open pdf file in asp.net using c# : Adding text to pdf document application Library cloud html asp.net wpf class 1984_25_1_058-0771-part529

Adding text to pdf document - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text fields to a pdf; adding text to a pdf form
Adding text to pdf document - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add text to a pdf in preview; how to add text to a pdf document using acrobat
listener may change. 
Frcan 
the listener's (or reader's) standpoint, 
his 
&erstanding may be inhibited 
by 
the presentation of stimuli 
mm- 
priate 
to 
the medium of perception. 
F'rom 
the 
symbol 
user's standpoint, 
he may have 
to 
listen 
to 
inferior expressions of his thoughts, a rather 
frustrating experience. 
These considerations point 
to 
a clear need for a programmed 
gram- 
mar. 
Wlt 
what sort of grammar? 
Should 
it 
be 
a grammar which 
minimizes 
input? Such a grammar would minimize physical effort, and that 
is 
certainly desirable 
in 
many 
instances, 
Mt 
it 
would 
be quite restrictive 
in output capability. 
One might, for example, have a list of sentences 
in 
which one or 
two words are left blank, and could be filled 
in  
by the user after 
choosing the desired sentence. Such a grammar would give access to 
quick correct speech and would cover certain cases. 
It 
may be seen, 
however, that 
it is 
quite restricted. Consider 
the 
possibility of 
making 
all unspecified nouns definite so that one less symbol needs to be 
chosen. To get "a car," one would indicate "a" and "car;" to get "the 
car," one would indicate only "car." This solution appears, at first 
glance, to be useful, but would, 
in 
fact, make the unspecified noun 
impossible. The sentence "Bread is the staff of life.", for example, 
would 
read "The 
bread 
is 
the 
staff of 
the 
life." That is, some sentences 
would sound very strange, or produce 
an 
unintended meaning. 
Assume, then, that we want to provide for a range of types of 
simple declarative sentences. 
simple declarative sentence 
with 
only a 
determiner 
ard 
noun 
or prorloun subject 
a d  
object 
and 
three 
verb tenses 
would require 
48 
sentence types. Allowing an optional adjective 
in 
either 
the 
subject or 
the 
object 
noun 
phrase raises the required 
number 
of sentences to 192. With so many possible sentence types to choose 
from, the task of finding the desired sentence type becomes much more 
time-consuming 
than 
select- 
more squares on 
the 
board, even 
if special 
selection algorithms are employed. We see, then, that this type of 
grammar 
would 
allow little flexibility 
in 
sentence type, altlmugh 
the 
vocalxlary 
need not be especially limited. 
3,,%r 
i: 
Another possible avenue to flexibility is the use of transforma- 
tions from one sentence type to another. 
It is 
possible, using these 
transformations, to construct a variety of syntactic forms 
wi t h  
ap- 
proxiately 
the 
same meaning. Each syntactic form 
is 
derived 
from 
a base 
form using at least one of the stipulated transformations. 
Beginning 
wi t h 
a base form "He sold the farmer a horse.", we could derive over 
twenty syntactic fom such 
as 
"He sold the horse 
to 
a farmer.", "for a 
horse to be sold to a farmer by him" and "there being a horse sold to a 
farmer". We would, perhaps be content 
wi t h  
only one third of these 
possibilities, Mt, 
even 
so, seven numbers 
would 
have 
to 
be referenced 
for the transformational possibilities 
in 
addition to whatever was 
necessary to generate the original sentence "deep structure," that 
is, 
the original base form. 
It 
seems better, therefore, to choose a grammar 
in 
which most of 
the words and the word order are specified by the user. This method 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
adding text to pdf in acrobat; how to add text fields to pdf
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
C#.NET: Add Text Box to PDF Document. Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program.
add text boxes to a pdf; add text pdf file
provides 
maximum 
flexibility for a sophisticated user without requiring 
reference to, or a knowledge of, anything except the vocabulary and 
grammatical symbols on the board itself. 
In 
particular, the user can 
rely on his or her (possibly passive) knowledge of order 
in 
the lan- 
guage, 
and 
need 
not 
refer to the rules of Bliss syntax. 
The grammar of Blisstalk 
.P 
-. 
*ti 
, $1 
*
r
: v v f f J  
+. 
The option that has 
been 
men for Blisstalk is 
to 
follow natural 
spoken language ordering. This ordering requirement promotes flexibili- 
ty 
in  
use, not forcing input into prescribed sentence structures and 
permitting the 
most 
natural sounding speech output. 
As 
for 
less 
sophis- 
ticated users who may not require such flexibility, Eugene McDonald 
..* 
states 
in 
his 
book 
Teaching 
and 
Using Blissymblics, 
.. 
-ypl) 
,* 
3 .  
t- 
-. 
"When 
teaching sentence construction to 
young 
z b  
or mentally retarded children, the symbol instruc- 
.r 
dp-<. 
tor 
wi l l  
probably find that the word order of 
, , 
English 
wi l l  
be easier for the children to learn 
,.- 
+I.- 
and 
to use 
than 
the 
word 
order of Bliss syntax." 
,. 
F. 
&.'.$ 
The grammar of Blisstalk can 
be 
described 
as 
a determinate finite 
state phrase structure 
grammar. 
It 
allows unrestricted input 
from the 
Blissymbol lexicon (1400 symbols) and from the text-mpeech system for 
spelled words. The grammar proceeds 
by 
first introducing phrase 
mar- 
kers, forming the input words 
into 
a single set of 
noun 
phrases 
and 
verb 
phrases (i.e., 
no 
choice is made 
among 
alternate phrase structures). 
1
-
5
,
. e  
, k 
The phrase structure gramnar 
,.;- 
<t  
t. 
.: 
Noun 
phrases 
and 
verb phrases are initially delimited 
by 
recogni- 
. tion of which words can or must not appear 
in 
them. Noun phrases can 
then be further divided by recognition of ordering conventions within 
them into double objects, subject-object pairs, or both. These con- 
structions may 
occur 
in 
declaratives, 
in 
questions and, 
in 
Swedish, in 
adverb-initial sentences. Verb phrases are split before a marked infi- 
nitive (one introduced by "to" 
in 
English, by "att" 
in  
Swedish). 
prepositional phrase is considered to be a special case of a noun 
phrase. 
-7 
The grammar's success 
in 
delimiting phrases is a 
direct 
consequence 
of 
the 
fact that lexical part of speech is, for the 
most 
part, predeter- 
mined 
by 
the Blissymbol input. Ambiguity results only 
if 
a Bliss 
user 
attempts to use a symbol 
in 
a function other 
than 
that determined 
by 
its 
place on the board. It would be possible to allow a user 
to change 
the 
part of speech of a word to one of those specifiable. This facility 
would be easy to specify 
in 
English noun-verb conversion since 
the 
singular form of a 
noun 
and the infinitive form of a 
corresponding 
verb 
may be the same (e.g., simple roots such as "walk" and "sleep"). Many 
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Feel free to define text or images on PDF document and extract accordingly. Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB.NET program.
add text to pdf acrobat; how to add text box in pdf file
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
C#.NET Winforms Document Viewer, C#.NET WPF Document Viewer. VB.NET PDF - Add Text Box to PDF Page in VB Provide VB.NET Users with Solution of Adding Text Box to
acrobat add text to pdf; add text to pdf in acrobat
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
DNN (DotNetNuke), SharePoint. Provide .NET SDK library for adding text box to PDF document in .NET WinForms application. A web based
adding text to a pdf in preview; add text to pdf online
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
This C# .NET PDF document page inserting & adding component from RasterEdge is written in managed C# code and designed particularly for .NET class applications
how to add text box to pdf document; add text to pdf
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
NET Winforms Document Viewer, C#.NET WPF Document Viewer. VB.NET PDF - Annotate Text on PDF Page in VB Professional VB.NET Solution for Adding Text Annotation to
add text field pdf; how to insert text into a pdf with acrobat
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Using this C# .NET image adding library control for PDF document, you can easily and quickly add an image, picture or logo to any position of specified PDF
add text pdf; how to enter text in pdf file
Order 
We  find additional support for adopting natural spoken language 
order  for  Blisstalk in an  article 
on 
children's  acquisition of  syntax, 
Roger  Brown  and Ursula Bellugi (1964) note that when young children 
imitate 
an 
adult's utterance, 
they 
preserve 
the 
word  order of 
the 
model 
sentences.  They  also report 
that 
at 
18 
months, 
children 
are 
likely 
to 
begin constructing integral 2-word  utterances with the 
prosodies 
of 
normdl speech. 
Al l 
the major  varieties of  English simple sentences 
up 
to  a length of 10 or 
11 
words are produced 
by 
the age of 36 months.  We 
may  assume 
that 
the 
sentences may 
nat 
be 
morphologically standard,  e.g., 
strong past tense verb forms may not 
all 
be present.  But,  given the 
correct word 
order 
and 
grammar, 
many inflectional endings 
and 
function 
words can be supplied 
by 
the listener.  And  i n the case of symbol-to- 
speech conversion,  grammatically redundant forms can 
be 
supplied 
by 
rule. 
This 
conversion 
takes 
advantage of the child's  ability 
to 
supply 
a rather 
advanced  concept  of  order in 
his/her 
internal grammar 
to 
p m  
duce speech output. 
There 
are, 
of  course,  many  expressions which 
cannot 
be 
exparded by 
rule because of possible ambiguity.  The expression "boy book,"  for 
example,  might mean  "The 
boy 
wants 
his 
book," 
or "Give the b y  a book," 
and there are 
number of other possibilities 
as 
well. 
The Brown and 
Bellugi  study showed 
that 
the 
mothers 
of  the children they reported 
an 
responded 
to 
their children's speech with expansions about 30% of  the 
time. 
That 
is, 
the child might say "boy book,"  and the mother would 
expand with something like "we'll give the boy his book back." 
It 
was 
noted 
that 
the mothers'  expansions,  like the 
ones 
abwe,  preserved the 
word order of the children's speech. 
We 
may therefore assume that in 
cases 
of reduced or incomplete expressions, the preservation of word 
order 
wil l 
aid communication in 
natural 
way. 
One  might say 
that 
this approach 
is 
not faithful 
to 
the principles 
of 
Blissymblics 
that 
the goal of  international  communicatim 
is 
mt 
being kept in mind.  Perhaps this 
is 
true.  But spoken and written, 
as 
opposed t o  pointed language,  has other requirements. 
Is 
it 
not more 
important 
that the 
individual user  of  a  Bliss-to-speech 
or 
Bliss-to- 
text device 
be 
able 
to 
communicate naturally with 
those 
who  speak 
his 
own language? 
This 
seems 
to  present 
problem:  should a user then 
learn two grammars,  one  for non-spoken  Blissymbols 
and 
one  for spoken 
Blissymbols? 
It is 
certainly 
possible 
to 
write  "translation" programs 
for a  limited grammar 
and 
with the limited vocahlary 
of 
~~SC1I-coded 
words. 
would  like 
to 
argue, 
however, 
that 
even 
though 
this 
might 
be 
an interesting project for multi-lingual  use, 
it 
is 
unnecessary for 
single language.  Some 
Bli ss 
users are taught only natural spoken lan- 
guage order.  And those who learn 
Bli ss 
syntax are certainly learning 
bath 
grammars 
one for Blissymbols 
and 
one that 
is 
internalized from 
listening t o speaking users of his own native language. 
It 
has been 
noted 
by 
teachers  w b e  students are using  synthetic speech 
that these 
students'  language capabilities 
are 
greatly enhanced 
by 
using  synthetic 
speech.  We 
can expect 
that 
many 
Bliss 
users 
wi l l  
go 
on 
to 
learn 
to 
read 
and write their own native language.  Supporting this development 
is 
certainly important. 
To 
add 
 further assurance that learning two grammars 
is 
not prohi- 
bitive, 
it 
can 
be 
noticed that a similar situation exists in the deaf 
community where two grammars are used,  one for deaf sign 
1-e 
among 
sign language users themselves,  and one for signed language which 
is 
normally spoken,  i.e.,  signed Swedish, signed English, etc.  There are 
sane similarities 
in 
deaf  sign language syntax 
and 
Bliss 
syntax,  eq., 
marking time of occurrence f i rs t  and then dispensing with verb tense 
markers,  leaving out articles,  placement  of  modifiers  (includirrg nega- 
tion).  The building of  compound symbols/signs  also 
has 
some 
si m il a r 
principles. 
In addition, the basic symbols,  arrows and baselines of 
Blissymbols  could 
be 
likened  t o the "dez",  "sig" and  "tab" of  sign 
language 
There are,  of  course,  many dissimilarities also,  and different 
levels of  development 
in 
various 
areas 
of  the 
two 
communication 
systems. 
Since 
Bl iss 
symbols have only been used for 
li t t l e  over ten years by 
non-speaking  users, 
it 
is still 
in an early developmental stage for 
,-; 
actual 
use. 
It is 
quite clear,  I-mwever, 
that 
to 
intellectually 
rnrmal 
non-speaking  persons,  learning two grammars for the same symbols or 
signs 
is 
quite feasible. 
.-. 
. . 
.. 
lrlA- 
I
,
. . 
-= 
I. 
-a 
A
>
.>I+ 
--, 
4: 
t.3~;:~~. 
*.r,:h*., 
+.- 
t .3 
-fc: 
I
+
"\:2C-:. 
'2 
s . .  
Oon~ludb 
=ks 
,i 
be3 
s. 
I' 
- ,  
xi 
>3C&KZ 
+? 
tleii* 
', 
This 
paper 
has been 
-ed 
with Blisstalk, 
a speaking electronic 
Ellissymbol board. 
Blisstalk 
expects 
symbols 
to 
be  chosen 
in 
the 
order 
of  natural spoken language, and allows a user to compose many well- 
formed sentences 
with 
flexibility of expression. 
As 
symbol 
bard with 
,. 
f, 
a "voice," 
it 
makes 
its 
users heard 
-- 
communication 
is 
not so highly 
dependent 
upon the 
willingness  of  a  "listener" 
to 
watch, 
and 
to inter- 
pret 
the 
symbols for himself. 
system 
similar to 
and 
contemporary with Blisstalk 
is 
the 
Sahara 
11, 
developed in France for 
the 
French language (Emerard, 
Graillot, 
Cyne 
and Lucas,  1979/1980). 
It 
also uses  a  500-symbol 
Bli ss 
chart,  and 
allows 
output 
in 
either speech or print. 
Sahara 
11's 
lexicon 
contains 
mot 
morphs 
in phcnetic or orthographic form,  their lexical category 
ad  
reference 
to 
rules 
applying 
to 
conjugations.  Permitted syntactic struc- 
tures are defined 
by 
a "precedence grammar" that controls which con- 
structions can precede,  follow,  or 
be 
in the same construction with 
other constructions. 
It 
also allows co-ordination  a t  the level of 
nouns, 
verb,  phrases  (which Blisstalk 
does 
not yet accanplish) 
and 
rel- 
atives.  Synthesis 
is 
based on 
(abut one 
thousand) 
diphones 
(Emerard, 
1977). 
References 
Bliss, 
C.K. 
1965) 
Semantography 
Semantography Blissymbolics Pub 
lications.  2rrd  Edition. 
Sydney, 
Australia. 
mlson, 
R, 
Granstrom, 
a, 
and 
Hmnicutt, S.  (1982a):  "~liss 
Communi- 
catim with 
Speech or 
Text 
Output," Conference 
Wrd, 
1982 
IEEE-I-, 
Paris, 
France. 
.+ 
> y 
Carlson, R.,  Granstrom, B.,  and  Hunnicutt, S.  (1982b):  "A Multi- 
Language Text--Speech 
Module, 
Conference Record, 1982 IEEE-ICASSP, 
Paris, 
France. 
Emerard, F.,  Graillot, P.,  Cyne. G.,  and Lucas, J.J.  (1979/1980): 
"Pro- 
theses de Parole Destinees a la Communication des Handicaps Moteurs 
Deficients de la Parole, 
Recherches Acous tique, VI, 
CNET 
Lannion, 
France. 
Emerard, F. (1977) 
"Synthese par diphones et traitement de la proso- 
die," These, Grenoble, 
France. 
5, 
1J 
McDonald, E. 
1980 
Teaching and Using Blissymbolics 
Blissymbolics 
Canmunicatim Institute, 
Tbmnto. 
McNaughton, S. 
1980) 
"Bliss ymbolics a d  Voice Output Cormnunicatim 
Aids," 
Presentation at VOCA Conference, May 22-23, Berkeley, California. 
Quirk, 
and 
Greenbaum, S.  (1973): 
Concise Grammar of 
Cmtempara- 
ry Bqlish, 
Harcourt 
Brace Jwanovich, Inc.,  New York. 
(4) 
present participle 
(-a 
fom) 
(a) progressive aspect 
EX: 
~eisswimningatthegymtoday. 
(bl in Dartici~lec lauses 
Ex: 
Swhnhg 
early, 
have 
the 
gym 
to myself. 
(5) past participle (-ed form) 
' 3
 
(a) 
perfective aspect 
(HAVE 
verb 
-ed) 
,, 
.. 
EJC: 
Theboyhasdrunkthewater. 
(b) passive voice (BE 
verb 
4-)  
We 
were surprised. 
(c) 
in 
participle clauses 
Surprised 
the 
n- 
he 
dropped 
his tiread 
--- - 
B. 
Auxiliary Verb 
Fom 
Auxiliary verb forms are used together with another verb 
in a verb phrase. (The verb phrase 
may 
be 
split 
by 
noun 
phrase in a question. These forms are available for the 
user 
of Blisstalk except for the contracted negative. 
(1) 
Primary 
auxiliaries: 
DO, HAVE, BE 
., 
(a) mn-negative 
-V 
'- 
PA 
Ex: 
Did 
yw 
guess? 
.\,,. 
(b) uncontracted negative 
Ex: 
You 
did 
mt 
guess. 
., 
(c) contracted negative 
Ex: 
~idn't 
you 
guess? 
(2) 
Modal auxiliaries:  CAN. 
MUST. 
WIIL, 
WOULD, COULD, 
*SHOULD, 
etc. 
-,>, 
"* 
Ex: 
Must 
yw 
go 
nod' 
(3) 
Marginal modal auxiliaries: 
NEED, 
*USEI 
*MI 
etc. 
Ex: 
Theyneedtogorrow. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested