open pdf file in asp.net using c# : Adding text to pdf file SDK software service wpf winforms azure dnn 200217REV20-part577

R- 5 
41.  Terrel, Ronald L., et al., Soil Stabilization in Pavement Structures A Users Manual Volume 
1 Pavement Design and Construction Considerations.  FHWA-IP-80-2.  U. S. Department 
of Transportation Office of Development Implementation Division.  October 1979. 
42.  Siekmeier, John and Blue, Jeff , Fly Ash Soil Stabilization on Waseca CSAH 8, LRRB 
Project.  Draft Executive Summary. Mn/DOT Office of Materials and Road Research and 
Waseca County Highway Department.  October 2000. 
43.  Velz, Paul G., Special Study No. 266 Asphalt Emulsion Stabilized Base Construction T.H. 
65, S.P. 0208-18 Near Johnsonville.   State of Minnesota Department of Highways 
Materials And Research Section.   December , 1960. 
44.  The Asphalt Institute, The Asphalt Handbook.  Manual Series No. 4 (MS-4). The Asphalt 
Institute, Research Park Drive, Lexington, KY.  1989. 
45.  AASHTO-FHWA, Special Product Evaluation List FHWA/RD-83/093. U. S. Department of 
Transportation, Federal Highway Administration.  August 1983. 
46.  Korfhage, G. R., Base Stabilization With Cut-Back Asphalt and Chlorides – Nobles County.  
Investigation No. 607, Final Report.   Office of Materials Minnesota Department of 
Highways in cooperation with U. S. Department of Transportation Bureau of Public Roads 
and Minnesota Local Road Research Board. 1967. 
47.  Terrel, Ronald L., et al., Soil Stabilization in Pavement Structures, A Users Manual.  
Volume 2, Mixture Design Considerations FHWA-IP-80-2.  U. S. Department of 
Transportation Office of Development Implementation Division.  October 1979. 
48.  Koerner, Robert M., Designing with Geosynthetics, Second Edition, Prentice Hall, 
Englewood Cliffs, NJ.  1990. 
49.  Rowe, R. Kerry and Badv, K., “Use of a Geotextile Separator to Minimize Intrusion of Clay 
into a Coarse Stone Layer”, Geotextiles and Geomembranes, No. 14, Elsevier Science Ltd, 
Ireland, 1996, pp. 73-93. 
50.  Haas, R., “Structural Behavior of Tensar Reinforced Pavements and Some Field 
Applications”, Proc. Symp. Polymer Grid Reinforcement in Civil Engineering, London: 
ICE, 1984, pp. 166-170. 
51.  Jung, F.W. Interpretation of Deflection Basin for Real-World Layer Materials of Flexible 
Pavements, Ontario Ministry of Transport, Downsview, Ontario.  December 1989. 
52.  Kohlnhofer, Guy W., Marti, Michael M., Braun Intertec Pavement, Inc., Lightweight Fill 
Materials for Road Construction, Mn/DOT MN/RC – 92/06 Local Road Research Board 
Adding text to pdf file - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to insert text in pdf using preview; how to insert text box in pdf document
Adding text to pdf file - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add editable text box to pdf; add text to pdf acrobat
R- 6 
Report No. 9LRR645. Minnesota Department of Transportation, 395 John Ireland Blvd., St. 
Paul, MN.  March 1992. 
53.  Holtz, Robert D., Christopher, Barry R. and Berg, Ryan R., Geosynthetic Design and 
Construction Guidelines, U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway 
Administration, Washington, D.C.  April 1998. 
54.  Ionescu, A. et al., “Methods Used for Testing the Bio-Colmatation and Degradation of 
Geotextiles Manufactured in Romania”, Proc. 2
nd
Infl. Conf. Geotextiles, St. Paul, MN: 
IFAI, 1982, pp. 547-552. 
55.  Faure, Y.H., et al., “Analysis of Geotextile Filter Behavior After 21 Years in Valcros Dam”, 
Geotextiles and Geomembranes, No. 17, Elsevier Science Ltd, Ireland.  1999. 
56.  Geotechnology Outreach Team, Degradation Reduction Factors for Geosynthetics, Federal 
Highway Administration Geotechnology Technical Note, 
http://www.geocouncil.org/Geo_Council_News/fhwa_tech_note/fhwa_tech_note. html.  
May 1997. 
57.  Narayan, S., Bhatia, S.K., Corcoran, B.W., and Nabavi, T.R., “Analysis of a Failed Basal 
Reinforced Embankment”, Geotechnical Special Publication. No. 103, 2000. ASCE, 
Reston, VA, USA. pp. 398-417. 
58.  Loulizi, A., Al-Qadi, I.L., Bhutta, S.A., Flintsch, G.W., “Evaluation of Geosynthetics Used 
as Separators”, Transportation Research Record, No.1687, 1999, pp. 104-111. 
59.  Clark, Ronald J., Subgrade Stabilization Using Geogrids, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 
Department of Transportation, Project number 89-54A, October 1995 
60.  Braun Intertec, Inc., Mn/DOT Technical Report 1998-05U, Wood Chips as a Lightweight 
Fill. Minnesota Department of Transportation, 395 John Ireland Blvd., St. Paul, MN.  
December 1996. 
61.  Drescher, Andrew and Newcomb, David E., Development of Design Guidelines for Use of 
Shredded Tires as a Lightweight Fill in road Subgrade and Retaining Walls, Mn/DOT 
Report Number 94-04.  January 1994. 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
If you want to read the tutorial of PDF page adding in C# class, we suggest you go to C# Imaging - how to insert a new empty page to PDF file.
how to add text field to pdf; how to add text to pdf file
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Feel free to define text or images on PDF document and extract accordingly. Capable of adding PDF file navigation features to your VB.NET program.
adding text pdf files; add text field pdf
A- 1 
APPENDIX A 
USE OF INVESTIGATION 183 AND 195 TEST 
SECTIONS AS A LONG TERM PERFORMANCE 
COMPARISON WITH THE MINNESOTA M-E DESIGN 
PROCEDURE 
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
code below to your VB.NET class program for adding text box on Dim outputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Annot_9.pdf" ' open a PDF file Dim doc
how to add text boxes to pdf; how to insert text into a pdf
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
for adding text box to PDF document in .NET WinForms application. A web based PDF annotation application able to add text box comments to adobe PDF file online
add text in pdf file online; how to input text in a pdf
A- 2 
INTRODUCTION 
A mechanistic-empirical design procedure (ROADENT) has been developed to determine 
appropriate design thicknesses of hot-mix asphalt pavements in Minnesota (1,2). Calculated 
strains in the pavement section are used with transfer functions to predict the amount of traffic, 
in ESALs, the section will support before deterioration in the form of fatigue cracking or critical 
rut depth. To make these predictions, field performance must be observed and related to 
measured or calculated strains in the pavement. The first performance prediction equations were 
developed based on performance of sections at the Minnesota Road Research Project 
(Mn/ROAD) after four years of service (3,4). 
Since the Mn/ROAD project represents only a portion of conditions encountered in 
Minnesota, it is necessary to expand the calibration data set to a wider range of conditions.  To 
validate and/or calibrate the performance equations for other traffic levels, soil types and 
pavement sections, performance records of some of the Investigation 183 and 195 test sections 
(5,6) were reviewed, some of which are over 40 years old.  The properties of the soils and 
pavement layers were measured during the course of the research studies and included in 
References (5) and (6).  Strain levels for the pavements were simulated mechanistically and 
damage factors were calculated for each season and totaled for each of the years to rehabilitation 
for the test sections and observed performance was compared to the predicted performance. 
Mr. Tom Nelson and Mr. Mark Levenson of the Mn/DOT Data Management Services 
Section made the traffic predictions necessary for comparison. The condition of the 50 test 
sections from 1964 through 1977 was reported by Lukanen (7). The Mn/DOT Pavement 
Management Section provided information on conditions from 1977 to the present. The 
conditions of the sections were observed on videos from 1992 to the present. Elaine Miron and 
Erland Lukanen located the sections using the video station at Mn/DOT and it was necessary to 
locate the original test sections using historical stationing and current reference points. This 
information was retrieved from historical records and files that had been stored for the past 25 
years. The locations using current reference points were determined using logbooks provided by 
the Mn/DOT Pavement Design and Management Sections. 
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program. C#.NET: Draw Markups on PDF File.
adding text box to pdf; how to insert pdf into email text
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
By using reliable APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel
how to insert text into a pdf with acrobat; how to insert text box on pdf
A- 3 
The construction histories of the 10 Investigation 183 test sections were used to relate the 
observed performance with the predicted damage ratios calculated from the computer simulated 
pavement and empirical transfer functions. The predictions were then compared to the observed 
performance and determined to be conservative or not conservative. This information was used 
to judge if the current performance prediction equations should be modified. 
MINNESOTA FLEXIBLE PAVEMENT DESIGN TEST 
SECTIONS 
In 1963 and 1964, 50 flexible pavement design test sections were established to help evaluate 
flexible pavements in Minnesota using the concepts and results from the AASHO Road Test.  In 
addition the stabilometer, R-Value was introduced as a strength test to evaluate subgrade soils 
and granular bases. Each test section consisted of two 500-ft test or evaluation sections separated 
by a 200-ft sampling and destructive testing segment.  The evaluation of the 1200-ft test sections 
was made using the following methods: 
1.  Sampling and testing of each layer was performed with plate load testing.  Thickness 
measurements of each layer were also made as trenches were dug. 
2.  Condition surveys were conducted each year to document the type, severity and amount of 
cracking. Alligator cracking was measured in square feet per 1000 square feet as defined at 
the AASHO Road Test. Cold temperature cracks were counted periodically, but not always 
recorded because they were not considered part of a structural evaluation. 
3.  Longitudinal profile was measured using the Bureau of Public Roads (BPR) roughometer in 
units of inches per mile and was called the Roughness Index. The Roughness Index was 
correlated with Present Serviceability Rating (PSR). Later the PSR was also correlated with 
the PCA roadmeter and the Maysmeter. 
4.  Traffic was measured using load and vehicle type distribution studies conducted in 1964 and 
1969 at each test section along with statewide data for other years. This information was used 
to calculate equivalent loads in ESALs for each year from the time of construction. 
5.  Performance was defined as the number of ESALs the pavement withstood or was predicted 
to withstand before the serviceability was reduced to 2.5. 
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
convert PDF to text, C#.NET convert PDF to images, C#.NET PDF file & pages Professional VB.NET Solution for Adding Text Annotation to PDF Page in VB
add text boxes to a pdf; how to add text fields in a pdf
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET read PDF, VB.NET convert PDF to text, VB.NET an (empty) page to a PDF and adding empty pages Certainly, random pages can be deleted from PDF file as well
add text box in pdf; adding text to a pdf in preview
A- 4 
6.  The structural capacity of the sections was measured using the plate bearing test and the 
Benkelman beam test. 
The information from the study of these test sections was used to develop the current 
Mn/DOT R-value design procedure, which has been in use since about 1971.  A report 
summarizing the performance of the original 50 test sections was written in 1980 (7). The 
distress and rideability conditions, applied traffic and strength summaries of each section were 
presented through 1977. 
SELECTION OF PILOT TEST SECTIONS 
With the advent of mechanistic-empirical (M-E) flexible pavement design and the need for a 
well-calibrated design system, it was decided to calibrate the mechanistic-empirical design 
procedure developed at the University of Minnesota using the performance and construction 
histories of the Investigation 183 test sections.  The steps required to accomplish this were the 
following: 
1.  Locate the test sections on the trunk highway system, which required determining the 
reference points and stationing of the sections. These were obtained from original project 
files and Mn/DOT log books in the Mn/DOT design and pavement management sections. 
2.  Request traffic predictions for each of the test sections' reference points from original 
construction through the year 2000. 
3.  Obtain pavement condition data.  The condition of each section was summarized in 
Reference (7) from original construction through 1977.  Conditions were observed using the 
Pavement Management video station from 1992 to the present.  Rut depths on each section 
were also measured. 
4.  Determine structural profile histories of the sections by examining pavement management 
records.  These records were used to establish when reconstruction or significant 
maintenance was performed, changes in thickness were also noted. 
5.  Resilient moduli of each layer were estimated using the stabilometer R-value of the soils and 
granular materials for each test section.  The moduli of the asphalt concrete layers were 
estimated from backcalculated moduli at the Mn/ROAD project.  The moduli along with 
A- 5 
thicknesses were used to calculate strains for each of five seasons. Using these strain 
calculations and the traffic estimates damage factors were determined using the existing 
performance equations for fatigue and rut depth. Comparisons of predicted and measured 
performance were made to check if the predictions were less or more conservative than the 
observed performance over the 40-year period. 
Selection of Pilot Study Test Sections 
As a pilot study to evaluate whether data could be generated to review the 40-year old test 
sections, it was decided to develop information from nine of the Investigation 183 test sections.  
The fifty Investigation 183 test sections were categorized by soil type using Table 1 and by 
traffic using Table 2.  Table 3 lists the sections along with the district, soil type and traffic level 
for each.  Table 3 shows that there were five sections with granular subgrades, 23 semi-plastic 
and 22 plastic subgrades.  There are 24 sections with low traffic, 17 medium and 8 high traffic 
sections.  The following criteria were used to select the pilot test sections: 
1.  At least one test section from each Mn/DOT district. 
2.  Some test sections with Plastic, Semi-Plastic, and Granular subgrade soils using the 
definitions as in Table 1. 
Table 1.  Soil Classifications for Pilot Project. 
Soil Type (Abbreviation) 
AASHTO Classification 
Plastic (P) 
A-6, A-7 
Semi-Plastic (SP) 
A-4, A-5 
Granular (G) 
A-1, A-2, A-3 
3.  Test sections which had Low, Medium and High traffic. The traffic categories were based on 
the calculated 1966 annual ESALs using the levels as in Table 2: 
Table 2.  Traffic Classifications for Pilot Project. 
Traffic Category (Abbreviation) 
Annual ESAL Level in 1966 
Low (L) 
< 20,000 
Medium (M) 
20,000 to 100,000 
High (H) 
> 100,000 
A- 6 
Table 3.  Investigation 183 Pavement Sections. 
Soil Category 
Traffic Category 
Test Section  District 
GR 
SP 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
A- 7 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
Unknown 
49 
50 
Table 4 lists the test sections selected for the pilot study to establish whether the 
pavement management system along with traffic and materials characterization could be used to 
trace performance history.  One section was selected from each Mn/DOT district and a variety of 
soil types and traffic levels. There are four each of semi-plastic and plastic soils and one with a 
granular subgrade. There are four sections with low, two medium and three high traffic levels. 
Table 4. Investigation 183 Sections Selected for Pilot Study of 40-Year Performance. 
District 
Test Section 
Soil Type 
Traffic 
183-6 
SP 
183-3 
183-11 
183-43 
183-22 
SP 
183-26 
SP 
183-47 
183-34 
183-23 
SP 
A- 8 
Location 
Table 5 lists the Trunk Highway, Lane, Reference Marker (Mile Post) and stationing for the 
nine pilot test sections. The information was obtained from the Investigation 183 files and was 
necessary for locating the sections using the current referencing system in the Mn/DOT 
Pavement Management System. It was also necessary to establish the locations for traffic 
requests. 
Table 5.  Pilot Section Locations. 
Test 
Section 
District 
Trunk 
Highway 
Lane
*
Mile Post 
(Mile Post Stationing) 
Test Section 
Station Limits 
EB 
250 - 251 
(372+43.7 - 424+82.3)
372 - 384 
59 
SB 
363 - 362 
(4099+52 – 4155+54) 
4140 - 4152 
11 
371 
SB 
43 - 44 
(555+92-608+63) 
565-577 
43 
54 
NB 
4 - 5 
(211+22 - 264+20) 
227 - 239 
22 
55 
EB 
179 - 180 
(1322+12 – 1374+72) 
1335 -1347 
26 
76 
SB 
30 - 29 
(682+50 - 734+79) 
693-700 
47 
19 
EB 
121 - 122 
(117+68 - 170+41) 
129-141 
34 
EB 
(116 - 117) 
(456+62 - 509+52) 
465-477 
23 
36 
EB 
(13 - 14) 
(141+89 - 196+73) 
171-183 
*
Lane:  The direction of traffic over the test section (EB = Eastbound, WB = Westbound, NB = 
Northbound and SB = Southbound) 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested