open pdf file in asp.net using c# : How to add text to a pdf file in preview software control dll winforms web page windows web forms 188-summer-20068-part513

2006] 
HAIR SAMPLE TESTING FOR DRUG USE 
73 
for commanders to use hair drug test results without great concern over 
possible claims of false test results due to “innocent” exposure.   
2.  Racial Bias 
In addition to environmental contamination, experts have also raised 
concerns  that  hair  drug  testing  results  in  disproportionate  treatment 
between races.
264
The experts argue that hair drug testing can detect 
lower  levels  of  a  drug  in  African-American  hair  than  in  Caucasian 
hair,
265
which has the potential to create a disproportionate population of 
criminal  prosecutions  for  African-Americans,  versus  Caucasions.
266
Some studies attribute the difference in detection and drug absorbency 
rates due to variances in hair color, curvature, and structure.
267
Although  these  differences  do  exist,  the  statistical  differences 
between the races are not significant enough to support a racial bias 
claim.
268
Any test that examines servicemembers’s biological processes 
Army (Jan. 24, 2006, 10:46 EST) (on file with author) (stating that extensive writing and 
extensive testimony by toxicologists and members of the drug testing industry formed the 
basis for the cut-off levels in the Proposed Revisions to Mandatory Guidelines for the 
Federal Workplace Drug Testing Program). 
264
See Hearing on the Federal Workplace Drug Testing Program, supra note 52, at 7-8, 
21, 26 (providing statements from experts about racial bias in hair testing); Letter from 
Theodore F. Shults, Chairman, American Association of Medical Review Officers, to 
Walter F. Vogt, Division of Workplace Programs, Substance Abuse and Mental Health 
Services Administration, Comments to Proposed Revisions to Mandatory Guidelines for 
Federal Workplace Drug Testing Program, 69 Fed. Reg. 19673-01 (June 30, 2004), 
available at http://workplace.samhsa.gov/DrugTesting/comments/Public%20Comment% 
208400121.doc (questioning hair analysis).  But see Mr. Thistle E-mail, Jan. 19, 2006, 
supra note 49 (attacking Mr. Shults’ comments about hair testing). 
265
See David A. Kidwell et al., Cocaine Detection in a University Population by Hair 
Analysis and  Skin  Swab Testing, 84 F
ORENSIC 
S
CI
.
I
NT
L
75, 83-84  (noting that  a 
“selection” bias may exist).   
266
See Hearing on Drug Testing and Drug Treatmentsupra note 55, at 152 (statement 
of the Honorable Mark Souder) (grappling with the racial bias concern of hair testing). 
267
See Thomas M. Mieczkwoski, Effect of Color and Curvature on the Concentration of 
Morphine in Hair Analysis, 3 F
ORENSIC 
S
CI
.
C
OMMUNICATIONS
4 (Oct. 2001), available 
at http://www.fbi.gov/hq/lab/fsc/backissu/oct2001/mzkowski.htm (providing a synopsis 
of studies concerning the relationship of hair characteristics to hair drug test results).  
268
See Tom Mieczkowski & Richard Newel, Statistical Examination of Hair Color as a 
Potential Biasing Factor in Hair Analysis, 107
F
ORENSIC 
S
CI
.
I
NT
L
13,  36 (2000) 
(finding  no  “distinction  between  black  and  brown  hair  on  the  basis  of  drug 
concentration”).  Mieczkowski and Newel examined 2791 hair tests from previous hair 
analysis studies.  Id. at 35.  Using statistical analysis, they compared the significance of a 
hair sample’s color to the various drug concentration levels found in the sample.  Id. at 
How to add text to a pdf file in preview - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add editable text box to pdf; how to add text box to pdf
How to add text to a pdf file in preview - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text field to pdf; add text to pdf using preview
74 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
will  have  some  degree  of  variation  in  the  test’s  results  due  to  the 
servicemembers’s unique physiological makeup.
269
For example, if two 
servicemembers consume the same amount of cocaine at the same time, 
their bodies will not metabolize the cocaine in exactly the same time.
270
The fact that some servicemembers may have a longer drug detection 
window  than  other  servicemembers  does  not  invalidate  the  testing 
because the exposure differences are considered minimal. 
Research demonstrating the difference between genders when testing 
for the presence of alcohol helps highlight the minimal impact of race on 
hair  sample  test  results.    Studies  have  shown  that  women’s  bodies 
generally retain more alcohol in their blood than men.
271
Consequently, 
a breathalyzer could return different results for a man and a woman, even 
when both drank the same amount of alcohol and have the same body 
weight.
272
However, police routinely enforce the same blood alcohol 
concentration  (BAC)  limit  with  both  genders.
273
 Apparently,  the 
metabolizing difference between genders is not great enough to require 
different BAC levels for each gender.
274
This same analysis applies to 
hair drug testing cut-off levels for differing races. 
V.  Commander’s Use of the Results  
The  reliability  of  hair  drug  testing  should  give  commanders 
confidence to use hair sample results involving servicemembers who test 
15.  They concluded that although some drugs may bind to melanin (the substance that 
gives hair its color), this binding effect does significantly affect the overall amount of 
drug retained in the hair.  Id. at 35-36.  
269
See Avitar, Inc. Website, Drug Detection Windows, http://www.avitarinc.com/Resour 
ces/drug-detection-windows.cfm (last visited Oct. 23, 2006) (explaining how differences 
in a person’s metabolic rate, body mass, age, overall health, drug tolerance, and urine pH 
can affect the length of time a drug remains in the person’s body). 
270
See id
271
Hearing on the Federal Workplace Drug Testing Programsupra note 52, at 34 
(prepared statement of Dr. Carl Selavka, Director of the Massachusetts State Police and a 
Consultant  to  the  Department  of Health  and  Human  Services)  (noting  that women 
generally have more fat and less muscle than men, which causes women to absorb less 
alcohol and thus have more alcohol in their blood). 
272
Id. 
273
Id. 
274
See generally id. “In the end, either laboratories need to start correcting for all 
possible physiological, morphological and behavioral differences among test subjects, or 
the administrators of drug testing programs, and the regulatory agencies involved, must 
accept that bias is a reality of every broad testing program.”  Id. 
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Add text to PDF document in preview. • Add text box to PDF file in preview. • Draw PDF markups. PDF Protection. • Sign PDF document with signature.
add text block to pdf; adding text to pdf in reader
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit
Convert CSV file to PDF (.pdf). Add, remove and save annotations to CSV file. Protection. Miscellaneous. • Select text on OpenOffice.
adding text to a pdf file; adding text fields to a pdf
2006] 
HAIR SAMPLE TESTING FOR DRUG USE 
75 
positive for drug use.  School districts,
275
prisons,
276
and businesses
277
have already used hair drug testing to effectively curtail drug use within 
their organizations.  The United States Food and Drug Administration 
has approved hair drug testing kits for the commercial marketplace.
278
Specifically, the long drug detection window inherent in hair drug testing 
will improve enforcement of suspension conditions,
279
confirm or deny 
urinalysis results,
280
and provide a new command inspection tool.
281
A.  Suspension Actions 
Military regulations allow an appropriate level commander to use his 
discretion to suspend a separation action,
282
an article 15 punishment,
283
and a court-martial sentence for illegal drug use.
284
As a conditions of 
the  suspension,  the  servicemember  is  often  requied  to  refrain  from 
further  illegal  drug  use.    Witness  reports  of  the  servicemember’s 
continued drug use and urinalysis tests provide the only way for the 
commander to ensure compliance with this suspension requirement.
285
275
See Hearing on the Federal Workplace Drug Testing Program, supra note 52, at 10 
(curtailing drug use at a New Orleans high school through hair drug testing). 
276
See  Thomas  E.  Feucht  &  Andrew  Keyser, Reducing Drug Use in Prisons: 
Pennsylvania’s Approach, N
AT
I
NST
.
J
UST
.
J. 10, 11-14 (Oct. 1999) (describing the 
effective use of hair drug testing as part of a prison anti-drug program). 
277
See CBS NEWS Website, SCI-TECH, Feds Eye New Kinds of Drug Tests, Jan. 15, 
2004,  http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2004/01/15/tech/main593356.shtml  (noting  that 
Kraft Foods Inc., Anheuser-Busch, and MGM Mirage use hair drug testing); see also 
Nevada Employment Sec. Dep’t v. Holmes, 914 P.2d 611, 612-15 (Nev. 1996) (finding 
that  a  hair  analysis  provided  “substantial  evidence”  to  deny  the  respondent 
unemployment benefits). 
278
See United States Food and Drug Administration Website, New Device Clearance: 
Psychemedics Corporation Opiate Assay—K000851, http://www.fda.gov/cdrh/mda/docs/ 
K000851.html (last visited Oct. 23, 2006) (approving the commercial marketing of a hair 
test for heroine use). 
279
See infra Part V.A. 
280
See infra Part V.B. 
281
See infra Part V.C. 
282
See U.S.
D
EP
T OF 
A
RMY
,
R
EG
.
635-200,
A
CTIVE 
D
UTY 
E
NLISTED 
A
DMINISTRATIVE 
S
EPARATIONS
para. 1-18 (6 June 2005) (allowing commanders to suspend execution of a 
servicemember’s administrative separation). 
283
See U.S.
D
EP
T OF 
A
RMY
,
R
EG
.
27-10,
M
ILITARY 
J
USTICE
para. 3-24 (16 Nov. 2005) 
[hereinafter AR 27-10]  (allowing a commander to suspend execution of Article 15 
punishment). 
284
See MCM, supra note 85, R.C.M
1108,
1109 (authorizing a convening authority to 
suspend execution of a sentence and to vacate the suspension of a sentence). 
285
Cf. AR 27-10, supra note 283, para. 3-24 (stating that an Article 15 suspension action 
“automatically includes a condition that the Soldier not violate any punitive article of the 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Also a preview component enables compressing and decompressing in preview in ASP.NET class. Also able to uncompress PDF file in VB.NET programs.
add text box to pdf file; how to add text to pdf document
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
With the SDK, you can preview the document content according to the preview thumbnail by the ways as following. C# DLLs for Word File Preview. Add references:
add text box in pdf; adding a text field to a pdf
76 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
Unfortunately, a servicemember’s body can quickly flush most drugs 
from his urine,
286
greatly reducing the urinalysis’s ability to catch  a 
servicemember violating his suspension requirements.  As a result, the 
commander may not support a suspension because he cannot monitor a 
servicemember’s compliance with suspension conditions. 
In contrast, hair drug testing could give the commander a greater 
ability to allow for suspension actions.  First, hair drug testing provides a 
long drug  detection window.
287
For  example, two  hair sample tests 
during a six-month suspension would identify any drug use over the 
entire length of the suspension.
288
A commander could also use the 
results of a hair sample test to ensure a servicemember’s compliance 
with  a  drug  rehabilitation  program.
289
 Therefore,  hair  drug  testing 
promotes a greater willingness on the part of commanders to consider 
suspension options because it increases a commander’s visibility of a 
servicemember’s drug habits during a suspension period.
290
B.  Confirmatory Compatibility 
The long drug detection window inherent to hair drug testing allows 
a commander to confirm positive urinalysis results despite an accused’s 
denials, or corroborate an accused’s confession.
291
For example, if the 
[Uniform  Code  of  Military  Justice]  UCMJ”).    Punitive  Article  112a  prohibits  the 
wrongful use of an illegal substance.  UCMJ art. 112a. (2005).   
286
See DOD Urinalysis Programsupra note 12 (listing the drug detection windows for 
a urinalysis); United States v. Medina, 749 F. Supp. 59, 60 (E.D. N.Y. 1990) (discussing 
urine’s short drug retention window). 
287
See supra Part II.D. 
288
See Hearing on Drug Testing and Drug Treatmentsupra note 55, at 10-11 (statement 
of Robert L. Dupont, President, Institute of Behavior and Health) (explaining how a 
typical hair drug test covers a ninety-day drug detection window). 
289
See AR 600-85, supra note 59, para. 4-7(a)(2) (noting that commanders should assess 
drug rehabilitation progress by considering further incidents of drug abuse). 
290
See generally Medina,  749  F. Supp.  at  60  (using  hair  drug  testing to  prove 
noncompliance with probation terms).  Medina, a probationer, denied that he had used 
drugs while on probation.  Id.  During probation hearings, the court ordered Medina to 
provide a hair sample to test for drugs.  Id.  Medina’s hair sample tested positive for 
cocaine.  Id. 
291
See United States v. Bethea, 61 M.J. 184, 185-88 (2005) (finding probable cause to 
seize and search a hair sample after defendant challenged positive urinalysis results); 
United States v. Cravens, 56 M.J. 370, 370-75 (2002) (finding probable cause to seize 
and search a hair sample after defendant admitted using drugs ); see also Lieutenant 
Colonel Michael R. Stahlman, Fourth Amendment and Urinalysis Update: “A Powerful 
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
bitmap of the first page in the PowerPoint document file. C# DLLs: Preview PowerPoint Document. Add necessary XDoc.PowerPoint DLL libraries into your created C#
add text in pdf file online; add text to pdf file
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
position and save existing PDF file or output a new PDF file. Insert images into PDF form field. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo, scanned
adding text pdf; add text to pdf online
2006] 
HAIR SAMPLE TESTING FOR DRUG USE 
77 
accused challenges a positive urinalysis test, the commander could use a 
hair drug test to confirm the urinalysis results.
292
Since commanders 
often have to wait weeks for urinalysis results, hair drug testing will 
allow them to test the same time period covered by the urinalysis test.
293
The commander could use this reach back capability to confirm any 
witness  observations  of  servicemember  drug  use.
294
 This  capability 
could also help a commander corroborate a servicemember’s admission 
of drug use outside of the urinalysis drug detection window.
295
C.  The Inspection Case  
In addition to hair drug testing’s confirmatory capability, hair drug 
testing alone can provide sufficient evidence to result in a criminal drug 
use conviction.
296
In United States v. Bush, the defendant avoided the 
urinalysis test by filling his specimen bottle with a saline solution.
297
The altered urine test forced the command to then conduct a hair sample 
test, which tested positive for cocaine.
298
The government offered the 
positive  test  results  and  testimony  about  the  faulty  urine  sample.
299
Based  on  this  evidence,  panel  members  convicted  the  defendant  of 
Agent is the Right Word,” A
RMY 
L
AW
., Apr./May 2003, at 139-40 (providing a synopsis 
of United States v. Cravens). 
292
See Bethea, 61 M.J. 184, 184-88 (finding probable cause for seizing a hair sample 
based upon evidence of a positive urinalysis).   
293
See Mieczkowski, supra note 21, at
2
(explaining the long drug detection window of 
hair sample analysis); see also Bethea, 61 M.J. at 185-88 (using a hair drug test to 
confirm or deny the results of a urinalysis test).  When the commander finally receives 
the urinalysis  results,  the illegal  substance  will  have already processed out  of the 
servicemember’s urine.  See supra Part II.D (comparing the drug detection windows of 
urine  and  hair).  However,  the  servicemember’s  hair  will  still  contain  the  illegal 
substance.  Id. 
294
See United States v. Ruiz, No. 33084, 1999 CCA LEXIS 219, at *5-7 (A.F. Ct. Crim. 
App. July 26, 1999) (unpublished) (basing search authorization for hair sample on agent 
observations that occurred a few months prior to the search authorization request). 
295
See Cravens, 56 M.J. at 372-73 (using a hair test to confirm a drug-use admission 
because too much time had expired to obtain a search authorization for a urinalysis). 
296
See United States v. Bush, 47 M.J. 305, 312 (1997) (upholding a drug conviction 
based solely on hair test results). 
297
Id. at 306, 312. 
298
See id. at 306-07, 312.  The command did not know about the altered urine test until 
after the laboratory notified the command of the adulteration several weeks after the test.  
Id. at 307.  By this time, the servicemember’s body had already processed the illegal 
drugs out of the servicemember’s urine.  Id.  Consequently, Staff Sergeant Bush’s actions 
forced the command to result to a hair drug test.  Id. at 307, 312.     
299
Id. at 306-07. 
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
how to insert text box on pdf; how to insert text in pdf file
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
page of your defined page number which starts from 0. For example, your original PDF file contains 4 pages. C# DLLs: Split PDF Document. Add necessary references
how to add text to a pdf file in preview; add text field to pdf acrobat
78 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
dereliction  of  duty  for  tampering  with  his  urine  sample  and  of  the 
wrongful use of cocaine.
300
In United States v. Bethea,  the  CAAF  upheld  a  conviction  for 
wrongful use of cocaine.
301
 The  case involved hair sample analysis 
results.
302
The  hair sample analysis provided  the  only evidence  for 
charging  a  specification  of  drug  use  on  “divers”  occasions.
303
 The 
AFCCA has also allowed hair sample analysis to support specifications 
of divers drug use in two other cases.
304
Although the Bush and Bethea decisions primarily involve search 
authorizations,
305
these decisions suggest that the results from a proper 
hair inspection alone could support a conviction.  Since hair drug testing 
uses  similar collection  procedures  and  laboratory  testing  methods  as 
urine  testing,  a  hair  sample  test  arguably  meets  the  same  legal 
requirements.
306
Trial counsel can rely on the permissive inference of 
wrongful use reconfirmed by United States v. Green for urinalysis cases 
when offering hair sample test results into evidence.
307
Drug testing 
laboratories  can  provide  a  urinalysis-like  litigation  packet  to  the 
prosecution.
308
As a result, commanders should incorporate hair drug 
testing into their arsenal of inspection tools.   
300
Id. at 307-08. 
301
See United States v. Bethea, 61 M.J. 184, 184-88 (2005) (involving cocaine use on 
“divers” occasions over a one-month period). 
302
Id. at 184-85. 
303
Id. at 184. 
304
United States v. Fuller, No. 35058, 2004 CCA LEXIS 182, at *1-6 (A.F. Ct. Crim. 
App. June 23, 2004) (unpublished), cert. granted, United States v. Fuller, 60 M.J. 424 
(2004); United States v. Brewer, No. 34936, 2004 CCA LEXIS 136 (A.F. Ct. Crim. App. 
Apr. 28, 2004) (unpublished), rev’d on other grounds, United States v. Brewer, 61 M.J. 
425 (2005).  In the Brewer case, the CAAF did not hold that the hair sample test results 
could not support the conviction.  Brewer, 61 M.J. at 426-32.  Instead, CAAF found that 
the exclusion of defense witnesses and the military judge’s instruction to the court 
members  on  the  permissive  inference  of  wrongful  use  violated  the  accused’s 
constitutional due process rights.  Id. 
305
Bethea, 61 M.J. at 184-88; Bush, 47 M.J. at 306-09. 
306
See supra  note  198  (comparing  collection  methods); see also supra  note  199 
(comparing laboratory testing methods). 
307
See United States v. Green, 55  M.J. 76, 77-81 (2001)  (finding that a positive 
urinalysis test result, in conjunction with expert testimony about the test, can support a 
permissive  inference  that  the  accused  knowingly  and  wrongfully  used  an  illegal 
controlled substance). 
308
See United States  v. Adens,  56  M.J.  724, 726  (Army  Ct.  Crim.  App.  2002) 
(referencing a hair analysis litigation packet prepared by a toxicology laboratory). 
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
page PDF document file to one-page PDF files or they can separate source PDF file to smaller VB.NET PDF Splitting & Disassembling DLLs. Add necessary references
add text pdf acrobat professional; adding text to a pdf form
2006] 
HAIR SAMPLE TESTING FOR DRUG USE 
79 
VI.  Implementing a Hair Analysis Program 
Given the benefits of hair drug testing, the Army should conduct a 
feasibility  study on  implementing  hair  drug  testing  into  the Army’s 
substance abuse program (ASAP).
309
Suggested changes to the Federal 
Workplace Drug Testing Program and the recently enacted Florida Drug-
Free Workplace Act provide guidance on procedures to implement a hair 
drug testing program,
310
including information on employee notification, 
laboratory standards, quality control, and cut-off levels.
311
A complete 
review  of  the  laboratory  changes  and  policy  updates  needed  to 
implement Army-wide hair drug testing goes beyond the scope of this 
article, however, a brief examination of Army Regulation 600-85, The 
Army Substance Abuse Program (AR  600-85) and unit drug policies 
provides some insight. 
A.  Adjusting Army Regulation 600-85 
Currently, AR 600-85 contains the Army’s program for urine sample  
testing.
312
The regulation’s text refers to biochemical testing instead of 
urine testing alone.
313
Also, the regulation defines biochemical testing as 
including the “identification of alcohol or other drug abuse through the 
testing of blood, urine, breath, or other bodily substance.”
314
Therefore, 
the regulation’s language could easily incorporate hair drug testing with 
minimal changes to the regulation’s overall text. 
309
See generally AR 600-85, supra note 59 (governing the Army’s drug abuse program); 
see also U.S.
A
RMY 
E
UROPE
,
R
EG
.
27-10,
M
ILITARY 
J
USTICE
para. 13 (30 Mar. 2005) 
(prohibiting units in Europe from using random hair analysis to test for the use of illegal 
drugs without commanding general approval).  The implementation of a military-wide 
hair testing program would eliminate the need for this restriction.  Interestingly, the 
regulation does not restrict the use of hair analysis to test for illegal substances when 
probable cause exists to support the hair test.  Id
310
Proposed Revisions to Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing 
Programs, 69 Fed. Reg. 19673, 19675-76, 19679, 19682, 19697, 19705 (Apr. 13, 2004); 
F
LA
.
S
TAT
.
A
NN
. § 112.0455 (LEXIS 2005).  
311
Proposed Revisions to Mandatory Guidelines for Federal Workplace Drug Testing 
Programs, 69 Fed. Reg. at 19675-76, 19679, 19682, 19697, 19705; § 112.0455.  
312
AR 600-85, supra note 59, paras. 8-1 to 8-5. 
313
See  id. (using the term “biochemical testing” throughout the regulation). 
314
Id. para. 6-2(a) (emphasis added). 
80 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
The most significant changes to the regulation would need to occur 
in  the  appendices.
315
 Appendix  E  provides  a  standard  operating 
procedure for urine collection and urine sample processing.
316
The Army 
would  need  to  add  additional  information  describing  the  standard 
operating procedures for hair sample collection and processing.
317
B.  Local Policy Memoranda 
In the short term, commanders could implement hair drug testing 
through  local  policy  memoranda,  which  would  need  to  notify 
servicemembers  of  the  implementation  of  hair  drug  testing.
318
 The 
notification  would  support  the  special  needs  exception  by  putting 
servicemembers on notice of a reduced privacy interest in their hair.
319
The memoranda would also need to designate hair collection procedures 
to prevent disparate treatment of servicemembers during testing.
320
Each 
servicemember  would  then  face  the  same  collection  protocol.    The 
protocol  would  prevent  the  servicemembers  from  experiencing 
“substantially different intrusions.”
321
C.  Cost-Benefit Analysis 
The  DOD  should  examine  the  cost  of  providing  the  DOD 
laboratories with the equipment and personnel necessary to conduct hair 
sample testing, which they do not currently perform.
322
Consequently, 
315
See id. apps. A-F. 
316
Id. app. E. 
317
See generally id. apps. A-F (ending appendices at letter F). 
318
See United States v. Bickel, 30 M.J. 277, 284-85 (C.M.A. 1990) (noting that “[t]he 
extensive notice that has been given to servicemembers about the drug-testing program is 
another circumstance  tending to establish that compulsory drug tests are reasonable 
searches” under the Fourth Amendment). 
319
See id.see also supra Part III.C.1 (analyzing the special need exception to the Fourth 
Amendment). 
320
See Bickel, 30 M.J. at 285 (highlighting that “detailed regulations and policies . . . 
reduce  the  occasion  for  arbitrariness  and  abuse  of  discretion”  by  the  authorities 
implementing the test). 
321
See MCM, supra note 85, M
IL
.
R.
E
VID
. 313(b) (requiring the prosecution to prove by 
“clear and convincing evidence” that an inspection was not a subterfuge for a search 
when the command subjects servicemembers to “substantially different intrusions during 
the same examination”). 
322
See E-mail from Edmund Tamburini, Forensic Science Coordinator, United States 
Army Criminal Investigation Laboratory (USACIL), Forest Park, Georgia, to Major 
2006] 
HAIR SAMPLE TESTING FOR DRUG USE 
81 
the military would need to either contract with private companies or, on 
rare occasions, request support from Federal Bureau of Investigation 
laboratories,  for  example,  to  meet  the  military’s  hair  drug  testing 
needs.
323
The military’s ability to perform in-house hair sample testing 
would likely help counter the costs of testing by reducing processing 
costs, eliminating expert fees, and reducing the military’s current volume 
of urine tests.
324
Currently, the cost for a hair sample test ranges from $40 to $100, as 
compared to a urine test for which the cost for an individual test is 
approximately $8.50 per test.
325
The differing drug detection windows 
for  hair  sample  testing  and  urine  testing  help  eliminate  this  cost 
discrephancy.
326
For example, a urine sample has a detection window for 
cocaine of three days.
327
Conversely, a hair sample has a drug detection 
window  for  the  same  drug  of  approximately  three  months.
328
 A 
commander would need to conduct thirty consecutive urinalysis tests to 
encompass the same drug detection window one hair sample test, and 
Keven Kercher, Student, The Judge Advocate General’s Legal Center and School, U.S. 
Army (Aug. 30, 2005, 8:33 EST) (stating that USACIL and the other DOD Laboratories 
do not perform hair toxicology testing) (on file with author). 
323
Id. (stating that USACIL has to contract hair toxicology tests with commercial 
laboratories);  Mr.  Guenzer  Interview, supra  note  248  (stating  that  in  limited 
circumstances the FBI Laboratory has conducted hair analysis for military prosecutors). 
324
 The  author  acknowledges  that  only  an  in-depth  cost-benefit  analysis  of  hair 
drugtesting could identify all the financial costs and financial benefits associated with 
hair drug testing, which is beyond the scope of this article.  Nevertheless, the military’s 
ability to  process a  high  volume  of hair samples appears more cost effective than 
contracting with several private laboratories throughout the country.  Of course, the cost-
benefit  analysis would  need  to  determine whether  outsourcing  hair  drug testing  or 
expanding in-house laboratory capabilities would provide the most cost effective way to 
proceed in both the short and long term.  A pilot hair drug testing program at the brigade 
level would assist in this analysis.   
325
E-mail from Dr. Donald J. Kippenberger, Deputy Program Manager for Forensic 
Toxicology, United States Army Medical Command (MEDCOM), Fort Sam Houston, 
Texas to Major Keven Kercher, Student, The Judge Advocate General’s Legal Center and 
School, U.S. Army (Sept. 19, 2005, 11:31 EST) (stating the cost of a urinalysis test 
equals $8.50 while a hair sample test costs over $100) (on file with author); E-mail from 
Mr. William Thistle, Senior Vice President and General Counsel, Psychemedics Corp., to 
Major Keven Kercher, Student, The Judge Advocate General’s Legal Center and School, 
U.S. Army (Sept. 27, 2005, 11:44 EST) (stating that hair drug testing costs between $40 
and $100 dollars per sample) (on file with author). 
326
See supra Part II.D (addressing drug detection windows). 
327
Id. 
328
Id. 
82 
MILITARY LAW REVIEW 
[Vol. 188 
these multiple urine tests would be $225, as compared to one $100 hair 
sample test. 
Additionally, fewer drug tests per year would save a military unit 
many hours of labor.  The replacement of several urinalysis tests by one 
hair  sample  test  would  decrease  the  ASAP’s  impact  on  military 
operations.
329
 A  commander  could  reduce  the  amount  of  time  his 
servicemembers miss in training due to urinalysis’ requirements.
330
Hair 
sample testing’s deterrent effect and long drug detection window more 
than justify the additional costs associated with the test. 
VII.  Conclusion 
Besides fighting insurgents in Iraq and Afghanistan, the military also 
faces  a  drug  “insurgency”  within  the  ranks.
331
 The  Army’s  current 
biochemical testing program supposedly provides commanders with an 
effective tool to identify drug use, deter future drug use, and monitor 
drug  rehabilitation.
332
 Unfortunately,  the  urinalysis’s  short  drug 
detection window severely limits a commander’s ability to effectively 
accomplish these objectives.
333
In order to identify drug users, the short 
detection  windows  force  commanders  to  rely  on  creative  drug  test 
scheduling instead of the test itself.
334
329
See id. (describing the typical three-month hair test). 
330
The commander would save the time of the servicemembers participating in the drug 
test and the time of the servicemembers administering the test.  In the Army, command-
designated  servicemembers  oversee  the  collection  of  the  urine  samples  during  a 
urinalysis inspection.  See AR 600-85, supra note 59, para. 1-26 & app. E (detailing the 
personnel requirements for executing a urinalysis program). 
331
See SAMHSA 2004 National Drug Survey, supra note 2 (noting that 19.1 million 
Americans  currently  use  illegal  substances); Rhem, supra  note  1  (highlighting  the 
concern  over ecstasy  use by military  members);  Gilmore, supra  note 3  (noting  an 
increase in club drug use by servicemembers); see also AR 600-85, supra note 59, para. 
1-31(a) (recognizing that the illegal drug use is “inconsistent with Army values and the 
standards of performance, discipline, and readiness necessary to accomplish the Army’s 
mission”). 
332
See AR 600-85, supra note 59, para. 8-1 (listing the objectives of the Army’s 
biochemical testing program). 
333
See DOD Urinalysis Programsupra note 12 (showing that urine testing can only 
detect drug use for most illegal drugs that occurred a few days prior to the test). 
334
See AR  600-85, supra note  59,  para.  8-3  (encouraging  commanders  to  use 
“unpredictable testing pattern[s]” and to test during “non-traditional times”). 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested