open pdf file in asp.net using c# : Add text to pdf in preview software control dll windows azure html web forms 2006%20Semagn%20et%20al%20Marker%20types%20review0-part588

African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 5 (25) pp. 2540-2568 29 December, 2006 
Available online at http://www.academicjournals.org/AJB 
ISSN 1684–5315 © 2006 Academic Journals  
Review 
An overview of molecular marker methods for plants 
K. Semagn
1
*, Å. Bjørnstad
2
and M. N. Ndjiondjop
1
1
Africa Rice Center (WARDA), 01 BP 2031, Cotonou, Benin. 
2
Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432, Ås, 
Norway. 
Accepted 23 November, 2006 
The  development  and  use  of  molecular  markers  for  the  detection  and  exploitation  of  DNA 
polymorphism  is  one  of  the  most  significant  developments  in  the  field  of  molecular  genetics.  The 
presence of various types of molecular markers, and differences in their principles, methodologies, and 
applications  require careful consideration in choosing one or more of  such methods.  No  molecular 
markers are available yet that fulfill all requirements needed by researchers. According to the kind of 
study to be undertaken, one can choose among the variety of molecular techniques, each of which 
combines  at  least  some  desirable  properties.  This  article  provides  detail  review  for  11  different 
molecular  marker  methods:  restriction  fragment  length  polymorphism    (RFLP),  random  amplified 
polymorphic  DNA  (RAPD),  amplified  fragment  length  polymorphism  (AFLP),  inter-simple  sequence 
repeats (ISSRs), sequence characterized regions (SCARs), sequence tag sites (STSs), cleaved amplified 
polymorphic  sequences  (CAPS),  microsatellites  or  simple  sequence  repeats  (SSRs),  expressed 
sequence  tags  (ESTs),  single  nucleotide  polymorphisms  (SNPs),  and  diversity  arrays  technology 
(DArT).  
Key words: AFLP, DArT, DNA markers, hybridization, ISSR, polymerase chain reaction, RAPD, RFLP, SNP, 
SSR. 
INTRODUCTION 
The differences  that distinguish one plant from another 
are encoded in the plant’s genetic material, the deoxy-
ribonucleic acid (DNA). DNA is packaged in chromosome 
pairs (strands of genetic material; Figure 1), one coming 
from  each  parent.  The  genes,  which  control  a  plant’s 
characteristics, are located on specific segments of each 
chromosome. All of the genes carried by a single gamete 
(i.e.,  by  a  single  representative  of  each  of all chromo-
some pairs) is known as genome  (King and Stansfield, 
1997).  Although  the  whole  genome  sequence  is  now 
available  for  a  few  plant  species  such  as  Arabidopsis 
thaliana (The Arabidopsis Genome Initiative, 2000) and 
rice (The Rice Genome Mapping Project, 2005), to help 
identify specific genes  located  on a particular chromoso- 
*Corresponding  author.  E-mail:  k.semagn@cgiar.org  or 
semagnk@yahoo.com; 
Fax 
(229) 
21350556; 
Tel 
(229)21350188. 
me,  most   scientists  use   an   indirect method called 
genetic markers. A genetic marker can be defined in one 
of  the  following  ways:  (a) a  chromosomal  landmark  or 
allele  that allows for the tracing  of a specific region  of 
DNA; (b) a specific piece of DNA with a known position 
on  the  genome  (Wikipedia-the  free  encyclopedia; 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetic_marker);  or  (c)  a 
gene  whose  phenotypic  expression  is  usually  easily 
discerned,  used  to  identify  an  individual  or  a  cell  that 
carries it, or as a probe to mark a nucleus, chromosomes, 
or locus (King and Stansfield, 1990). Since the markers 
and the genes they mark are close together on the same 
chromosome,  they  tend  to  stay  together  as  each 
generation  of  plants  is  produced.  As  scientists  learn 
where markers occur on a chromosome, and how close 
they  are  to  specific  genes,  they  can  create  a  genetic 
linkage map. Such genetic maps serve several purposes, 
including  detailed  analysis  of  associations  between 
economically  important traits  and  genes  or  quantitative 
trait   loci   (QTLs)   and   facilitate   the   introgression   of  
Add text to pdf in preview - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
adding text to pdf reader; add text to pdf in preview
Add text to pdf in preview - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to add text to a pdf file in preview; adding text box to pdf
desirable  genes  or  QTLs  through  marker-assisted 
selection. 
Genetic  markers  fall  into  one  of  the  three  broad 
classes: those based on visually assessable traits (mor-
phological  and  agronomic  traits), those based on  gene 
product  (biochemical  markers),  and  those  relying  on  a 
DNA assay (molecular markers). The idea of using gene-
tic markers appeared very early in literatures (Sax, 1932; 
Wexelsen, 1933) but the development of electrophoretic 
assays  of  isozymes  (Markert  and  Moller,  1959)  and 
molecular  markers (Botstein et al.,  1980;  Nakamura et 
al., 1987; Welsh and McClelland, 1990; Williams  et al., 
1990; Adams et al., 1991; Caetano-Anolles et al., 1991; 
Akkaya et al., 1992; Akopyanz et al., 1992; Jordan and 
Humphries,  1994;  Zietkiewicz  et  al.,  1994;  Vos  et  al., 
1995; Jaccoud et al., 2001)  have greatly  improved  our 
understanding in biological sciences. Molecular markers 
should  not  be  considered  as  normal  genes,  as  they 
usually do not have any biological effect, and instead can 
be thought of as constant landmarks in the genome. They 
are identifiable DNA sequences, found at  specific loca-
tions  of  the  genome,  and  transmitted  by  the  standard 
laws of inheritance from one generation to the next.  The 
existence of various molecular techniques and differen-
ces in their principles and methodologies require careful 
consideration in choosing one  or more of such  marker 
types. This review article deals on the basic principles, 
requirements, and advantages and disadvantages of the 
most widely used molecular markers for genetic diversity 
studies,  genetic  mapping,  marker-trait  association  stud-
ies, and marker assisted selection programs.  
DNA  Extraction  is  the  Beginning  of  Molecular 
Markers Analysis 
Extraction  (isolation)  of  DNA  (nuclear,  mitochondrial, 
and/or chloroplast DNA) from sample to be studied is the 
first  step  for  all  molecular  marker  types.  DNA  can  be 
extracted  either  from  fresh,  lyophilized,  preserved  or 
dried  samples  but  fresh  material  is  ideal  for  obtaining 
good quality DNA. There are many alternative protocols 
for DNA extraction and the choice of a protocol depends 
on  the  quality  and  quantity  of  DNA  needed,  nature  of 
samples,  and  the  presence  of  natural  substances  that 
may interfere with the extraction and subsequent analy-
sis. DNA extraction protocols vary from simple and quick 
ones (e.g., Clancy et al., 1996; Ikeda et al., 2001; Dayteg 
et al., 1998; von Post et al., 2003) that yields low quality 
DNA but nevertheless good enough for routine analyses 
to the  laborious and  time-consuming standard methods 
(e.g.  Murray  and  Thompson,  1980;  Dellaporta  et  al., 
1983; Saghai-Maroof et  al., 1984) that usually produce 
high quality and quantity  of DNA  (Figure  2).  The  most 
commonly  used DNA  extraction  protocols involve brea-
king (through grinding) or digesting away cell walls and 
membranes in order to release the cellular constituents. 
Removal  of membranes lipids is facilitated by using dete- 
Semagn et al.    2541 
rgents  such  as  sodium  dodecyl  sulphate  (SDS),  Cetyl 
trimethylammonium  bromide  (CTAB)  or  mixed  alkyl 
trimethyl-ammonium bromide (MTAB). The released DNA 
should  be  protected  from  endogenous  nucleases  and 
EDTA is often included in the extraction buffer to chelate 
magnesium  ions  that  is  a  necessary  co-factor  for 
nucleases. DNA extracts often contain a large amount of 
RNA,  proteins,  polysaccharides,  tannins  and  pigments, 
which  may  interfere  with  the  extracted  DNA.  Most 
proteins  are  removed  by  adding  a  protein  degrading 
enzyme  (proteinase-K),  denaturation  at  65 
o
 and 
precipitation using chloroform and isoamyl alcohol. RNAs 
are  normally  removed  using  RNA  degrading  enzyme 
called  RNase  A.  Polysaccharide-like  contaminants  are, 
however,  more  difficult  to  remove.  NaCl,  together  with 
CTAB is known to remove polysaccharides (Murray and 
Thompson, 1980; Paterson et al., 1993). Some protocols 
replace NaCl by KCl (Thompson and Henry, 1995).  
As DNA will be released along with other compounds 
(lipids, proteins, carbohydrates, and/or phenols), it needs 
to be separated from others by centrifugation. The DNA 
in  the aqueous phase will then be transferred into  new 
tubes and precipitated in salt solution (e.g. sodium ace-
tate)  or  alcohol  (100%  isopropanol  or  ethanol),  re-
dissolved in sterile water or buffer. Finally, the concentra-
tion  of the extracted DNA needs to be measured using 
either  1% agarose gel electrophoresis or spectrophoto-
meter. Agarose gel is useful to check whether the DNA is 
degraded or not (Figure 2) but estimating DNA concent-
ration  by  visually  comparing  band  intensities  of  the 
extracted DNA with a molecular ladder of known concent-
ration is too subjective. Spectrophotometer measures the 
intensity  of  absorbance  of  DNA  solution  at  260  nm 
wavelength,  and also indicates the presence  of protein 
contaminants  but  it  does  not  tell  whether  the  DNA  is 
degraded or not.  There are three possible outcomes at 
the end of any DNA extraction: 
a)  There is no DNA.  
b)  The  DNA  appears  as  sheared  (too  fragmented), 
which  is  an  indication  of  degradation  for  different 
reasons.  
c)  DNA  appears  as  whitish  thin threads  (good quality 
DNA) or  brownish  thread  (DNA  in  the  presence  of 
oxidation  from  contaminants  such  as  phenolic 
compounds).  
The  researcher,  therefore,  needs  to  test  different 
protocols in order to find out the best one that works for 
the species under investigation. 
Types of Molecular Markers 
Various types of molecular markers have been described 
in the literature, which are listed in alphabetical order as 
follows: allele specific associated primers (ASAP; Gu et 
al., 1995), allele specific oligo (ASO; Beckmann, 1988), 
allele specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR; Land- 
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Highlight PDF text. • Add text to PDF document in preview. • Add text box to PDF file in preview. • Draw PDF markups. PDF Protection.
how to enter text in pdf file; how to add text box to pdf document
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
PDF Annotation. • Add sticky notes to PDF document. • Highlight PDF text in preview. • Add text to PDF document. • Insert text box to PDF file.
how to enter text into a pdf; how to insert text in pdf reader
2542     Afr. J. Biotechnol. 
Figure 1. Structure of DNA after unpacking it from the chromosome.  
egren et al., 1988) amplified fragment length polymorphi-
sm  (AFLP;  Vos  et  al.,  1995),  anchored  microsatellite 
primed PCR (AMP-PCR; Zietkiewicz et al., 1994), ancho-
red simple sequence repeats (ASSR; Wang et al., 1998), 
arbitrarily  primed  polymerase  chain  reaction  (AP-PCR; 
Welsh and McClelland, 1990), cleaved amplified polymor-
phic sequence (CAPS; Akopyanz et al., 1992; Konieczny 
and Ausubel, 1993), degenerate oligonucleotide  primed 
PCR (DOP-PCR; Telenius et al., 1992), diversity arrays 
technology (DArT; Jaccoud et al., 2001),  DNA amplifica-
tion  fingerprinting  (DAF;  Caetano-Anolles  et  al.,  1991), 
expressed  sequence  tags  (EST;  Adams  et  al.,  (1991), 
inter-simple  sequence  repeat  (ISSR;  Zietkiewicz  et  al., 
1994), inverse PCR (IPCR; Triglia et al., 1988), inverse 
sequence-tagged  repeats  (ISTR;  Rohde,  1996),  micro-
satellite  primed  PCR  (MP-PCR;  Meyer  et  al.,  1993), 
multiplexed  allele-specific  diagnostic  assay  (MASDA; 
Shuber  et  al.,  1997),  random  amplified  microsatellite 
polymorphisms (RAMP; Wu et al., 1994), random amp-
lified microsatellites (RAM; Hantula et al., 1996), random 
amplified  polymorphic  DNA  (RAPD;  Williams  et  al., 
1990), restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP; 
Botstein et al., 1980), selective amplification of microsa-
tellite  polymorphic  loci  (SAMPL;  Morgante  and  Vogel, 
1994), sequence characterized amplified regions (SCAR; 
Paran and Michelmore, 1993), sequence specific ampli-
fication  polymorphisms  (S-SAP;  Waugh  et  al.,  1997), 
sequence  tagged  microsatelite  site  (STMS;  Beckmann 
and Soller, 1990), sequence tagged site (STS; Olsen et 
al.,  1989),  short  tandem repeats (STR;  Hamada  et al., 
1982),    simple  sequence  length  polymorphism  (SSLP; 
Dietrich  et  al.,  1992),  simple  sequence  repeats  (SSR; 
Akkaya  et  al.,  1992),  single  nucleotide  polymorphism 
(SNP; Jordan and Humphries 1994), single primer ampli-
fication  reactions  (SPAR;  Gupta  et  al.,  1994),  single 
stranded  conformational  polymorphism  (SSCP;  Orita  et 
al., 1989), site-selected insertion PCR (SSI; Koes et al., 
1995), strand displacement amplification (SDA; Walker et 
al., 1992), and variable number  tandem  repeat  (VNTR; 
Nakamura et al., 1987).  
Although some of these marker types are very similar 
(e.g.,  ASAP,  ASO  and  AS-PCR),  some  synonymous 
(e.g.,  ISSR, RAMP,  RAM,  SPAR,  AMP-PCR,  MP-PCR, 
and ASSR; Reddy et al., 2002), and some identical (e.g., 
SSLP, STMS, STR and SSR), there are still a wide range 
of techniques for researchers to choose upon. One of the 
main challenges is, therefore, to associate the purpose(s) 
of  a  specific project  with  the various  molecular marker 
types. The various molecular  markers can be classified 
into different groups based on: 
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
With the SDK, you can preview the document content according to the preview thumbnail by the ways as following. C# DLLs for Word File Preview. Add references:
how to add text to pdf document; adding text to pdf in acrobat
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
C# DLLs: Preview PowerPoint Document. Add necessary XDoc.PowerPoint DLL libraries into your created C# application as references. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
add text pdf file; add text box to pdf
Semagn et al.    2543 
Figure 2. The different methods of grinding samples for DNA extraction: (a) large scale DNA extraction using juice-maker; 
(b) medium scale DNA extraction using mortal and pestle; (c) mini-scale DNA extraction using 1.5 ml tubes and small 
grinding pestle (even a nail or driller); (d) mini-scale DNA extraction using 96-well format microtiter plates or strip tubes 
(left) and grinding machine (right); (e) DNA after precipitation in 100% isopropanol. Note that the DNA is whitish and tiny 
thread like structure, which is an indication of good quality that can easily be fished using glass hooks); (f) agarose gel 
(1%) showing DNA concentration for 8 samples and a marker (M) with a known concentration. The  DNA for sample 
number 7 and 8 shows partial degradation compared to the other samples.  
a)  Mode of transmission (biparental nuclear inheritance, 
maternal  nuclear  inheritance,  maternal  organelle 
inheritance, or paternal organelle inheritance). 
b)  Mode  of  gene  action  (dominant  or  codominant 
markers). 
c)  Method  of  analysis  (hybridization-based  or  PCR-
based markers).  
The next section provides detail reviews for the latter. 
Hybridization-based molecular markers 
RFLP is the most widely used hybridization-based mole-
cular marker. RFLP markers were first used in 1975 to 
identify DNA sequence polymorphisms for genetic map-
ping of a temperature-sensitive mutation of adeno-virus 
serotypes (Grodzicker et al., 1975). It was then used for 
human genome mapping (Botstein et al., 1980), and later 
adopted  for  plant  genomes  (Helentjaris  et  al.,  1986; 
Weber and Helentjaris, 1989). The technique is based on 
restriction enzymes that reveal a pattern difference bet-
ween  DNA  fragment  sizes  in  individual  organisms. 
Although  two  individuals  of  the  same  species  have 
almost identical genomes, they will always differ at a few 
nucleotides due to one or more of the following causes: 
point mutation, insertion/deletion, translocation, inversion 
and duplication. Some of the differences in DNA sequen-
ces at the restriction sites can result in the gain, loss, or 
relocation of a restriction site. Hence, digestion of DNA 
with restriction enzymes results in fragments whose num-
ber  and  size  can  vary  among  individuals,  populations, 
and  species.  The  procedures  and  principles  of  RFLP 
markers are summarized in Figure 3: 
a)  Digestion  of  the  DNA  with  one  or  more  restriction 
enzyme(s).  
b)  Separation  of  the  restriction  fragments  in  agarose 
gel. 
c)  Transfer of separated fragments from agarose gel to 
a filter by Southern blotting. 
d)  Detection  of  individual  fragments  by  nucleic  acid 
hybridization with a labeled probe(s) 
e)  Autoradiography (Perez  de la  Vega, 1993;  Terachi, 
1993; Landry, 1994). 
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. Also a preview component enables compressing and
adding text to pdf; adding text pdf files
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
viewer component supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe Insert images into PDF form field. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo
add text to pdf without acrobat; how to enter text in pdf form
2544     Afr. J. Biotechnol. 
Figure  3.  Outline of the  different steps  of  restriction  fragment  length  polymorphism (RFLP) markers. Double-
stranded  DNA  fragments  generated  by  restriction  enzymes  are  separated  according  to  length  by  gel 
electrophoresis. A sheet of either nitrocellulose or nylon paper (membrane) is laid over the gel, and the separated 
DNA fragments are transferred to the sheet by blotting (Southern transfer). The gel is supported on a layer of 
sponge in a bath of alkali solution, and the buffer is sucked through the gel and the nitrocellulose paper by paper 
towels stacked on top of the nitrocellulose. As the buffer is sucked through, it denatures the DNA and transfers the 
single-stranded fragments from the gel to the surface of the nitrocellulose sheet, where they adhere firmly. This 
transfer  is  necessary  to  keep  the  DNA  firmly  in  place  while  the  hybridization  procedure  is  carried  out.  The 
nitrocellulose sheet containing the bound single-stranded DNA fragments is carefully peeled off the gel and placed 
in a sealed plastic bag that contained a radioactively labeled DNA probe for hybridization. The sheet is removed 
from the bag and washed thoroughly, so that only probe molecules that have hybridized to the DNA on the paper 
remain attached. After autoradiography, the DNA that has hybridized to the labeled probe will show up as bands 
on the autoradiograph. 
Restriction  enzymes  (endonucleases)  are  bacterial 
enzymes  (e.g.,  MseI,  EcoRI,  PstI,  etc.)  that  recognize 
specific  four,  six  or  eight  base  pair  (bp)  sequences  in 
DNA, and cleave double-stranded DNA whenever these 
sequences are encountered. For example, EcoRI has six 
bp  recognition sequence  and it cuts between G  and A 
whenever  the  sequences  5’…GAATTC…3’  or 
3’…CTTAAG…5’  exit  together.  The  choice  between 
using enzymes recognizing four, six or eight bp can be 
made  depending  on  the  resolution  required  and  the 
electrophoresis facility available. The greatest resolution 
is obtained by using 'four-cutters' (enzymes recognizing a 
four base pair sequence) because there are many such 
sites  in  the  genome.  The  fragments  produced  will  be 
relatively  small,  which  provides  a  better  chance  of 
identifying  single  base  alterations.  Conversely,  use  of 
enzymes  that  recognizes  an  eight  bp  sequence  will 
require  fewer  probes,  because  larger  fragments  of  the 
genome are analyzed at one time. As a result of this, only 
large  alterations  of  the  DNA  will  be  visualized  and 
complex electrophoresis system must be used to resolve 
the fragments into discrete bands. As a compromise, 'six-
cutter' enzymes are most often used for RFLP analysis 
because  they  are  readily  available,  cheaper  and  they 
usually  produce  fragments  in  the  size range of 200  to 
20,000  bp,  which  can  be  separated  conveniently  on 
agarose  gels  (Table  1).  After  digestion  by  restriction 
enzymes,  the  DNA  is  present  as  a  mixture  of  linear 
double-stranded molecules of various lengths. These are 
then  separated  by  electrophoresis  through  agarose  or 
polyacrylamide  gels.  The  choice  between  agarose  and 
polyacrylamide  is  based  on  the  restriction  enzymes 
chosen. Four-cutters produce fragments too small to be 
resolved by agarose gels; hence, polyacrylamide gels are 
required.  Conversely,  polyacrylamide  gels  can  not 
normally be used to resolve the fragments produced by 
six-cutters  so  agarose  gels  must  be  used.  These 
considerations  have  led to most  workers use six-cutter 
enzymes,  as  agarose  gels  are  much  easier  to  handle 
(Potter and Jones, 1991). 
DNA  fragments  separated by  gel  electrophoresis  are 
then denatured to single strands and transferred onto a 
solid support  ('membranes' or  'filter')  using a technique 
referred to as 'Southern blotting' or 'Southern hybridiza-
tion' (Southern, 1975). The basis of this is the transfer of 
the DNA from the gel to a solid support, thus preserving 
the position of the fragments as they were in the gel, yet 
enabling hybridization reactions to be performed.  Filter-
immobilized DNA is then allowed to hybridize to labeled 
probe  DNA.  The  probes  used  for  hybridization  are 
preferably  single  locus  and  mostly  species-specific 
probes  of  about  500  to  3000  bp  in  size  (Staub  and 
Serquen,  1996).  Probes  used  to  identify  specific  DNA 
fragments  by  hybridization  are  of  two  types:  genomic 
clones  (fragments  of  nuclear  DNA)  and  cDNA  clones 
(DNA  copies of mRNA molecules). Genomic libraries are 
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
adding text to pdf online; add text to pdf
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
following. C# DLLs: Preview Excel Document without Microsoft Office Installed. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
add text block to pdf; add text boxes to pdf document
Semagn et al.    2545 
Table 1. Recommended gel percentages for separation of linear DNA. 
Agarose gel 
Polyacrylamide gel 
Gel concentration (%) 
Range of separation (bp) 
Gel concentration (%) 
Range of separation (bp) 
0.5 
1,000-30,000 
3.5 
100-1,000 
0.7 
800-12,000 
5.0 
80-500 
1.0 
500-10,000 
8.0 
60-400 
1.2 
400-7,000 
12.0 
40-200 
1.4 
200-4000 
20.0 
5-100 
2.0 
50-2,000 
easy to construct and will contain many repetitive probes 
because repetitive sequences constitute the largest pro-
portion of plant genomic DNA. Such probes will hybridize 
into many fragments on the filters and produce very com-
plex patterns. cDNA libraries are difficult to construct but 
they contain predominantly unique or low  copy number 
sequences  representing  expressed  genes  and  usually 
provide fewer bands on the filter (for details, see ESTs 
below).  Although  use  of  cDNA  probes  will  help  the 
identification  of  small  changes,  the  proportion  of  the 
genome covered by each  probe will be relatively small 
and many more probes must be used (Potter and Jones, 
1991). Therefore, the selection of appropriate source for 
RFLP  probe  varies  with  the  requirement  of  particular 
application  under  consideration.  The  denatured  probe 
solution is left in contact with the filter to allow hybridiza-
tion of the probe to target sequences. Hybridization is the 
process by which the labeled probe binds to complement-
tary DNA on the filter, enabling  visualization of specific 
DNA fragments. Labeling has been traditionally achieved 
by means of radioactive nucleotides, but non-radioactive 
methods are now available (Holtke et al., 1995; Mansfield 
et  al.,  1995).  Non-specific  hybridization  must  then  be 
washed off under more 'stringent' conditions than those 
used  for  initial  hybridization.  If  radioactive  probes  are 
used, the filter is placed against photographic film, where 
radioactive disintegrations from the probe result in visible 
bands. An autoradiography of membrane will reveal the 
set of fragments complementary to the probe. With non-
radio-active  probes,  such  as  digoxigenin,  antibodies 
against the modified nucleotides and a coupled enzyma-
tic  reaction  are  used  to  show  up  the  set  of  fragments 
directly on the membrane (Holtke et al., 1995).  
The  information  obtained  with  the  RFLP  technique 
depends upon both the number of probes and restriction 
enzymes  used.  Each  different  probe  hybridizes  with  a 
different set of genomic DNA fragments and each enzy-
me excises a segment of genomic DNA at different points 
(Perez de la Vega, 1993). The major strength of RFLP 
markers are high reproducibility, codominant inheritance, 
good transferability between laboratories, provide locus-
specific markers that allow synteny (conserved order of 
genes between related organisms) studies,  no sequence 
information required, and relatively easy to score due to 
large  size  difference  between  fragments.  There  are, 
however, several limitations for RFLP analysis:   
I.  It requires the presence of high quantity and quality 
of  DNA  (e.g.,  Potter  and  Jones,  1991;  Roy  et  al., 
1992; Young et al., 1992). 
II.  It  depends  on  the  development  of  specific  probe 
libraries for the species.  
III.  The technique is not amenable for automation. 
IV.  The level of  polymorphism is  low,  and few loci  are 
detected per assay. 
V.  It is time consuming, laborious, and expensive (Yu et 
al., 1993). 
VI.  It usually requires radioactively labeled probes. 
PCR-based markers 
PCR is a molecular biology technique for enzymatically 
replicating  (amplifying)  small  quantities  of  DNA  without 
using  a  living  organism.  It  is  used  to  amplify  a  short 
(usually up to 10 kb), well-defined part of a DNA strand 
from  a  single  gene  or  just  a  part of a gene.  Since  its 
invention by Kary Mullis in 1983, this technique enabled 
the development of various types of PCR-based techni-
ques  (and  a  Nobel  Prize  for  Kary  Mullins  in  1993). 
However,  the  basic  PCR  procedure  was  described  in 
1968 by Kleppe and his co-workers in Khorana’s group, 
and  it  has  been  discussed  if  the  main  contribution  of 
Mullis was the thermostable DNA polymerase and if he 
actually knew this paper. This point has been important in 
challenging the PCR patent. The basic protocol for PCR 
is simple (Figure 4): 
I.  Double-stranded  DNA  is  denatured  at  high 
temperature  (92-95 
o
C)  to  form  single  strands 
(templates).  
II.  Short single strands of DNA (known as primers) bind 
at  a  lower  annealing  temperature  to  the  single 
stranded complementary templates at ends flanking 
the target sequences. 
III.  The  temperature is raised usually to  72 
o
C (some-
times  68
o
C)  for  the  DNA  polymerase  enzyme  to 
catalyze  the  template-directed  syntheses  of  new 
double-stranded DNA molecules that are identical in 
sequence to the starting material. 
2546     Afr. J. Biotechnol. 
Figure 4. Schematic drawing of the different steps of polymerase chain reaction (PCR): (a) denaturing step at 92-95°C; (b) primer 
annealing step (37-68°C depending of the technique); (c) extension step at 72°C (P=Taq DNA polymerase), and (d) end of the first 
cycle with two copies of DNA strands. The two resulting DNA strands make up the template DNA for the next cycle, thus doubling 
the amount of DNA duplicated for each new cycle (Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polymerase_chain_reaction). 
IV.  The newly synthesized double-stranded DNA target 
sequences are denatured  at high temperature, and 
the cycle is repeated. 
The  amplification  of  target  DNA  can  be  exponential  in 
that every cycle has the potential to double the amount of 
target  DNA  from  the  previous  cycle,  provided  there  is 
sufficient  amount  of  DNA  polymerase,  primers,  and 
deoxynucleotide  triphosphates  (dNTPs)  in  the  reaction 
solution. Although the basic protocol of PCR is straight-
forward, each application requires optimizing the various 
parameters for the species to be studied. 
Back in the early days of PCR work, the DNA polymer-
ase would need to be added fresh to the reaction at each 
temperature cycle because thermostable (high tempera-
ture  tolerant)  DNA  polymerases  were not  commercially 
available. Of course, there were also no thermocyclers so 
moving the tubes from one temperature bath to another 
for several hours was a job that fells to graduate students 
and/or technicians. The discovery of Taq DNA polymer-
rase, the DNA polymerase that is used by the bacterium 
Thermus auquaticus in hot springs, was decisive for the 
immense utility and popularity of PCR-based techniques. 
The original function of this enzyme was to facilitate the 
in  vivo  replication  of  DNA  in  the  thermophilic  bacteria, 
and  thus  it  ables  to  operate  at  the  high  temperature 
required for the in vitro replication. This DNA polymerase 
is  stable  at  high  temperature  needed  to  perform  the 
amplification, whereas  other DNA  polymerases  become 
denatured. Nowadays, the PCR technology is much more 
advanced  with  a  wide  range  of  thermostable  DNA 
polymerases (such as Taq, Pfu or Vent polymerase) and 
automation of reactions can be done by a PCR machine 
(thermocycler)  that has found  its  way  into  nearly every 
molecular biology lab in the world.  
The major advantages of PCR techniques compared to 
hybridization-based methods include: 
1
st
cycle 
2
nd
cycle 
3
rd
cycle 
1.  A small amount of DNA is required.  
2.  Elimination of radioisotopes in most techniques.  
3.  The ability to amplify DNA sequences from preserved 
tissues. 
4.  Accessibility of methodology for small labs in terms of 
equipment, facilities, and cost.  
5.  No prior sequence knowledge is required  for  many 
applications,  such  as  AP-PCR,  RAPD,  DAF,  AFLP 
and ISSR. 
6.  High  polymorphism  that  enables  to  generate  many 
genetic markers within a short time, and  
7.  The  ability  to  screen  many  genes  simultaneously 
either for direct collection of data or as a  feasibility 
study  prior  to  nucleotide  sequencing  efforts  (Wolfe 
and Liston, 1998).  
These advantages, however, can vary depending on the 
specific technique chosen by the researcher. The various 
PCR-based  techniques are of two  types depending  on 
the primers used for amplification: 
1)  Arbitrary  or  semi-arbitrary  primed  PCR  techniques 
that  developed  without  prior  sequence  information 
(e.g., AP-PCR, DAF, RAPD, AFLP, ISSR). 
2)  Site-targeted  PCR  techniques  that  developed  from 
known  DNA  sequences  (e.g.,  EST,  CAPS,  SSR, 
SCAR, STS).  
Arbitrarily Amplified DNA Markers 
RAPD  (random  amplified  polymorphic  DNA),  AP-PCR 
(arbitrarily  primed  PCR)  and  DAF  (DNA  amplification 
fingerprinting)  have  been  collectively  termed  multiple 
arbitrary  amplicon  profiling  (MAAP;  Caetano-Annolles, 
1994). These three techniques were the first to amplify 
DNA fragments from any species without prior sequences 
information.  The  difference  among  MAAP  techniques 
include modifications in amplification profiles by changing 
primer  sequence  and  length,  annealing  temperature 
(Caetano-Anolles et al., 1992), the number of PCR cycles 
used in a reaction (Caetano-Anolles et al., 1991; Welsh 
and McClelland, 1991; Micheli et  al., 1993;  Jain  et  al., 
1994), the thermostable DNA polymerase used (Bassam 
et  al.,  1992),  enzymatic  digestion  of  template  DNA  or 
amplification products (Caetano-Anolles et al., 1993), and 
alternative methods of fragment separation and staining. 
These  three  techniques  produce  markedly  different 
amplification profiles,  varying from quite  simple (RAPD) 
to highly complex (DAF) patterns. The key innovation of 
RAPD, AP-PCR and DAF is the use of a single arbitrary 
oligonucleotide  primer to  amplify  template DNA  without 
prior knowledge of the target sequence. The amplification 
of nucleic acids with arbitrary primers is mainly driven by 
the interaction between primer, template annealing sites 
and  enzymes,  and  determined  by  complex  kinetic  and 
thermodynamic  processes  (Caetano-Anolles,  1997).  A 
discrete PCR  product is produced when, at an appropria- 
Semagn et al.    2547 
te annealing temperature, the single primer binds to sites 
on opposite strands of the genomic DNA that are within 
an  amplifiable  distance  (Figure  5),  generally  less  than 
3,000  base  pairs.  In  all  AP-PCR,  DAF  and  RAPD, 
polymorphisms (band presence or absence)  result from 
changes in DNA sequence that inhibit primer binding or 
interfere with amplification of a particular marker in some 
individuals;  therefore,  they  can  be  simply  detected  as 
DNA fragments that are amplified from one individual but 
not from another.  
The  RAPD  protocol  usually  uses  a  10  bp  arbitrary 
primer at constant low annealing temperature (generally 
34 – 37 
o
C). RAPD primers can be purchased as sets or 
individually from different sources, such as the University 
of British  Colombia (http://www.michaelsmith.ubc.ca/ser-
vices/NAPS/Primer_Sets)  and  the  Operon  Biotechnolo-
gies (http://www.operon.com). Although the sequences of 
RAPD  primers are  arbitrarily chosen,  two basic  criteria 
indicated  by  Williams  et  al.  (1990)  must  be  met:  a 
minimum  of 40% GC  content (50 - 80% GC content is 
generally used) and the absence of palindromic sequen-
ce (a base sequence that reads exactly the same from 
right  to  left  as  from  left  to  right).  Because  G-C  bond 
consists of three hydrogen bridges and the A-T bond of 
only two, a primer-DNA hybrid with less than 50% GC will 
probably not withstand the  72 
o
C temperature at which 
DNA  elongation  takes  place  by  DNA  polymerase.  The 
resulting  PCR  products  are  generally  resolved  on  1.5-
2.0%  agarose  gels  and  stained  with  ethidium  bromide 
(EtBr);  polyacrylamide  gels  in  combination  with  either 
AgNO
3
staining  (e.g.,  Huff  et  al.,  1993;  Vejl,  1997; 
Hollingsworth et al., 1998), radioactivity (e.g., Pammi et 
al., 1994), or fluorescently labeled primers or nucleotides 
(e.g., CorleySmith et al., 1997; Weller and Reddy, 1997) 
are sometimes used. Despite its low resolving power, the 
simplicity and low cost of agarose gel electrophoresis has 
made RAPD more popular and rapid than AP-PCR and 
DAF. 
Most RAPD fragments result from the amplification of 
one  locus,  and  two  kinds  of  polymorphism  occur:  the 
band  may  be  present  or  absent,  and  the  brightness 
(intensity) of the band may be different (Figure 6). Band 
intensity  differences  may  result  from  copy  number  or 
relative  sequence  abundance  (Devos  and  Gale,  1992) 
and may serve to distinguish homozygote dominant indi-
viduals  from  heterozygotes,  as  more  bright  bands  are 
expected for the former. However, some authors (Thor-
mann  et al.,  1994)  found  no  correlation between  copy 
number  and band intensity. The  fact  that fainter  bands 
are generally less robust in RAPD experiments (Ellsworth 
et al., 1993; Heun and Helentjaris, 1993) suggests that 
varying  degrees  of  primer  mismatch  may  account  for 
many  band  intensity  differences.  Since  the  source  of 
band intensity differences is uncertain (copy number or 
primer mismatch), most studies disregard scoring differ-
ences in band intensity although some authors have used 
up  to  7-state  scale  of  band  intensity  (Demeke  et  al.,
2548     Afr. J. Biotechnol. 
Figure 5. Schematic drawing for reaction conditions for random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). The primers must anneal in 
a particular orientation (such that they point towards each other) and within a reasonable distance of one another. The arrows 
represent multiple copies of a single primer and the direction of the arrow indicates the direction in which DNA synthesis will 
occur. The numbers represent primer annealing sites on the DNA template. For sample 1, primers anneal to sites 1, 2, and 3 on 
the top strand of the DNA template and to sites 4, 5, and 6 on the bottom strand of the DNA template. In this example, only 2 
RAPD products are formed for sample 1: (i) product A is produced by PCR amplification of the DNA sequence which lies in 
between the primers bound at positions 2 and 5; (ii) product B is the produced by PCR amplification of the DNA sequence which 
lies in between the primers bound at positions 3 and 6. No PCR product is produced by the primers bound at positions 1 and 4 
because these primers are too far apart to allow completion of the PCR reaction. No PCR products are also produced by the 
primers bound at positions 4 and 2 or positions 5 and 3 because these primer pairs are not oriented towards each other. For 
sample 2, the primer failed to anneal at position 2 and PCR product was obtained only for primers bound at position 3 and 6. 
Figure 6. RAPD amplification products separated on 1.5% agarose gels with ethidium bromide staining (a-c) and 
10% polyacrylamide gel with silver nitrate staining (d): (a) poor amplification, (b) good amplification, (c) the problem 
of homology of comigrating RAPD bands of 6 samples in agarose gel, and (d) each of the bands numbered from 1 
to 4 in the agarose gel appeared to be two comigrating bands in the polyacrylamide gels.  
1992; Adams and Demeke, 1993). 
RAPD has three limitations:  
1)  Reproducibility 
2)  Dominant inheritance 
3)  Homology 
Several  factors  have  been  reported  to  influence  the 
reproducibility of RAPD reactions: quality and quantity of 
template DNA, PCR buffer, concentration of magnesium 
chloride, primer to template ratio, annealing temperature, 
Taq DNA polymerase brand or source, and thermal cyc-
ler brand (Wolff et al., 1993). The concern about repro-
ducibility of RAPD markers, however, could be overcome 
through choice of an appropriate DNA  extraction  proto-
col to remove any contaminants (Micheli et al., 1994), by 
optimizing  the parameters  used (Ellsworth et  al., 1993; 
Skroch and Nienhuis, 1995), by testing several oligonuc-
leotide  primers  and  scoring only  the  reproducible  DNA 
fragments  (Kresovich  et  al.,  1992;  Yang  and  Quiros, 
1993), and by using appropriate DNA polymerase brand. 
The  presence  of  artifactual  bands  (false  positives) 
corresponding  to  rearranged  fragments  produced  by 
nested  primer  binding  sites  (Schierwater  et  al.,  1996; 
Rabouam  et  ,al.  1999)  and  intrastrand  annealing  and 
interactions during PCR (Hunt and Page, 1992; Caetano-
Anolles et al., 1992) have also been reported to influence 
the reliability of RAPD data. The presence of both false 
negatives and false positives may, if frequent, seriously 
restrict  the  reliability  of  RAPDs  for  various  purposes, 
including genetic diversity and mapping studies. All pair 
wise  comparison  of  RAPD  fragments  along  samples 
begins with the assumption that co-migrating bands (i.e., 
bands  that  migrate  equal  distance)  represent  homolo-
gous loci. However, as in any study based on electropho-
retic resolution, the assumption that equal length equals 
homology  may  not  be  necessarily  true,  especially  in 
polyploid  species.  For  example,  some  RAPD  bands 
scored as identical (equal length) have been found not to 
be homologous (e.g., Thormann et al., 1994; Pillay and 
Kenny,  1995;  Figure  6);  more  accurate  resolution  of 
fragment  size  using  polyacrylamide  gels  and  AgNO
3
staining have been reported to reduce such errors (e.g., 
Huff et al., 1993). The other limitation of RAPD markers is 
that  the  majority  of  the  alleles  segregate  as  dominant 
markers, and hence the technique does not allow identi-
fying  dominant  homozygotes  from  heterozygotes.  The 
RAPD  assays  produce  fragments  from  homozygous 
dominant or heterozygous alleles. No fragment is produ-
ced from homozygous recessive alleles because ampli-
fication is disrupted in both alleles.  
The  original  DAF  protocol  is  mainly  different  from 
RAPD in that it uses short primers (at least 5 bp), higher 
primer concentrations, two-temperature cycles in stead of 
three-temperature  cycles,  and detection  of amplification 
product on AgNO
3
stained polyacrylamide gel. The main 
characteristics  of  AP-PCR  technique  in  comparison  to 
RAPD and DAF are: 
a)  The amplification reaction is divided into three steps, 
each with different stringencies and concentrations of 
constituents. 
Semagn et al.    2549 
b)  High  primer  concentrations  are  used  in  the  first 
cycles. 
c)  Primers of 20 or more nucleotides, originally design-
ned for other purposes (e.g., sequencing primers) are 
chosen arbitrarily. 
d)  Detection of amplification products involve radioacti-
vity and autoradiography (Weising et al., 1995). 
AFLP (amplified fragment length polymorphism) 
AFLP  technique  combines the power  of RFLP  with the 
flexibility  of  PCR-based  technology  by  ligating  primer-
recognition  sequences (adaptors) to the  restricted  DNA 
(Lynch and Walsh, 1998). The key feature of AFLP is its 
capacity  for  “genome representation”: the simultaneous 
screening of representative DNA regions distributed ran-
domly  throughout  the  genome.  AFLP  markers  can  be 
generated for DNA of any organism without initial invest-
ment in primer/probe development and sequence analy-
sis. Both good quality and partially degraded DNA can be 
used for digestion but the DNA should be free of restrict-
tion  enzyme  and  PCR  inhibitors.  Details  of  the  AFLP 
methodology  have  been  reviewed  by  various  authors 
(e.g.,  Blears  et  al.,  1998;  Mueller  and  Wolfenbarger, 
1999; Ridout and Donini, 1999). The first step in AFLP 
analysis  involves  restriction  digestion  of  genomic  DNA 
(about 500 ng) with a combination of rare cutter (EcoRI or 
PstI)  and  frequent  cutter  (MseI  or  TaqI)  restriction 
enzymes  (Figure  7).  Double-stranded  oligonucleotide 
adaptors are then designed in such a way that the initial 
restriction site is not restored after ligation. Such adaptors 
are  ligated  to  both  ends  of  the  fragments  to  provide 
known sequences for PCR amplification.  
As described by Vos et al. (1995),  PCR amplification 
will only occur where the primers are able to anneal to 
fragments  which  have  the  adaptor  sequence  plus  the 
complementary base  pairs to the additional nucleotides 
called selective nucleotides. An aliquot is then subjected 
to  two  subsequent  PCR  amplifications  under  highly 
stringent  conditions  with primers  complementary  to the 
adaptors, and possessing 3` selective nucleotides of 1 - 3 
bases  (Figure  7).  The  first  PCR  (preamplification)  is 
performed with primer combinations containing a single-
bp  extension  while  final  (selective)  amplification  is 
performed using primer pairs with up to 3-bp extension. 
Because of the high selectivity, primers differing by only a 
single  base  in  the  AFLP  extension  amplify  a  different 
subset of fragments. A primer extension of one, two or 
three bases reduces the number of amplified fragments 
by  factors  of  4,  16  and  64,  respectively.  Ideal  primer 
extension lengths will vary with genome size of the spe-
cies and will result in an optimal number of bands: not too 
many  bands  to  cause  smears  or  high  levels  of  band 
comigration during electrophoresis, but sufficient to provi-
de adequate polymorphism (Vos et al., 1995). 
AFLP fragments are visualized either on agarose gel or 
on  denaturing polyacrylamide gels with autoradiography,  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested