open pdf file in asp.net using c# : Adding text fields to a pdf Library application API .net html winforms sharepoint 20068650-part590

U.S. Department of Education 
Institute of Education Sciences 
EFSC 2006-865 
Documentation for 
the NCES 
Comparable 
Wage Index Data 
Files
Adding text fields to a pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text pdf professional; add text to pdf reader
Adding text fields to a pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text box in pdf document; how to add text to a pdf file in acrobat
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
Add Password to PDF; VB.NET Form: extract value from fields; VB.NET PDF - Add Text Box to PDF Page in VB Provide VB.NET Users with Solution of Adding Text Box to
how to add text to a pdf in acrobat; how to insert text box in pdf
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
Provide .NET SDK library for adding text box to PDF document in .NET WinForms application. Adding text box is another way to add text to PDF page.
adding text to pdf in reader; how to add text box in pdf file
U.S. Department of Education 
Institute of Education Sciences 
EFSC 2006-865 
Documentation for 
the NCES 
Comparable Wage 
Index Data Files
May 2006 
Lori L. Taylor 
Bush School of Government and 
Public Service 
Texas A&M University 
Mark C. Glander 
K-Force Government Solutions 
William J. Fowler, Jr. 
Project Officer 
National Center for  
Education Statistics
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Support adding PDF page number. Offer PDF page break inserting function. DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class. Add necessary references:
adding text to a pdf file; add text field to pdf
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Password to PDF; VB.NET Form: extract value from fields; VB.NET PDF - Annotate Text on PDF Page in Professional VB.NET Solution for Adding Text Annotation to PDF
adding text field to pdf; how to add text to a pdf file in reader
U.S. Department of Education 
Margaret Spellings 
Secretary 
Institute of Education Sciences 
Grover J. Whitehurst 
Director 
National Center for Education Statistics 
Mark Schneider 
Commissioner 
The  National Center  for  Education  Statistics  (NCES) is  the  primary  federal  entity for  collecting, analyzing, and 
reporting data related to education in the United States and other nations. It fulfills a congressional mandate to 
collect, collate, analyze, and report full and complete statistics on the condition of education in the United States; 
conduct and publish reports and specialized analyses of the meaning and significance of such statistics; assist state 
and local education agencies in improving their statistical systems; and review and report on education activities in 
foreign countries. 
NCES activities are designed to address high-priority education data needs; provide consistent, reliable, complete, 
and accurate indicators of education status and trends; and report timely, useful, and high-quality data to the U.S. 
Department of Education, the Congress, the states, other education policymakers, practitioners, data users, and the 
general public. Unless specifically noted, all information contained herein is in the public domain. 
We strive to make our products available in a variety of formats and in language that is appropriate to a variety of 
audiences. You, as our customer, are the best judge of our success in communicating information effectively. If you 
have any comments or suggestions about this or any other NCES product or report, we would like to hear from you. 
Please direct your comments to 
National Center for Education Statistics 
Institute of Education Sciences 
U.S. Department of Education 
1990 K Street NW 
Washington, DC 20006-5651 
May 2006 
The NCES World Wide Web Home Page address is http://nces.ed.gov
The NCES education finance World Wide Web Home Page address is http://nces.ed.gov/edfin
The NCES World Wide Web Electronic Catalog address is http://nces.ed.gov/pubsearch
Suggested Citation 
Taylor, L. L., and Glander, M. (2006). Documentation for the NCES Comparable Wage Index Data File (EFSC 2006-
865). U.S. Department of Education. Washington, DC: National Center for Education Statistics. 
For ordering information on this report, write to 
U.S. Department of Education 
ED Pubs 
PO Box 1398 
Jessup, MD 20794-1398 
Call toll free 1-877-4ED-Pubs or order online at http://www.edpubs.org
.  
Content Contact 
William J. Fowler, Jr. 
202-502-7338 
willaim.fowler@ed.gov
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Support adding protection features to PDF file by adding password, digital signatures and redaction feature. Various of PDF text and images processing features
add text field to pdf acrobat; add text pdf acrobat professional
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
Provide users with examples for adding text box to PDF and edit font size and color in text box field in C#.NET program. C#.NET: Draw Markups on PDF File.
add text to pdf acrobat; adding text fields to pdf acrobat
iii 
Contents 
I.  Introduction to the NCES Comparable Wage Index Data Files ............................................. 1 
II.  Background  ............................................................................................................................ 3 
III.  User’s Guide ........................................................................................................................... 5 
A.  CWI Geography ................................................................................................................. 5 
B.  Using the Index .................................................................................................................. 5 
C.  Standard Errors  .................................................................................................................. 8 
D.  School District CWI File  ................................................................................................... 8 
E.  Labor Market CWI File  ................................................................................................... 11 
F.  State CWI File .................................................................................................................. 12 
G.  Regional CWI File ........................................................................................................... 12 
H.  Related Data Files ............................................................................................................ 13 
I.  File Formats and File Names ........................................................................................... 14 
IV.  References  ............................................................................................................................ 17 
Appendixes 
Appendix A— Record Layout and Descriptions of Data Elements:  
NCES District CWI Data File ............................................................................ A-1 
Appendix B— Record Layout and Descriptions of Data Elements:  
NCES Labor Market CWI Data File ...................................................................B-1 
Appendix C— Record Layout and Descriptions of Data Elements:  
NCES State CWI Data File .................................................................................C-1 
Appendix D— Record Layout and Descriptions of Data Elements: 
NCES Regional CWI Data File  ......................................................................... D-1 
Appendix E— Glossary  ..............................................................................................................E-1 
Appendix F— Frequencies and Ranges.......................................................................................F-1 
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
application? To help you solve this technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc.PDF for .NET. Similar
adding text to a pdf; adding text to pdf in preview
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create fillable PDF document with fields. toolkit, if you need to add some text and draw Besides, using this PDF document metadata adding control, you can add
add text pdf file; how to add text to a pdf file in preview
U.S. Department of Education 
INSTITUTE OF EDUCATION SCIENCES 
NATIONAL CENTER FOR EDUCATION STATISTICS 
1990 K Street NW, Washington, DC 20006 
I.  Introduction to the NCES Comparable Wage Index Data Files 
The Comparable Wage Index (CWI) is a measure of the systematic, regional variations in the 
salaries of college graduates who are not educators. It can be used by researchers to adjust 
district-level finance data at different levels in order to make better comparisons across 
geographic areas. 
The CWI was developed by Dr. Lori L. Taylor at the Bush School of Government and Public 
Service, Texas A&M University and William J. Fowler, Jr. at NCES. Dr. Taylor’s research was 
supported by a contract with the National Center for Education Statistics. The complete 
description of the research is provided in the NCES Research and Development “A Comparable 
Wage Approach to Geographic Cost Adjustment” (NCES 2006-321). 
This documentation describes four geographic levels of the CWI, which are presented in four 
separate files. These files are the school district, labor market, state, and a combined regional and 
national file. 
The school district file provides a CWI for each local education agency (LEA) in the NCES 
Common Core of Data (CCD) database. For each LEA there is a series of indexes for the years 
1997–2004. The file can be merged with school district finance data, and this merged file can be 
used to produce finance data adjusted for geographic cost differences. This file also includes four 
agency typology variables. 
The additional files allow for similar cost adjustments for larger geographic areas.  
NCES has sponsored the development of other geographic adjustment indexes in the past; the 
latest was for the 1993–94 school year. For more information on these, and on geographic cost 
adjustments generally, please see this web site—http://nces.ed.gov/edfin/prodsurv/data.asp
The remainder of this documentation includes background information, a user’s guide and the 
following appendixes.  
Appendix A—Record layout and descriptions of data elements in the district level file  
Appendix B—Record layout and descriptions of data elements in the labor market file  
Appendix C—Record layout and descriptions of data elements in the state level file  
Appendix D—Record layout and descriptions of data elements in the regional file  
Appendix E—Glossary of terms particular to this data file. 
Appendix F—Frequency counts and descriptive statistics by various categorical variables for the 
district-level data file. 
II.  Background 
Geographic cost data for states, metropolitan areas, and school districts are frequently and widely 
requested by the public and school finance research community. In response, the National Center 
for Education Statistics (NCES) has had a long tradition of publishing work that reflects the 
latest research and development of education geographic cost adjustments.
1
This report 
documents the newly developed Comparable Wage Index (CWI). 
The basic premise of a comparable wage index is that all types of workers—including teachers—
demand higher wages in areas with a higher cost of living (e.g., San Diego) or a lack of 
amenities (e.g., Detroit, which has a particularly high crime rate) (Federal Bureau of 
Investigation 2003). Therefore, one should be able to measure most of the uncontrollable 
variation in educator pay by observing variations in the earnings of comparable workers who are 
not educators.
2
The CWI reflects systematic, regional variations in the salaries of college 
graduates who are not educators. Provided that these noneducators are similar to educators in 
terms of age, educational background, and tastes for local amenities, the CWI can be used to 
measure the uncontrollable component of variations in the wages paid to educators. Intuitively, if 
accountants in the Atlanta metro area are paid 5 percent more than the national average 
accounting wage, Atlanta engineers are paid 5 percent more than the national average 
engineering wage, Atlanta nurses are paid 5 percent more than the national average nursing 
wage, and so on, then the CWI predicts that Atlanta teachers should also be paid 5 percent more 
than the national average teacher wage. 
The CWI was developed by combining baseline estimates from the 2000 U.S. census with annual 
data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). The Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) 
survey is a BLS database that contains average annual earnings by occupation for states and 
metropolitan areas from about 400,000 nonfarm businesses, and is available from 1997 to 2004. 
Combining the Census with the OES makes it possible to have yearly CWI estimates for states 
and local labor markets for each year after 1997. OES data are available each May and permit the 
construction of an up-to-date, annual CWI. For a complete description of the methodology, see 
“A Comparable Wage Approach to Geographic Cost Adjustment” (NCES 2006-321). 
The CWI offers many advantages over the previous NCES geographic cost adjustment 
methodologies.
3
In addition to its obvious timeliness, the clearest advantage of the CWI is that it 
measures costs that are beyond the control of school district administrators. Unlike analyses 
based on school district expenditures, there is no risk that a cost-of-living index confuses high-
spending school districts with high-cost school districts, and no need to rely on
statistical 
technique and researcher judgment to separate controllable from uncontrollable costs. The CWI 
is also appropriate regardless of the competitiveness of teacher labor markets. If a lack of 
competition in the teacher market distorts teacher compensation patterns, then cost indexes based 
on teacher compensation will be biased, but a CWI will not (Hanushek 1999; Goldhaber 1999). 
Another advantage of the comparable wage approach is its general applicability. Because the 
1
For example, see Brazer and Anderson 1983; Chambers 1997; Fowler and Monk 2001; Goldhaber 1999; Taylor 
and Keller 2003. 
2
See for example, Rothstein and Smith (1997), Guthrie and Rothstein (1999), Goldhaber (1999), Alexander et al. 
(2000), Taylor et al. (2002), and Stoddard (2005). 
3
For a more detailed discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of the CWI, see Taylor and Fowler (2006). 
resulting cost index is based on systematic differences in the general wage level, it can be used to 
measure labor costs not only for public elementary and secondary education, but also for private 
schools, job training programs, and postsecondary institutions.  
There are also a number of disadvantages to using the CWI to measure variations in school 
district costs. First, the CWI is a labor cost index, and labor cost is only part of the total cost of 
education—albeit a very large part.
4
Therefore, while it is clearly appropriate to use the CWI to 
adjust for cost variations with respect to teacher salaries or current operating expenditures, it 
could be problematic to apply a labor cost index such as the CWI to school district expenditures 
that are largely unaffected by labor cost differentials, such as energy costs (Smith et al. 2003)  or 
capital outlays.  
Second, the methodology underlying the CWI presumes that workers are mobile. If moving costs 
or other barriers to moving slow worker migration, then labor costs may temporarily diverge 
from what is expected given local amenities and the cost of living. Employers in fast-growing 
industries and school districts in fast-growing areas may need to pay a temporary premium to 
attract workers. The CWI cannot capture this effect.  
Finally, the CWI may not capture all of the uncontrollable variations in labor cost. By design, the 
CWI measures cost in a broad labor market like a metropolitan area. It does not capture 
variations in cost across school districts within a labor market. In particular, it does not reflect 
any variations in cost attributable to working conditions in specific school districts. All school 
districts in a given labor market are assigned the same CWI.  
Despite its limitations, the CWI should be a particularly useful tool for researchers and 
policymakers. The CWI offers a timely method for geographic cost adjustment that is undeniably 
outside of school district control. Furthermore, it demonstrates that the gains from cost 
adjustment could be substantial. In 2004, the CWI for Washington, DC was 63 percent higher 
than the CWI for Montana, while the CWI for New York City was 49 percent higher than the 
CWI for Elmira, New York. Given such large differences in the prevailing wage for college 
graduates, cost adjustment is crucial to a complete understanding of important school finance 
issues both across states and within states. 
4
Payroll costs comprise more than 80 percent of current school district expenditures (U.S. Census Bureau 2004). 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested