open pdf file in asp.net using c# : Adding text to a pdf in reader Library control component asp.net web page .net mvc 200217REV3-part580

1 - 18 
It is very important that the same standard procedures be used for both QC and 
QA testing. The testing must also be done by certified technicians for both the 
Contractor and the Agency. 
Section 5.4.2.3.3. includes a discussion on Methods of Compaction Control for 
HMA. Compaction is the most important part of construction of an HMA mixture. 
Inadequate compaction will result in a shorter life because of accelerated 
deterioration due to higher air voids resulting in more permeability and lower 
strength.  
Three methods of compaction control are provided for in Specifications 
2360/2350 (Gyratory/Marshall Design): 
•  Specified Density Method (2360.6-B2).  The Bulk Specific Gravity of a field 
sample is compared to compaction obtained from the same material prior to 
compaction and compacted with a Marshall Hammer or gyratory compactor. 
The Maximum Theoretical Density is also determined to check the field 
compaction with the specified levels listed in Tables 2360.6 B-2 respectively. 
The frequency of and variations permitted between QC and QA testing are 
also listed. 
•  Ordinary Compaction. For Ordinary Compaction a control strip of at least 330 
m
3
(395 yd
2
) of the same material, on the same subgrade and base conditions 
shall be compacted to determine a proper roller pattern to achieve maximum 
density. A growth curve of density with roller passes must be used to 
determine when maximum density has been obtained. If materials or 
conditions change a new control strip must be constructed. A given control 
strip can only be used 10 days of construction. 
The Specified Density Method should be used unless otherwise indicated. 
Ordinary Compaction without a control strip should only be used for very 
small areas or thin lifts less than 39 mm (1.5 in.). For these areas the HMA should 
be compacted until there is no appreciable increase in density with each pass of the 
roller as defined by an experienced Engineer or Inspector.  
The type and characteristics of the roller(s) to be used for Ordinary Compaction 
are presented in the Specifications. 
Adding text to a pdf in reader - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add text box to pdf document; adding text to pdf
Adding text to a pdf in reader - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text to pdf file; add text pdf professional
1 - 19 
The Inspector’s Job Guide for Construction (11) includes sections on both the 
inspection of plant and paving operations.  
The Guide assumes that the Inspector will not just be a data or sample taker. The 
Inspector should be aware of the whole operation to make sure that a consistent, 
uniform quality mixture is produced and constructed. 
1.6.  Summary and Recommendations. 
Chapter 6 presents the summary and recommendations given in the manual. These deal with 
the thickness design procedure(s) to use now since the MnPAVE procedure is not documented 
fully across Minnesota especially for low volume roads. It is now recommended that either the 
Soil Factor or R-Value procedure be used and then the same roadway be designed using 
MnPAVE. Comparisons should be made and reported to the MnDOT Research Section. A form 
has been developed to report the comparisons. 
Traffic is evaluated using 20-year projections of AADT and HCADT for the Soil Factor 
design procedure. Equivalent Standard Axle Loads (ESALs) are used for both the R-Value and 
MnPAVE design procedures. ESAL predictions over a 20-year design period require an estimate 
of AADT, vehicle type distribution, average effect of the various types of vehicles in terms of 
ESALs, a growth factor and lane distribution factor for the roadway. Tables and procedures are 
presented in Chapter 3 for determining these values both with estimates and using a field 
procedure for measuring vehicle type distribution.  
The subgrade or embankment is the most important part of a pavement structure. Chapter 
presents the methods of evaluating the subgrade strength or stiffness for the three design 
procedures. To realize the design parameters obtained for a given soil good construction 
practices must be followed. Good construction starts with good specifications that define how the 
material is to be constructed and paid for. The MnDOT specifications that are used for subgrade 
construction are Nos. 2105, 2111 and 2123. Chapter 4 includes summaries of these specifications 
and the field procedures that will most effectively help carry them out. The importance of well-
trained knowledgeable personnel is emphasized. 
Chapter 5 presents how the materials used for the pavement section are evaluated for the 
three design procedures. The granular equivalent factors are used for the Soil Factor and the R-
Value. The factors are dependent on the specifications which either a granular material or an 
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
C# source code for adding or removing annotation from PDF Support to take notes on adobe PDF file without Support to add text, text box, text field and crop
how to add text to pdf file with reader; adding text pdf file
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Others. Provide VB.NET Users with Solution of Adding Text Box to PDF Page in VB.NET Project.
how to add text to a pdf document; adding text to a pdf form
1 - 20 
asphalt mixture pass. The GE factors are presented in Chapter 5 and summarized in Chapter 6. 
The resilient moduli that are used for the MnPAVE procedure have been related to the other 
specification granular and hot mix asphalt materials. Eventually laboratory and non-destructive 
field tests (the FWD and DCP) will be used to relate the laboratory tests to the field values. One 
big advantage of the mechanistic-empirical design (MnPAVE) is that seasonal variations in 
resilient modulus for a material in the pavement section for a given year and from year to year 
can eventually be documented. 
MnDOT combined 2360 and 2350 (Gyratory/Marshall Design) specifications are 
recommended for HMA construction on low volume roads in Minnesota. These specifications 
feature the use of volumetrics for field control and quality management (QM) of the team of the 
Contractor and the Agency. The Contractor is responsible for Quality Control QC) and the 
Agency, Quality Assurance (QA). The specifications include requirements for material quality, 
mixture design, mixture variability, density (voids), Voids in the Mineral Aggregate (VMA), 
moisture susceptibility, field density and smoothness of the finished surface. Construction 
procedures and a checklist for field engineers and inspectors are presented. 
One of the major goals of the presentation of design and construction of the subgrade and 
pavement section materials is to obtain uniformity, which helps a great deal in the achievement 
of good performance. 
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Provide .NET SDK library for adding text box to PDF document in .NET WinForms application. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
add text to pdf file online; how to add text fields to a pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references:
how to insert text into a pdf file; how to insert text box in pdf file
2 - 1 
CHAPTER 2 
THICKNESS DESIGN PROCEDURES 
2.1.  Background and Introduction 
There are three flexible pavement thickness design procedures now used in Minnesota. In 
addition some pavements, especially at the local level, are designed by experience based on what 
has worked in the past. The three formal thickness design procedures are the Soil Factor Design 
found in the MnDOT State Aid Manual (4), the Stabilometer R-Value Design found in the 
MnDOT Geotechnical and Design Manual (5) and MnPAVE, which is the mechanistic-empirical 
design procedure currently under development. The Soil Factor Procedure was developed in the 
1950’s and has been modified somewhat since then. MnDOT adopted the R-Value Procedure in 
the early 1970’s. The MnPAVE Procedure is in software form and is being tested against the 
other procedures. The Beta version is now available (6). In this Chapter the procedures are 
presented along with the factors needed for thickness determination. 
The traffic factor for each of the procedures is presented in Chapter 3. The embankment 
(subgrade) factors for design and construction specifications and recommended procedures are 
given in Chapter 4. The thickness of the pavement section is defined using the Granular 
Equivalent for the Soil Factor and R-value design procedures. The Resilient Modulus (M
r
) and 
the thickness of the layers define the structure for the MnPAVE Procedure. The required 
specifications and recommended construction procedures to attain the respective pavement 
section factors are presented in Chapter 5. 
2.2.  Soil Factor Design 
Since 1954 some pavements in Minnesota have been designed using a table similar to Figure 
2.1. This is the 2001 version from the State Aid Manual which uses English and metric units (4). 
The chart uses seven traffic categories based on 20-year projected two-way AADT and HCADT 
and eight embankment types using the AASHTO classification system. Thickness in terms of 
Granular Equivalent (G.E.) is determined for each level of traffic and soil type. Each design also 
has a specified maximum spring axle load.  
The traffic factors are Average Daily Traffic (ADT) and Heavy Commercial Average Daily 
Traffic (HCADT). The ADT and HCADT are both two-way values. The ADT includes all 
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Support adding protection features to PDF file by adding password, digital signatures and redaction feature. Various of PDF text and images processing features
how to add text to pdf; add text to a pdf document
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Barcoding. XImage.Barcode Reader. XImage.Barcode Generator. Others. Professional VB.NET Solution for Adding Text Annotation to PDF Page in VB.NET.
how to insert a text box in pdf; how to add text box to pdf
2 - 2 
vehicles and the HCADT is defined as all trucks with six or more tires; thus HCADT does not 
include cars, small pickup and panel-type trucks. The ADT and HCADT normally used for 
design are values predicted for 20 years into the future. Local conditions must be considered and 
the projected value may either be increased or decreased based on the projected future use of the 
road. More specific methods of determining design values are presented in Chapter 3.  
As noted in Figure 2.1 a soil factor of 100% represents an A-6 or A-4 soil. Stronger soils 
have soil factors less than 100% and weaker soils greater than 100%. The soil factor percentage 
represents the percent increase or decrease in the thickness of the subbase (D
3
). There are ranges 
of percentages shown for A-1, A-2, A-4 and A-7 soils. Therefore, it is possible to use some 
judgment relative to the capabilities of the soils after evaluating drainage and other design 
S.F.
Minimum 
Bit. G.E.
Total G.E.
S.F.
Minimum 
Bit. G.E.
Total G.E.
S.F.
Minimum Bit. G.E.
Total G.E.
50
3.0 (75)
7.25 (180)
50
7.0 (175)
14.00 (350)
50
8.0 (200)
20.30 (510)
75
3.0 (75)
9.38 (235)
75
7.0 (175)
17.50 (440)
75
8.0 (200)
26.40 (660)
100
3.0 (75)
11.50 (290)
100
7.0 (175)
21.00 (525)
100
8.0 (200)
32.50 (815)
110
3.0 (75)
12.40 (310)
110
7.0 (175)
22.40 (560)
110
8.0 (200)
35.00 (875)
120
3.0 (75)
13.20 (330)
120
7.0 (175)
23.80 (595)
120
8.0 (200)
37.40 (935)
130
3.0 (75)
14.00 (350)
130
7.0 (175)
25.20 (630)
130
8.0 (200)
39.80 (995)
Minimum
Minimum
Bit. G.E.
Bit. G.E.
Superpave Hot Mix
Spec. 2360
2.25
50
3.0 (75)
9.00 (225)
50
7.0 (175)
16.00 (400)
Plant Mix Asp Pave
Spec 2350
2.25/2.25/2.00
75
3.0 (75)
12.00 (300)
75
7.0 (175)
20.50 (515)
Plant-Mix Bit.
Type 41,61
2.25
100
3.0 (75)
15.00 (375)
100
7.0 (175)
25.00 (625)
Plant-Mix Bit.
Type 31
2
110
3.0 (75)
16.20 (405)
110
7.0 (175)
26.80 (670)
Aggregate Base
(Class 5 & 6) 3138
1
120
3.0 (75)
17.40 (435)
120
7.0 (175)
28.60 (715)
Aggregate Base
(Class 3 & 4) 3138
0.75
130
3.0 (75)
18.60 (465)
130
7.0 (175)
30.40 (760)
Select Granular
Spec 3149.2B
0.5
AASHTO SOIL 
CLASS
SOIL FACTOR 
(S.F.) %
ASSUMED     
R-VALUE
Minimum
Minimum
A-1
50 - 75
70 - 75
Bit. G.E.
Bit. G.E.
A-2
50 - 75
30 - 70
50
7.0 (175)
10.25 (255)
50
8.0 (200)
18.50 (465)
A-3
50
70
75
7.0 (175)
13.90 (350)
75
8.0 (200)
23.70 (595)
A-4
100-130
20
100
7.0 (175)
17.50 (440)
100
8.0 (200)
29.00 (725)
A-5
130 +
-
110
7.0 (175)
19.00 (475)
110
8.0 (200)
31.10 (780)
A-6
100
12
120
7.0 (175)
20.50 (515)
120
8.0 (200)
33.20 (830)
A-7-5
120
12
130
7.0 (175)
22.00 (550)
130
8.0 (200)
35.30 (885)
A-7-6
130
10
NOTE:If 10 ton (9.1 t) design is to be used, see Road Design Manual 7-3.
For full depth bituminous pavements, see Road Design Manual 7-3.
*Granular Equivalent Factor per MnDOT Technical Memorandum 98-02-MRR-01.
S.F.
Total G.E.
9 TON @ LESS THAN 150 HCADT
9 TON - 600 @ 1100 HCADT
S.F.
Total G.E.
S.F.
Total G.E.
S.F.
Total G.E.
9 TON - MORE THAN 1100 HCADT
7 TON @ 400 - 1000 ADT
9 TON - 300-600 HCADT
MATERIAL
TYPE OF 
MATERIAL
G.E. FACTOR*
7 TON @ LESS THAN 400 ADT
9 TON -150-300 HCADT
FLEXIBLE PAVEMENT DESIGN USING SOIL FACTORS
Required Gravel Equivalency (G.E.) for various Soil Factors (S.F.)
For new construction or reconstruction use projected ADT.  For resurfacing or reconditioning use present ADT.
All units of G.E. are in inches with millimeters (mm) in parenthesis.
Figure 2.1  Flexible Pavement Design Using Soil Factors 
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF reader installed. technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc
how to add text to a pdf in reader; how to insert text in pdf file
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
By using reliable APIs, C# programmers are capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as PDF, Tiff, Word, Excel
how to add text to a pdf file; add text to pdf reader
2 - 3 
considerations. Chapter 4 includes a discussion on the selection of these and other design 
parameters for the embankment soils.  
The strength and stiffness of the soil supporting the pavement are very dependent on the 
density and moisture conditions of the constructed soil. Uniformity is also important to 
minimize differential heave during freeze up. The construction specifications and procedures 
presented in Chapter 4 must be followed to attain the strength and stiffnesses inferred in the 
given soil factors. 
The Granular Equivalent (G.E.) defines a pavement section by equating the thickness of each 
aggregate or HMA layer to an equivalent thickness of granular base material. Equation 2.1 is 
used to calculate the Granular Equivalent. In Minnesota this is a Specification 3139 material, 
Class 5 or 6 (9). The relevant specifications for the other pavement materials are listed in Figure 
2.1. Minimum bituminous and total granular equivalents are also shown for each traffic category. 
The total Granular Equivalent is defined using Equation 2.1.  
G.E.  =  a
1
D
+ a
2
D
+ a
3
D
+ …  
(2.1) 
Where:  D
  
=  thickness of asphalt mix surface, in. (mm) 
D
2
=  thickness of granular base course, in. (mm) 
D
3  
=  thickness of granular subbase course, in. (mm) 
a
1
, a
2, 
and a
3
=  G.E. Factors listed in Figure 2.1. 
The required design thicknesses are listed in two categories (minimum bituminous G.E. and 
total G.E.). The maximum granular base thickness can be calculated by subtracting the minimum 
bituminous G.E. from the total G.E. Other design combinations of bituminous and granular 
materials can be determined using the G.E. factors. 
The respective specifications and construction procedures necessary to attain the material 
characteristics defined for the soil factor design are presented in Section 5.3.2. 
2.3.  Stabilometer R–Value Design 
The Stabilometer R-Value is the current design procedure used by MnDOT to determine the 
design thickness of an HMA surfaced pavement. This procedure is based on research done in the 
1960’s using results from the AASHO Road Test. The basis of the design is limiting spring 
2 - 4 
deflections by increasing the strength (stiffness) of the soil or by increasing the strength 
(stiffness) of the pavement layers for a given level of traffic. 
Figure 2.2 is the R-Value design chart from the MnDOT Design and Geotechnical and 
Pavement Design Manual (5). The embankment R-Value can be measured with a standard 
laboratory test (ASTM D-2844) or estimated from the soil type or classification. The R-Value 
laboratory procedure used in Minnesota is presented in Chapter 4. An exudation pressure of 
1655kPa (240 psi) is used for determining a design R-Value in Minnesota. Predictions of R-
Value from soil classification are also presented in Table 4.5.  
The traffic is evaluated in terms of 80-kN (18,000-lb) equivalent standard axle loads 
(ESAL’s). For a particular road being designed the ESAL’s are estimated for a design lane in one 
direction. Calculated ESAL’s will be different for flexible and rigid pavements for the same 
traffic mix. Chapter 3 presents methods for estimating design ESAL’s for flexible pavements in 
Minnesota. 
Figure 2.2  R-Value Design Chart
2 - 5 
The thickness is defined in terms of Granular Equivalent in inches. Granular equivalent 
factors (a
1
, a 
2
, and a 
3
) for the R-Value design are listed in Section 5.3.2. Equation 2-1 is used to 
calculate the total granular equivalent in the same way as for the soil factor design. In addition to 
the lines for specific R-Values showing the required GE for a given number of ESAL’s, lines on 
the R-Value design chart represent: 
1. 
The minimum bituminous thickness GE and  
2. 
Bituminous plus base thickness GE.  
The actual thicknesses represented can be calculated using the appropriate G.E. factors. 
Examples of designs using the R-Value design chart with minimum thicknesses of                       
surface and base, plus other combinations are given in Reference 5. 
2.4.  MnPAVE Design 
2.4.1.  General    
The Minnesota Department of Transportation and the University of Minnesota have 
developed a mechanistic-empirical (M-E) design method for flexible pavements. The 
procedure has been developed as a software package (MnPAVE) because of the great 
quantities of data and analyses used for the design. A Beta Version of the software is now 
available. It is still being fine-tuned somewhat. 
MnPAVE predicts the structural performance of pavement sections using calculated 
strains in a simulated elastic layered system. To use the elastic layered system moduli and the 
thickness of each pavement layer must be determined for the pavement. Up to five (5) layers 
can be used for the calculations of:  
•  The tensile strain in the bottom of the surface layer and  
•  The compressive strain on the top of the subgrade, which is assumed to be infinite in 
depth. 
Various combinations of material properties (moduli) are used to simulate the seasons 
throughout the year. Currently, five seasons are used (winter, early spring, late spring, 
summer and fall). MnPAVE calculates the percent of damage that occurs in each season, 
maximum stress, strain and displacement at the critical locations, the allowable axle load 
repetitions and reliability percentages. The life in years is then predicted using the predicted 
traffic in ESAL’s or load spectra. 
2 - 6 
Fatigue cracking has been correlated with the tensile strain in the HMA surface layer and 
embankment rutting has been correlated with the compressive strain on the embankment. The 
performance equations are derived from the development of fatigue cracking and rut depth 
on the MnROAD test sections. Moduli of the layers have been measured throughout the year 
using backcalculated Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD) data or estimated from the 
Dynamic Cone Penetrometer (DCP) or other standard tests. 
The performance equations were also checked using the performance of a number of 40-
year old test sections from Investigation 183 (15).  The research to develop the information to 
check the performance of these sections was done as part of this project and reported in 
Appendix A of this report. 
Variability can also be incorporated into MnPAVE. Variations in the following 
parameters contribute to the overall variation of the pavement section.  
•  Layer Moduli 
−  HMA Surface 
−  Granular base and subbase 
−  Subgrade Soil 
•  Layer Thicknesses 
•  Load Predictions 
−  Vehicle class predictions 
−  Vehicle weight estimates 
−  Total number of vehicles 
The variability of these parameters is used with the predictions equations to calculate the 
reliability of the performance predictions. A Monte Carlo simulation is used to calculate the 
reliability of the performance predictions (16).  With this type of analysis it is possible to 
relate the variability of the thickness, material properties and traffic predictions to required 
thickness. More uniform construction can therefore be translated into thickness saved or 
increased life predictions.  
MnPAVE requires that the materials be described by their stiffness (modulus) for the 
seasons defined. This requires that the modulus be defined for these seasons either directly or 
backcalculated using the FWD or DCP. Correlations with other standard tests as shown in 
Table 4.5 can also be used.  
2 - 7 
At this time MnPAVE should be used in conjunction with one or both of the current 
methods. In this way a city or county can develop confidence in the results of the MnPAVE 
design. Without the MnPAVE software it has not been possible to take into account the many 
variables that affect the performance of a pavement section.  
MnPAVE has the following features: 
•  Three design levels based on input data quality 
•  Material properties adjusted seasonally 
•  Traffic quantified using either ESAL’s or load spectra 
•  English or System International (S.I.) Units 
•  HMA modulus temperature adjustment equations that can be modified 
•  Reliability estimates using Monte Carlo simulations 
2.4.2.  Set Up 
MnPAVE is designed for Windows 95/98/NT operating systems and requires 2 MB of 
hard drive space and a 200 MHz processor or higher. 
Installation can be accomplished using the following procedure: 
1. Create a new folder on the hard drive called “MnPAVE” 
2. Copy the *.exe file from the floppy disk to the MnPAVE folder. 
3. Run the program. 
2.4.3.  Start Up 
2.4.3.1.  Control Panel 
The “Control Panel” is the first window to appear when MnPAVE is started. The 
control panel includes areas for input data which includes “Climate, Structure and 
Traffic” A button to display “Output” also appears on the window. The input must be 
entered in order beginning with “Climate” and ending with “Traffic”, because the 
seasonal factors used in “Structure” depend on Climate and some of the ESAL 
calculations in Traffic depend on Structure. Changes can be made in these input windows 
at any time.  However, for a given design check, all inputs must be completed before 
“Output” can be selected.  
2.4.3.2.  General Operation 
MnPAVE uses the pull-down menu and window selection structures common to most 
software packages. The pull-down menu at the top of the screen includes, “File, Edit, 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested