SBI RURAL INITIATIVE: A SURVEY REPORT 
Steve Brown, Eastern Kentucky University  
ABSTRACT  
This paper presents a model of rural business development and how Small Business Institute programs fit into the 
model. A census was made of all 520 SBI directors. Approximately eight percent of the SBI directors indicated they 
were involved in community development programs other than the traditional one-on-one counseling. While the 
initiatives appear to be successful, the weakest efforts exhibited by SBIs occur in the evaluating phase while the 
strongest occur in the implementing phase. The findings indicate that most of these efforts have been local responses to 
local needs on a project by project basis rather than addressing all phases of the model in a comprehensive manner.  
INTRODUCTION  
RURAL DEVELOPMENT  
Community development became an important aspect of rural development strategies during the 1960's and 1970's. 
Rural health care and physician recruitment were major initiatives. Developed in part to assure equal access to rural 
residents, regional planning and development commissions emphasized intergovernmental planning and growth 
strategies. The Economic Development Administration began and continues to fund many of these efforts, often in 
cooperation with other federal agencies and the states.  
Economic studies of rural America have been conducted by the federal government, state agencies, colleges and 
universities, local development organizations, and private consultants during the 1980's. Most studies recommended 
states consider both agriculture and non-agriculture approaches in crafting long-term solutions to the farm and rural 
crisis in their states. In a 1986 survey, conducted by the Center for Agriculture and Rural Development at The Council 
of State Governments, four basic approaches were identified: agriculture-related development, transition assistance, 
rural business assistance and rural community assistance.  
More than 500 state programs in 34 categories were identified. An update of this survey in 1988 found over 700 
programs in 30 categories. Three state agencies emerge as the principal factors in state agriculture and rural policy 
formation: agriculture, economic development, and community affairs. Other state agencies such as mental health, 
education and labor often provide "transition assistance" to individuals and communities in distress.  
The diversity of programs reflects the diversity of the rural economy. This groundswell of activity is a natural response 
in trying to save a declining way of life, and demonstrates the strong sense of independence and self reliance rural 
America has long been known for. In addition to the 700 programs identified in the 1988 study, many rural 
communities also have local initiatives to blunt the steady drain on their economies and citizens. Such efforts increase 
the number of programs addressing rural development many times, and adds to the complexity of an already confusing 
array of state and federal projects.  
RURAL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MODEL  
A general model of business development in rural areas has been designed by the author while working at the council 
of States Government's Center for Agriculture and Rural Development. It draws on the U.S. Small Business 
Administration, Economic Development Administration and the Tennessee Valley Authority rural development 
experiences.  
This model is generic in nature and zeros in on rural development. Each one of the five phases could apply to a variety 
of key issues such as education, health care, and quality of life which plague progress in rural areas. Phase V and 
perhaps Phase II contain elements common to any type of comprehensive rural initiatives while the other three phases 
have elements unique to business development. Organizing and evaluating are weak links in the model. Many 
programs offer help and advice but do little to build independence and grass root level initiatives.  
With the exception of leadership development few projects recruit, structure, and establish groups to carry on after the 
ter the 
Adding text to a pdf in preview - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text to a pdf document; how to insert text box in pdf
Adding text to a pdf in preview - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add text to pdf file; add text to pdf online
projects termination. The impact of development efforts are usually measured, if at all, in soft descriptive terms instead 
of hard facts. There is little evidence of effective criteria establishment, monitoring, and follow up.  
Assessing is the first step in rural business development and establishes a base line for the following phases. In order 
for development to progress in an orderly fashion and have maximum effect, information should be gathered and 
analyzed to describe the business climate. If essential pieces of community puzzles are missing expansion efforts will 
be retarded and many new ventures doomed to fail before they are launched.  
Once assessed and organized, a community is in position to develop a long term approach to over all business 
development. Several strategic, or even better a combination of strategies, can be pursued to improve local business 
conditions such as strengthening existing business, creating new ones, recruiting new industries, and retaining local 
money.  
Implementing involves transforming the plans from an idea or concept to a reality. In this phase actual businesses or 
potential  
businesses receive help determining feasibility, capital, information, training, and technical assistance.  
SMALL BUSINESS INSTITUTES  
Purpose and Scope  
The purpose of this survey was to determine the extent of SBI involvement in rural economic development.  
Small Business Institutes have traditionally concentrated their efforts in the implementing phase through one-on-one 
counseling to individual businesses. SBI's were originally conceived to aid troubled businesses backed by SBA 
financial support. Because of tightened loan requirements the number of SBI cases generated by the SBA has dwindled 
causing the SBA and some schools to start thinking in terms of broadening the SBI's scope to include community based 
business development.  
Over 500 schools provide assistance to our 7,000 small businesses each year. These businesses are geographically 
dispersed throughout the county.  
A majority of participating colleges and universities are located in rural areas resulting in a disproportionate high 
number of cases to be located in small communities. With the exception of a few nationally recognized projects no 
organized efforts have been made by schools to concentrate on individual communities. Cases are normally chosen on 
an individual as needed basis rather than a planned community wide development approach.  
Analysis  
A census was made of all 520 SBI directors. Each director was sent a two page questionnaire consisting of three 
sections. Section I was based on the five phases of the general rural business development model (assessing, 
organizing, planning, implementing, and evaluating). The directors were asked whether they had been involved, were 
now involved, or just involved in these phases. Section II attempted to determine the scope of involvement by 
requesting numbers of students, teams, cost, duration, and types of business or activities. Section III asked for evidence 
of success and leads on other university rural development activities.  
Findings  
A total of fifty three directors returned questionnaires. Responses were received from twenty nine schools located in 
twenty one states who have either been involved or are now involved in rural development projects. Fourteen schools 
in eleven states indicated that they were not and had not been involved in rural economic development. The result of 
the survey was summarized by phase:  
Assessing  
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
viewer component supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe this technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc
how to insert text in pdf reader; adding text to a pdf in acrobat
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
applications. Support adding and inserting one or multiple pages to existing PDF document. Forms. Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer
adding text to a pdf file; how to enter text in pdf
1. Number of Schools Past and Presently Involved-21 2. Number of Teams Involved-63 3. Number of Students 
Involved-241 4. Funding Levels $300 - $15,000 5. Number of Schools Currently Involved-9 6. Time Span of Project 
2.5 to 6 months  
Organizing  
1. Number of Schools Past and Presently Involved - 15 2. Number of Teams Involved - 36 3. Number of Students 
Involved - 135 4. Funding Levels $200 to $1,000 5. Number of Schools Currently Involved - 11 6. Time Span of 
Project 2.5 - 6 months  
Planning  
1. Number of Schools Past and Presently Involved - 18 2. Number of Teams Involved - 42 3. Number of Students 
Involved - 201 4. Funding Levels $200 to $10,000 5. Number of Schools Currently Involved - 11 6. Time Span of 
Projects 1 to 12 months  
Implementing  
1. Number of Schools Past and Presently Involved - 26 2. Number of Teams Involved - 205 3. Number of Students 
Involved - 579 4. Funding Levels $400 - $10,000 5. Number of Schools Currently Involved - 15 6. Time Span of 
Projects 1 to 12 months  
Evaluating  
1. Number of Schools Past and Presently Involved - 12 2. Number of Teams Involved - 5 3. Number of Students 
Involved - 6 4. Funding Levels $400 5. Number of Schools Currently Involved - 7 6. Time Span of Projects 2.5 to 12 
months  
In addition to the schools responding to the survey, five universities had SBI programs which were identified as being 
involved in extensive rural economic development demonstration projects. A summary of these projects are provided 
below:  
1. Illinois Project  
School: lllinois State University Director: Robert Kerber Phases: I, II, III Towns: 2 Students: Results: Information Not 
Available  
Teams were involved in a variety of projects which included economic analysis, attitudes of citizens, consumer studies, 
organizing leadership, downtown revitalization, tourism, transportation, recreation, promotion and business 
development.  
**This project has been considered by the White House staff for possible incorporation into national policy for rural 
development.  
2. Wisconsin Project:  
School: University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire Director: Richard Lorentz Towns: 2 Phase: I Students: Results: Informal 
Evaluation Only  
The project concentrated on improving the overall business environment in the two communities. The projects were 
broken into four areas: a community resource profit, economic analysis, shopping behavior and individual business 
profiles.  
**This project has been studies by the White House staff for policy purposes.  
3. Nebraska Project:  
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
C#.NET using this PDF document creating toolkit, if you need to add some text and draw Besides, using this PDF document metadata adding control, you
adding text fields to pdf; how to add text fields to pdf
C# TIFF: TIFF Editor SDK to Read & Manipulate TIFF File Using C#.
Easy to generate image thumbnail or preview for Tiff 1. Support embedding, removing, adding and updating ICCProfile. 2. Render text to text, PDF, or Word file.
how to add text to a pdf file; add text pdf file acrobat
School: University of Nebraska, Omaha Director: David Ambrose Towns: 14 Phase: IV Students: Results: Formal 
Evaluation Not Available  
This Project has won awards from Exxon, Freedom Foundation, Joint Council on Economic Education and the 
National Association for Industry-Education Co-operation.  
It has also been written up in Business Week and the Wall Street Journal. Mid-career graduate students spend two 
weeks in one town working to improve already existing businesses.  
4. Virginia Project:  
School: James Madison University Director: Rodger Ford Towns: 1 Phases: I, III, IV Students: Results: No Evaluation 
To Date  
The project was a joint venture between James Madison, Virginia Highlands Community College, and the Appalachian 
Regional Commission. A site selection process was developed for phase I which included criteria and assessments. SBI 
subcenters were set up at the junior college to deliver phase IV counseling.  
5. Georgia Project  
School: University of Georgia Director: Rudy Kagerer Towns: 3 Phases: I, II, III, IV Students: Results: Just Being 
Implemented  
This is part of a Kellogg Foundation grant to mobilize and network existing rural development agencies. A detailed 
inventory of the business environment was developed, communities were organized to promote development, strategies 
were developed, existing businesses are being strengthened, and new ones were created.  
DISCUSSION  
Responses to the questionnaire were received from fifty-three schools located in twenty-eight states. There was a fair 
regional representation with gaps found in the far west, great plains, and east coast.  
The level of involvement of SBI by phase followed a pattern found in previous studies of rural economic development: 
(i.e., in descending order of involvement) implementing, assessing, planning, organizing, and evaluating. The number 
of schools providing traditional one-on-one business counseling out number the schools evaluating rural development 
programs two to one and have almost one hundred more students involved in implementing than in the next closest 
phase, assessing.  
The level of funding different significantly from a high of $15,000 to a low of $100. This differential seems to be 
explained by the scope of the project. Projects involving more students, teams, and greater lengths of time cost more.  
The government rate set by SBA, $400 per case, appears to be the norm for most schools. The length of time also 
varied but not to  
the extent of funding varied. Most variation was found in planning and implementing phase ranging from one to twelve 
months. The dura- tion was likely to be determined by either the course length or project completion date.  
The specific type of businesses or activities identified in each phase also varied significantly. The implementing phase 
was most well defined, and the evaluating phase was sorely lacking in information. Implementing consisted of 
traditional counseling involving all types of businesses and all types of services speci- fied in the questionnaire. 
Planning activities were also well defined and similar to those defined in the questionnaire.  
Traditional types of businesses were counseled in assessing phase but the types of activities were only generally 
described. This was also the case for the organizing phase.  
Only seven SBI directors provided any evidence of success. Most indicated that they do not track this type of data. Of 
. Of 
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
smart and mature PDF image adding component of As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
add editable text box to pdf; add text boxes to a pdf
C# PowerPoint - Insert Blank PowerPoint Page in C#.NET
This C# .NET PowerPoint document page inserting & adding component from RasterEdge is written in managed C# code and designed particularly for .NET class
how to add text to a pdf file in preview; adding text box to pdf
those reporting, 29 new businesses were created and 129 businesses were retained. One Main Street project resulted in 
the creation of several new fans and significant reinvestment in the downtown area.  
Of the five SBI demonstration projects, Nebraska seems to be the most successful to date. The director identified a 
rural community and sends in teams of graduate students to provide traditional SBI counseling.  
The work is concentrated into a time span of three to four weeks. This project is the longest running project and has 
worked with most communities. It is apparently well received by the communities served because there is a waiting list 
of small towns requesting help, plus it has received numerous awards for innovation in edu- cation.  
The Illinois project covers all aspects of rural business development with exception of evaluating the worth of the 
project. Numerous types of community data are collected, task groups are organized, strategic plans developed, and 
individual businesses are advised. Two communities have been helped over the last past six years, and plans are being 
made to work with a third town.  
The Wisconsin project concentrated on assessing the business climate in two communities and worked with high 
schools as well as college students to leverage. The information was used by the Chamber of Commerce and local 
banks to promote new businesses, attract new industries, and strengthen current business. The students currently are not 
working with any new towns.  
The Georgia projects also worked with both high school and college students. Two communities have been 
participating and services were provided in all areas of the development process except evaluating. Several businesses 
were started at one town including one by the students themselves. A third town will be helped in the future.  
The Virginia project established an SBI program in a community college in a depressed rural area. A selection process 
was used to identify the community in which to work. Traditional counseling was provided to thirty-three businesses. 
An evaluation plan was developed but not fully implemented at this time.  
CONCLUSION  
The SBI is a well established geographically dispersed program uniquely situated for mobilizing students throughout 
the country into a force which could help attack problems plaguing rural communities. Until recently the services 
provide one-on-one counseling to small business. The cases were randomly generated throughout the school's service 
area.  
In the past five years there has been a move to focus the efforts on communities in order to improve their business 
climate. The rollover effect of a holistic approach to business development serves to provide greater opportunity for 
successful business retention, expansion, and creation than the traditional random one-on-one counseling.  
We were seeking profiles of programs which had experienced rural economic development and did not request replies 
from schools that had not. Twenty-five percent of the questions were received by schools who had SBI programs but 
did not have a small town focus. Several of these schools were located in urban areas and had an urban mission. There 
were, however, some attempts being made by the urban schools to move beyond the city into satellite towns.  
Most SBIs service rural areas, and many of the schools which were not involved in a rural development program 
indicated an interest in getting involved. Only five schools provided an in depth look at their programs. These programs 
were created to be demonstrations for illustrating the benefits and evolving and integrating SBIs into the main street of 
rural business development. Neither the demonstration SBIs nor those responding to the survey provided hard data 
supporting the success of their programs.  
Further, information needs to be generated concerning what works and what does not, what is transferable and what is 
not, and how this information can be shared. It seems imperative that means other than testimonials, attitudes, and case 
examples be devised to evaluate success.  
Until now no attempt has been made to organize and integrate SBIs into the rural development systems at the state, 
regional, or national level. It is being done at the local level in reactive rather than pro-active manner. The local 
al 
C# Word - Insert Blank Word Page in C#.NET
This C# .NET Word document page inserting & adding component from RasterEdge is written in managed C# code and designed particularly for .NET class applications
adding text to a pdf form; how to add text to a pdf file in reader
C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
slides/pages in the simplest procedures, for instance, using online clear C# methods to add, insert or delete any specific PowerPoint slide, adding & burning
how to add text to a pdf document using reader; how to enter text in a pdf document
programs have moved to fill gaps in the system - a local response to a local need. Because a functioning network of 
SBIs is already in-place, it could be rapidly employed on a much larger scale of rural development. In order for this to 
happen, plans will have to be made, support will have to be established, coordination will have to be developed, and  
funding will have to be secured.  
PREPARING SBI TEAMS TO DEAL WITH FUNCTIONAL WORKPLACE ILLITERACY 
Theodore J. Halatin, Southwest Texas State University Roger D. Scow, Southwest Texas State University  
ABSTRACT  
This paper describes the seriousness of illiteracy problems in small businesses as reported by 134 owners and/or 
managers of small businesses. The focus is on the reading, writing, and computational abilities and skills of employees, 
customers, and suppliers. Suggestions are offered to help SBI directors and student teams when they encounter 
illiteracy problems in a client's business.  
INTRODUCTION  
SBI Directors and students on consulting teams may encounter a pro- blem that plagues many businesses-functional 
workplace illiteracy (FWI). Within or associated with the client's business there may be people who have reading, 
writing, or computational skills that are deficient and inadequate for the demands of the job and the business.  
ILLITERACY IN AMERICA  
Illiteracy is a national problem that adversely affects business organizations and operations. Businesses need people 
who can read, write, and compute, yet according to the Coalition For Literacy, 27-million Americans can't read. (#l) 
Secretary of Labor Elizabeth Dole described this growing problem when she said,  
"At the same time that skills levels are, increasing, you have about 500,000 young people dropping out of school each 
year and another 500,000 who complete high school but are functionally illiterate. About 20% of workers are 
functionally illiterate, and many have skills that are obsolete or soon will be obsolete because of the increased 
technology." (#2)  
The problem is even more critical as evidenced by the declining scores on the college entrance tests that gauge 
advanced reading skills of students hoping to enter colleges and universities. (#3) Verbal scores on the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test taken by students entering college in 1990, are down and tied for the worst performance ever. (#4)  
ILLITERACY PROBLEMS IN BUSINESS  
Illiteracy is a major problem for many businesses. The Bottom Line: Basic Skills in the Workplace, a joint publication 
of the U.S. Department of Labor and the U.S. Department of Education,  
describes a major concern of business as the need for workers with stronger basic skills to accomplish tasks in the 
workplace of today and to adapt to the workplace of tomorrow. (#5) The Wall Street Journal describes American 
schools as " ... producing students who lack the skills that business so desperately needs to compete in today's global 
economy." (#6)  
The illiteracy problem is described in greater detail in many business oriented publications. FORTUNE, in a special 
issue, discussed the problem and what businesses are doing. (#7) Supervisory Management offered suggestions for 
supervisors. (#8) Articles on the problem of illiteracy in business have appeared in recent issues of Association 
Management and IABC COMMUNICATION WORLD. (#9 and #10)  
ISSUES FOR SMALL BUSINESS  
While the problem and the responses by businesses are well publicized, Anderson describes two items that are of 
special interest to those involved with small businesses. First, the issue of work force illiteracy is elusive in that the 
most of the published literature is anecdotal relating to a few dramatic instances rather than solid data. Second, most of 
the data does not include small businesses. (#11)  
ILLITERACY PROBLEMS IN SMALL BUSINESSES 
The Survey  
Information about illiteracy problems in small business was obtained from questionnaires completed by the managers 
and/or owners of 134 small businesses in Texas. Participants in the study were asked to mark the blocks that best 
describe the seriousness of nine problem areas for their businesses. The problem areas, presented in figure 1, involve 
the reading, writing, and computational skills/abilities of employees, customers, and suppli- ers.  
FIGURE 1  
SERIOUSNESS OF LANGUAGE AND MATH PROBLEMS  
AS REPORTED BY SMALL BUSINESS OWNERS AND/OR MANAGERS  
VERY SERIOUS SERIOUS SLIGHT NO DESCRIPTION PROBLEM PROBLEM PROBLEM PROBLEM  
Reading abilities/skills 1 5 28 100 of employees 0.7% 3.7% 20.9% 74.6%  
Writing abilities/skills 1 8 38 87 of employees 0.7% 6.0% 28.4% 64.9%  
Mathematical or compu- tational abilities/ 2 6 36 90 skills of employees 1.5% 4.5% 26.9% 67.2%  
Reading abilities/skills 1 5 43 85 of customers 0.7% 3.7% 32.1% 63.4%  
Writing abilities/skills 1 3 37 93 of customers 0.7% 2.2% 27.6% 69.4%  
Mathematical or compu- 1 4 41 88 tational abilities/skills 0.7% 3.0% 30.6% 65.7% of customers  
Reading abilities/skills 2 2 13 117 of suppliers 1.5% 1.5% 9.7% 87.3%  
Writing abilities/skills 2 1 15 116 of suppliers 1.5% 0.7% 11.2% 86.6%  
Mathematical or compu- 2 1 16 115 tational abilities/skills 1.5% 0.7% 11.9% 85.8% of suppliers  
Totals may not equal 100% due to rounding.  
The Respondents  
More than half (54.6%) of the businesses were described as retail operations. The others included 2.2% wholesalers, 
5.2% repair and service operations, 7.5% manufacturers, 16.4% professional services, and 14.2% with combined 
operations. The businesses ranged in size from no full-time employees to 250 full-time employees. Sixty per cent of the 
businesses reported having part-time employees.  
The participants included 79 males and 55 females. They ranged in  
age from 20 years to 60 years.  
Survey Results  
The summary of responses, presented in figure 1, reveal that illiteracy and innumeracy are problems for small 
businesses. Figure 1 presents the number and percent of respondents marking each block.  
Reading, writing, and computational skills and abilities of employees are problems for small businesses. While nearly 
75% of the respondents indicated "no problem" with the reading ability/skills of employees, one in four respondents did 
find this to be a problem area. More than one-third (35.1%) of the managers and/or owners of small businesses 
indicated problems with the writing ability/skills of employees. Nearly one-third (32.9%) described the mathematical or 
computational abilities/skills of employees as a problem. Considering the importance of reading, writing, and 
g, and 
computational abilities/skills of employees, it is discouraging that so many managers and/or owners of small businesses 
describe these deficiencies as problems for their businesses.  
The literacy and numeracy abilities/skills of customers are pro- blems for a large percentage of the small business 
owners/managers. Only 63.4% stated that the reading ability/skills of customers were not problems for the business. A 
large percentage (30.5%) reported problems with the writing ability/skills of customers. One-third (34.3%) reported 
that the mathematical or computational skills of customers were problems for the business.  
Although the literacy and numeracy problems with suppliers are not as great as those with employees and customers, 
problems do exist. Problems with the reading ability/skills of suppliers were reported by 12.7% of the respondents. A 
slightly higher percent (13.4%) reported problems with writing ability/skills of suppliers with the highest percent 
(14.1%) indicating problems with the mathematical or computational ability/skills of suppliers.  
Reading, writing, and computational deficiencies of employees, customers, and suppliers are problems for many small 
businesses. SBI directors and students on the consulting teams must be prepared for FWI problems in small businesses. 
PREPARING STUDENT TEAMS FOR FWI PROBLEMS  
The program director must be alert for reading, writing, and computational deficiencies of student team members. 
Declining SAT scores, criticisms of public education, and performance on proficiency exams point to the possibility of 
language and computational deficiencies of college students who may be on the consulting team. Students with 
deficiencies will need special attention.  
Team members should be alerted to the problem of FWI in small busi- nesses. The information presented in this paper, 
supported with local area studies, can be useful in emphasizing the reality of such problems for small businesses.  
Many articles describe the signs of reading, writing, and computational deficiencies. Student consultants should read 
industry related materials for specific examples of deficiencies, efforts to hide the deficiencies, and the resulting 
problems for the business.  
While the student consultants should be alert for language and computational deficiencies, they should NOT react 
immediately to their observations. The observations should be professionally noted and discussed in privacy with the 
director and other team members.  
Student teams should be alert for language and computational deficiencies of customers and suppliers. Customers who 
are unable to read directions may need graphic aids. Suppliers who deliver the wrong materials may be causing costly 
problems for the business. The client may need to find new methods for working with customers or suppliers who are 
illiterate.  
Local area programs for combatting illiteracy and innumeracy should be contacted for information and assistance. 
Community education programs are being alerted to the problems within small businesses. (#12)  
The section "Opportunities for Improvement" in the final report can address the problem of illiteracy. Local area 
remediation programs can be identified and described as well as the possible benefits from such programs.  
CONCLUSION  
Functional workplace illiteracy is a problem for small businesses. It is a problem that will not go away. SBI directors 
need to recognize the magnitude of the problem and be prepared to assist the student teams when they encounter 
illiteracy.  
REFERENCES  
1. Coalition For Literacy, Advertisement, Business Week, June 25, 1990 p. 127.  
2. Bendetto, Wendy, "The Nation is Facing a Workforce Crisis," an interview with Secretary of Labor Elizabeth Dole, 
e, 
USA TODAY, Sept. 20, 1990 p. 13a.  
3. Anderson, Richard C., Elfrieda H. Hiebert, Judith A. Scott, and Ian A.G. Wilkinson, Becoming a Nation of Readers: 
The Report of the Commission on Reading, Washington, D.C.: The National  
Institute of Education, 1985.  
4. Putka, Gary, "Verbal Skills Slip as SAT Scores Fall," Wall Street Journal, Aug. 28, 1990, p. B1.  
5. ---- The Bottom Line: Basic Skills in the Workplace, Washington, D.C.: U. S. Department of Labor and the U. S. 
Department of Education, 1988 p. 3.  
6. Wall Street Journal, Special Supplement, Feb. 9, 1990.  
7. "Saving Our Schools," FORTUNE, Special Issue, Spring 1990.  
8. "Functional Illiteracy: It's Your Problem, Too." Supervisory Management, June 1989, p. 22-26.  
9. Carlivati, Peter A., "Workplace Illiteracy." Association Management, May 1990 p. 20 and 65.  
10. Walker, Albert, "Illiteracy in the Workplace," IABC COMMUNICATION WORLD, June 1989, p. 18, 20-21.  
11. Anderson, Claire, "Literacy in the Workplace: A Call for Research," Proceeding of the Academy of Management -- 
Southwest Division, 1990, p. 204-207.  
12. Halatin, T.J. and Beverly Oliver, "Workplace Illiteracy in Small Businesses," National Community Education 
Association Annual Conference, 1990.  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested