hair  to  obtaining  blood  samples  or 
fingernail scrapings.
122
would require a search authorization in order to compel a servicemember to ingest a 
substance to find evidence of a crime.  Id.  On a government interlocutory appeal, the 
United States Navy-Marine Corps Court of Military Review (NMCMR) agreed with the 
government that MRE 313 provided the correct legal standard.  Id.  The court’s opinion 
implied that MRE 313 would support the command’s order.  Id.  However, the NMCMR 
did not reverse the trial judge’s decision but relied on the court’s opinion to put the judge 
on notice of his legal error.  Id. at 655-56.  The government then petitioned the COMA 
which reversed the NMCMR.  United States v. Mitchell, 16 M.J. 95 (C.M.A. 1983). 
116
See Coddington, 112 F. App’x at 838 (shaving head and body hair); Bouse, 573 F.2d 
at 550-51 (pulling pubic hair). 
117
Coddington, 112 F. App’x at 838.  In Coddington, the appellant served as a member 
of  the  Pennsylvania  State  Troopers.   Id.  at  836.    Based  upon  information  from 
confidential informants that Officer Coddington used cocaine, Coddington’s superior 
officers ordered him to  provide a hair sample for drug testing.   Id.  Since Officer 
Coddington had short hair, a police sergeant had to shave hair from Coddington’s head, 
neck, and back.  Id. at 836, 838.  Officer Coddington argued that this method of hair 
sample collection violated his Fourth Amendment right to privacy.  Id. at 837.  However, 
the  court  found  nothing  wrong  with  the  hair  collection  method  because  Officer 
Coddington did not have sufficient hair on his head to provide a cut sample.  Id. at 838.   
118
Id. (noting that the hair was in plain view).  
119
Id. 
120
See id. at 837-38; see also In re Grand Jury Proceedings Cecil Mills, 686 F.2d 135, 
140 (3rd Cir. 1982) (noting that cutting a hair sample from the head versus pulling a hair 
sample from the root may result in different constitutional outcomes).  But see State v. 
Sharpe, 200 S.E. 2d 44, 47, 49 (N.C. 1973) (holding that plucking hairs from defendant’s 
head and arm incident to a lawful arrest did not violate the Fourth Amendment). 
121
Coddington, 112 F. App’x at 838.  
122
Id. at 837-38 (citing In re Grand Jury Proceedings Cecil Mills, 686 F.2d 135, 139 (3rd 
Cir. 1982)). 
Add text block to pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text to a pdf document; how to add text to a pdf document using reader
Add text block to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add text box in pdf file; how to insert text into a pdf using reader
54 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
Consequently, a legal window is currently open for military counsel 
to argue that a servicemember does not have a reasonable expectation of 
privacy  in  his  hair.
123
This argument,  if  successful,  could preserve 
evidence from a command-directed hair collection regardless of whether 
sufficient probable cause exists.
124
Additionally, a commander could 
order a hair drug test based on less than probable cause and still have the 
results admitted.
125
For example, assume a commander hears rumors that three of his 
servicemembers  consumed  illegal  drugs  over  the  past  weekend.
126
However, the commander does not have probable cause for a search 
authorization.    Unfortunately,  a  last  minute  inspection  would  raise 
subterfuge concerns that  the  inspection  is only  a  quest for  evidence 
which the Manual for Courts-Martial prohibits.
127
In consultation with 
his legal advisor, the commander might decide to order a fitness-for-duty 
urinalysis test.
128
Unfortunately, this test triggers the Army’s limited use 
policy,  which  prohibits  the  commander’s  use  of  the  results  of  the 
urinalysis for judicial and nonjudicial punishment.
129
If servicemembers had no expectation of privacy in their hair, a hair 
sample test might legally sidestep the limitations of the Army’s limited 
123
United States v. Ruiz, No. 33084, 1999 CCA LEXIS 219, at *2-3 (A.F. Ct. Crim. 
App. July 26, 1999) (unpublished) (raising but not addressing the issue of whether a 
servicemember  has a reasonable expectation  of  privacy in his  hair  for drug testing 
purposes).   The  author’s extensive research in military case law revealed no other 
military case at the appellate level that addressed the reasonable expectation of privacy 
issue for hair sample testing. 
124
See id. at *1-3 (giving a “no reasonable expectation of privacy” argument as a backup 
position to a sufficient probable cause argument).   
125
See United States v. Dionisio, 410 U.S. 1, 4-5, 13-15 (1973) (disagreeing with the 
lower  court’s position that requiring a  voice recording on less than probable cause 
violated the Fourth Amendment).  The Court found that an individual did not have a 
reasonable expectation of privacy in his voice.  Id. at 14-15.  Therefore, the probable 
cause protections of the Fourth Amendment did not apply.  Id.    
126
See generally United States v. Taylor, 41 M.J. 168, 168-69 (C.M.A. 1994) (involving 
an anonymous tip reporting drug use in the unit). 
127
See id. at 168-72 (deciding whether a commander’s urinalysis inspection constituted a 
subterfuge for a search); MCM, supra note 84, M
IL
.
R.
E
VID
. 313(a), (b). 
128
See U.S.
D
EP
T OF 
D
EFENSE
,
D
IR
.
1010.1,
M
ILITARY 
P
ERSONNEL 
D
RUG 
A
BUSE 
T
ESTING 
P
ROGRAM 
para. 3.3.6 (9 Dec. 1994) (describing the competence-for-duty urine test);
see 
also
AR
600-85,
supra note 59, para. 6-4(a)(1). 
129
See AR 600-85,
supra note 59, para. 6-4(a)(1) (explaining the limited use policy as 
the policy applies to command-directed biochemical testing).   
C# Raster - Image Compression in C#.NET
algorithm, Named Bzip2 yet. DXT1. The value is 3. It is also known as Block Compression1 or BC1. DXT3. The value is 4. It is collectively
adding text to pdf in acrobat; add text pdf file
C# Word - Header & Footer Processing in C#.NET
Default); //More TODO:may create some block in footer. header.CreateParagraph(); //Create a run and text in paragraph Create and Add Table to Footer & Header.
add text to a pdf document; adding text to pdf
2006] 
HAIR SAMPLE TESTING FOR DRUG USE 
55 
use policy.
130
The limited use policy covers “results of a command-
directed biochemical testing that [are] inadmissible under the Military 
Rules of Evidence.”
131
However, MRE 311 only makes the evidence of a 
search  inadmissible  if  “the  accused  had  a  reasonable expectation  of 
privacy in the person . . . searched.”
132
A hair sample test could occur 
under the same premise used to justify an order to a servicemember 
suspected of wrongful entry to provide fingerprint samples for possible 
comparison.
133
In both cases, the evidentiary rule would not preclude 
introduction of the evidence since the servicemembers would have no 
reasonable expectation of privacy in their fingerprints or in their hair.
134
Even  if  a  commander  had  valid  ground  to  seize  the  hair,  a 
commander would not be authorized to conduct the hair sample test in a 
dragnet fashion.
135
A finding of no reasonable expectation of privacy in 
the hair would justify only the seizure of the hair and the search of the 
hair.
136
The Fourth Amendment would still require a legitimate reason 
for temporarily detaining a servicemember temporarily to obtain a hair 
sample,  such  as  pursuant  to  a  law  enforcement  investigation.
137
 A 
commander must be able to articulate a reasonable suspicion about a 
130
See MCM, supra note 85, M
IL
.
R.
E
VID
. 311(a)(2); AR 600-85,
supra note 59, para. 
6-4(a)(1).  The limited use policy would need to allow for a hair analysis exception for 
competency-for-duty tests.  AR 600-85, supra note 59, para. 6-4(a)(1). 
131
AR 600-85, supra note 59, para. 6-4(a)(1). 
132
MCM, supra note 85, M
IL
.
R.
E
VID
. 311(a)(2). 
133
See  United  States  v.  Fagan,  28  M.J.  64,  64-66  (C.M.A.  1989)  (upholding  a 
commander’s  order to provide fingerprint samples).  The Court noted that  “people 
ordinarily  do  not  have  enforceable  expectations  of  privacy  in  their  physical 
characteristics.”  Id. at 66. 
134
See id. 
135
See Davis v. Mississippi, 394 U.S. 721, 722-28 (1969) (finding that a police dragnet 
sweep of African-American males for fingerprinting violated the Fourth Amendment); 
Fagan, 28 M.J. at 66 (distinguishing between the Fourth Amendment applications of 
holding an individual to obtain physical evidence and of actually obtaining the physical 
evidence). 
136
United States v. Dionisio, 410 U.S. 1, 8 (1973). 
137
See id.Davis, 394 U.S. at 727-28 (1969) (holding that law enforcement did not have 
proper  legal  authority  to  detain  young  African-American  men  for  fingerprinting 
purposes); Fagan, 28 M.J. at 64-70 (upholding commander’s order to require Marines to 
provide fingerprints to law enforcement despite the commander’s lack of probable cause).  
Wrongful entries had occurred at the enlisted barracks of 1st Battalion, 12th Marines, 
located at Marine Corps Air Station, Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii.  Id. at 64-65.  The entries 
happened while the unit conducted off-island training.  Id. at 65.  The investigating 
agents did not have any evidence pointing to a particular Marine.  Id.  Therefore, the 
commander decided to fingerprint all of the Marines, approximately 100, who had not 
attended the training and who had remained on the island.  Id. 
C# Word - Footnote & Endnote Processing in C#.NET
0); //More TODO:May create some block in endnote //Save 4.Create text for run footnoteRun.CreateText("Text created in Create or Add Table in Footnote & Endnote.
how to add text to a pdf file; how to insert text into a pdf with acrobat
About RasterEdge.com - A Professional Image Solution Provider
Block 2-1-5, #29 Yonglin Road, Chengdu City, Sichuan Province, China. We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
how to insert text into a pdf file; how to add text to a pdf file in acrobat
56 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
certain servicemember,
138
or at least possess a reasonable belief that a 
hair sample test would identify a perpetrator.
139
Additionally,  the  hair  sample  seizure  must  utilize  reasonable 
collection procedures.
140
In Bouse v. Bussey, the Ninth Circuit Court of 
Appeals  held  that  a  hair  sample  collection  violated  the  Fourth 
Amendment.
141
The Ninth Circuit found that two police officers acted 
inappropriately  when  they  subdued  a  pretrial  detainee,  unzipped  his 
trousers, and forcibly pulled a pubic hair sample.
142
The court found that 
these actions exceeded the “minor intrusions upon privacy and integrity 
that . . . are not generally considered searches or seizures.”
143
“[W]hat is 
reasonable depends upon all of the circumstances surrounding the search 
or seizure and the nature of the search or seizure itself.”
144
In sum, military appellate courts have not ruled on the threshold 
question of whether a servicemember has an expectation of privacy in his 
hair for drug testing purposes.
145
However, commanders should always 
try  to  obtain samples  of  hair from the  head  instead of  the  body  to 
138
See generally Knight v. Evanco, No. 02-CV-1748, 2003 U.S. Dist. LEXIS 23734, at 
*2, 19-20 (E.D. Pa. 2003) (involving a Pennsylvania State Police regulation requiring a 
commander to have a reasonable suspicion of drug use by a police officer prior to 
ordering the police officer to submit to a hair drug test). 
139
See Fagan, 28 M.J. at 68 (C.M.A. 1989) (requiring a commander to at least have 
knowledge that fingerprints may lead to perpetrator’s identity). 
140
See Davis, 394 U.S. at ,727-28 (1969) (noting that warrantless fingerprinting by law 
enforcement  might  survive  Fourth  Amendment  scrutiny  if  law  enforcement  follow 
“narrowly circumscribed procedures”); Bouse v. Bussey, 573 F.2d 548, 549-50 (9th Cir. 
1977) (finding police seizure of pubic hair sample as unreasonable). 
141
Bouse, 573 F.2d at 550-51. 
142
Id. at 550.  Mr. Bouse had filed a claim under 42 U.S.C.S. § 1983 (LEXIS 2006) that 
the police officers had violated his Fourth Amendment rights when the officers allegedly 
obtained his pubic hair sample.  Id. at 549.  The district court dismissed the complaint on 
grounds that the alleged conduct did not constitute a Fourth Amendment violation.  Id.  
The appellate court reversed the lower court, holding that Mr. Bouse would have a 
Constitutional claim based upon his allegations.  Id. at 549, 551. 
143
See id. at 550 (distinguishing between “reasonable” and “unreasonable” searches as 
envisioned by the language of the Fourth Amendment).   
144
United States v. Montoya De Hernandez, 473 U.S. 535, 537 (1985); cf. Rochin v. 
California, 342 U.S. 165 (1952) (establishing a “shock the conscious” due process test for 
improper police action). 
145
See United States v. Ruiz, No. 33084, 1999 CCA LEXIS 219, at *2 (A.F. Ct. Crim. 
App. July 26, 1999) (unpublished) (raising but not addressing the issue of expectation of 
privacy in one’s hair). 
Customize, Process Image in .NET Winforms| Online Tutorials
Edit images & documents using Erase Rectangle & Merge Block function; Microsoft Visual Studio; Open an existed Windows Application; Add RasterEdge.DotNetImaging
add text to pdf file reader; add text to pdf reader
.NET Imaging Processing SDK | Process, Manipulate Images
Provide basic transformation functions, like Crop, Rotate, Resize, Flip and more; Basic image edit function support, such as Erase Rectangle, Merge Block, etc.
how to enter text in a pdf document; how to add text field to pdf form
2006] 
HAIR SAMPLE TESTING FOR DRUG USE 
57 
minimize any intrusiveness concerns.
146
Commanders should also obtain 
hair samples using cutting, not plucking, methods.
147
These techniques 
will strengthen the government’s argument that a servicemember does 
not  have  a  reasonable  expectation  of  privacy  in  his  seized  hair.
148
Finally, the commander should be able to articulate a basis for seizing 
hair from the servicemember and should follow established collection 
procedures.
149
B.  Search Authorization 
Although  military  appellate  courts  have  not  yet  addressed  the 
expectation of privacy issue for hair drug testing, they have routinely 
upheld search authorizations for hair samples.
150
Witness observations 
and  positive  urinalysis results  usually provide the  facts  necessary  to 
146
See Coddington v. Evanko, 112 F. App’x 835, 837-38 (3rd Cir. 2004) (finding no 
reasonable expectation of privacy for hair on “public display”); Bouse, 573 F.2d at 550-
51 (involving the collection of pubic hair). 
147
Coddington, 112 F. App’x at 838; see also In re Grand Jury Proceedings Cecil Mills, 
686 F.2d 135, 140 (3rd Cir. 1982) (cutting a hair sample from the head versus pulling a 
hair sample from the root may result in different constitutional outcomes).  But see State 
v.  Sharpe,  200 S.E.  2d  44, 47,  49 (N.C.  1973) (holding  that  plucking  hairs  from 
defendant’s  head  and  arm  incident  to  a  lawful  arrest  did  not  violate  the  Fourth 
Amendment). 
148
See Coddington, 112 F. App’x at 837-38 (finding no expectation of privacy in hair 
exposed to public view). 
149
See United States  v.  Dionisio,  410  U.S.  1,  8 (1973)  (stating  that  the  Fourth 
Amendment applies both to the seizure of a person and then to the seizure and search of 
the person’s body evidence); United States v. Fagan, 28 M.J. 64, 68-70 (C.M.A. 1989) 
(examining the “seizure” of a servicemember to collect body evidence). 
150
See United States v. Bethea, 61 M.J. 184, 184-86, 188 (2005) (finding probable cause 
for search authorization to collect a hair sample); United States v. Cravens, 56 M.J. 370, 
370-75 (2002) (upholding magistrate’s decision to grant search authorization); United 
States v. Bush, 47 M.J. 305, 308-09 (1997) (finding a proper search authorization without 
requiring an agent to apply a “precise mathematical limitation to the length of the hair 
obtained” from the accused); United States v. Adams, No. 33055, 2000 CCA LEXIS 196, 
at *1-7 (A.F. Ct. Crim. App. Aug. 4, 2000) (unpublished) (supporting the magistrate’s 
probable cause determination despite minor errors in the agent’s affidavit); United States 
v. Johnson, No. 33134, 2000 CCA LEXIS 18, at *1-5 (A.F. Ct. Crim. App. Jan. 27, 2000) 
(unpublished) (denying defense claim that agent’s information to magistrate about hair 
drug testing was erroneous); United States v. Ruiz, No. 33084, 1999 CCA LEXIS 219, at 
*2-11 (A.F. Ct. Crim. App. July 26, 1999) (unpublished) (involving Air Force Office of 
Special Investigations (AF OSI) agents obtaining a search authorization for a hair sample 
test based upon observations of the accused snorting a white substance); United States v. 
Millar, No. 32222, 1997 CCA LEXIS 30, at *1-3 (A.F. Ct. Crim. App. Jan. 8, 1997) 
(involving a search authorization to obtain pubic hair). 
58 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
support a probable cause determination.
151
In several military cases, 
however,  the  defense  challenged  the  commander  or  magistrate’s 
probable cause determination based on inaccurate information provided 
by witnesses about the capabilities of hair sample testing.
152
For example, United States v. Bethea involved confusion over the 
ability of hair sample testing to detect a one time drug use.
153
When a 
Criminal  Investigation  Division  (CID)  special  agent  confronted  the 
accused  with  a  positive  urinalysis  test,  the  accused  denied  using 
cocaine.
154
 The  special  agent  then  sought  a  magistrate’s  search 
authorization for a hair sample.
155
The special agent’s affidavit stated 
that hair sample testing analysis could detect only chronic or binge drug 
use.
156
The defense argued that  the positive  urinalysis result lacked 
probable  cause  for  a  second  test  that  could  detect  one  time  use.
157
Therefore, the defense claimed the magistrate lacked probable cause to 
order  a  follow-up  hair  test  because  the  hair  test  could  only  detect 
multiple uses.
158
Even if a hair sample analysis might not detect all one time uses,
159
the Court  of Appeals for  the Armed Forces (CAAF) stated that this 
possible limitation did not invalidate the search authorization.
160
The 
court held that because a urinalysis could detect not only a one time use 
but also multiple uses, 
161
a urinalysis could provide sufficient probable 
151
See Johnson, 2000 CCA LEXIS 18, at *1-5 (basing hair sample authorization on 
results of urinalysis test); Ruiz, 1999 CCA LEXIS 219, at *2-11 (establishing probable 
cause for hair sample test based upon witness observation of drug use). 
152
See Bethea, 61 M.J. at 184-86 (challenging agent’s affidavit); Johnson, 2000 CCA 
LEXIS 18, at *1-5 (rejecting defense claim that the magistrate’s reliance on the case 
agent’s and hair consultant’s statements did not support probable cause for a hair test); 
see also Major Charles Pede, New Developments in Search and Seizure and Urinalysis
A
RMY 
L
AW
., Apr. 1998, at 86-88 (analyzing agent’s failure in United States v. Bush, 47 
M.J. 305 (1997), to provide a commander with sufficient information about defendant’s 
hair sample). 
153
Bethea, 61 M.J. at 184-86. 
154
United States v. Bethea, No. 35381, 2004 CCA LEXIS 175, at *2 (A.F. Ct. Crim. 
App. July 20, 2004), aff’d, United States v. Bethea, 61 M.J. 184 (2005). 
155
Id. 
156
Bethea, 61 M.J. at 185. 
157
Id. at 185-86.  
158
Id. 
159
See supra Part II.E (addressing hair testing’s ability to detect a one-time use). 
160
Bethea, 61 M.J. at 187-88.  The CAAF noted that its opinion did not address whether 
hair testing could detect a one-time use.  Id. at 186 n.3. 
161
Id. at 187. 
2006] 
HAIR SAMPLE TESTING FOR DRUG USE 
59 
cause for a hair sample test.
162
The court effectively dodged the one time 
use issue by focusing on a urinalysis’s ability to detect multiple drug 
uses.
163
Bethea represents the problems that lack of precise wording in  
affidavits  can  create  in  the  search  authorization  process.
164
 Law 
enforcement  officers  and  special  agents  should  always  contact  hair 
sample  analysis experts prior to executing an affidavit that is geared 
toward seizure of a hair sample.
165
This simple step can help ensure 
commanders  and  magistrates  obtain  accurate  hair  drug  testing 
information  prior  to  being  confronted  with  a  probable  cause 
determination. 
C.  Military Rule of Evidence 313 
Although  a proper  search authorization  complies  with the Fourth 
Amendment,  a  commander’s  inspection  authority  provides  a  lawful 
exception  to  Fourth  Amendment  requirements.
166
 Military  Rule  of 
Evidence 313  outlines  the legal  standards  applicable  to  a  command 
inspection.
167
 These  standards  provide  guidance  on  inspection 
procedures and regulate the admissibility of evidence collected pursuant 
to  an  inspection.
168
Hair drug  testing complies with these  standards 
because it satisfies the rule’s underlying “special needs” exception to the 
Fourth Amendment’s warrant clause.
169
Hair drug testing also mirrors 
the rules urinalysis exception criteria because the rationale used to justify 
hair drug testing can be analogized to that used with urinalysis testing.
170
162
Id. at 187-88. 
163
Id. 
164
Id. at 184-88. 
165
See generally id. at 185 (noting that the special agent on the case contacted a forensic 
science consultant and the National Medical Services Laboratory). 
166
U.S.
C
ONST
. amend. IV; MCM, supra note 85, M
IL
.
R.
E
VID
. 313. 
167
MCM, supra note 85, M
IL
.
R.
E
VID
. 313. 
168
Id. at M
IL
.
R.
E
VID
. 313(a), (b). 
169
See Skinner v. Ry. Labor Executives Ass’n, 489 U.S. 602, 618-34 (1989) (using the 
special need exception to the Fourth Amendment to uphold urine testing of certain 
railway employees); Nat’l Treasury Employees Union v. Von Raab, 489 U.S. 656, 665-
79 (1989); United States v. Bickel, 30 M.J. 277 (C.M.A. 1990) (applying the special need 
exception to the military urinalysis program); see also infra Part III.C.1 (analyzing the 
special need exception). 
170
See infra Part III.C.2. 
60 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
Adhering to these proscribed requirements also helps prevent subterfuge 
inspections.
171
1.  The “Special Needs” Exception 
The Supreme Court has created a “special needs” exception to the 
Fourth Amendment’s probable cause and warrant requirement to deal 
with unique government interests.
172
A compulsory urinalysis ordered 
pursuant to MRE 313 already complies with this exception both in the 
rule’s text and supportive case law.
173
The “special needs” exception 
permits a suspicionless, warrantless search into an area in which a person 
has a reasonable expectation of privacy if the government interest or 
“special need” outweighs that person’s privacy rights.
174
“In limited 
circumstances, where the privacy interests implicated by the search are 
minimal, and where an important governmental interest furthered by the 
intrusion would be placed in jeopardy by a requirement of individualized 
suspicion,  a  search  may  be  reasonable  despite  the  absence  of  such 
suspicion.”
175
The Supreme Court has analyzed the “special needs” exception in 
five separate cases.
176
These cases developed factors the Court applies in 
171
Id. 
172
See Skinner, 489 U.S. at 618-34 (addressing the special needs exception); Von Raab, 
489 U.S. at 665-79. 
173
See Bickel, 30 M.J. at 281-86 (remaining “convinced that the [compulsory urinalysis] 
testing of servicemembers authorized by MRE 313 pursuant to an ‘inspection’ rationale is 
constitutionally valid” in light of the Skinner v. Ry. Labor Executives’ Ass’n, 489 U.S. 
602 (1989), and Nat’l Treasury Employees Union v. Von Raab, 489 U.S. 656 (1989) 
decisions). 
174
See Ferguson v. City of Charleston, 532 U.S. 67, 78 (2001); Skinner, 489 U.S. at 618-
20. 
175
Skinner, 489 U.S. at 624; see also Von Raab, 489 U.S. at 665-79.  A “suspicionless” 
search refers to a search without a warrant or probable cause.  See generally Von Raab
489 U.S. at 665-66. 
176
See Ferguson, 532 U.S. at 69-86 (finding that police and prosecution involvement in 
a public hospital’s drug testing of pregnant mothers removed the testing from the special 
needs exception); Chandler v. Miller, 520 U.S. 305, 308-23 (1997) (finding no special 
need exception for drug testing of Georgia political candidates); Vernonia School Dist. 
47J v. Acton, 515 U.S. 646, 648-66 (1995) (approving of school district’s random drug 
testing of student athletes as a special need); Skinner, 489 U.S. at 602, 633-34 (upholding 
Federal  Railroad  Administration  regulations  requiring  urinalysis  testing  for  certain 
railroad employees); Von Raab, 489 U.S. at 659-79 (upholding special need of United 
States Customs Service to drug test employees seeking promotion to positions involving 
drug interdiction or involving firearm use); see also John B. Wefing, Employee Drug 
2006] 
HAIR SAMPLE TESTING FOR DRUG USE 
61 
articulating  a  special  governmental  need  and  in  weighing  that  need 
against a person’s privacy interests.
177
First, the Court will not find a 
special need that serves simply as a pretext for criminal prosecution.
178
Second, the Court will look favorably upon a special need that does not 
subject an individual to arbitrary testing.
179
Third, the Court will give 
great weight to the deterrent effect of the government tests when the 
Court  finds  a  special  need.
180
 Fourth,  the  Court  will  consider  the 
temporal  applicability  of  the  government  test—whether  the  test  can 
prevent destruction of evidence or determine immediate impairment.
181
Additionally,  the  Supreme  Court  prefers  a  special  need  that 
minimally intrudes on a person’s privacy.
182
When analyzing a unit drug 
testing  program,  the  Court  will  consider  the  intrusiveness  of  the 
collection procedures.
183
The Court will also examine the amount of 
restriction the test places on a person’s freedom of movement.
184
The 
nature of the person’s employment will also receive close review by the 
Court.
185
The Court has found that an employee has a lower expectation 
of privacy in a heavily regulated work environment.
186
In United States v. Bickel, the Court of Military Appeals (COMA) 
found a special need for the military’s urine testing program.
187
The 
Bickel court identified several distinctions between the Supreme Court’s 
Testing: Disparate Judicial and Legislative Responses, 63
A
LB
.
L.
R
EV
.
799, 800-14 
(2000) (providing an overview of Supreme Court, federal, and state cases applying the 
special need exception). 
177
See Skinner, 489 U.S. at 620-32 (identifying special need factors). 
178
See Ferguson, 532 U.S. at 82-86 (finding no special need due to extensive law 
enforcement involvement in the drug testing program); Skinner, 489 U.S. at 620-21 & 
621 n.5. 
179
See Skinner, 489 U.S. at 621-22 (1989) (favoring limited discretion by persons who 
authorize the drug testing). 
180
See id. at 629-30 (recognizing that a program preventing drug use will not work if 
employees have no fear of discovery). 
181
Id. at 623, 631-32. 
182
See Ferguson, 532 U.S at 77-78 (weighing the amount of intrusion into the person’s 
indi vidual privacy against the importance of the government’s special need). 
183
Skinner, 489 U.S. at 626-27. 
184
Id. at 618, 624-25. 
185
See id. at 627 (noting that a heavily regulated industry to ensure employee health, 
fitness,  and  safety  supports  a  lower  expectation  of  privacy  among  the  industry’s 
employees). 
186
Id. 
187
United States v. Bickel, 30 M.J. 277, 281-86 (C.M.A. 1990) (finding drug testing, 
pursuant to an inspection, as constitutionally valid).  
62 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
“special  needs” drug  cases and the  military  urinalysis  inspections.
188
First,  the  court  recognized  that  the  military  used  the  test  results  in 
criminal  prosecutions  but  that  the  Supreme  Court  favored  an 
administrative use of the results.
189
Second, the court noted that the 
military required  direct observation  of  a  servicemember  providing  a 
urine  sample  while  the  Supreme  Court  emphasized  no  such 
observation.
190
Despite these differences, the Bickel court “remain[ed] convinced 
that the testing of servicemembers authorized by [MRE 313] pursuant to 
an ‘inspection’ rationale [was] constitutionally valid.”
191
The COMA 
identified several reasons to support its decision:  (1) the effects of drugs 
on a servicemember’s ability to accomplish the military mission;
192
(2) a 
servicemember’s use of firearms;
193
(3) the legislative intent of Congress 
in criminalizing drug use and drug possession under the Uniform Code 
of  Military  Justice;
194
(4)  a  reduced  expectation  of  privacy  in  the 
military;
195
(5) a dramatic reduction in positive test results;
196
(6) proper 
notification  to  servicemembers  about  the  program;
197
and  (7)  the 
administrative purpose of the urinalysis program.
198
Applying the Supreme Court factors and the COMA rationale, hair 
drug testing satisfies the “special needs” exception.  First, since hair drug 
188
Id. at 281-82. 
189
Id.  The COMA recognized that the Federal Railroad Administration in the Skinner v. 
Railway Labor Executive’s Association conducted the drug testing for safety reasons and 
had not provided the results to law enforcement.  Id. at 281 (citing Skinner v. Ry. Labor 
Executives Ass’n, 489 U.S. 602, 639 (1989)).   
190
Id. at 281-82.  The COMA referenced Justice Kennedy’s note in Skinner v. Ry. Labor 
Executive’s Ass’n Id. at 282.  In Skinner, Justice Kennedy pointed out that the railroad’s 
drug  testing  regulations  did  not  require  a  monitor’s  direct  observation  of  sample 
collection.  Skinner v. Ry. Labor Executives’ Ass’n, 489 U.S. 602, 626-27 (1989). 
191
Bickel,  30  M.J.  at  282.    The  court  countered  the  “prosecution”  concern  by 
highlighting the military’s frequent use of urine test results in adverse administrative 
proceedings.  Id. at 285.  Also, the court supported the direct observation requirement 
with the need to prevent sample adulteration.  Id. at 286.   
192
Id. at 282-83 (highlighting that even a servicemember with a routine task may have to 
act quickly to perform a military mission).  
193
Id. at 283. 
194
Id.   
195
Id. 
196
Id. at 284. 
197
Id. 
198
Id. at 285 (noting the military’s priority in ensuring the mental and physical fitness of 
the force). 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested