open pdf file in asp.net using c# : How to input text in a pdf Library software API .net windows asp.net sharepoint 1991%20Proceedings26-part549

There are no significant differences although clearly some directions are indicated in Questions 1, 2, 4, and 8. In 
question one, on the issue of using insider information to purchase stock, 63% of the SBI's who thought the person in 
the scenario would buy stock would buy the stock themselves but less than half of the business students would. In 
question two not a single one of the SBI's would pad the expense account even if they thought the person in the 
scenario would, whereas 25% of the students would. In question four there was a somewhat greater tendency for the 
SBI clients who felt the company would discharge older workers to say they themselves would discharge older workers 
than for the students. In the gift scenario of Question eight there was a greater tendency for the business students who 
felt the person in the scenario would send gifts to also respond that they would send gifts than for the SBI's.  
Another interesting finding is that for question five. The clients and students had differed in their perceptions of what 
the person in the scenario would do (Table 2), yet the fact they felt the person in scenario would keep the planned 
shutdown a secret did not affect their own strong belief that they themselves would inform the employees.  
A greater percentage of the students (43%) preferred to work with the more flexible White than did the SBI's (29%) 
although this was not significantly different.  
Both students and SBI's preferred to work with the noncom- promising Easton.  
Ways of Improving Business Ethics (Question 16)  
Both the SBI's and students seemed to approve of at least three ways of improving business ethics (Table 6): 
developing principles of business ethics, having ethics courses in business schools (most favored by both groups), and 
having industry codes of ethics.  
The differences were not significant in what the SBI's and students approved of. The SBI's were less favorably disposed 
to legislating stronger legislation than business students although neither group was particularly in favor of that option. 
An even less appealing option was to get religious leaders more active in business. The greatest difference, still not 
significant however, was in the religious leaders getting involved with students disapproving even more than SBI's.  
SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION  
There is not much difference in self described values between SBI clients and students. The one scenario reflecting a 
significant difference in responses might be reflective of the attitude - "if everyone else is doing it, why not." (17). In 
the case of padding the expense account and sending gifts, the students tend to be more inclined than the SBI's to do it 
themselves. This is leaning toward holding a more "flexible" situational definition of ethics which is also reflected in a 
greater percentage of the students preferring the more flexible White (Table 5) as a coworker than the SBI clients 
preferred. What impact having exposure to business ethics classes has is certainly not clear. Are ethics classes geared to 
making students act more ethically? Would this group have preferred less ethical postures if they had not had the ethics 
class they did have?  
More important than differences between SBI clients and student consultants may be the tendency in both populations 
to feel that though they would act in an ethical way - the person in the scenario would not. This was especially 
prevalent in Q1 (Table 4) with forty of the business students feeling they would not buy stock with insider information 
although they felt the person in the scenario would - 7 of the SBI's responded that way also. Forty nine (75%) of the 
students who thought the person in the scenario would pad an expense account, would not themselves. On Q4, of the 
business students thinking the person in the scenario would discharge older workers, 36% thought they themselves 
would discharge the younger workers. on Q8, 44% of the SBI's who felt the person in the scenario would send gifts, 
they themselves would not.  
On the surface, it looks like more communication would be necessary among SBI's and or among students as well as 
between groups to get a better understanding of what people think and why. And, although it does not appear that there 
are significant differences in values of student consultants and the SBI clients at least at the university in this SBI 
program, an individual client's values could differ greatly from any individual student or groups' values in certain 
situations.  
How did self selection of SBI respondents affect findings - were those who responded representative of the entire SBI 
population at that university? Will this finding hold also for MBA consultants? Does the gender of team members 
bers 
How to input text in a pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text to a pdf file; adding text to a pdf
How to input text in a pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text to a pdf in acrobat; add text box to pdf file
influence the outcome? What about the gender of the SBI client or the gender of person in scenario? What impact do 
the faculty, mentors/guides, and SBI director have? Are the faculty's values different from students' and/or clients". Do 
the values differ from SBI type clients to big business clients? Just what role do perceived value differences or 
similarities play in effective consultation experiences for the SBI program? What impact does age of participants have 
on the findings? Will these findings differ with different parts of the country? Internationally are business people's 
values perceived differently? What impact does size of business have, if any, on outcomes? What impact is there of 
required ethics courses? What impact does experience in workplace have on values? What impact does the industry or 
type of client have on these findings? Does the composition of majors make a difference - i.e., would marketing 
students have values more similar to certain types of business clients than would accounting students?  
This preliminary cross disciplinary study has just scratched the surface. The actual differences in values/ethics between 
students and SBI clients is possibly not as important an issue as the general issue of being aware of individual 
perceptions within groups - the one SBI client a team has. Clarifying the individual's goals/objectives of the business 
must be done from an individual's framework - not a class or group. Effective SBI consulting will start from where an 
individual small business owner feels he or she is, not where the consultant thinks that person is.  
APPENDIX  
QUESTIONNAIRE 1990  
Instructions: Please check one response for a, b. and c.  
1. Virginia Stone, a member of the Board of Directors of Scott Electronics Corp., has just learned that the company is 
about to announce a 2-for-1 stock split and an increase in dividends. Stone personally is on the brink of bankruptcy. A 
quick gain of a few thousand dollars can save her from economic and social ruin. She could purchase the stock now to 
sell in a few days at a profit.  
a. Do you think Virginia Stone would purchase the stock to sell at a profit? yes no  
b. What would you do if you were Stone? buy not buy  
2. Brian George is a new salesman for Sweep Soap Company. With commissions, his salary usually comes to about 
$36,000 per year. George could supplement this to the extent of about $1,800 per year by charging certain unauthorized 
personal expenses against his expense account. He feels that this is a common practice in his company.  
a. Do you think Brian George would supplement his income? yes no  
b. What would you do if you were Brian George? supplement income with personal expenses not supplement income 
with personal expenses  
3. Wallace Brown, Treasurer of Lloyd Enterprises, is about to retire and contemplates recommending one of his two 
assistants for promotion to Treasurer. Brown is sure that his recommendation will be accepted, but he also knows that 
the assistant not recommended will find promotion opportunities seriously limited. one of the assistants, William 
Grimes, seems to him the most qualified for the new assignment, but the other assistant, Sylvia Leonard, is the niece of 
the president of Lloyd's biggest customer. Brown feels Leonard's relationship with her uncle will help Lloyd's.  
a. Did Wallace Brown choose: Grimes or Leonard ?  
b. Would you choose: Grimes or Leonard ?  
4. Jenkins Manufacturing company is faced with the necessity of closing down one of its two Los Angeles plants. This 
will necessitate laying off about 100 employees. Another 100 employees will be transferred to the other plant in the 
same area. Though the company is not unionized, generous allowances have been set aside for separation pay. The 
problem which Mr. Howard Jenkins, company president, faces is whether to discharge older and more highly paid 
workers who have been with the company a number of years, or the younger and less highly paid workers who have 
less seniority. The industry is a competitive one, and Mr. Jenkins is concerned about his company's ability to compete. 
pete. 
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
Dim intputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" ' Input password. Dim userPassword As String = "you" ' Open an encrypted PDF document.
add text to pdf reader; add text field pdf
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
String intputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf"; // Input password. String userPassword = @"you"; // Open an encrypted PDF document.
how to add text to a pdf file in reader; add editable text box to pdf
a. Would Jenkins discharge the older workers - or the younger workers ?  
b. Would you discharge the older workers or the younger workers ?  
5. The Board of Directors of the Boldt Manufacturing Company has decided to close down its Eastbrook plant in four 
months. The plant employs 200 workers in a Michigan town of 30,000. At a recent Board meeting, Pauline Belcher, 
company Treasurer, has urged that the employees not be informed of this decision until the actual day of their 
dismissal. If this is not done, she argues, absenteeism and productivity declines will-seriously hamper output. Henry 
Roscoe, Personnel Director, feels that the employees should be given some advance notice in order to plan necessary 
adjustments even at the cost of absenteeism and productivity decline.  
a. Would the company: keep the planned shutdown a secret ? or notify the employees ahead of time ?  
b. Would you: keep the shutdown a secret? or notify the employees ahead of time?  
6. Larry D. Brown is President of the St. Clair Importing Company, a US firm that wholly owns a subsidiary that is a 
Canadian importing company. The Canadian subsidiary has been offered the opportunity to merchandise a number of 
products manufactured in Cuba. The Cuban price of these products is so attractive that the Canadian firm estimates it 
will be able to increase substantially the usual mark-up and still sell the products at a retail price below Canadian 
prices. Brown has contacted the US State Department, and while it would be illegal and against public policy for the 
American firm to market the products in the US, there is no prohibition for the Canadian subsidiary to sell them in 
Canada.  
a. Would Brown distribute the products through the Canadian subsidiary? yes no  
b. Would you if you were Brown? yes no  
7. The Dodd Textile Company wants to make shirts in a large Western city. Because of the severity of competition, the 
company feels it would be forced to hire employees from immigrant and other underprivileged groups which accept 
sub-standard wages. Recently union officials have accused such plants as this of maintaining "sweat-shop conditions." 
Cheryl Dodd, the owner, admits conditions are not ideal and that employees can hardly make sufficient wages for a 
minimum living standard but says that Dodd Textile would at least provide some employment for people who would 
otherwise probably be unemployed. Dodd feels entitled to profits which would not be received if wages were raised.  
a. Would Dodd pay substandard wages? yes no  
b. Would you pay substandard wages? yes no  
8. Mary Raines, Vice President of Westerly Chemical Company, feels that sending expensive Christmas gifts to 
customers compromises their position as buyers, and thus is a form of bribery. However, Raines knows that this is a 
common practice among competitors and that sales are likely to be adversely affected by failure to conform to the 
traditional practice.  
a. Would Raines decide to send the gifts? yes no  
b. Would you send the gifts if you were Raines? yes no  
Which of the following would you prefer to work with? Please circle a or b.  
a. Susan White: "I think that if a person joins a reputable company and then remains sensitive to the ethical values of 
her colleagues she won't stray far from the ethical ideal."  
b. Sharon Easton: "I have some strong ethical commitments I've formulated through the years, and I'll resign before I 
compromise these principles."  
Below are listed some suggestions which have been proposed for the improvement of Business Ethics. Rate each one 
one 
C# PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET
Description: Delete specified page from the input PDF file. Description: Delete consecutive pages from the input PDF file starting at specified position.
how to add text fields in a pdf; how to add text to pdf file with reader
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
inputFilePath, Input file path, Valid pdf file path. pageIndex, The page index of the page that will be rotated. inputFilePath, Input file path, Valid pdf file path
how to input text in a pdf; how to insert text box in pdf
(1-approve; 2- somewhat approve; 3-somewhat disapprove; 4-disapprove)  
a. Develop some widely accepted general principles of business ethics. b. Introduce courses in Business Ethics in 
business schools. c. Introduce industry codes of ethical practices.  
d. Legislate stronger government regulation of business. e. Encourage a more active participation of religious leaders in 
developing general ethical norms for business.  
REFERENCES  
(1) Alexander, C.S. and H.J. Becker, "The use of vignettes in survey research," Public Opinion Quarterly, Spring, 1978, 
pp. 93-104.  
(2) American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business, Accreditation Council Policies, Procedures, and Standards 
1989-1990, (St. Louis, MO).  
(3) Andrews, K.R., "Ethics in practice," Harvard Business Review, Vol. 67, No. 5, Sept-Oct, 1989, pp. 99-104.  
(4) Arlow, P. and T.A. Ulrich, "Business ethics, social responsibility and business students: An empirical comparison 
of Clark's study," Akron Business and Economic Review, Vol 11, No. 3, Fall, 1980, pp. 17-23.  
(5) Arlow, P. and T.A. Ulrich, "Can ethics be taught to business students?" The Collegiate Forum, 1983.  
(6) Brenner, S. and E. Molander, "Is the ethics of business changing?" Harvard Business Review, Vol. 55, 1977, pp. 
57-71.  
(7) Budner, H.R., "Ethical orientation of marketing students, instructors, and practitioners," Western Marketing 
Educators Association Conference Proceedings, 1988, p. 25.  
(8) Case, J., "Honest business, It Inc., June, 1990, pp. 65-69.  
(9) Clark, J.W., Religion and the Moral Standards of American Businessmen, (Cincinnati: South-Western, 1966).  
(10) Douglas, M.E- and S.W. Lamb, "Student counselor satisfaction with the SBI Program: A national survey," Small 
Business Institute-Directors, Association National Proceedings, 1986, pp- 391-401.  
(11) Feldman, H.D. and R.C. Thompson., "Teaching business ethics: A challenge for business educators in the 1990's," 
Journal of Marketing Summer, 1990, pp- 10-22.  
(12) Kassarjan, H.H. and B.E. Kahn, "The ethical standards of business students, business professors, and business 
people." Western Marketing Educators Association Conference Proceedings, 1989, p. 48.  
(13) Lane, M.S., D. Schaupp, and B. Parsons, "Pygmalion effect: An issue for business education and ethics.." Journal 
of Business Ethics Vol. 7, 19881 pp. 223-229.  
(14) Martin, T.R., "Do courses in ethics improve the ethical judgement of students? "Business and Society, 20, 2:21, 1, 
1981-82, pp- 17-26.  
(15) O'Connor, E.L. and J.C. Rogers, "An examination of the attitudes of clients and students in the SBI case situation", 
Small Business Institute Directors, Association National Proceedings, 1988, pp. 311-315.  
(16) Purcell, T., S.J., "Do courses in business ethics pay off?" California Management Review, Vol. 19, No. 4, 1977, 
pp. 50-58.  
(17) Roberts, T., "The absence of ethics," Computerworld Focus, 2 December, 1987, p. 48.  
8.  
VB.NET PDF Form Data fill-in library: auto fill-in PDF form data
rotate PDF pages, C#.NET search text in PDF As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" Dim fields As field, set state to ON Dim input As AFCheckBoxInput
add text field to pdf acrobat; adding text pdf file
C# PDF Form Data fill-in Library: auto fill-in PDF form data in C#
input = new AFCheckBoxInput(true); PDFFormHandler.FillFormField(inputFilePath, "AF_RadioButton_01", input, outputFilePath + "1.pdf"); } { fill a RadioButton
how to enter text in a pdf document; how to add text to a pdf file in preview
(18) Stevens, G., "Business ethics and social responsibility: The responses of present and future managers," Akron 
Business and Economic Review, Fall, 1984, pp. 6-ii.  
(19) Sturdivant, F.D. and A.B. Cocanougher, "What are ethical marketing practices?" Harvard Business Review, Nov-
Dec, 1973.  
(20) Weinstein, A., "Students as marketing consultants: A methodological framework and client evaluation of the 
Small Business Institute," Small Business Institute Directors' Association National Proceedings, 1990, pp- 122-128. 
TABLE 1 PROFILE OF SAMPLE  
Undergraduate SBI Senior business Clients Students  
Number: 28 112 Gender: Male 13 66 Female 15 43 Age: < 20 0 0 20 - 30 3 90 31 - 40 12 17 41 - 50 9 0 51+ 3 0 No 
Answer 1 5  
Taken Ethics Courses: NO 22 48 yes 3 54 No Answer 3 10 Years of School: Some College 10 Not Asked College 
Graduate 2.2 Not Asked Graduate School 6 Not Asked Years in Business: 1 - 5 14 Not Asked 6 - 10 7 Not Asked over 
10 6 Not Asked No Response 1 TABLE 2  
RESPONSES (PERCENTAGES) OF SBI CLIENTS (SBI'S) AND UNDERGRADUATE SENIOR BUSINESS 
STUDENTS (STUDENTS) TO WHAT RESPONDENTS FELT PERSON IN SCENARIO WOULD DO. (PLEASE 
SEE QUESTIONS 1A, 2A, ... . ,8A ON QUESTIONNAIRE IN APPENDIX.)  
SBI's Students Chi-Square  
Q1(a) PURCHASE STOCK 19 78 (73%) (70%) *NOT PURCHASE STOCK 7 34 (27%) (30%) p - 1.0  
Q2(a) SUPPLEMENT INCOME 15 65 (54%) (58%) *NOT SUPPLEMENT INCOME 13 47 (46%) (42%) P - .82  
Q3(a)*CHOOSE GRIMES 12 41 (QUALIFIED) (43%) (37%) CHOOSE LEONARD 16 70 (CONTACTS) (57%) 
(63%) P - .695  
Q4(a) DISCHARGE OLDER 14 73 (64%) (69%) *DISCHARGE YOUNGER 8 35 (36%) (32%) p - 1.0  
Q5(a) SHUTDOWN SECRET 8 71 (29%) (65%) *NOTIFY EMPLOYEES 20 39 (71%) (35%) p - .001  
Q6(a) DISTRIBUTE IN CANADA 25 105 (93%) (95%) *NOT DIST. IN CANADA 2 6 (7%) (5%) p - 1.0  
Q7(a) PAY SUBSTANDARD WAGES 25 94 (89%) (86%) *NOT PAY SUBST. WAGES 3 15 (11%) (14%) P - .936  
Q8(a) SEND GIFTS 25 90 (96%) (81%) *NOT SEND GIFTS 1 21  
Ethical choice (4%) (19%) p - .115  
TABLE 3 RESPONSES (PERCENTAGES) OF SBI'S AND STUDENTS TO WHAT THEY THEMSELVES 
(RESPONDENTS) WOULD DO IN EACH ETHICAL DILEMMA, (PLEASE SEE QUESTION 1B, 2B, ...., 8B ON 
QUESTIONNAIRE IN APPENDIX,)  
SBI's Students chi-square  
Ql(b) PURCHASE STOCK 13 40 (50%) (36%) *HOT PURCHASE STOCK 33 72 (50%) (64%) P - .2604 Q2(b) 
SUPPLEMENT INCOME 0 19 (0%) (17%) *NOT SUPPLEMENT INCOME 28 93 (100%) (83%) P - .0418 Q3(b) 
CHOOSE LEONARD 3 20 (CONTACTS) (11%) (18%) *CHOOSE GRIMES 25 91 (QUALIFIED) (89%) (82%) p - 
.519 Q4(b) DISCHARGE OLDER 9 39 (41%) (36%) *DISCHARGE YOUNGER 13 69 (59%) (64%) p - .855 Q5(b) 
SHUTDOWN SECRET 1 11 (4%) (10%)  
)  
C# Image Convert: How to Convert Adobe PDF to Jpeg, Png, Bmp, &
This demo code just converts first page to jpeg image. String inputFilePath = @"C:\input.pdf"; String outputFilePath = @"C:\output.jpg"; // Convert PDF to jpg.
how to insert text into a pdf file; add text to pdf using preview
C# PDF Convert: How to Convert Jpeg, Png, Bmp, & Gif Raster Images
Console.WriteLine("Fail: can not convert to PDF, file type unsupport"); break; case ConvertResult.FILE_TYPE_UNMATCH: Console.WriteLine("Fail: input file is not
add text to pdf file online; how to add a text box to a pdf
*NOTIFY EMPLOYEES 27 99 (96%) (90%) P - .497 Q6(b) DISTRIBUTE IN CANADA 22 91 (82%) (82%) *NOT 
DIST. IN CANADA 5 20 (18%) (18%) p - 1.0 Q7(b) PAY.SUBSTANDARD WAGES 7 31 (25%) (28%) *NOT PAY 
SUBST. WAGES 21 78 (75%) (72%) P - .846 Q8(b) SEND GIFTS 14 75 (54%) (68%)  
*NOT SEND GIFTS 12 36 (46%) (32%) P - .244  
Ethical Choice  
TABLE 4 OF THOSE WHO THOUGHT PERSON IN SCENARIO WOULD DO THE LESS ETHICAL ACTION, 
WHAT WOULD RESPONDENT HIM/HERSELF DO'.>  
SBI's Students Chi-Square  
Ql(b) PURCHASE STOCK 12 38 (63%) (49%) *NOT PURCHASE STOCK 7 40 (37%) (51%) P - .382 Q2(b) 
SUPPLEMENT INCOME 0 16  
(0%) (25%) *NOT SUPPLEMENT INCOME 15 49 (100%) (75%) P - .073 Q3(b) CHOOSE LEONARD 3 19 
(CONTACTS) (19%) (27%) *CHOOSE GRIMES 13 51 (QUALIFIED) (81%) (73%) p - 1.0 Q4(b) DISCHARGE 
OLDER 9 36 (64%) (49%) *DISCHARGE YOUNGER 5 37 (36%) (51%) P - .462 QS (b) SHUTDOWN SECRET 1 
11 (13%) (15%) *NOTIFY EMPLOYEES 7 60 (97%) (85%) p - 1.0 Q6(b) DISTRIBUTE IN CANADA 22 90 (88%) 
(86%) *NOT DIST. IN CANADA 3 15 (12%) (14%) p - 1.0 Q7(b) PAY SUBSTANDARD WAGES 7 27 (29%) 
(29%) *NOT PAY SUBST. WAGES 15 67 (72%) (71%) p - 1.0 Q8(b) SEND GIFTS 14 69 (56%) (77%) *NOT 
SEND GIFTS 11 21 (44%) (23%) P - .0738 Ethical Choice  
TABLE 5 RESPONSES OF SBI'S AND STUDENTS TO PREFERRED CO-WORKER. (QUESTION #15 ON 
QUESTIONNAIRE, APPENDIX,)  
SBI's STUDENTS TOTAL  
PREFER WHITE 8 45 53 ("FLEXIBLE) (29%) (43%)  
PREFER EASTON 20 61 81 ("NON-COMPROMISING") (71%) (57%)  
28 106 134  
P - .23  
TABLE 6 MEAN RESPONSES OF SBI'S AND STUDENTS TO IMPROVEMENT OF BUSINESS ETHICS 
CHOICES. (PLEASE SEE QUESTION #16 ON QUESTIONNAIRE, APPENDIX,)  
SBI,'& STUDENTS T-VALUE* P (2-TAIL)  
DEVELOP PRINCIPLES OF 1.41 1.64 1.44 .156 BUSINESS ETHICS  
ETHICS COURSES IN 1.26 1.22 -.25 .802 BUSINESS SCHOOLS  
INDUSTRY CODES OF ETHICS 1.88 1.92 .19 .850  
LEGISLATE STRONGER 2.96 2.83 -.53 .598 REGULATION  
RELIGIOUS LEADERS MORE 2.96 3.30 1.39 .177 ACTIVE IN BUSINESS  
1 - APPROVE 2 - SOMEWHAT APPROVE 3 - SOMEWHAT DISAPPROVE 4 - DISAPPROVE  
SEPARATE VARIANCE ESTIMATES  
How to C#: Cleanup Images
body of the image, the Shear method can adjust the text body of RasterImage img = new RasterImage(@"F:\input.png"); ImageProcess process = new ImageProcess(img
add text block to pdf; how to enter text into a pdf
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Program.RootPath+ @"\part_1.pdf"; String secondFile = SplitDocument + @"\part_2. pdf"; String thirdFile = SplitDocument + @"\part_3.pdf"; //Split input file to
how to add text field to pdf; how to insert text box on pdf
ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE AND OPERATIONAL BEHAVIOR 
OF SMALL BUSINESS INSTITUTE PROGRAMS  
Marilyn Young, The University of Texas at Tyler George Joyce, The University of Texas at Tyler  
ABSTRACT  
The importance of small businesses as an integral part of our economy dictates that continuous efforts be undertaken to 
assess these organizations in their ever changing environments.  
The role of the Small Business Institute program is one of the most effective vehicles for management assistance based 
on the results of a variety of past research efforts. Therefore, a better understanding of the Small Business Institute 
programs will provide added insight for their development and continued contribution to the success of the small 
business sector in the U.S. economy.  
This study is based on a survey mailed to all Small Business Institute Directors. The study examined the reasons small 
businesses request counseling, as well as the role of other information sources such as SCORE, SBDC, and advisory 
committees. The role of the SBI Director, course pedagogy, budget control, and number of cases were also assessed. 
The demographics of the institution, as well as the director were also examined.  
INTRODUCTION  
The continued emphasis on small business as a major component of our economy and, in particular, as one viable 
element in national and regional economic growth and development suggests continual attention. In many areas of the 
country where economic conditions have reflected a downturn, it has been consistently recognized that the future 
prospects for economic growth can be enhanced by the role of small business. Small businesses are an integral, indeed 
a major economic institution in the economy of the United States. Estimates as high as 60 percent have been made 
concerning the nation's work force which is employed in the small business sector. Small businesses account for 
approximately 40 percent of the country's Gross National Product (11). Consistently, economic development studies 
recommend that small businesses are areas where growth, innovation and expansion provide a real opportunity for 
responding to ever changing environments (9).  
Unfortunately, the failure rate for small business within the first year approximates one-half while estimates run as high 
as 80 percent within the first three to five years (1). The obvious question is how to protect against the economic and 
social costs associated with these conditions which is most often a result of poor management. The role of the Small 
Business Institute (SBI) program is one of the most effective vehicles for small business assistance based on the 
conclusions of a variety of past studies. These programs help to improve operations and/or reduce the rates of failure 
with subsequent effective utilization of their limited resources (12;10;8;3). Although a constant effort has been made 
through research and analysis in both education and government, many issues remain unresolved regarding the present 
and potential role of small business (13;6;14;7;5;2;4).  
The need remains for a better understanding of the SBI program as an effective tool in assisting small businesses to 
continue their contributions to the economy and at the same time to fulfill their role as the foundation for all business, 
since all businesses were once small.  
PURPOSE  
The purpose of the research is to examine the SBI program and obtain a more comprehensive appreciation of their 
activities and to establish a contemporary posture of these programs. Additionally, this research will provide a clearer 
definition of the role of SBI programs and examine methods to improve their contributions to small business by 
assisting .owner/managers in a more efficient allocation of their human and financial resources. In order to meet these 
objectives, specific research questions are as follows:  
1. What are the major reasons small businesses requested counseling in 1989-90? 
0? 
2. What supporting services are offered through SBI programs?  
3. What percent of SBI's are affiliated with SBDC'S?  
4. What is the nature of the SBI course and student's grade?  
5. What proportion of cases are completed per year and what proportion of those are not funded?  
6. What is the normal teaching load for the SBI Director, and does the individual have a reduced teaching load?  
7. Which university office controls the budget for the SBI program?  
8. What sources other than SBI Directors are used for advisory assistance?  
9. Do SBI programs have advisory committees, and what is the nature of such committees?  
10. What are the characteristics of the SBI institution as well as the director?  
METHODOLOGY  
A complete universe data base was used which comprised all SBI directors. This data base was derived from the 1990 
official roster of membership of Small Business Institute Directors' Association (SBIDA). The universe of 516 was 
reduced to 501, since some programs were found to no longer be in existence. This study is based on a survey mailed to 
501 directors on August 24, 1990.  
After a follow-up mailing, a total of 300 completed questionnaires were returned which resulted in a response rate of 60 
percent.  
The research was undertaken to develop a current profile of SBI programs and to establish a foundation for analysis 
and subsequent measurement. Data for this paper was requested from all SBI's in the United States. Figure 1 is a map 
which shows the ten U. S. regions according to the Small Business Administration's designation. The following two 
sections provide a summary of computations from the results of the study.  
ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE OF SMALL BUSINESS INSTITUTES  
The following section describes aspects relating to the organizational structure of SBI's such as demographics of SBI 
institutions and directors. Also, geographic location, size of the institutions, and relationship with the Small Business 
Development Center (SBDC) are examined.  
Demographics of SBI's  
Table I illustrates the approximate number, 501, of SBI programs in the United States segmented by SBA region. For 
instance, the largest number, 98, or 20% of the total 501, are located in Region 5. Also, 68 out of the 300 responses 
were from this region which accounted for 69% of the SBI's in that region. The region having the lowest return was 
Region 1 with only 28% of the directors responding.  
Geographical Location  
Figure 2 shows a breakdown of the SBI directors responding to the study according to the geographic location of their 
institutions. For instance, 32% of the responding SBI's were located in the Midwest United States.  
Size of Academic Organization  
Over 60% of the institutions responding were colleges and universities with enrollments of less than 10,000 students. In 
fact, approximately 40% were institutions with less than 5,000 students as observed from Figure 3. 
3. 
Demographics of Directors  
Some 97% of the SBI directors held advanced degrees and had served in the director's position for a number of years. 
For instance, some 57% held the doctorate, and only 36% had served 4 years or less. The majority of the SBI Directors 
responding, 86%, were male, while female directors accounted for 14%. The majority of the directors' academic 
specialization was in the field of management which accounted for almost one-half of the total respondents.  
The directors reported numerous types of business and professional experience. As may be noted in Table 2, consulting 
experience was mentioned most often by approximately one-half of the responding directors, while sales, retailing, and 
production followed with smaller proportions.  
Relationship SBDC  
The organizational structure for assisting small businesses appears to reflect a traditional pattern of continuity. That is, 
the survey responses clearly indicate over 80% of the SBI programs have direct access to SBDC. Based on 59% of the 
responses, the location of the SBDC is housed in the same location as the SBI program as depicted in Figure 4.  
OPERATIONAL BEHAVIOR  
This section describes certain areas of operational behavioral associated with the SBI program such as the nature of 
counseling, supporting services, and case load. Also, teaching responsibility, budgetary authority, and sources of 
management assistance are analyzed.  
Nature of Counsel  
The major area of requested counseling was in the functional area of marketing; i.e., sales, advertising and general 
marketing.  
Following marketing were marketing research, start-up advice, accounting, and financing as major reasons as observed 
in Table 3. Few respondent reported requests for assistance concerning legal issues.  
Supporting Services  
Observable from Figure 5, Small Business Institute programs also offer supporting services in addition to their primary 
role of management assistance. It is noteworthy that over 21% of the respondents indicated they had offered seminars; 
additionally, another 11% of the directors had held conferences. Further, 10% of the respondents offered other 
supporting services, such as individual counseling and research.  
The Nature of the Course  
A significant number, 82%, of the responding directors reported that the SBI program was offered through an elective 
course, rather than a course which was required. Only one fourth of the respondents stated that the SBI programs were 
a part of a required course. The course mentioned most often was the capstone business course entitled, Business 
Policy/Strategy. Figure 6 clearly conveys the importance of the counseling project as a partial requirement for the 
course. Over half of the directors indicated that the SBI consulting project encompasses more than 75% of the grade.  
Funded and Non-Funded Cases  
The largest number of cases completed during the academic year, 1989-90, as reported by 72% of the directors was 
within the range of 1-9. The median number of cases was computed to be 12. Only 11 percent of the institutions 
completed 30 cases or more in this period as shown by Figure 7.  
More than half, 54%, of the directors reported that they completed more cases than the Small Business Administration 
funded in 1989. The median number per institution of non-funded cases for this period was 4. Therefore, through 
extrapolation, a figure in the vicinity of 2,000 cases a year are the directors counted the project three fourths of the 
course grade.  
The average number of cases completed per SBI program during the academic year, 1989-90, was 12. Over 72% of the 
directors completed a range of 1-9 cases. Over one half of the directors completed more cases than were funded by the 
SBA; the average number of unfunded cases was 4. The majority of the directors, 74%, were fulfilling the role of the 
SBI director in addition to, a full teaching load at their respective institutions. Only 34% were permitted a reduced 
teaching assignment, which was typically three semester hours. The budgetary authority for the SBI program was at the 
director's level in 52% of the responding institutions.  
In addition to the director, the faculty of each institution were relied upon as a major information resource for small 
business client management assistance. Also, 32% of the directors utilized the experience of SCORE personnel.  
Over 80% of the directors did not have an advisory committee. This situation may be an avenue to pursue as a means of 
obtaining additional management assistance with a minimal cost of providing service to the small businesses.  
The survey findings reveal that businesses requested many types of counseling. it would appear directors should 
continue to seek outside resources for this additional assistance. Since directors reported they possessed a variety of 
business and professional experience, it would suggest that overall the SBI's are furnishing valuable management 
assistance to their communities at low cost.  
REFERENCES  
(1) Anderson, Robert L. and Dunkelberg, John S., Entrepreneurship; Starting a New Business, (New York: Harper & 
Row, 1990), p. 5.  
(2) Bruckman, J. C. and Imon, S., "Consulting With Small Business: A Process Model." Journal of Small Business 
Management, 1980, Vol. 18, No. 2. pp.41-47.  
(3) Chrisman, J. J. and Leslie, J., "Strategic, Administrative and Operating Problems: The Impact of Outsiders on Small 
Business Performance." Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, 1989, Vol. 13, No. 3. pp. 37-51.  
(4) Elbert, D. J. et al., "SCORE/ACE Volunteers and SBI Programs: An Evolution of Support Potential." Journal of 
Small Business Management, 1983, Vol. 21, No. 2. pp. 38-44.  
(5) Franklin, S. G. and Goodwin, J. S., "Problems of Small Business and Sources of Assistance: A Survey." Journal of 
Small Business Management, 1983, Vol. 21, No. 2. pp. 5-12.  
(6) Kennedy, James, et al., "Problems of Small Business Firms: An Analysis of the SBI Consulting Program." Journal 
of Small Business Management, 1979. pp. 7-14.  
(7) Krause, David, et al., "Can Academia Truly Help Small Business Owners?" Small Business Forum, 1990. pp. 54-
61.  
(8) Nohavandi, Afsaneh and Chesteen, Susan, "The Impact of Consulting on Small Business: A Further Examination." 
Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, 1988, Vol. 13, No. 1. pp. 29-40.  
(9) Perryman, M. Roy, Texas Economic Forecast: The Perryman Report, (Baylor University: Texas Economic 
Publishers, 1987).  
(10) Rocha, J. R. and Kohn, R. M., "The Human Resource Factor in Small Business Decision Making." American 
Journal. of Small Business, 1983, Vol. 3, No. 1. pp. 53-62.  
(11) Scarborough, Norman M., et al., Effective Small Business Management, (Columbus: Merrill Publishing Co., 
1991), p. 16.  
(12) Solomon, G. T. and Weaver, K. M., "Small Business Institute Economic Impact Evolution." American Journal of 
Small. Business, 1983, Vol. 3, No. 1. pp. 41-51. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested