open pdf file in asp.net using c# : Add text pdf reader software application project winforms windows html UWP 1991%20Proceedings20-part543

A DRIVE WITH DIRECTION THE TYPE A - HIGH SELF-MONITOR 
PERSONALITY-PROFILE: - IMPLICATIONS FOR COMPANY 
PERFORMANCE  
Richard E. Hunt, Rockhurst College David C. Adams, Marywood College  
ABSTRACT  
This paper deals with the anomaly that the Type A personality, characterized by strong personal drive combined with 
disorganized and unfocused behavior, is often highly productive. The research forwards a more complex personality 
profile of the Type A personality linked with individual propensity towards monitoring environmental cues as 
explaining such successful performance. Empirical data from a sample of midwestern small business owners support 
hypotheses that these are independent personality factors and businesses run by individuals high on both factors will 
outperform businesses run by owners with other personality combinations. Implications for SBI consulting are 
discussed.  
INTRODUCTION  
Past research has shown a positive relationship between Type A behavior on the part of the small business owner and 
success of the business as measured by return on investment and growth in sales revenue (Boyd, 1984). In this study, 
we will consider whether such results reflect simply Type A behavior, or whether there is a more complex personality 
cluster present, which, while it includes the Type A profile, is not solely impacted by Type A. We will also consider the 
implications of such a personality cluster for how we, as SBI consultants, may provide the best levels of assistance to 
our clients.  
Type A behavior is defined as "individuals which exhibit enhanced hostility, ambitiousness and competitiveness, and 
are often preoccupied with deadlines and with work (Chesney and Rosennman, 1980). Everly and Girdano (1980) have 
identified four measure of Type A behavior, they are:  
1. Hostility - defined as a person who is excessively competitive  
2. Time Urgency - defined as a person who races against the clock even when it is not necessary  
3. Polyphasic Behavior - defined as a person who tends to undertake two or more tasks simultaneously, even when it is 
inappropriate to do so  
4. Lack of Proper Planning - defined as a person who rushes into work without first deciding on a plan to accomplish 
the desired task  
On an intuitive level, we would be hard pressed to understand how such an individual,, high in Type A characteristics,, 
could perform successfully in a business environment, except through sheer effort. However, there may be an 
additional mitigative personality factor that makes sense of this seeming contradiction.  
A personality factor that has been posited as critical to this personality/environment interaction is the recognition that 
individuals may vary significantly in their level of reaction to the various messages or signals that the outside world 
sends them. Individuals characterized as "high self -monitors" are very sensitive to these environmental cues and adjust 
their behavior according to the expectations of their relevant external environment; in contrast, individuals 
characterized as "low self-monitors" are often oblivious to these external data and therefore tend to maintain similar 
patterns of behavior irrespective of situational demands (Snyder and Campbell, 1982). Since responsiveness to external 
demands is an important contributing factor to business success, (i.e. without satisfied customers there is little 
likelihood of survival) we would hypothesize that "high self-monitors" will be more likely to lead their businesses to 
higher performance levels than will "low self-monitors".  
In terms of our roles as SBI consultants, we will likely find significant differences in terms of the degree of inherent 
receptivity of our clients as a function of "high" versus 'low self-monitoring". We may have to make significant 
icant 
Add text pdf reader - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text fields to pdf; add text box in pdf document
Add text pdf reader - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text to pdf in acrobat; how to enter text in a pdf document
adjustments in the ways that we deal with these different people.  
Is there a possible interaction effect between Type A and "high/low self monitoring"? If the highly driven Type A 
individual is also sensitive to the outside world, it is quite possible that the business person will be higher on hostility, 
polyphasic behavior, and time urgency due to a recognition of more relevant external factors to deal with. However, 
such an awareness may sensitize this individual towards planning, which is contrary to the Type A profile. It appears 
that a mixture of Type A and high self- monitoring behaviors might prove to blend into a combination that would 
enhance performance.  
Hypothesis to be Tested  
Hypothesis 1:Companies run by individuals who are high on Type A characteristics will outperform companies run by 
individuals who are low on Type A characteristics. This hypothesis is consistent with previously reported findings 
(Boyd, 1988).  
Hypothesis 2:Companies engaged in higher levels of internal performance evaluation will outperform companies 
engaged in lower levels of performance evaluation.  
Hypothesis 3:There will be a significantly higher level of internal performance evaluation utilized by companies run by 
individuals who are high on Type A characteristics as compared to companies run by individuals who are low on Type 
A characteristics. If hypothesis 1 and 2 are supported and this hypothesis is not supported, this would suggest that the 
strong possibility of an additional explanatory variable for predicting success.  
Hypothesis 4:Individuals who are high on Type A characteristics will be more likely to be "high self monitors" than 
will individuals who are low on Type A characteristics. The hypothesis is forwarded to test the degree of independence 
of the two personality variables. If this hypothesis is rejected, this suggests that they are independent personality 
factors.  
Hypothesis 5:Companies run by individuals who are "high self - monitors" will engage in higher levels of internal 
performance evaluation than will companies run by individuals who are "low self-monitors". This is consistent with the 
theoretical discussion. Also, if Hypothesis 3 is not supported and this hypothesis is supported, this suggests that "high 
selfmonitoring" may be a significant factor in explaining company performance.  
Hypothesis 6:Companies run by individuals who are "high self - monitors" will out perform companies run by "low self 
monitors". This will especially reflect itself in terms of the trend in the change in performance from one year to the 
next.  
Hypothesis 7:Companies run by individuals who are both high on Type A and high on self-monitoring will be more 
likely to engage in internal performance evaluation than will companies run by individuals who are high on only one of 
these; in turn, the lowest level of internal performance evaluation will be in those companies run by individuals low on 
both Type A and self monitoring.  
Hypothesis 8:Companies run by individuals who are high on both Type A and self-monitoring will be more likely to 
out perform companies run by individuals who are high on only one of these; in turn,, the lowest level of company 
performance will be in those companies run by individuals low on both Type A and self-monitoring.  
Hypotheses 7 and 8 merge those individuals who are high on Type A's and "low self-monitors" with those who are low 
Type A's and "high self-monitors". We will also test if there are significant differences in company performance 
between these groups. If such differences are found, this would suggest that one or the other of the two personality 
variables plays a more dominate role.  
METHODOLOGY  
To test our hypotheses, we utilized a questionnaire previously developed for a study of Canadian business owners 
(Adams, 1988). A stratified (by type of business), random sample of 1000 small businesses in the Kansas City area was 
generated by Sorkin's Directory (a private company that specialized in maintaining a computerized, current 
, current 
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF reader installed. Insert images into PDF form field. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo
add text boxes to pdf document; how to add text field to pdf
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats
how to enter text into a pdf form; how to enter text in pdf
comprehensive directory of businesses in several major cities). Questionnaires were mailed to this sample; 211 
responses were received with 165 judged as usable. our respondents averaged 25.3 employed, with a range from 1 to 
101. A comparison of the response rates for various types of businesses with their prevalence in the original sample 
shows that the responses are reasonably representative of the initial sample.  
Prevalence in Type of Business initial sample ------------------------------------------------- Retail 16% Wholesale 13% 
Construction 10% Manufacturing 16% Service 45%  
Prevalence in usable Type of Business responses ------------------------------------------------- Retail 19% Wholesale 7% 
Construction 6% Manufacturing 12% Service 52%  
The measures used in this study are as follows:  
(1) Type A/B - questions originally developed by Everly & Girdano (1980) measured the 4 submeasures (time urgency, 
hostility, polyphasic behavior and lack of planning). An overall Type A/B score was generated (range = 0-14), with 
higher scores indicating stronger tendencies towards Type A behavior.  
(2) "High/Low self-monitor" traits - Respondents were asked five (Likert scale) questions dealing with the degree to 
which they monitor both the behavior of their customers and competitors. The five responses were combined into a 
standardized score for each respondent.  
(3) Internal Performance Evaluation Respondents were asked five (Likert scale) questions dealing with the degree to 
which they developed business plans and strategies, reevaluated existing plans and analyzed ongoing financial and 
performance data. These variables were combined into a standardized score for each respondent.  
(4) Company Performance Respondents were asked to indicate the percentage increase in sales for their company for 
1987 versus 1986 and 1988 versus 1987. We created an additional variable comparing these two figures to determine 
whether 1988 performance improvement was larger or smaller than 1987.  
The statistical analyses of these data included: Spearman correlation between variables, t-tests for differences between 
2 categories of respondents, and ANOVA for differences between 3 categories of respondents.  
RESULTS  
Hypothesis 1 - partially supported  
A t-test comparison of company performance between companies run by high versus low Type A leaders showed the 
following:  
1987 improvement High Type A 14.6% Low Type A 7.4% Stat. Signf. p<.10  
1988 improvement High Type A 17.3% Low Type A 7.4% Stat. Signf. p<.01  
Difference in 1988 vs 1987 improvement High Type A 2.7 Low Type A 0 Stat. Signf. ns  
This hypothesis is supported in 1988, with partial support in 1987. It is interesting to note that companies run by high 
Type A personalities not only outperform companies led by low Type A personalities, but show an upward versus 
stagnant trend line (albeit the percentage improvement is not statistically significant).  
Hypothesis 2 - strong partial support  
Correlational analysis shows that in both 1987 and 1988, improvement in company performance was positively related 
to higher levels of internal performance evaluation (1987, r=.19, p<.05; 1988 r=.23, p<.0l); these findings support 
hypothesis 2. However, there was a negative correlation between the level of internal performance evaluation and the 
difference between the 1988 and 1987 level of improvement (r=-.19, p<.05), which partially rejects the hypothesis. 
thesis. 
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
add text pdf file; add text to pdf without acrobat
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
how to enter text in pdf; how to insert text box in pdf document
Hypothesis 3 - rejected  
A t-test comparison of the level of internal performance evaluation of companies run by high versus low Type A 
personalities shows no significant differences (1.8 versus 1.1, t=.61, ns. ) . This rejection of hypothesis 3, when 
combined with the results of hypothesis 1 and 2 suggest that a consideration of an additional explanatory variable is 
warranted.  
Hypothesis 4 - rejected  
A t-test comparison of high versus low Type A personality leaders shows that they are not significantly different in the 
degree to which they are self-monitors (.15 versus -.11, t=l.ll, ns). Thus, we are free to proceed with the assumption that 
Type A and self-monitoring are two independent personality variables.  
Hypothesis 5 - accepted  
A t-test comparison of companies run by "high" versus "low self-monitors" shows a significant difference in the level 
of internal performance evaluation (3. 44 versus -.33, p<.001). This stands in marked contrast to the lack of significant 
differences seen in Hypothesis 3.  
Hypothesis 6 - strong partial support  
A t-test comparison of companies run by "high" versus "low self monitors" is summarized below:  
1987 improvement High self-monitor 10.1% Low self-monitor 12.2% Stat. Signf. ns  
1988 improvement High self-monitor 15.5% Low self-monitor 8.8% Stat. Signf. p<.10  
Difference in 1988 vs 1987 improvement High self-monitor 5.4% Low self-monitor -3.4% Stat. Signf. p<.01  
These results indicate that companies run by "high self-monitors" made significant improvements in 1988 versus 1987, 
while "low self-monitors" actually declined in terms of relative improvement. These findings suggest that "high self -
monitors" are making on-going adjustments to further enhance their companies performances, while "low self-
monitors" may be likely to be less responsive to changing conditions, and hence the-downward-trend.  
Hypothesis 7 - supported  
ANOVA analysis shows the following results:  
Low on both Type A & Self- Monitoring Mean score on Internal Performance Evaluation -1.27  
High on either Type A or Self- Monitoring Mean score on Internal Performance Evaluation 2.30  
High on both Type A & Self- Monitoring Mean score on Internal Performance SIG Evaluation 2.89 p<.05  
Here we can observe that the differences between being low on both and high on at least one of the personality factors 
is far more pronounced than is the difference between high on one versus high on both.  
Hypothesis 8 - strong partial support  
ANOVA analysis shows the following:  
Low on both Type A & Self- Monitoring % Improvement in Company Performance '87 8.16  
High on either Type A or Self- Monitoring % Improvement in Company Performance '87 12.66  
High on both Type A & Self- Monitoring % Improvement in Company SIG Performance '87 12.55 NS 
55 NS 
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
add text to pdf online; add text to pdf in acrobat
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
adding text to a pdf in acrobat; adding text field to pdf
Low on both Type A & Self- Monitoring % Improvement in Company Performance '88 2.03  
High on either Type A or Self- Monitoring % Improvement in Company Performance '88 14.66  
High on both Type A & Self- Monitoring % Improvement in Company SIG Performance '88 18.45 p<.0l  
Low on both Type A & Self- Monitoring Difference in % Improvement 1988 vs 1987 -6.13  
High on either Type A or Self -monitoring Difference in % Improvement 1988 vs 1987 2.00  
High on both Type A & Self- Monitoring Difference in % Improvement SIG 1988 vs 1987 5.90 p<.05  
These results suggest that companies run by individuals who are a combination of a high Type A and a "high self-
monitor" personality profile will ultimately outperform companies run by individuals high on only one of these 
dimensions and will definitely out perform companies run by individuals low on both of these dimensions. Companies 
in the latter category show a trend towards declining performance. It would be interesting to track these companies over 
an extended time frame.  
As discussed earlier, we also performed a t-test comparison of the level of company performance between companies 
run by high Type A/"low self-monitors" versus low Type A/"high self-monitors". The results of these analyses were 
nonsignificant, which suggest that neither personality factor is the dominant factor; rather, we can conclude that while 
both may play an important role by themselves, they are especially significant when found in combination.  
DISCUSSION  
The results of this study strongly suggest that we need to examine not only whether an entrepreneur is a Type A or 
Type B personality, but must also consider whether the person is a "high" or "low self-monitor". The results of this 
study strongly suggest that individuals who are high on both of these personality variables will lead companies that, 
over time, tend to outperform companies led by individuals who are only high on one or the other, and especially 
companies led by individuals who are low on both personality factors.  
What we are seeing is very simple: drive combined with direction will result in higher levels of success than will drive 
without direction or direction without drive. It appears that the gap will likely grow over time. The most interesting 
phenomenon seen in this study is that of comparing 1987 and 1988 levels of improvement. When we view the trend 
line from 1987 to 1988, we see the difference between vibrant companies on the upswing and companies that are 
starting to stagnate. Future research might consider tracking companies over an extended period of time (e.g. five 
years) to determine whether these differences become especially pronounced.  
What implications do these findings have for SBI consultants? In simple terms, we are likely to see both high 
opportunity and high frustration. On the opportunity side, sensitizing present and potential business owners to the need 
to be aware of the messages being sent to them by the outside world will help us to help them enhance their chances of 
success. On the frustration side, often those with the greatest need for this advice are those least likely to listen. 
However, we may still be able to partially deflect this tendency by pointing out business options such as (1) 
franchising, or other affiliation strategies where the business person depends on other companies run by more 
externally sensitive individuals to perform this function, or (2) taking on a partner who will f ill this gap. The key to our 
success as SBI consultants will be to (1) recognize that these different personality profiles are significant in terms of 
business success, (2) recognize the potential difficulties in dealing with "low self -monitors", and (3) be prepared to 
adjust advising our methods to fit the needs of our clients.  
REFERENCES  
Adams, D.C., "The Relationship Among Personality Type, Management Practices, and Sales", International Council 
for Small business, 34th Annual World Conference proceedings.  
Chesney, M. A. and Rosenman, R.H. "Type A Behavior in the Work Setting" in Current Concerns in Occupational 
Stress, C.L. Cooper and R. Payne (Eds.) , John Wiley and Sons, New York, N.Y. (1980), pp. 187-212. 
87-212. 
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; Add Image to PDF; VB.NET Protect: Add Password to VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word
add text to pdf using preview; how to add text field to pdf form
C# PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in C#.net, ASP
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; Add Image to PDF; VB.NET Protect: Add Password to VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word
adding text to a pdf form; how to add text fields to a pdf
Boyd, David P. (1984) "Type A Behaviors, Financial Performance and Organizational Growth in Small Business 
Firms", Journal of Occupational Psychology, 57, p. 137.  
Everly, Jr., G.S. and Girdano, D.A. The Stress Mess Solution, Prentice-Hall Company, Bowie, maryland, 1980, p. 56.  
Snyder, M., and Campbell, M.H. (1982). "Self-monitoring: The self in action" In J. Suls (Ed.), Psycholgical 
perspectives on the self (pp. 185-207). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum. 
um. 
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; Add Image to PDF; VB.NET Protect: Add Password to VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word
how to insert text into a pdf using reader; how to insert text into a pdf with acrobat
STRATEGIC TRAINING UNITS FOR GROWTH-ORIENTED 
MANUFACTURING  
Thomas R. Blue, Fort Lewis College Roy A. Cook, Fort Lewis College  
ABSTRACT  
Training for many small business manufacturers represents a major capital investment in human resources. How well 
entrepreneurs allocate their limited training dollars can make or break the enterprise. This paper proposes that small 
businesses account for their training costs by employee and track revenues generated from training by strategic training 
units. A "five-star" approach is suggested for an accounting of training related to the customer, statistical process and 
quality control, product development, manufacturing and distribution.  
INTRODUCTION  
There exists a need for comprehensive training strategies in small businesses. What are the hidden training costs of 
firing, hiring, promoting, or retiring an employee? Who knows? As one operation's manager said, "I don't think I want 
to know."  
The definition of training here extends to informally organized on-the-job training, as well as formally organized 
programs of training. Full attention to training costs by employee and revenue centers offers several direct benefits: (1) 
bases for adjustments to the training programs, (2) changes in the pricing of training-related products and services, (3) 
more complete record of the investment in personnel, (4) better organization and operation of revenue centers. (5) 
coordination of training with capital investments, (6) support for added compensation to and a targeting of training 
costs for revenue centers and (7) retention of skill-rich employees. These benefits more than justify "the need to know" 
from an accounting perspective for the true cost of training.  
STRATEGICALLY TARGETED TRAINING  
Without a strategically targeted training program, a small business significantly reduces its chances of success (2). The 
best trained employees quickly become obsolete at an accelerating rate as technology changes (8). Just the mandated 
increases in the minimum wage, implemented in 1990 and scheduled for 1991, require that small businesses generate 
ever-increasing sales and profits to pay for these wage increases. The rising costs of benefit packages--especially health 
care which is projected to increase at  
double digit rates into the foreseeable future (4)--all require greater profits to fund benefits. Training programs which 
are self-funding generate the needed revenues to pay for these programs.  
Yet self-funding training programs present other problems. On the one hand, training which is profitable both for the 
company and employee increases the value of that employee to the company. On the other hand, this value-added calls 
for added compensation to retain skill-enriched employees. Top performers expect adequate merit pay, for they are 
most likely the first to receive lucrative offers from competitors. Replacing these "heavy hitters" proves at least as 
costly.  
Not only will a new hire usually command a higher wage, but new hires also require orientation and on-the-job 
training. With the ill-prepared group of workers who are beginning to enter the workforce, more small businesses must 
invest in additional training and development to adequately prepare these workers. Moreover, for well-trained 
employees pay becomes a potential dissatisfier (5), particularly if training enhances the "marketable" skills of 
employees. Pickle and Abrahamson (9) make note of the dilemma faced by small business owners, who must accept 
training as a continuous process. Continuous training is needed to upgrade skills in a changing and competitive 
environment. However, this training also presents employees with increasingly more challenging opportunities for 
advancement. The alternative to skill enhancement is make-work training.  
To make training cost effective, small business managers must identify their "top performers" in a timely manner. Part 
of this identification involves an accounting for training costs by employee, rather than just a line-item expense on the 
on the 
income statement. While one might be tempted to keep detailed records of training only on the top performers, much is 
sacrificed by slighting the skill development of other employees. Ellig (1) points out the need for viewing employees as 
investments, since in the foreseeable future the number of personnel reaching working age will drop significantly. The 
ever present potential for dissatisfaction with pay and/or benefits can turn even the best employee into a "bad 
employee" (7). Most any employee, once turned bad, can quickly offset the efforts of key "top performers." Therefore, 
slighting training hurts the entire company. In addition,, as Marshall and Briggs note, "As technology becomes more 
pervasive, people who want to improve their incomes and productivity must acquire learning, thinking, and problem 
solving skills not traditionally a part of their jobs (6, pp. 212-213).  
Small business owners may be lulled into a false sense of complacency by asking themselves the following question, 
"If my competitors neglect training, why should I invest in it?" That attitude ignores training strategies employed 
overseas by the Japanese, South Koreans, Germans and other potential competitors. Present-day barriers to skilled-
labor movement are rapidly  
dissolving, as world-class companies locate and import skill-rich employees. Just as capital moves through currency 
markets, so too are employees crossing national labor poole. As Marshall and Briggs comment, "Countries with limited 
physical resources, like Germany and Japan, have enjoyed superior economic performance because they have been 
forced to develop their human resources" (6, p. 211).  
STRATEGIC TRAINING UNITS  
To meet this world-class competition for skilled labor, smaller manufacturers need to establish centers of revenue 
creation, based on the ability of training to generate revenues. The authors refer to these revenue centers as Strategic 
Training Units (STU's). How does the training of personnel generate revenues? The answer to this question requires an 
assessment of one's business lines and how training enhances productivity in these lines.  
An example of STU's comes from a rapidly growing manufacturer in Monroe, Louisiana, Sunbelt Plastics. In only 
fifteen years, this company has grown from nothing to the largest single facility producing blown film plastic products 
in the U.S.  
The "Five Star Program" at Sunbelt is indicative of the STU approach. This program places a balanced emphasis on 
benefits derived from customers, statistical process and quality control, product development, manufacturing and 
distribution. The "five stars" in the program designate centers through which training dollars generate more revenue to 
fund continued training and growth. While each small business is unique, these five-Star centers serve as a model for 
manufacturers wishing to grow through a strategically balanced approach to training.  
Training at Sunbelt cuts across management levels, product lines and seniority. The training function operates 
independently of other functional, hierarchical, departmental and strategic designations in the organizational structure. 
What may seem as an extreme, quality assure personnel develop skills in making customer calls and assisting with 
sales closings. Customer contacts even originate from executives discussing products and problems with operators to 
discussions with customers during plant tours.  
Statistical process and quality control training also generates revenues. Close behind, a commitment to training for 
quality, are innovations which increase the quantities and revenues produced. More products of higher quality mean 
higher revenues to cover more training.  
Product development training generates product innovations in quality assurance, customer sales, operator insights, and 
even in training decisions themselves. As the head of R&D surveys the shop  
floor from his office overlooking the plant, product development training continues as an integral, nearly 
indistinguishable component, of the manufacturing process. Production and training blend in such a way that new 
product development training almost seems to function as a training program.  
Sustainable revenue generation also originates from other training closely tied to the manufacturing process. The 
blending of scheduling, inspections and operations affords unique opportunities for on-the-job training and revenue 
generation. Training affords personnel at all levels learning opportunities not traditionally incorporated into their work. 
These learning opportunities also require employees to develop problem solving skills not typically a part of their jobs. 
eir jobs. 
For example, product delivery presents endless opportunities: Who knows what drivers may learn while delivering 
products? What if a purchasing agent expresses an interest in other sunbelt products? Does the driver know how to 
respond to the customer's needs?  
ACCOUNTING FOR STRATEGIC TRAINING UNITS  
Will the driver ignore the comments, brush off the customer, or in the attempt to avoid problems say, "I don't think I 
want to know"? Accounting for costs and revenues has revealing outcomes. Perhaps, distribution is not taken seriously 
as a distinct STU. Treated as a stepchild, no one can identify revenues associated with  
TABLE 1 TRAINING LEDGER CARD  
Employee: Joseph Spulerra Hired: 2/15/88 Birthdare 10/3/53 Starting Wage: 9.50/hr. Position: Forklift Operator 
ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÂÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÂÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÂÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ ³
³ ³ANTICIPATED³ ³ ³ ³ESTIMATED³ BENEFIT ³ ³ DATE ³ DESCRIPTION ³ COST ³ PERIOD ³ 
ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ ³ 
2/17/88³ Company orientation ³ 500 ³ 1 yr. ³ 
ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ ³ 
2/18/88³ Cost of time taken by employee ³ 2,000 ³ 6 mos. ³ ³ ³ and others from on-the-job ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ training in forklift 
operations³ ³ ³ ³ ³ (1 week) ³ ³ ³ 
ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ ³ 
4/15/88³ Plant-safety training & testing³ 1,500 ³ 5 yrs ³ ³ ³ (lated entire week) ³ ³ ³ 
ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ ³ 
5/15/88³ Problem-solving training in ³ 5,000 ³ 10 yrs ³ ³ ³ teams (2 days a week for ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 3 weeks) ³ ³ ³ 
ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´  
³ 7/20/88³ Training on new shrink-wrap ³ 500 ³ 2 yrs ³ ³ ³ machine pallets. ³ ³ ³ 
ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ ³ 
3/8/89 ³Electricians school, stage 1 ³ 3,900 ³1,000 cost ³ ³ ³training (2 days a month through³ ³benefit ³ ³ ³ 11/89). 
Dropped out of training³ ³past 1989 ³ ³ ³ 11/30/88. ³ ³ ³ 
ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ ³ 
6/30/89³Merit raise (wage up to ³ 41,600 ³ 20 yrs ³ ³ ³10.50/hr.; 1.00/hr. raise for an³ ³ ³ ³ ³estimated 40 hrs./wk. ³ ³ ³ ³ 
³for 20 yrs) ³ ³ ³ 
ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ ³ 
9/10/89³SPC training in Atlanta for zero³ 4,700 ³ 8 yrs. ³ ³ ³defect program (1 week) ³ ³ ³ 
ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ ³ 
TOTAL ³ ³ 59,000 ³ ³ 
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÁÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÁÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÁÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ  
ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÂÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÂÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³ ³ TRAINING 
COSTS ³ ³ ³ ³ PERIOD ³ REMAINING ³ ³ DATE ³ 1988 1989 ³ COST ³ 
ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ ³ 2/17/88 ³ 500 -0- ³ 
-0- ³ ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ ³ 2/18/88 ³ 
2,000 -0- ³ -0- ³ ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ ³ 
4/15/88 ³ 225 500 ³ 775 ³ ³ ³ (9 mos.) ³ ³ 
ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ ³ 5/15/88 ³ 333 500 ³
4,167 ³ ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ ³ 7/20/88 ³ 
104 250 ³ 146 ³ ³ ³ (5 mos.) ³ ³ 
ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ ³ 3/8/89 ³ -0- 2,900 ³ 
1,000 ³ ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ ³ 6/30/89 ³ -
0- 1,040 ³ 40,560 ³ ³ ³ (2,800/yr.) ³ ³ ³ ³ for 6 mos.) ³ ³ 
ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ ³ 9/10/89 ³ -0- 196 ³ 
4,504 ³ ³ ³ (4 mos.) ³ ³ 
ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ ³ TOTAL ³ 3,162 
5,386 ³ 51,152 ³ ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÁÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÁÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ  
distribution, and drivers receive little else besides "safety training." Accounting by STU identifies those areas either 
her 
lacking or over-endowed in training-related revenues.  
Not yet addressed is the possibility of losing top performers. Facing issues of compensation imbalance and inequities 
requires an accounting for training costs by employee. While the STU is the unit of revenue generation, the employee is 
the unit of training and training costs. A ledger of training costs looks similar to a fixed asset ledger. Does this mean 
that employees are no better than machinery? Hardly. It does mean, however, that employees and training costs in a 
training ledger receive the same attention as would an expensive piece of machinery in a fixed asset ledger. The 
procedure suggested, here, is an simple but workable approach to bringing equal attention to both capital investment 
and skill development essential for organizational growth (1). The costs per employee of formal and informal training 
can easily approach or exceed capital investment in machinery per employee.  
THE TRAINING LEDGER  
Spreadsheet programs such as LOTUS allow a two-dimensional accumulation of training costs by employee and STU. 
A basic ledger card demonstrates how significant even a conservative estimate of training costs can be. A hypothetical 
forklift operator at Sunbelt, Joseph Spulerra, exemplifies how rapidly training costs accumulate. As Table 1 shows, 
these costs include a merit raise of $1/hour on June 30, 1989. Conservatively, these costs accumulated to almost 
$60,000 in his first 17 months of employment.  
TABLE 2 SHORT-AND LONG-TERM MONETARY EFFECTS OF TRAINING  
MONETARY BENEFIT SHORT-TERM EFFECTS LONG-TERM EFFECTS 
ÚÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÂÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÂÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ¿ ³To 
Only Companies ³Contributes funds for ³Contributes fund ³ ³ ³operations, but does ³for capital ³ ³ ³not provide funds 
³expenditures needed³ ³ ³for annual raises. ³to support higher ³ ³ ³ ³skill levels, but ³ ³ ³ ³does not contribute³ ³ ³ ³to the 
funding of ³ ³ ³ ³past raises. ³ 
ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ ³To 
Only Employees ³Funds annual employee ³Contributes to the ³ ³ ³raises, but does not ³funding of past ³ ³ ³contirbute to 
funds ³raises, but does ³ ³ ³for current operations³not fund or even ³ ³ ³ ³drains funds from ³ ³ ³ ³capital ³ ³ ³ ³expenditures 
³ ³ ³ ³needed to support ³  
³ ³ ³higher skill ³ ³ ³ ³levels. ³ 
ÃÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÅÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄ´ ³Goal 
³Funds annual employee ³Contributes to the ³ ³ ³raises, and provides ³funding of past ³ ³ ³funds for current ³raises, and 
funds ³ ³ ³operations. ³capital ³ ³ ³ ³expenditures needed³ ³ ³ ³to support higher ³ ³ ³ ³skill levels. ³ ³ ³ ³ ³ 
ÀÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÁÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÁÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÄÙ  
While one could describe each entry on the ledger, amounts left off the ledger are of greater impact. The costs of 
interviewing prospective employees is not allocated. Recruitment costs are significant when the wages of interviewers 
are included. The costs of replacing employees can become formidable for small business owners. On the average, 
companies spend $1,668 to hire office workers and $887 to hire production workers (3). In Table 1, straight-line 
amortization of these hiring and training costs for 1988 and 1989 probably understates the real costs. In practice, the 
value of training decays in keeping more with the double-declining balance method, which would approximately 
double the annual costs for 1988 and 1989 (8).  
Using the double-declining convention, STU revenues may not cover training costs in the initial years. Present value 
analysis by STU of revenues and costs would enable small business managers to select training programs based on 
anticipated financial returns. One might think only self-funding training programs should remain. But not so. Another 
costs not shown on the ledger is the costs of customer dissatisfaction and lost sales if employees are poorly trained.  
CONCLUSION  
Assuming then that small manufacturers are willing to account for training by employee and STU, what might be some 
short-term and long-term objectives of training programs? The "bottom line" objectives would seem to be training 
which monetarily benefits both employer and employee. Table 2 shows how companies can be at odds with their own 
employees without a carefully orchestrated training program. In the short-term (row 1, column 1) training margins 
might contribute to current operations but be inadequate to fund raises. In the long-term (row 1. column 2) a company-
pany-
-
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested