open pdf file in asp.net using c# : Add text block to pdf Library software component asp.net wpf windows mvc 188-summer-20067-part512

2006] 
HAIR SAMPLE TESTING FOR DRUG USE 
63 
testing  and  urine  testing  employ  similar  analysis  procedures
199
and 
generally yield similarly accurate results,
200
hair drug testing uses the 
same  justification  criteria  identified  in Bickel.
201
 Second,  hair  drug 
testing  involves  a  faster and  less intrusive collection  procedure  than 
urinalysis testing.
202
Even if the command needs to obtain body hair, the 
monitor  can collect the  hair  sample quickly.
203
 The hair  collection 
procedure also eliminates the pressure of having to urinate under direct 
observation.
204
Third, the command can easily incorporate hair drug 
testing  into  current  urinalysis  programs  and  thereby  avoid  arbitrary 
application.
205
Finally,  hair drug  testing,  in  conjunction  with urine  testing, will 
subject servicemembers to a testing program that can reveal drug use 
over  a  period  of  several  months.
206
 Commanders  can  use  this 
information to identify patterns of drug use in their units and respond 
199
Compare P
SYCHEMEDICS 
T
RAINING 
M
ANUAL
supra  note  30  (describing  hair 
collection  procedures) with AR 600-85, supra  note  59,  app. E (providing standard 
operating procedures for urine collection). 
200
Compare Vinal, supra note 18, §§ 8-9 (noting the laboratory tests performed on hair), 
with DODI 1010.16,
supra note 46, paras. E1.5, E1.6 (identifying the military laboratory 
tests performed on urine). 
201
See Bickel, 30 M.J. at 282-85 (providing several reasons why the military urinalysis 
program meets the special needs exception). 
202
See Nat’l Treasury Employees Union v. Von Raab, 489 U.S. 656, 680 (1989) (Scalia, 
J., dissenting) (noting that  urine  testing is “destructive  to  privacy and  offensive  to 
personal dignity”); Mr. Thistle E-mail, Jan. 4, 2006, supra note 59 (noting that clipping 
hair from a person’s body is less intrusive than watching them urinate into a cup).  Mr. 
Thistle noted that “in this country it is not unusual for people to get their hair cut in front 
of plate glass windows at the mall.  It is quite unusual if someone urinates in front of a 
plate glass window at the mall.”  Id.  Mr. Thistle also stated that a hair collection only 
takes a few minutes and a hair collector can obtain a pubic hair sample without having 
the individual expose his or her genitals.  Id. 
203
See Mr. Thistle E-mail, Jan. 4, 2006, supra note 59 (stating that a collector needs only 
a few minutes to obtain a hair sample from a person). 
204
See Bickel, 30 M.J. at 286 (justifying the direct observation requirement in the 
military’s urinalysis program). 
205
See infra Part VI (implementing a hair analysis program); see Bickel, 30 M.J. at 285 
(noting  that  the  military’s  extensive  urinalysis  regulations  and  extensive  urinalysis 
policies help avoid arbitrary application of the urinalysis test). 
206
See supra Part II.D (discussing hair drug testing’s drug detection window); see also 
Hearing on the Federal  Workplace Drug Testing Programsupra note 52, at 8-10 
(testimony of Harry F. Connick, District Attorney, City of New Orleans) (explaining how 
hair testing’s long drug detection window helped reduce recidivism in drug use offenders 
and helped decrease high school student drug use).  
Add text block to pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text to pdf online; adding text to a pdf document
Add text block to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text to pdf form; add text field pdf
64 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
with appropriate administrative measures.
207
This increased deterrent 
effect compensates for hair drug testing’s lack of temporal application.
208
Hair  drug  testing’s  long  drug  detection  window  is  not  significantly 
different from current urinalysis testing’s one to three week window for 
detecting marijuana use.
209
Although hair drug testing cannot identify 
immediate drug impairment, the military’s need to identify “recent” drug 
use and prevent future drug use justifies a “special needs” application for 
hair drug testing.
210
2.  Applying the Language of MRE 313 
The strong similarities between hair drug testing and urine testing 
support  hair  drug  testing  analysis’s  ability  to  meet  the  textual 
requirements of MRE 313.  The text of MRE 313 clearly recognizes the 
military urinalysis program as a valid inspection.
211
Hair drug testing 
employs the same RIA screening test and GC/MS confirmatory test as a 
207
See generally Hearing on Drug Testing and Drug Treatmentsupra note 55, at 10-11 
(statement of Robert L. Dupont, President, Institute for Behavior and Health) (explaining 
the hair’s ability to create a ninety-day drug use history). 
208
See supra Part II.E (noting the inability of hair drug testing to detect immediate drug 
use, because hair must grow for several days to expose the hair containing the drugs 
above the skin’s surface); see also Bickel, 30 M.J. at 283 (recognizing the deterrent effect 
of drug testing). 
209
See DOD Urinalysis Program, supra note 12 (providing the DOD drug detection 
window for marijuana). 
210
See  Skinner  v.  Ry.  Labor  Executives’  Ass’n,  489  U.S.  602,  631-33  (1989) 
(emphasizing that even information about  “recent” employee drug use  can  help  an 
employer identify how a particular accident occurred).  Opponents of hair testing could 
argue that hair testing’s lack of temporal application violates MRE 313 because they 
view MRE 313 as ensuring the “immediate” fitness of servicemembers.  See generally  
MCM, supra note 85, M
IL
.
R.
E
VID
. 313.  They might argue that MRE 313 supports an 
inspection  before  a  unit  deploys or  conducts  maneuvers but  not  an inspection that 
involves activities that occurred months prior to the inspection.  Although the COMA did 
not directly discuss the temporal applicability of urine testing in Bickel, the court did 
provide some insight on drug testing for immediate impairment.  See Bickel, 30 M.J. at 
283.  The court recognized that servicemembers’s duties could require the use of a 
weapon at a moments notice.  Id The court then stated “[i]n such an event there would 
probably not be sufficient time to test a member’s fitness to handle weapons; hence our 
more sweeping rule allowing random testing of all hands.”  Id.  Under the same rationale, 
the military’s unique environment would also support the larger drug detection window 
of hair testing. 
211
See MCM, supra note 85, M
IL
.
R.
E
VID
. 313(b) (stating that “[a]n order to produce 
body fluids, such as urine, is permissible in accordance with this rule”). 
C# Raster - Image Compression in C#.NET
algorithm, Named Bzip2 yet. DXT1. The value is 3. It is also known as Block Compression1 or BC1. DXT3. The value is 4. It is collectively
add text to pdf in preview; how to add text to a pdf document using acrobat
C# Word - Header & Footer Processing in C#.NET
Default); //More TODO:may create some block in footer. header.CreateParagraph(); //Create a run and text in paragraph Create and Add Table to Footer & Header.
how to add text boxes to pdf; how to add a text box in a pdf file
2006] 
HAIR SAMPLE TESTING FOR DRUG USE 
65 
urinalysis.
212
Both hair testing and urine testing also use comparable 
collection methods.
213
Additionally, MRE 313’s text prevents a commander from using his 
inspection authority as a subterfuge for a search.
214
The government will 
need to prove by clear and convincing evidence that the commander did 
not subvert the search authorization requirement if the commander:  (1) 
orders a urinalysis inspection directly following a report of drug use in 
the unit; (2) targets certain servicemembers during the inspection; and/or 
(3) subjects the servicemembers to “substantially different intrusions” 
during the same inspection.
215
A subterfuge issue often arises when a commander seeks to drug test 
particular  unit  members  based  on  rumors  that  these  members  use 
drugs.
216
The rumors frequently do not provide the commander with 
probable cause for a command-directed urinalysis.
217
Nevertheless, the 
commander may still want to take immediate action before the drugs 
process out of the servicemember’s body.  Therefore, the commander 
sometimes decides to rely on his inspection authority.
218
Consequently, 
if the commander specifically uses his inspection authority to avoid the 
probable  cause  requirement,  the  government  cannot use  the  positive 
urinalysis results in court.
219
Instead, a commander could rely on the long drug detection window 
of a previously scheduled hair drug test to avoid a subterfuge search.
220
For example, in February 2006 a commander schedules a hair sample test 
for 31 March 2006.  On 1 March 2006 the commander becomes aware of 
212
See supra note 199. 
213
See supra note 198. 
214
MCM, supra note 85, M
IL
.
R.
E
VID
. 313 (outlining inspection requirements); United 
States v.  Taylor,  41 M.J. 168,  168-71 (C.M.A. 1994)  (finding that  a  headquarters 
company commander’s urinalysis inspection did not constitute a subterfuge for a search 
despite allegations of drug use by servicemembers in the personnel section); United 
States v. Campbell, 41 M.J. 177, 178-82 (C.M.A. 1994) (finding an improper urinalysis 
inspection  where command selected  the  accused for the inspection  based solely on 
suspicions of drug use). 
215
MCM, supra note 85, M
IL
.
R.
E
VID
. 313(b); Campbell, 41 M.J. at 178-82. 
216
Campbell,  41  M.J.  at  178-82  (selecting  certain servicemembers  for  an  illegal 
urinalysis “inspection” after the commander heard rumors of drug use in the unit). 
217
Id. at 182-83.  
218
See id. at 178-82 (finding an improper urinalysis inspection). 
219
Id. at 181-82. 
220
See supra Part II.D (discussing hair sample analysis’s long drug detection window). 
C# Word - Footnote & Endnote Processing in C#.NET
0); //More TODO:May create some block in endnote //Save 4.Create text for run footnoteRun.CreateText("Text created in Create or Add Table in Footnote & Endnote.
adding text to pdf document; how to add a text box to a pdf
About RasterEdge.com - A Professional Image Solution Provider
Block 2-1-5, #29 Yonglin Road, Chengdu City, Sichuan Province, China. We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
adding text to a pdf in preview; adding text to a pdf in reader
66 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
rumors of recent drug use in the unit.  Instead of conducting a urinalysis 
on 1 March 2006, the commander could rely on the previously scheduled 
31 March 2006 hair sample test.
221
The commander would receive the 
benefit of  testing the time  period of the suspected drug use without 
unlawfully ordering a urinalysis directly following rumors of drug use.  
Also, when the commander schedules a hair sample test, he could require 
100% unit participation to avoid targeting specific servicemembers.
222
Additionally, a commander could avoid subjecting servicemembers 
to “substantially different intrusions” during the inspection by obtaining 
primarily hair from the head, and by articulating strict guidelines for 
obtaining hair from the body.
223
If possible, the commander should first 
attempt to obtain a head hair sample from the servicemember.
224
If the 
servicemember cannot provide a sample of hair from his head, then the 
commander should follow clearly defined procedures for obtaining hair 
from the body.
225
As a result, the commander’s inspection procedures 
would uniformly  subject  each servicemember  to  the same  collection 
protocol.
226
221
See id. (noting that most hair sample test results encompass a three-month window). 
222
See  United  States v.  Bickel,  30  M.J.  277, 286  (C.M.A.  1990)  (noting  that  a 
commander cannot “pick and choose the members of his unit who will be tested for drugs 
and then . . . use the resulting evidence to obtain a criminal conviction”). 
223
See id. (requiring a urinalysis to follow established guidelines).  
224
See P
SYCHEMEDICS 
T
RAINING 
M
ANUAL
supra note 30, at 6-7 (noting that head hair 
provides the easiest site for hair collection).   
225
See Bickel, 30 M.J. at 286 (emphasizing the need for set guidelines and defined 
policies to regulate military drug testing to avoid arbitrary application of the tests by the 
command); P
SYCHEMEDICS 
T
RAINING 
M
ANUAL
supra note 30, at 6 (describing body hair 
collection).   
226
See Bickel, 30 M.J. at 286 (requiring a urinalysis to avoid arbitrary application).  
Lieutenant Colonel Mark Jamison, Professor, The Judge Advocate General’s School, 
Charlottesville, Virginia, and Major Jennifer Santiago, Professor, The Judge Advocate 
General’s School, Charlottesville, Virginia, raised a concern about the disparate treatment 
hair testing could have on female servicemembers.  Their concern involves the use of 
alternative hair collection sites for a female servicemember who does not have sufficient 
head hair to provide an adequate hair sample.  As noted in the text above, this article 
proposes the use of alternative hair sites according to an established protocol.  The 
protocol would require the collector to first seek head hair, then body hair (e.g., arm and 
chest hair), and as a last resort pubic hair.  Nevertheless, the vast majority of female 
servicemembers, if not all, would likely not have alternative body hair other than pubic 
hair.  Therefore, this lack of body hair creates an argument that female servicemembers 
would  face  a  more  intrusive  hair  collection  protocol  than  male  servicemembers.  
Although  female servicemembers  would  likely  not  have alternative  body hair,  this  
should not prevent hair  drug testing for several reasons.   First, the author’s casual 
observance of female servicemembers’s hair seems to indicate that very few female 
servicemembers would have insufficient head hair for a hair sample.  See generally U.S.
Customize, Process Image in .NET Winforms| Online Tutorials
Edit images & documents using Erase Rectangle & Merge Block function; Microsoft Visual Studio; Open an existed Windows Application; Add RasterEdge.DotNetImaging
adding text box to pdf; adding text fields to pdf
.NET Imaging Processing SDK | Process, Manipulate Images
Provide basic transformation functions, like Crop, Rotate, Resize, Flip and more; Basic image edit function support, such as Erase Rectangle, Merge Block, etc.
how to add text fields to pdf; how to input text in a pdf
2006] 
HAIR SAMPLE TESTING FOR DRUG USE 
67 
IV.  Reliable and Relevant Results 
Besides surviving Fourth Amendment scrutiny, hair  sample  tests 
have also defeated reliability arguments and relevancy challenges in the 
courts over the last fifteen years.
227
Prior to 1990, military appellate 
courts  had  only  addressed  hair  sample  testing  in  the  context  of 
comparing a hair sample taken from a person whose identity was known,  
to a crime scene sample.
228
Since 1990, military courts have allowed hair 
sample results into evidence.
229
The recent CAAF opinion in United 
D
EP
T OF 
A
RMY
,
R
EG
.
670-1,
W
EAR AND 
A
PPEARANCE OF 
A
RMY 
U
NIFORMS AND 
I
NSIGNIA
paras. 1-8 (a)(2), (3) (3 Feb. 2005) (allowing female servicemembers to have longer hair 
than male servicemembers).  Second, pubic hair collection is less intrusive than current 
urine collection methods because pubic hair collection does not require observation of the 
genitals.  See Mr. Thistle E-mail, Jan. 4, 2006, supra note 59.  Third, use of trained 
female collectors for female servicemembers would reduce the emotional impact of hair 
collection.  See AR 600-85, supra note 59, E-4(d) (requiring a commander to designate 
same sex  observers  for  tested Soldiers).   Furthermore,  military  regulations  already 
account for differences in gender physiology and in gender anatomy when appropriate.  
For example, while not completely analogous to this situation, male servicemembers 
could argue that lower physical fitness test standards for female servicemembers results 
in unequal treatment for male servicemembers.  See U.S
D
EP
T OF 
A
RMY
,
F
IELD 
M
ANUAL 
21-20,
P
HYSICAL 
F
ITNESS 
T
RAINING
14-3 to 14-7 (1 Oct. 1998) (providing the fitness test 
point  scales  for  male  and  female  Soldiers);  U.S.
D
EP
T OF 
A
RMY
,
R
EG
.
600-8-19,
E
NLISTED 
P
ROMOTIONS AND 
R
EDUCTIONS
para. 3-47(b) & tbl. 3-21 (10 Jan. 2006) (linking 
promotion points to physical fitness test scores).  Nevertheless, the author argues that the 
military  supports  these  different  standards  based  on  physiological  and  anatomical 
differences, not on gender alone.  The hair collection protocol would create the same 
distinction—a  distinction  based  upon  biological  differences  and  not  upon  a 
servicemember’s gender status.  As a result, hair drug testing does not create a male-
female distinction, but instead creates a hair-no hair distinction, regardless of gender.  In 
the author’s opinion, the few servicemembers (male or female) who would have to give 
body hair or pubic hair would suffer no more embarrassment or intrusion than the few 
servicemembers (male or female) who could not provide a urine sample due to the 
anxiety of urinating under direct observation. 
227
See United States v. Medina, 749 F. Supp. 59, 61-62 (E.D. N.Y. 1990) (setting 
precedent for hair analysis reliability); United States v. Bush, 47 M.J. 305, 310 (1997) 
(rejecting defense argument that hair drug testing is only reliable as a confirmatory test). 
228
See Major Samuel Rob, Drug Detection by Hair Analysis, A
RMY 
L
AW
., Jan. 1991, at 
14 (noting that the author’s case law research could not find a single case where the 
military appellate courts had admitted hair drug test results at trial); United States v. 
Pyburn, 47 C.M.R. 896, 904-07 (A.F. C. M. R. 1973) (comparing hair samples). 
229
See  United  States  v.  Bethea,  61  M.J.  184,  184-88  (2005)  (upholding  search 
authorization for hair samples); United States v. Brewer, 61 M.J. 425, 427 (2005) (noting 
that the trial court allowed hair drug test results into evidence); United States v. Cravens, 
56 M.J. 370, 370-75 (2002) (affirming lower court’s ruling on the admissibility of a hair 
sample obtained under a search authorization); United States v. Bush, 47 M.J. 305, 306-
12 (1997) (upholding hair analysis evidence); United States v. Will, No.  9802134, 2002 
CCA LEXIS 218, at *12-18 (N-M Ct. Crim. App. Sept. 27, 2002) (unpublished) (finding 
68 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
States v. Bethea demonstrates the military judicial system’s continuing 
acceptance of hair drug testing results.
230
During this fifteen-year period, federal courts have also recognized 
the reliability of hair drug testing.
231
United States v. Medina provided 
an on-point analysis of hair drug testing’s reliability in detecting cocaine 
use.
232
The Medina court referred to extensive scholarly writing on hair 
drug testing to support its conclusion.
233
A.  Evidentiary Reliability 
Ironically, military appellate courts’ first review of hair drug  testing 
originated with the defense.
234
In United States v. Nimmer, the defense 
sought  to enter a hair sample that  tested negative for drug use into 
evidence to counter a positive urinalysis test.
235
The trial court and the 
Navy-Marine Corps Court of Military Review denied admissibility of the 
hair  sample  test.
236
 Counsel  often  cite  this  case  as  authority  for 
that the trial court should have allowed the defense to submit a  hair sample testing 
negative for the presence of drugs into evidence); United States v. Ruiz, No. 33084, 1999 
CCA LEXIS 219, at *3-11 (A.F. Ct. Crim. App. July 26, 1999) (unpublished) (involving 
AF  OSI agents obtaining a  search  authorization for  a hair sample test based upon 
observations of the accused snorting a white substance); see also United States v. Webb, 
No. 32521, 1998 CCA LEXIS 270, *6 (A.F. Ct. Crim. App. June 12, 1998) (unpublished) 
(mentioning an order to provide a hair sample to test for cocaine); United States v. Millar, 
No. ACM 32222, 1997 CCA LEXIS 30, at *2-7 (A.F. Ct. Crim. App. Jan. 8, 1997) 
(claiming  pretrial  punishment  because  an  agent  took  photographs  of  pubic  hair 
collection); United States v. Baker, 45 M.J. 538, 539-41 (A.F. Ct. Crim. App. 1996), 
aff’d, United States v. Baker, 50 M.J. 223 (1998) (challenging accused’s consent to a hair 
test). 
230
Bethea, 61 M.J. at 184-88. 
231
See also Medina, 749 F. Supp. at 61-62 (accepting the reliability of a hair sample 
analysis report). 
232
Id. at 60-62. 
233
Id. at 61.  As a starting point for their case research, counsel can refer to American 
Jurisprudence Proof of Facts 3d to find multiple references on hair drug testing.  See 
Vinal, supra note 18. 
234
See United States v. Nimmer, 41 M.J. 924 (N.M.C.M.R. 1994), remanded by United 
States v. Nimmer, 43 M.J. 252 (1995). 
235
Id. at 926. 
236
Id. at 927-28.  The judge found that the scientific community generally did not accept 
the ability of a hair test to detect one-time use.  Id. at 927.  The Navy-Marine Court of 
Military Review (NMCMR) agreed with the trial judge and concluded that hair analysis 
needed more scientific study.  Id. at 928-29. 
2006] 
HAIR SAMPLE TESTING FOR DRUG USE 
69 
challenging the reliability of hair drug testing.
237
However, on appeal, 
the  CAAF remanded  the case  to  the  trial  court  to  apply  the  “new” 
Daubert guidance on admissibility of expert scientific evidence.
238
Since 
the Nimmer case, the military court system has accepted hair sample test 
results as reliable evidence under MRE 702.
239
Additionally, hair drug testing also survives relevancy challenges 
under MRE 401 and 403.
240
In United States v. Will, the Navy-Marine 
Court of Criminal Appeals (NMCCA) upheld the logical relevance of a 
hair sample analysis test to rebut a charge of drug use.
241
In United 
States v. Cravens, the CAAF upheld the legal relevance of a hair sample 
analysis.
242
The CAAF deferred to the trial judge’s decision that hair 
sample analysis results were not too confusing to be at issue before the 
court.
243
As a result, commanders should feel comfortable relying on  
hair sample test results.   
237
See United States v. Bush, 47 M.J. 305, 309 (1997) (citing the decision of the 
NMCMR in United States v. Nimmer, 39 M.J. 924 (1994)). 
238
United States v. Nimmer, 43 M.J. 252, 260 (1995).  Between the time of the trial and 
the CAAF ruling on the case, the Supreme Court had decided Daubert v. Merrell Dow 
Pharmaceuticals, Inc., 509 U.S. 579 (1993).  Id. at 256-60.  Daubert provided a non-
exclusive list of factors to assist a trial judge in determining the admissibility of scientific 
evidence.  Id. at 256.  
239
See Bush, 47 M.J. at 309-12 (upholding a trial judge’s ruling under MRE 702 to admit 
hair drug testing results after the judge conducted a Daubert hearing).  Military Rule of 
Evidence 702 states “[i]f scientific, technical, or other specialized knowledge will assist 
the trier of fact to understand the evidence or to determine a fact in issue, a witness 
qualified as an expert by knowledge, skill, experience, training, or education, may testify 
thereto in the form of an opinion or otherwise.”  MCM, supra note 85, M
IL
.
R.
E
VID
. 702. 
240
See United States v. Cravens, 56 M.J. 370, 376 (2002) (confirming the trial judge’s 
decision to admit hair sample evidence under MRE 401 and 403); United States v. Will, 
No. 9802134, 2002 CCA LEXIS 218, at *15 (N-M Ct. Crim. App. Sept. 27, 2002) 
(unpublished decision, this opinion does not serve as precedent).  The United States 
NMCCA uses the phrase “as an unpublished decision, this opinion does not serve as 
precedent” on all of its unpublished decisions.  See
U
NITED 
S
TATES 
N
AVY
-M
ARINE 
C
ORPS 
C
OURT OF 
C
RIMINAL 
A
PPEALS 
R
ULES OF 
P
RACTICE AND 
P
ROCEDURE
para. 6-4 (C1, 15 Feb. 
2002).  Although the Navy-Marine court does not give these cases precedential value, the 
court still allows counsel to cite to the cases as persuasive authority.  Id.  
241
Will, 2002 CCA LEXIS 218, at *15; see also Major Charles H. Rose III, New 
Developments:  Crop Circles in the Field of Evidence, A
RMY 
L
AW
., Apr./May 2003, at 
49-52 (providing an overview and analysis of United States v. Will). 
242
Cravens, 56 M.J at 376. 
243
Id. (noting that the trial judge “specifically considered and admitted this hair analysis 
evidence under Mil.R.Evid. 401 and 403”). 
70 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
B.  Value of the Results
244
Although hair drug testing emerged recently as a reliable drug use 
test method, hair drug testing has existed for several decades.
245
Since 
the 1950s, authorities have tested hair for arsenic or lead.
246
Despite hair 
sample testings’s extensive track  record, experts  have raised  concern 
over the interpretative variability hair drug testing.
247
These experts do 
not question the ability of hair drug testing to detect drugs, but instead 
question what a positive result reveals about drug use.
248
Environmental 
contamination and racial bias have surfaced as the predominant areas of 
concern.
249
1.  Environmental Contamination 
Congressional  hearings  on  drug  testing  in  the  summer  of  1998 
examined the environmental contamination controversy.
250
As explained 
in the hearings, the environmental contamination issue involves hair drug 
testing’s ability to distinguish between intentional drug use and innocent 
environmental exposure to drugs.
251
Some  experts argue that illegal 
244
The author acknowledges that researchers (medical and legal) have written hundreds 
of articles about hair sample analysis and the interpretative concerns of hair analysis 
results.   See, e.g.,  D
RUG 
T
ESTING 
I
H
AIR
(Pascal  Kintz  ed.,  1996)  (providing  a 
compilation of articles, including references, about hair analysis).  A complete analytical 
review of all of the hair analysis writings is well beyond the scope of this article.  
However, the following subsections provide the author’s view of the current status of 
these concerns.  
245
See Tom Mieczkowski, New Approaches in Drug Testing: A Review of Hair Analysis
in 521 A
NNALS 
A
M
.
A
CAD
.
P
OL
.
&
S
OC
.
S
CI
.
132,
135 (1992). 
246
See United States v. Bush, 44 M.J. 646, 651 (A.F. Ct. Crim. App. 1996), aff’d, United 
States v. Bush, 47 M.J. 305 (1997) (noting that hair drug testing for heavy metals and 
arsenic had existed for fifty to sixty years at the time of the case).  
247
See Theresa K. Casserly, Evidentiary and Constitutional Implications of Employee 
Drug  Testing  Through  Hair  Analysis, 45 C
LEV
.
S
T
.
L.
R
EV
.  469,  473-77  (1997) 
(discussing some scientists’ concerns over external drug contamination and hair drug 
absorbency rates). 
248
 Interview  with  Charles  Guenzer,  Forensic  Toxicologist,  Federal  Bureau  of 
Investigations  Laboratory,  in  Quantico,  California  (Oct.  5,  2005)  [hereinafter  Mr. 
Guenzer Interview]. 
249
Hearing on the Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programsupra note 52, at 21-22. 
250
See id. at 20, 25, 27-28, 33, 63, 85 (providing testimony and prepared statements from 
various experts in the hair testing field on environmental contamination ); Hearing on 
Drug Testing and Drug Treatmentsupra note 55, at 10-11. 
251
Hearing on the Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programsupra note 52, at 21-22; 
Tom  Mieczkowski, Distinguishing Passive Contamination from Active Cocaine 
2006] 
HAIR SAMPLE TESTING FOR DRUG USE 
71 
drugs could innocently infiltrate a person’s hair through sweat absorption 
or smoke penetration.
252
The drugs presence would then create a “false” 
positive test result.
253
For  example,  the  Naval  Research  Laboratory  conducted  several 
studies which indicate that drugs can absorb into a person’s hair.
254
The 
studies also  indicate that continuous  exposure to crack  smoke could 
appear in hair drug testing results.
255
However, additional studies prove that metabolite identification and 
proper  wash  procedures  can  eliminate  external  contamination.
256
External contamination would leave traces of the actual drug on the hair, 
while ingestion results  in  the  deposit of drug metabolites within the 
hair.
257
A hair sample test’s detection of these metabolites would tend to 
Consumption: Assessing the Occupational Exposure of Narcotics Officers to Cocaine, 84 
F
ORENSIC 
S
CI
.
I
NT
L
87,  108 (1997)  (discussing “passive contamination” of  hair  in 
narcotics officers); see also United States v. Bush, 47 M.J. 305, 307 (1997) (noting that 
the appellant routinely suggested “passive” exposure of his hair sample to drug smoke as 
a defense). 
252
Hearing on the Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programsupra note 52, at 21; Wen 
Ling  Wang  &  Edward  J.  Cone, Testing Human Hair for Drugs of Abuse.   IV. 
Environmental Cocaine Contamination and Washing Effects, 70 F
ORENSIC 
S
CI
.
I
NT
L
39, 
49 (1995) (finding cocaine deposits in hair exposed to crack cocaine smoke and hair 
exposed to cocaine-filled solutions); Kidwell & Blank, supra note 40, 28-29 (addressing 
the effects of passive exposure on hair testing). 
253
See Wang, supra note 252, at 49 (discussing how false positives can ruin a testing 
methodology’s validity). 
254
Hearing on Drug Testing and Drug Treatmentsupra note 55, at 141 (statement of 
David Kidwell, Ph.D., Naval Research Laboratory).  The Naval Laboratory conducted 
hundreds of laboratory tests where the laboratory soaked hair in drug solutions.  Id.  
Within five minutes, the experiment indicated that some drugs had absorbed into the hair.  
Id. 
255
Id. (describing the Naval Research Laboratory’s studies).  The Naval Research 
Laboratory  conducted  a  study  of  the  hair of  children living  with  cocaine-smoking 
mothers.  Id.  The study found that the children’s hair had similar cocaine levels as their 
mother’s hair.  Id. 
256
See  Virginia Hill et al., Removing and Identifying Drug Contamination in the 
Analysis of Human Hair, 145
F
ORENSIC 
S
CI
.
I
NT
97,
108
(2004); Mieczkowski, supra 
note 251, at 108 (assessing  the effects  of wash  procedures on narcotic officer hair 
samples).  
257
See  Mr.  William  Thistle, Accounting for Environmental Contamination, 
Pyschemedics Corp. (2004) (available by contacting Mr. Thistle at billt@psychemedics. 
com or 1-800-522-7424) (describing metabolites as “unique compounds created by the 
body’s processing of the drugs”).  Mr. Thistle works as the Senior Vice President and 
General Counsel of Psychemedics Corporation. 
72 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
expose drug use versus mere drug exposure.
258
The results of these 
studies also  showed  that laboratory hair  wash procedures effectively 
removed external drug deposits.
259
In  comparison, hair may  also  have  a  stronger resistance to drug 
penetration  than  the  lungs  and  the  gastrointestinal  tract.
260
 This 
difference  would  make  urine  samples  and  breath  samples  more 
susceptible to external contamination than a hair sample.
261
Forensic laboratories have begun to set drug detection cut-off levels 
high enough to eliminate concerns over innocent exposure.
262
These cut-
off levels originate from scientific studies research,
263
making it possible 
258
Id. 
259
See Hill, supra note 256, at 97-99, 108 (combining in-depth wash procedures and 
detailed wash criteria to effectively identify contamination).  The authors used a wash 
criterion that subtracted the amount of drug left in the wash solution from the amount of 
drug found in the hair segment to further prevent false positives.  Id. at 99.  See Gideon 
Koren et al., Hair Analysis of Cocaine: Differentiation between Systematic Exposure and 
External  Contamination, 32 J.
C
LINICAL 
P
HARMACOLOGY
671,  674  (1992).    The 
researchers placed volunteers in a 2.5 x 3 x 2.5 meter unventilated room and exposed 
them to crack cocaine smoke.  Id. at 672.  The researches also placed hair samples in 
closed beakers and exposed the hair to the equivalent of 5 - 5000 “lines” of cocaine 
(100mg per line).  Id.  After exposure, the researchers washed the hair using ethanol.  Id.  
All cases of contaminated hair tested negative after washing except for the highest 
amount- 5000 cocaine lines.  Id. at 673. 
260
See Dr. Kippenberger E-mail, Jan. 26, 2006, supra note 63 (estimating that the lungs 
and the gastrointestinal tract would absorb drugs more easily than hair).  “The cortex of 
hair is surrounded by a protective layer of epithelia cells called the cuticle.  The cuticle 
cells overlap in a shingle arrangement, holding the cortex together and serving as a 
protective barrier to the environment.”  Wang, supra note 252, at 40. 
261
See generally Dr. Kippenberger E-mail, Jan. 26, 2006, supra note 63 (estimating that 
the lungs and the gastrointestinal tract would absorb drugs easier than hair). 
262
See United States v. Fuller, No. 35058, 2004 CCA LEXIS 182, at *4  (A.F. Ct. Crim. 
App.  June 23,  2004)  (referencing  Associated  Pathologies  Laboratories,  Las  Vegas, 
Nevada,  cut-off’s  levels  for  cocaine  in  hair);  Proposed  Revisions  to  Mandatory 
Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programs, 69 Fed. Reg. 19673, 19697 
(Apr.  13,  2004)  (providing  cut-off  concentrations—i.e.,  500  pictograms of  cocaine 
metabolites for 1 milligram of hair); F
LA
.
S
TAT
.
A
NN
. § 112.0455 (13)(b)(1)(b) (LEXIS 
2005) (establishing a cut-off level for cocaine of 5 nanograms of drug per 10 milligrams 
of hair).  Cut-off levels exist for both the initial drug screening test and the subsequent 
drug confirmatory test.  See id. § 112.0455 (13)(b)(1)&(2) (creating screening cut-off 
levels and confirmatory cut-off levels). 
263
See Mr. Thistle E-mail, Jan. 19, 2006, supra note 49 (explaining how approximately 
90% of the hair testing industry uses the same cut-off levels based upon instrument 
limitations and scientific research); E-mail from Mr. Tom Mieczkowski, Ph.D., Professor 
and Chair of the Department of Criminology, University of South Florida, to Major 
Keven Kercher, Student, The Judge Advocate General’s Legal Center and School, U.S. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested