open pdf file in asp.net using c# : How to enter text in pdf software control dll winforms web page wpf web forms 200217REV21-part578

A- 9 
The nine test sections selected for this study were subjected to a mechanistic-empirical (M-E) 
analysis to assess whether the current performance transfer functions accurately predict observed 
pavement performance.  The following subsections detail the process and findings of the M-E 
analysis. 
PILOT TEST SECTION DATA 
Prior to performing the M-E analysis it was necessary to gather information regarding the 
structural profiles of the sections, seasonal layer moduli, traffic and performance data.  Each of 
these is described below. 
Structural Profiles 
Records from the pavement management office of Mn/DOT were examined to obtain the 
dates of maintenance; rehabilitation or reconstruction activities performed on each of the test 
sections.  Of interest in this study were changes made to the structural profile of the sections.  
Tables 6 through 14 detail the construction histories of the test sections.  It is important to note 
that, in some cases, sections were milled and overlaid.  However, in the tables, simply total 
thicknesses are given since only these were needed in the M-E analysis.  Additionally, except 
where noted, the granular base layers were constructed of Mn/DOT Class 5 material and subbase 
layers of Mn/DOT Class 4 material.  Finally, the subgrade soil types are specified according to 
the AASHTO soil classification system. 
Table 6.  Section 183-3 Structural Profile History. 
Year  Asphalt Concrete 
Thickness (in) 
Granular Base 
Thickness (in) 
Subgrade Soil 
Type 
1961 
2.0 
1969 
6.5 
1987 
8.0 
1999 
10.0 
15.5 
A-7-6 
How to enter text in pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text to a pdf in acrobat; how to add text fields to pdf
How to enter text in pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text to pdf without acrobat; adding text to a pdf document acrobat
A- 10 
Table 7.  Section 183-6 Structural Profile History. 
Year  Asphalt Concrete 
Thickness (in) 
Granular Base 
Thickness (in) 
Granular Subbase 
Thickness (in) 
Subgrade Soil 
Type 
1959 
1.5 
1960 
6.0 
1981 
7.5 
5.0 
11.0 
A-2-4 
Table 8.  Section 183-11 Structural Profile History. 
Year  Asphalt Concrete 
Thickness (in) 
Granular Base 
Thickness (in) 
Granular Subbase 
Thickness (in) 
Subgrade Soil 
Type 
1960 
2.0 
1961 
5.5 
1986 
4.5 
5.0 
4.0 
A-1-b 
Table 9.  Section 183-22 Structural Profile History. 
Year  Asphalt Concrete 
Thickness (in) 
Granular Base 
Thickness (in) 
Granular Subbase 
Thickness (in) 
Subgrade Soil 
Type 
1961 
7.0 
1973 
8.5 
6.0 
16.0 
A-4 
Table 10.  Section 183-23 Structural Profile History. 
Year  Asphalt Concrete 
Thickness (in) 
Granular Base 
Thickness (in) 
Granular Subbase 
Thickness (in) 
Subgrade Soil 
Type 
1960 
7.0 
1987 
11.75 
9.0 
12.0 
A-2-4 
C# HTML5 Viewer: Deployment on DotNetNuke Site
Open Web Matrix, click “New” and select “App Gallery”. Select “DNN Platform” in App Frameworks, and enter a Site Name. RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF.dll.
add text to pdf; add text field to pdf
C#: XDoc.HTML5 Viewer for .NET Online Help Manual
Enter the URL to view the online document. Click to OCR edited file (one for each) to plain text which can be copied Click to convert PDF document to Word (.docx
how to add text to a pdf in acrobat; add text pdf
A- 11 
Table 11.  Section 183-26 Structural Profile History. 
Year  Asphalt Concrete 
Thickness (in) 
Granular Base
*
Thickness (in) 
Subgrade Soil 
Type 
1961 
3.0 
1988 
7.5 
14 
A-4 
*
Mn/DOT Class 3 Material
Table 12.  Section 183-34 Structural Profile History. 
Year  Asphalt Concrete 
Thickness (in) 
Granular Base 
Thickness (in) 
Granular Subbase 
Thickness (in) 
Subgrade Soil 
Type 
1959 
9.5 
1986 
12.5 
3.5 
4.5 
A-6 
Table 13.  Section 183-43 Structural Profile History. 
Year  Asphalt Concrete 
Thickness (in) 
Granular Base 
Thickness (in) 
Granular Subbase 
Thickness (in) 
Subgrade Soil 
Type 
1959 
2.0 
1968 
4.0 
1989 
7.5 
7.0 
8.0 
A-6 
Table 14.  Section 183-47 Structural Profile History. 
Year  Asphalt Concrete 
Thickness (in) 
Granular Base
*
Thickness (in) 
Granular Subbase 
Thickness (in) 
Subgrade Soil 
Type 
1954 
2.0 
1973 
4.5 
4.0 
8.0 
A-6 
*
Asphalt stabilized base
Seasonal Layer Moduli 
Asphalt Concrete 
Based upon previous research at Mn/ROAD (8), the asphalt concrete layers were 
assigned seasonal moduli as shown in Table 15. 
VB.NET TWAIN: TWAIN Image Scanning in Console Application
WriteLine("---Ending Scan---" & vbLf & " Press Enter To Quit & automatic scanning and stamp string text on captured to scan multiple pages to one PDF or TIFF
how to add text to a pdf file in reader; add text boxes to pdf
C# TWAIN - Scan Multi-pages into One PDF Document
imaging DLLs used for scanning multiple pages into one PDF/TIFF document true; device.Acquire(); Console.Out.WriteLine("---Ending Scan---\n Press Enter To Quit
adding text to pdf file; adding text to pdf form
A- 12 
Table 15.  Asphalt Concrete Seasonal Moduli. 
Season 
Modulus, psi 
I (Winter) 
1,987,433 
II (Spring Thaw) 
1,528,794 
III (Spring Recovery) 
993,717 
IV (Summer) 
290,471 
V (Fall) 
764,397 
Granular Base and Subbase 
Tests to determine the R-value of the granular bases and subbases were done in the 
original 183 investigation (5,7).  The data were used in this project to determine the normal or 
summer modulus using the following relationships (9): 
M
R
= 1000 + 555*R-value 
(R-value  20) 
M
R
= 1000 + 250*R-value   
(R-value > 20) 
Seasonal multipliers, obtained from Mn/ROAD (8), were used to determine the moduli in the 
other four seasonas as shown in Table 16. 
Table 16.  Seasonal Base and Subbase Moduli. 
Season 
I
*
II 
III 
IV 
Test Cell and Layer 
Modulus, psi 
183-3 Base 
40,000 
19,200 
24,100 
28,650 
28,940 
183-6 Base 
40,000 
19,665 
24,650 
29,350 
29,650 
183-6 Subbase 
40,000 
14,070 
17,600 
21,000 
21,200 
183-11 Base 
40,000 
19,900 
24,950 
29,700 
30,000 
183-11 Subbase 
40,000 
8,880 
11,100 
13,250 
13,380 
183-22 Base 
40,000 
19,665 
24,700 
29,350 
29,650 
183-22 Subbase 
40,000 
13,400 
16,800 
20,000 
20,200 
183-23 Base 
40,000 
18,730 
23,480 
27,950 
28,200 
183-23 Subbase 
40,000 
11,200 
14,100 
16,750 
16,900 
183-26 Base 
40,000 
20,600 
25,800 
30,750 
31,100 
183-34 Base 
40,000 
13,800 
17,300 
20,600 
20,800 
VB.NET Image: Image Rotator SDK; .NET Document Image Rotation
image rotation API (which allows VB.NET developers to enter the rotating We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, tiff
how to insert text into a pdf using reader; adding text to pdf in acrobat
VB.NET Image: VB.NET Planet Barcode Generator for Image, Picture &
REFile.SaveDocumentFile(doc, "c:/planet.pdf", New PDFEncoder()). type barcode.Data = "01234567890" 'enter a 11 Color.Black 'Human-readable text-related settings
adding text fields to a pdf; add text box in pdf document
A- 13 
183-34 Subbase 
40,000 
11,900 
14,900 
17,750 
17,900 
183-43 Base 
40,000 
18,960 
23,770 
28,300 
28,600 
183-43 Subbase 
40,000 
12,900 
16,200 
19,250 
19,400 
183-47 Base 
40,000 
19,900 
24,950 
29,700 
30,000 
183-47 Subbase 
40,000 
18,730 
23,500 
27,950 
28,200 
*
Winter modulus assigned a maximum value of 40,000 psi.
Subgrade 
Previously measured R-values, as with the base and subbase layers, were used to 
determine the moduli for the subgrade soils in the summer condition.  The following equations 
converted R-value to resilient modulus (9): 
M
R
= 1000 + 555*R-value   
(R-value  20) 
M
R
= 1000 + 250*R-value   
(R-value > 20) 
Seasonal multipliers obtained from Mn/ROAD (8) were used to adjust the moduli for seasonal 
effects.  Table 17 lists the seasonal subgrade moduli by test section.  It is important to point out 
that soils having the same AASHTO classification typically had somewhat different R-values 
resulting in different seasonal moduli.   
Table 17.  Seasonal Subgrade Moduli. 
Season 
II 
III 
IV 
Test Cell (Soil Type) 
Modulus, psi 
183-3 (A-7-6) 
40,000 
19,020 
5,740 
5,550 
7,760 
183-6 (A-2-4) 
40,000 
20,800 
16,000 
16,000 
14,550 
183-11 (A-1-b) 
40,000 
23,400 
18,000 
18,000 
16,360 
183-22 (A-4) 
40,000 
31,950 
9,650 
9,325 
13,040 
183-23 (A-2-4) 
40,000 
15,925 
12,250 
12,250 
11,140 
183-26 (A-4) 
40,000 
29,980 
9,055 
8,750 
12,236 
183-34 (A-6) 
40,000 
28,150 
8,500 
8,215 
11,500 
183-43 (A-6) 
40,000 
26,250 
7,930 
7,660 
10,700 
183-47 (A-6) 
40,000 
29,126 
8,797 
8,500 
11,888 
VB.NET TIFF: .NET TIFF Splitting Control to Split & Disassemble
Developers can enter the page range value in this VB Imports System.Drawing Imports System.Text Imports System TIFDecoder()) 'use TIFDecoder open a pdf file Dim
add text pdf acrobat professional; how to add text to a pdf in preview
A- 14 
Traffic Data 
The test section locations were provided to the Management Data Services Section of 
Mn/DOT where estimates of accumulated ESALs over the 40 years were made. Original 
estimates were made from the initial date of construction through 1980 and then from 1980-
2000. The estimates are based on weight and vehicle type distributions made periodically at the 
specific test section location throughout these time periods. Accumulated and yearly total ESAL 
values were tabulated so that accumulated ESALs could be noted at the time of rehabilitation or 
reconstruction.  The total number of ESALs were then determined for each of the structural cross 
sections shown in Tables 6 through 14.  Table 18 lists the relevant ESALs for each structural 
profile. 
Table 18.  ESALs by Test Section During Each Time Span. 
Years 
ESALs 
Section 183-3 
1961-1968  109,073 
1969-1986  458,126 
1987-1998  504,711 
1999-2001  100,858 
Section 183-6 
1959 
1960-1980  3,241,078 
1981-2001  3,705,513 
Section 183-11 
1960 
13,463 
1961-1985  477,568 
1986-2001  655,432 
Section 183-22 
1961-1972  258,706 
1973-2001  1,771,782 
Section 183-23 
A- 15 
1960-2001  3,833,503 
Section 183-26 
1961-1987  126,198 
1988-1998  113,450 
Section 183-34 
1959-1985  1,541,977 
1986-2001  1,139,912 
Section 183-43 
1959-1967  31,730 
1968-1988  112,630 
1989-2001  69,730 
Section 183-47 
1954-1972  565,554 
1973-2001  1,422,364 
A- 16 
Performance Data 
In the original 183 study, yearly measurements of rut depth and amount of cracking were 
recorded; however, measurements were taken only through 1977.  More recently, video records 
of the test sections were evaluated to assess the rutting and cracking performance of the test 
sections.  These records were available for the years of 1996 to 1998.  These two sources of data 
were merged to give a more complete sectional history of pavement performance.  Figures A1 
through A18, in Appendix A, illustrate the rutting and cracking performance of each section by 
year.  Additionally, the total surface thickness was plotted on the graphs to give an indication of 
when the structural profile changed during the life of the section.  It is important to note that 
years in which there is a profile change and zero rut depth or cracking corresponds to no 
performance data available for that year. 
MECHANISTIC-EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS 
Once all the necessary inputs had been obtained as specified above, it was possible to 
proceed with the M-E analysis of the test sections.  The procedure consisted of four steps, 
detailed below: 
1.  Calculate strains for each pavement cross section. 
2.  Calculate seasonal traffic volumes. 
3.  Calculate seasonal expected number of allowable loads. 
4.  Calculate damage factors using Miner’s Hypothesis. 
Calculate Strains for Each Pavement Cross Section 
The program, WESLEA for Windows, was used to perform the mechanistic simulation 
necessary to determine strains in the pavement structures.  The structural inputs, specified above, 
were input and an 18-kip single axle load with dual tires inflated to 100 psi was applied to the 
pavement surface.  The maximum tensile strain (ε
t
) at the bottom of the asphalt concrete layer 
and the maximum compressive strain (ε
v
) at the top of the subgrade were recorded as illustrated 
in Figure 1.  This was done on a seasonal basis to account for changes in layer stiffnesses due to 
temperature and moisture changes in the different layers.  The strain data may be found in 
Appendix B. 
A- 17 
Figure 1.  Mechanistic Simulation of Pavement Sections. 
Calculate Seasonal Traffic Volumes 
To accommodate a seasonal evaluation in Miner’s hypothesis, it was necessary to 
distribute the ESALs over the five seasons of the analysis.  The percentages shown in Table 19 
were used to distribute the traffic to each season.  The seasonal traffic data for each section are in 
Appendix B. 
Table 19.  Seasonal Traffic Multipliers. 
Season 
% of ESALs In Each Season 
I - Winter 
23% 
II - Spring Thaw 
5.8% 
III - Spring Recovery 
5.8% 
IV - Summer 
50% 
V - Fall (Normal) 
15.4% 
Calculate Seasonal Expected Number of Allowable Loads 
Transfer functions developed at the Minnesota Road Research Project (Mn/ROAD) were 
used to estimate the number of allowable loads for each structural cross section based on the 
strain data obtained from WESLEA for Windows.  The number of allowable loads, by test 
AC 
Granular 
Base 
Granular 
Subbase 
Subgrade 
4,500 lb/tire inflated to 100 psi 
Maximum tensile 
strain, ε
t
Maximum compressive 
strain, ε
v
A- 18 
section, season and year are listed in Appendix A.  The transfer functions for fatigue and rutting 
life are as follows: 
3.206
6
6
10
10
2.83
=
t
f
N
ε
(1) 
3.929
15
1
5.5 10
=
v
r
N
ε
(2) 
where:  N
f
= number of allowable load repetitions until fatigue failure (approximately 
10% of area fatigue cracked) 
N
r
= number of allowable load repetitions until rutting failure (0.5 inch rut depth) 
ε
t
= maximum tensile microstrain at bottom of asphalt concrete layer 
ε
v
= maximum compressive microstrain at top of subgrade layer 
Calculate Damage Factors Using Miner’s Hypothesis 
Using Miner’s hypothesis, which is a damage function that accounts for the cumulative 
effects of traffic-related pavement damage, it was possible to determine damage factors for each 
structural profile.  The equation representing Miner’s hypothesis is: 
=
=
k
i
i
i
N
n
D
1
(3) 
where:  D = damage factor 
n
i
= number of actual repeated loads in season i 
N
i
= number of allowable loads before fatigue or rutting failure in season i 
i = Season, 1 through 5 
By definition, when D exceeds unity, failure has occurred.  When D is less than unity, then 
the pavement structure has sufficient capacity to withstand the given traffic level.  The damage 
factors for each test section, by season and year, are listed in Appendix A. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested