open pdf file in asp.net using c# : How to insert text in pdf reader application SDK utility azure winforms .net visual studio 2007-120-part593

December 2007
ACGNJ News
Page 1
Volume 32, Number 10
December 2007
Amateur Computer
Group of New Jersey
NEWS
In This Issue
Further Adventures in Time Travel, Robert Hawes . . . . 3
DealsGuy, Bob Click . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Dufferfom: Squaring the Circle, David DUffer . . . . . 10
Fake Check Scams, Ira Wilsker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Google Street Views, Linda Gonse. . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
DustKleen, Neil Longmuir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
ARouter Can Protect Your Computer, Sandy Berger. . 15
How to Answer the Question, Mike Kerwin. . . . . . . . 16
Do You Really Need to Upgrade?, Elizabeth B Wright. . 17
Zune, a Player for the Rest of Us, Ash Nallawalla . . . . 19
Guru Corner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
http://www.acgnj.org
Founded 1975
It’s Election Time Again
In addition to the slate of officers and directors to
be elected, there is also a proposal for a change
in the Constitution and By-Laws to be voted on
by the members.
This change, proposed by Bruce Arnold, will al-
low the SIG Leaders to vote at BOD meetings.
The exact wording of the amendment will be
presented at the Main Meeting, December 7.
As usual, elections will be held at the Main
Meeting on December 7. Nominations will be
accepted from the floor until the actual voting
begins, and yes, you can nominate yourself..
The Election Slate
President · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Mike Redlich
Vice President · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Mark Douches
Treasurer· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Malthi Masurekar
Secretary· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · Paul Syers
Directors
<Open> · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 1 year term
Gregg McCarthy · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 year term
Arnold Milstein· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 year term
John Raff· · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 year term
<Open> · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · 2 year term
Obviously we need volunteers to fill the open
seats on the Board — we urge you to consider
volunteering some of your time — it’s only
one evening a month!
Happy Holidays
How to insert text in pdf reader - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to add a text box to a pdf; how to insert text box in pdf
How to insert text in pdf reader - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text box in pdf document; add text block to pdf
Page 2
ACGNJ News
December 2007
Officers, Directors and Leaders
Officers
Board of Directors
President
Mike Redlich
(908) 246-0410
Director Emeritus
Sol Libes
(609) 520-9024
Vice President
Mark Douches
(908) 889-2366
Through 2008
Bill Farrell
(732) 572-3481
Treasurer
Lela Rames
David McRichie
Secretary
Evan Williams
(908) 359-8070
Lenny Thomas
Past President
Frank Warren
(908) 756-7898
Malthi Masurekar
(732) 560-1534
Special Interest Groups
Through 2007
Gregg McCarthy
.Net
Manuel J. Goyenechea
Arnold Milstein
(908) 753-8036
CLanguages
Bruce Arnold
(908) 735-7898
John Raff
(973) 560-9070
Firefox Activity
David McRitchie
Norm Wiss
Genealogy
Frank Warren
(908) 756-1681
Standing Committees
Investing
Jim Cooper
APCUG Rep.
Frank Warren
(908) 756-1681
Java
Michael Redlich
(908) 537-4915
Facilities
John Raff
(973) 992-9002
Layman’s Forum
Matthew Skoda
(908) 359-8842
Financial
Mark Douches
(908) 889-2366
LUNICS
Andreas Meyer
Historian
Lenny Thomas
NJ Gamers
Gregg McCarthy
Membership
Mark Douches
(908) 889-2366
Mobile Devices
David Eisen
Newsletter
—open —
VBA & Excel
James Ditaranto
(201) 986-1104
Trenton ComputerFest Mike Redlich
(908) 246-0410
Web Dev
Evan Williams
(908) 359-8070
John Raff
(973) 992-9002
Window Pains
John Raff
(973) 560-9070
Vendor Liaison
Bill Farrell
(732) 572-3481
Webmaster
John Raff
(973) 992-9002
ACGNJ News is published by the Ama-
teur Computer Group of New Jersey, In-
corporated (ACGNJ), POBox135, Scotch
Plains NJ 07076. ACGNJ, a non-profit ed-
ucational corporation, is an independent
computer user group. Opinions expressed
hereinaresolelythoseof theindividualau-
thor or editor. This publication is Copy-
right © 2007 by the Amateur Computer
Group of New Jersey, Inc., all rights re-
served. Permission to reprint with ap-
propriate credit is hereby given to
non-profit organizations.
Submissions: Articles, reviews, cartoons,
illustrations. Mostcommonformatsareac-
ceptable. Graphics embedded in the docu-
ment must also be included as separate
files. Fax or mail hard copy and/or disk to
editor; OR e-mail to Editor. Always con-
firm. Date review and include name of
word processor used, your name, address
andphoneandname, address andphone of
manufacturer, if available.
Tips for reviewers: Why does anyone
needit?Whydidyou likeitor hate it? Ease
(or difficulty) of installation, learning and
use. Would you pay for it?
Advertising: Non-commercial announce-
ments from members are free. Commercial
ads 15 cents per word, $5minimum. Camera
ready display ads: Full page (7 x 10 inches)
$150, two-thirds page (4½ x 10) $115,
half-page $85, one-third $57, quarter $50,
eighth$30. Discount 10% on 3or more con-
secutive insertions. Enclose payment.
Publication Exchange: Other computer
user groups areinvitedtosendasubscription
to ACGNJ at the address below. We will re-
spond in kind.
Address Changes should be directed to
MartinRosenblum(m.rosenblum@ieee.org)
and/or to his attention at ACGNJ at the ad-
dress below.
Membership, including subscription:1year
$25, 2 years $40, 3 years $55. Student or Se-
nior Citizen (over 65): 1 year $20, 3 years
$45. Family of member, without subscrip-
tion, $10 per year. Send name, address and
payment to ACGNJ, PO Box 135, Scotch
Plains NJ 07076.
Typographic Note: The ACGNJ News is
produced using Corel Ventura 5. Font fami-
lies used are Times New Roman (TT) for
body text, Arial (TT) for headlines.
Editor
Barbara DeGroot
145 Gun Club Road
Palmerton PA 18071
Tel: (570) 606-3596
bdegroot@ptd.net
Publisher
Associate Editor
Bill Farrell
(732) 572-3481
wfarr18124@aol.com
ACGNJ News
E-Mail Addresses
Here are the e-mail addresses of ACGNJ
Officers, Directors and SIG Leaders (and
the Newsletter Editor). This list is also at
(
http://www.acgnj.org/officers.html
).
Bruce Arnold
barnold@ieee.org
BillBrown
onlineauction@acgnj.org
Jim Cooper
jim@thecoopers.org
Barbara DeGroot
bdegroot@ptd.net
Mark Douches
pcproblems@pobox.com
David Eisen
ultradave@gmail.com
BillFarrell
wfarr18124@aol.com
Manuel Goyenechea
Goya@acgnjdotnetsig.org
SolLibes
sol@libes.com
Malthi Masurekar
masureka@umdnj.edu
GreggMcCarthy
greggmc@optonline.net
David McRichie
dmcritchie@hotmail.com
AndreasMeyer
lunics@acgnj.org
ArnoldMilstein
mrflark@yahoo.com
John Raff
john@jraff.com
Lela Rames
lrames@att.net
Mike Redlich
mike@redlich.net
MattSkoda
som359@aol.com
KeithSproul
ksproul@noc.rutgers.edu
Lenny Thomas
lennythomas@technologist.com
Scott Vincent
scottvin@optonline.net
FrankWarren
kb4cyc@webwarren.com
Evan Williams tech@evanwilliamsconsulting.com
NormWiss
cut.up@verizon.net
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Insert PDF Page. C# PDF - Insert Blank PDF Page in C#.NET. Add and Insert a Page to PDF File in C#.
adding text box to pdf; add text field pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
how to enter text into a pdf form; adding text to pdf file
December 2007
ACGNJ News
Page 3
Continued
Further Adventures in Time Travel
Robert Hawes (r.d.hawes@hotmail.com), ACGNJ
I’vewantedtousethistitleforabout twoyears. Ithoughtof it,
but didn’t get to use it, while writing my 2005/2006 series of
rantsabout“TimeBugs”.(Thosearethephenomenathathave
been driving me crazy for over a decade, but which nobody
else seems to care about, or even notice). Don’t panic. We
won’t be talking about them this time. I promise. Mostly, the
kind of timetravel I’ll be covering this month isthekind that
wealldo every day: minuteby minute into thefuture. In other
(more intelligible) words, our topic this month mostly con-
cerns backups of one form or another.
Here’s our first time traveling example: As I somewhat ex-
plained in previous issues, much of this article was actually
written in a three to four week period beginning in the last
days of June (just about when the deadline would have been
for our non-existent July issue). My intention was to get an
earlystart on my Septemberarticle.That way,whentheinevi-
tablesummerdistractionscamealong,I’dhavesomething “in
the bank”. However, some sections developed a decidedly
“Halloweeny” flavor, so they were postponed until October.
Therest developed a“follow-uppy”flavor. Thus,parts (com-
bined with new material) became my November article, and
therest (with somenew stuffaswell) gotheld overuntil now.
Asaresult,after puttinginaboutamonth’sworth ofadvanced
work,Istill had to start all overfrom scratch to cover Septem-
ber,and you’renotseeingthisuntil December.Cuetheweepy
violin music. (To those of you who don’t like be-
hind-the-scenes details, I apologize; but I enjoy reading that
kind ofstory.SowhenI’vegotoneofmyown,Itendto tellit).
After this, I’ve got two other articles in partial development,
and twomoreinstatus“stalledpending inspiration”.IfI don’t
wimp out on my plans for LinuxFrom Scratch, that’ll gener-
ate even morematerial. Ishould becovered well beyond next
summer’s hiatus. As far as this newsletter goes, I’m heading
into the future with a bang.
Anyway, let’s get started. First, we have to go back fourteen
years into the past. (See! Time traveling all over the place). I
got my first tape backup drive in 1993. It was a Colorado
Jumbo 250, which used 120 MB DC2120 tape cartridges.
Eventually, I amassed about fifty tapes, and six tape drives.
There’sasad story (whichI’ll tellyou in aminuteortwo) that
explains why I bought a second tape drive right away. The
othersjustsortofmultiplied,when Ifoundthat thetapescould
beused formore than just backups. I had several friendswho
had similar drives, all of which could read and write the
DC2120 tapes.Asacynicmight expect,that “250” claim was
abig, fat lie; but with compression, you could usually count
on fitting about 180 MB of data on those 120 MB capacity
tapes. Those tapes and drives became my first mass data
“transmission” method; to and from my friends, and between
my owncomputersaswell.Think ofit as“sneakernet”onste-
roids.(Thiswas afew yearsbefore Igot into cable-connected
networking).
That first tapedrivecamebundled with Colorado Backup for
DOS (CBD) software, which I immediately and enthusiasti-
cally adopted. Before that, I made backups to floppy disks,
first using the BACKUP programs that came with MS-DOS
3.3 and 5.0,then using Central Point Backup (acomponent of
PCTools).Shortly afterI first successfully used thetapesasa
filetransfermedium,I thought about using them forcompact,
long term massstorageaswell.Inpursuit ofthat goal,I began
aproject which, I’m sorry to say,I still haven’t finished. I as-
sembled 364 floppy disks containing previous backups,
intending to transfer their contents to tape. (It’s actually the
samephilosophy asmakingfrequent current backups.It’snot
as if I really expect to ever use any of them. However, in the
extremely unlikely event that Ido need someagain,thoseold
files will still be there waiting; ready, willing and able).
Ionly madeone tapefrom those floppies,though,beforerun-
ning into some technical glitches that caused me to suspend
the project. (I didn’tabandon it,but Ididn’t do much work on
itforafewyears,either).Ihad CDreading drivesevenbefore
the tape drives, but a personally affordable CD writer didn’t
becomeavailableuntil1997.I got Colorado BackupforWin-
dows 95 (CBW95)at just about thesametime. (Beforethat, I
also had Colorado Backup forWindows 3.1,but I never, ever
used it). CBW95 was missing some features of CBD (an an-
noying but unfortunately quite common occurrence in
Windowsprogramsadvertised as “upgrades” from DOS ver-
sions), but it had a new feature that I liked a lot: You didn’t
actually need a tape. You could back up to a QIC file on the
hard disk that was just pretending to be a tape. I cut back on
using the tapes as my primary backup method, and started
making QIC files, which I’d then burn to CDs.A few months
later, I decided to re-activatemy floppy-to-tapebackup pres-
ervation project, except this time transferring both floppy
and tape backups to CD. That’s when I made a startling
discovery.
In lessthan fiveyears,all of my tapeshad begun to fail.Itdid-
n’t matter how long I’d been using them, either. From my
very first tapeto my most recent purchase,they alldeveloped
read errorswithin areally short interval.(Ofcourse,itspossi-
ble that every single tape of that particular type was
manufactured at essentially the sametime; but some of them
spent more time “on the shelf” than others). Whatever the
case, I consider such a short life span to becompletely unac-
ceptable. At that same time, my collection of old floppy
backups had grown to fivehundred disks, all about ten years
old.(I hadn’t madeany newones. Ijust dug up abunch more
old ones). Of those disks, only eleven had read errors, and
only two of them were completely inaccessible. (It’s true!
They don’t make ‘em like they used to). So, with the tapes
nowinaccessible,thebackup-saverproject gotstalled again.
Here’sanotherexampleof possiblecomputerrelated planned
obsolescence: Years ago, I had three 32X CD drives (two
IDE, one SCSI) in three different computers. All three of
them stopped working within the same week! Was it a
strange coincidence, or a fiendish plot? You decide.
Now,aspromised,here’sacomparativelyshortversionofthe
sad story mentioned above: Once upon a time, there was an
early national computer club (then very popular, now long
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Text. VB.NET PDF - Extract Text from PDF Using VB. How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application.
how to add text to a pdf file in acrobat; add text to pdf using preview
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Text. C# PDF - Extract Text from PDF in C#.NET. Feel Free to Extract Text from PDF Page, Page Region or the Whole PDF File.
how to add text fields to a pdf document; how to add text fields in a pdf
Page 4
ACGNJ News
December 2007
Continued
gone).Overtheyears,they had assembled alibrary of about a
thousand floppy disks containing freeware and shareware
programs, split fairly evenly between CP/M and DOS. They
sold thosedisksby mail,but memberswho brought theirown
blank floppies to local chapter meetings could make copies
for free. In the late eighties, when data CDs began growing in
popularity, the national chapter decided to make (and sell) a
CDofthatlibrary.Sincemany of thosefloppieswere360KB,
all of them would have fit on one single CD. They began the
CD creation process by consolidating those floppies onto
hard disks,andasaprecaution,they got atapedrivetoback up
the hard disks. Unfortunately, their headquarters were in San
Francisco,and San Francisco had an earthquake. They lost all
theirhard disks and they lost their tape drive;but theirbackup
tapessurvived.So they got areplacement tapedrive,and tried
to restore their data; but the new drive couldn’t read any of
their tapes. (Nowadays, many so-called backup programs
don’t even bother to include a “compare” function; but their
particular backup software had it, and they’d used it. There-
fore, they knew that those backup tapes had been good when
made). So they took the problem to the tape drive manufac-
turer. They were told that the head on their first drive must
have been out of alignment. The manufacturer would have
gladly fixed thaterrorbyre-aligning theoldtapedrive’shead,
but absolutely flat out refused to try to adjust thenew drive’s
head to read the existing tapes. So: no restored files, no CD,
and (eventually) no club.
Themoral; “When creating removable media, always besure
that your results can be read by an entirely separate device;
not just by the unit that produced them”. I’ve heeded this
warning for my Jumbotapebackups,then for CDreader/writ-
ers, then for DVD reader/writers. I’ve actually had some
instances where a CD or DVD created by one drive couldn’t
be read on another, so I consider this advice to be very well
taken.
Acorollary second moral (based on my own experience with
backup tapes) would be; “Before you make backups,find out
just how long your backup media is likely to last”. I’d heard
that optical media were supposed to be more-or-less eternal.
SinceCD/DVD disksareopticalmedia,I thoughtI wasallset
this time. I should have known better. It seems that many of
the blank CDs and DVDs being sold today can begin to fail
due to corrosion in as little as two years. Wow! Talk about
planned obsolescence; and to think I considered a five year
tapelifespan bad.Quoting myself(from my November,2005
articleMuch Ado About A Bad Ethernet Cable): “There is no
quality.Thereisonlyprice”.Eventhoughit wasmy ownidea,
Ireally hate this little bit of homespun philosophy; but more
and more these days (quoting Walter Cronkite’s famous tag
linefromoveraquartercenturyago): “That’sthewayitis”.
I’ve quoted computer columnist Jerry Pournelle, too (in my
April 2006articleParanoid ComputingRevisited).Currently,
he has a Web site, featuring a blog and a lot of other things
(
www.jerrypournelle.com
). Jerry generates more material now,
but Ifind thatI’m reading him lessoften.No matterhowinter-
esting thetopic may be,reading stuff from a computer screen
is just not as relaxing as reading a column in a magazine.
Maybe someday it will be, but not yet. Whatever. One thing
he does now that he couldn’t do before is publish questions
from his readers. Sometimes, Jerry knows the answer him-
self, but often he hands it off to his group of “Advisors”; the
peopleheturnsto when hehasa technicalproblem. Thethird
letter in Jerry’s “Mailbag”forMarch 19,2007,from a person
identified only as “Sean”, concerned CD R life spans. Advi-
sorRobert BruceThompson replied; “All Taiyo-Yuden disks
arefirst rate.Verbatim in thepasthas relabeled somegarbage
disks, but in the last few years they’vebeen selling only first
rate disks (8X ones labeled MCC003 and 16X ones labeled
MCC004 arecompletely reliable)”. Advisor David Em noted
that Delkin makes gold CDs and DVDs they claim will last
100 - 200 years. David then said that he uses portable hard
disks for his own backups. Jerry concluded by saying; “On
Bob Thompson’s advice given me a good dozen years ago I
have looked for and bought Taiyo-Yuden and Verbatim me-
dia rather than theel cheapo specialsoneseesin bins near the
checkout line”.
If you want to see the complete letter and all replies, follow
this link (remember, it’s the third letter):
www.chaosmanorreviews.com/open_archives/jep_20070319_mail.php
As part of his reply, Thompson included some links to his
own Web site. There (his “DaynotesJournal”for the week of
12 June2006),hedisplayed the results of testsheperformed,
and named the brands that nobody should ever buy. Here are
direct links:
http://www.ttgnet.com/daynotes/2006/2006-24.html#Mon
http://www.ttgnet.com/daynotes/2006/2006-24.html#Fri
Now,Ishould point out that ifyou do aweb search,you’ll get
many results that just cite the 100-200 year figure mentioned
above, and don’t bring up the sub-standard disk problem at
all. In my opinion, the authors of those sites have their heads
stuck firmly in the sand. When quality isn’t a consideration
(as it’s definitely not these days), the cheap junk always
drives out the good stuff. Just ask all those people who re-
cently bought toysthat werecovered with lead paint, madein
(country of origin deleted due to fear of lawsuits and/or
nuclear weapons).
In the end,all Ireally haveis my own personal experience. In
the ten years since I got my first CD writer, I’ve produced
about 200 dataCDs. Right after Imadeeach and every one, I
did acompletebinary comparison test on a different (usually
read-only) CD drive. That took a lot of extratime, but I con-
sider it to have been worth it, because I’ve turned up several
“bad burns” over the years. So far, of those 200 disks that I
made myself, only one that passed its initial quality tests has
nowturned up bad. Just a few months ago,when I tried to get
some old data off of it, Igot read errors. ThatCD wascreated
on September 5, 1999. It was definitely accessed several
times after that, but probably not often after 2001. Thus, I
can’t say howmuchlongerthan two years itlasted,but itdefi-
nitely didn’t last more than seven. Considering the current
spateofcomputer-relatedlawsuits,Ican’tin goodconscience
puttheclubormyself in jeopardy by publishing themanufac-
turer’s name. (I don’t think this particular corporation has
Further Adventures in Time Travel,
continued
C# Imaging - Scan Barcode Image in C#.NET
RasterEdge Barcode Reader DLL add-in enables developers to add barcode image recognition & barcode types, such as Code 128, EAN-13, QR Code, PDF-417, etc.
adding text to a pdf; adding text to pdf in preview
XImage.Barcode Scanner for .NET, Read, Scan and Recognize barcode
Read: PDF Image Extract; VB.NET Write: Insert text into PDF; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#;
add editable text box to pdf; add text field to pdf acrobat
December 2007
ACGNJ News
Page 5
Continued
nuclear weapons; but hey, you never know). So I’vehad one
now-bad CD that possibly lasted longer than the DC2120
tapes, but not nearly as long as the vast majority of my old
floppy disk backups.
Like David Em above, alot of people seem to beusing porta-
ble hard disksthese days.Unfortunately,my own experience
casts a pall over that idea, too. One of my hard disks (manu-
factured, according to its label, on February 18, 2002) just
recently succumbed to the “click of death” (and it took my
new“semi-permanent”Ubuntu Linuxinstallation with it).An
only slightly more than fiveand a half year life span like that
doesn’t bode well for the use of hard disks as a long-term
backup medium, either.
In his “wrap-up”to thelink above,Jerry Pournellespeculated
that, in this case, the Library of Congress is the closest thing
that the US government has to an official arbiter of quality.
Unless they settle on a verifiably rugged standard for
long-term digital storage,thenusetheirconsiderablepurchas-
ing power to enforce itby buying onlydevices and mediathat
meet such a standard; Jerry thought (and I reluctantly agree)
thatthere’sprobably not much anybody elsecan do except try
the best they can to buy only the good stuff.
As a pessimist might expect, of thethirty-two unused CD-R,
twenty-four unused DVD+R and forty-six unused DVD-R
disks I currently have on hand, not one of them is from a
Thompson-approved brand. At least, none of them is from a
“complete garbage” brand, either. I searched the Internet for
Delkin disks, and found that their “Archival Gold” CD-R
disks cost from $1.63 to $2.40 each, while their “Archival
Gold” DVD-R disks cost from $2.97 to $3.40 each. (Both
prices vary due to where you buy them, as well as how many
you buy at a time).They also sell “Archival Gold Scratch Ar-
mor”DVD-Rdisksat$3.42 to$3.80 each.They don’tseem to
sell DVD+R disks of anykind. When I finally get my “home
movieto DVD”system set up,I’ll probablybuy thoseScratch
Armor DVDs; but for CDs and data DVDs, I’ll have to go
with Taiyo-Yuden or Verbatim. They cost about the same as
all the other brands (which I’ll never be buying again).
Generallyspeaking,Idon’t liketo impart “bad news”without
at least suggesting the possibility of some “good news” as
well. So just beforeI submitted this articleto thenewsletter,I
did a search for CD and DVD sales on
www.pricewatch.com
.
Ever since I “discovered”that sitein 2000, it’sbeen my main
source for comparison prices. This time, rather than prices, I
was looking for reliable sources; and Pricewatch provides
somedealerinformation aswell.Herearethebest fourVerba-
tim sources I found, listed in descending feedback order.
Unfortunately, only the last two also stock Taiyo-Yuden
disks. The only other Taiyo-Yuden sources I turned up had
even lesspositivefeedback, so Ileft them out. I haven’t listed
prices or quantities in stock either, sincethat information can
change from day to day.
Unity Electronics, Inc.
http://www.unityelectronics.com/
,(Union
City, CA) 510-475-0400
Verbatim CD-R, CD-RW, DVD+R (No Taiyo-Yuden)
On Pricewatch since 10/3/2001
93% positive responses from their last 107 feedbacks
Computer Giants
http://www.computergiants.com/
(New York,
NY) 800-905-9885
Verbatim: CD-R, CD-RW, DVD-R, DVD-RW,
DVD+R, DVD+RW (No Taiyo-Yuden)
On Pricewatch since 6/15/1999
80% positive responses from their last 210 feedbacks
CDrDVDrMedia
http://www.cdrdvdrmedia.com/
(City of Indus-
try, CA) 888-813-5667
Verbatim: CD-R, CD-RW, DVD-R, DVD-RW,
DVD+R, DVD+RW. Taiyo-Yuden: CD-R, DVD-R,
DVD+R
On Pricewatch since 5/1/2002
73 % positive responses from their last 123 feedbacks
Yesbuy.net
http://www.yesbuy.net/
(Baldwin Park, CA)
626-480-1868
Verbatim: CD-R, DVD-R, DVD+R. Taiyo-Yuden:
CD-R, DVD-R, DVD+R
On Pricewatch since 2/25/2000
69% positive responses from their last 297 feedbacks
Unfortunately, while I found some Delkin electronic equip-
ment sales, Pricewatch had no current or recent Delkin CD or
DVD transactions listed. Fortunately, the company will still
sell directly to the public. (Their Website does have a Find a
Retail Storelink,but it’s still “under construction”).Notethat
the following information came from them, not from
Pricewatch.
Delkin Devices, Inc
delkin.com/products/archivalgold/index.html
(Poway, CA) 800-637-8087
Archival Gold CD-R and DVD-R (no DVD+R) disks
Additional Scratch Armor (SA) protective layer
available
In business since 1986
Price list (as of this writing, not including shipping):
• CD-R100/$173.99(SA:$224.99)
• CD-R25/$49.99(SA:$63.99)
• CD-R16/$47.99(SA:$59.99)
• CD-R10/$25.99(SA:$29.99)
• DVD-R100/$309.99(SA:$354.99)
• DVD-R25/$79.99(SA:$95.99)
• DVD-R16/$69.99(SA:$79.99)
• DVD-R10/$35.99(SA:$39.99)
Note that I personally have never bought anything from any
oftheabovesources. All of them havebeen in existenceforat
least five years, but that doesn’t necessarily mean much.
They’re listed here only for your information, and absolutely
not
as any form of recommendation. If you’re contemplating
buying stuff on the Internet, you should definitely do your
own research. You really need the “Force” to bewith you,be-
cause whatever emasculated watchdog agencies may still
exist probably won’t be.
Further Adventures in Time Travel,
continued
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
to PDF in preview without adobe PDF reader installed. Able to zoom and crop image and achieve image resizing. Merge several images into PDF. Insert images into
how to enter text in pdf; add text to pdf reader
C# PDF Text Search Library: search text inside PDF file in C#.net
Text: Search Text in PDF. C# Guide about How to Search Text in PDF Document and Obtain Text Content and Location Information with .NET PDF Control.
how to add text box to pdf document; add text field to pdf
Page 6
ACGNJ News
December 2007
That’saboutallI’vegotat themomenton backupmedia.Next
month, we’ll look at some contemporary backup programs.
See you then.
APPENDIX I: ANSWERS TO TRIVIA QUESTIONS:
First of all,don’t think that I’m aThree Stooges fanatic. Like
Bugs Bunny cartoons, they’reafond memory from my child-
hood;butuntilrecently,I hadn’twatchedany oftheirfilmsfor
along time. Last month, I took what would probably be my
only chance to publish my trick trivia question about their
names. To make sure I had my facts straight, I made a rela-
tively quick Internet search. In just a couple of hours, I’d
cut-and-pasted almost five thousand words into a temporary
textfile,all of which I thought worth repeating. In apainfully
heroic process, I trimmed it down to 2,824 words; which is
stillawholelot,especially for thenewsletter ofatechnical as-
sociation. My excuse: I dug up all this stuff while surfing the
net,so it is,infact,computerrelated.Much ofmyinformation
came from
The Three Stooges Official Website
(
www.threestooges.com
), but by no means all of it. There are
other Stooge sites, plus there are sites dedicated to just about
every othernameI’ll bementioningbelow.Even ifyou’renot
aStooge fan, I think you’ll find this interesting.
We’lltakequestiontwo first (becausetheanswer iseasier and
shorter): Werethereever Four Stooges? Yes, sort of. In the
Columbiashort Hold That Lion (1947),Curly makesacameo
appearance as a sleeping passenger on a train, doing his fa-
mousStoogeSnore.Hesaysno lines, and hardly movesatall.
This is the only Stooge short in which brothers Moe, Curly
and Shemp appear together (and Larry too, making four
Stooges on screen). It’s rumored that Curly also filmed a
sceneforMalicein thePalace(1949),playing achef; but ifso,
itwas left on thecutting room floor.(I already knew about the
first scene, though I’m not sure from where. I found the
second scene on the Internet).
Nowforquestion one:Whatweretheeightnamesof thesix
“ThreeStooges”? Thetrick ofthisquestion isthat itrefersto
Stooge names as listed in end credits (and end credits only).
Around thirteen years ago, while watching PBS (of all
places), I discovered the seventh name. That led to my origi-
nal version: What were the seven names of the six “Three
Stooges”?Then,just afewmonths ago,whilewatchingabor-
rowed StoogesDVDduring afitofnostalgia,I discovered the
eighth name. Those of you familiar with my previousarticles
shouldn’t be surprised that I’ll now blather on and on end-
lessly before I actually tell you those names. The standards
I’ve used for my selections are arbitrary and totally my own,
but I’m not just picking nits. I won’t accept anything that I
don’t consider to be distinctly different. For instance, Curly
Joe DeRita, Curly-Joe DeRita, Curly Joe and Joe DeRita are
obviously just minor variations, so they all count as only one
name. Fora brief,exhilarating moment,I thought I’d found a
ninth name when I discovered that Curly had been spelled
“Curley” on early marquees and in the opening titles of the
first 14 Columbia shorts (from Woman Haters through
Half-Shot Shooters).However, I rejected it for three reasons:
It’s notin the end credits, it soundsexactly thesame, and it’s
basically just a typo. So my list of names remains at eight.
Let’sstart out with brief biographiesof thesix universally ac-
knowledged “Three Stooges”:
Moe Howard was born Moses Horwitz, although he also
usedthenameHarry Moses Horwitz.Hedied on May 4,1975
at the ageof 77. Moe and Helen (hiswife of almost 50 years)
had a daughter, Joan and a son, Paul.
Larry Finewas born LouisFienberg. Hesuffered a strokein
1970, during thefilming of “Kook’s Tour” (which was never
officiallyreleased),and didn’tperform again.Hedied onJan-
uary 24,1975,at theageof72.Larry and hiswifeMabel hada
son, Johnny and a daughter, Phyllis.
Curly Howard wasbornJeromeLesterHorwitz.Hesuffered
astroke in 1946 during the filming of his 97th ThreeStooges
comedy, “Half-Wits’ Holiday” (released in 1947). In his last
years, he suffered a long series of further strokes. He died on
January 18, 1952, at the ageof 48.Curly and hissecond wife,
Elaine had a daughter, Marilyn. He and his fourth wife (and
widow) Valerie had a daughter, Janie.
Shemp Howard was born Samuel Horwitz. On November
23, 1955, he had a sudden heart attack while riding in a taxi
and was dead at the ageof 60.Heand hiswifeGertrudehad a
son, Mort. The ThreeStooges Official Website lists 42 films
in which Shemp appeared on his own. There are probably
more.
Joe Besser (his real name) was a close personal friend of
Shemp. He died March 1, 1988 at the age of 80. He and his
wife Erna apparently had no children.
Curly JoeDeRita wasborn Joseph Wardell.(DeRitawas his
mother’smaiden name).Hedied on July 3, 1993 at theage of
83. He and his wife Jean apparently had no children
Just to be perverse, I’m going to continueby detailing all the
names that I’m not counting, beginning with the original
Stooge-master himself. Ted Healy was born Charles Earnest
Lee Nash, and died December 21, 1937, at the age of 41. He
and his second wifeBetty had a son, John Jacob, born on the
night Ted died.(Justto confusefuturehistorians,hisfirst wife
was named Betty, too). I’d always thought that his split with
boyhood friend Moe was acrimonious, but apparently the
story wasn’t that simple. Two days before his death, Ted had
been in touchwith Moe’swife,Helen,updating her onBetty’s
condition. It’s said thatMoe,who wasknownfornevershow-
ing his emotions,collapsed in tearswhen told of Ted’sdeath.
Hewas on a publicphonein New York City’s Grand Central
Station at thetime,and wasn’tableto explainwhy hewascry-
ing until afterLarry andCurly had helped himonto theirtrain.
Remember that, although they made afew film appearances,
Ted Healy and His Stooges were primarily a stage act, often
doing several shows each day. This was during the great de-
pression. Everybody had to get work wherever they could,
and their friends (if they really were friends) helped out as
much astheywereable.Over theyears,Healy used alot ofre-
placement stooges, whenever one of his regulars (especially
Shemp) was off working elsewhere. Ted died just as preview
audiences were acclaiming his performance in the Warner
Brothers film Hollywood Hotel (1937). If he’d lived, it’s
quite possible that he might have worked with the Three
Continued
Further Adventures in Time Travel,
continued
December 2007
ACGNJ News
Page 7
Stoogesagain, though no doubtwith differentbilling.In their
filmed appearances together, Ted was always thebossand/or
straight man, never one of the Stooges.
Thesecond nameI’m not counting is JoePalma(born Joseph
Provenzano), who probably died on August 15, 1994, at the
age of 89 (somesources list adifferent date).Hewasmarried
to Marjorie Ann Ries for more than 50 years, but apparently
they had no children. Palma played bit parts and/or did stunt
work in virtually all the Stooge comedies of the 1940s and
early ‘50s. He has a somewhat valid claim to “Stoogehood”
because he doubled for Shemp in four 1956 shorts, filmed
from thebackor with hisfaceobscured by props.That’sright!
Shemp starred in four of the eight comedies that the Three
Stooges released in 1956 after he had died. (Too bad I could-
n’t work that ghostly tidbit into my “Halloween Issue” in
October). Those four films were all re-makes of previous
shorts, using stock footage of Shemp wherever possible; but
Palma did, in fact, appear on film in each one, playing the
third Stooge. Shemp’s official successor (Joe Besser) didn’t
comein until the 1957 releases (many ofwhich wereactually
madein 1956).Forthepurposesofmy triviaquestion,Ireject
Palma’s claim because he wasn’t listed as a Stooge in the
credits. Others have rejected him because he was just imitat-
ing Shemp, not projecting a Stooge personality of his own.
The third name I’m not counting is Emil Sitka (born Emil
Josef Sitka), who died on January 16, 1998, at the age of 83.
Heand his first wifeDonnahad seven children.Emil worked
as a character actor with all six Three Stooges in dozens of
their films over more than twenty years, and healso appeared
as straight-man for Moe, Larry and Curly Joe in thirty-nine
live-action opening/closing sequences produced for “The
New ThreeStooges”,a 1965/66 made-for-TV cartoon series.
(Each sequence was used as a wraparound on four different
cartoons, for a total of 156 cartoons). Emil actually was pro-
claimed by MoeastheOfficial “Middle”Stooge, succeeding
Larry. (His character, “Harry” was conceived as being ex-
tremely conscientious, to the point of ridiculousness).
Publicity photos of Emil with Moe and Curly Joe were re-
leased. Some still survive. Unfortunately, Emil never got to
be a Stooge on film, because Moe died just as shooting was
scheduled to begin.I’ll havemoreto say about thislast Three
Stooges movie later on. For the purposes of my trivia ques-
tion, I’m rejecting Emil’s claim only because he was never
listed as a Stooge in a finished film’s credits.
The fourth and fifth names I’m not counting are two
show-businessveteranswho (afterMoeand Larrydied)made
afew on-stage public appearances with Curly Joe, billing
themselves as “The New Three Stooges” (recycling the car-
toon series title). Paul “Mousie” Garner, who died August 8,
2004 at the age of 95, had a long and varied career. He’d
worked asapinch-hitter forTedHealyinthe“good old days”,
where he frequently performed with Moe and Larry when
Shemp was unavailable. Frank Mitchell, who died January
21,1991attheageof85,wasalso apopularslapstickcomicin
the halcyon days of vaudeville. He’d worked all over the
place, as a single or half of a duo. My far-from-exhaustive
Internet search couldn’t document a connection with Ted
Healy, but who knows? For the purposes of my trivia ques-
tion, these two are also rejected because they were never
credited on film as Stooges.
The sixth through fifteenth namesI’m not counting are ten of
the eighteen men identified as Stooges in the book “The
ThreeStooges:TheTriumphsandTragediesoftheMost Pop-
ular Comedy Team of All Time”, by Jeff Forrester, Tom
Forrester and JoeWallison. Theauthors obviously did alotof
painstaking research; but for the purposes of my trivia ques-
tion, I’ve rejected all ten names (Jimmy Brewster, Dave
Chasen, Dick Hakins, Kenny Lackey, Red Pearson, Bobby
Pinkus, Freddie Sanborn, Jack Wolf, Lou Warren, and
Sammy Wolfe). They may have been Ted Healy’s Stooges,
but none were ever credited on film as one of the Three
Stooges.Interestingly,theothereightnamesthebook listsare
the six Official Stooges, plus Mousie Garner and Frank
Mitchell.Theauthorseithermissed orrejected JoePalmaand
Emil Sitka, the only men I’d consider to be (by any criteria)
possibly legitimate heirs to “Three Stoogedom”.
Finally, here are the names I do count: Jerry Howard and
JeromeHoward.Nowyou seethetrick. Both arevariationsof
Curly’s real name. So, why do I accept theseastwo different
names, when I rejected “Curley” above? Because they were
used in end credits, they don’t sound exactly the same, and
they’renottypos.Besides,hisnicknamewasBabe,not Jerry.
Furthermore, each billing was a conscious choice made
(about a dozen years apart) by Curly; at the beginning of his
movie career, and at the end.
At the start of his career, Curly was sometimes credited as
Jerry Howard, and sometimes just as Howard (of Howard,
Fineand Howard).I don’tcount Howard (considering it to be
just ashortened version ofJerry Howard),butJerry ismy sev-
enth name. I discovered it by accident thirteen years ago,
while watching (on my local PBS station’s “classic movie
night”)afilmfeaturing acameo appearanceby Ted Healyand
HisStooges.Duringmy recent Internet search,I foundquitea
few Jerry listings, but no plot synopsis to match my (now
faint) memory of what I saw all thoseyears ago. None of the
variousfilm databasesI found areguaranteed to becomplete,
so maybe whatever I saw just hasn’t been listed yet. In any
case,I found morethanenough instancesto provemy seventh
name.Here,in release(but not necessarily production) order,
are just four ofthemoviesin which Curly iscredited asJerry
Howard:
Dancing Lady (1933):With Ted Healy,MoeandLarry.
FugitiveLovers(1934):With Ted Healy,Moeand Larry.
Roast-Beef and Movies (1934): Appearing by himself.
Jailbirdsof Paradise(1934): Also featuring Moe (but not
Larry).
(Note: FugitiveLovers isthelastfilm of theStoogeswith Ted
Healy).
The DVD I recently watched; Swing Parade (1946), starred
GaleStorm asasingertrying to break into show business,and
featured many musical performances (hence the title). Moe,
Further Adventures in Time Travel,
continued
Continued
Page 8
ACGNJ News
December 2007
From The DealsGuy
Bob (The Cheapskate) Click, Greater Orlando Computer Users Group
*I’m Excited About My New Toys
Wewanted a GPS devicewith a4.3" screen (diagonally),and
withbetterfeatures.WefinallychosetheGarmin nuvi660be-
cause it announces your next turn (street name) well before
you will turn, and again just beforeyou actually turn. It has a
bright screen and includes traffic reporting capabilities with-
outpurchasing an FM traffic adaptor,which isin theDCcord
you get with it. 90 days of traffic reporting is activated when
you register it, but after that, you must subscribe ($60 year).
The nuvi 660 includes Bluetooth technology for hands free
use with your Bluetooth cell phone. MP3 file use is also in-
cluded and it has an SD slot. It will also talk through your car
radio. The 4.3" screen is easier to see and it was on sale for
$599 atBJ’sWholesale.I could havedone much better on the
Web,but Ipreferred tobuyit locally fortheeaseofreturning it
if I so desired. A friend returned four before he settled on the
Mio he kept. So far, we are satisfied in spite of two curious
anomalies in the mapping that we encountered. MapQuest
had given us worse in the same areas. I ordered a free CD to
updatethemaps,but I’ll havetopay forupdatesinthefuture.
Another new toy; aKwikset BiometricSmart Lock, is for our
house door.The last fewyears weused a Kwikset pushbutton
lock that wecouldpressthebuttonsfor apresetcode and it au-
tomatically unlocks.Great if you can’tfindyour key.You can
also use your key. We were happy with the ease of use, but
alongcametheKwiksetbiometriclock.Simply slideyourfin-
ger across the sensor for it to automatically unlock.
It looks like a conventional lock on the outside, but with a
small fingerprint sensor sticking down from the key cylinder
housing. It is powered by four AA batteries and fingerprint
data is stored in flash memory. It also works with a key. The
interior lock housing is larger, containing batteries, electron-
ics and the Lock’s programming screen. It can store over 50
different fingerprints and the lock administrator can limit
privilegesof any fingerprint to acertain timeof day, and even
aday oftheweek; and can makeanotheruseralso an adminis-
trator. Any stored fingerprint data can be deleted or
neutralized.A great featureof any Kwikset Smart Key lock is
Larry and Curly appearedassupportingplayers,bothadvanc-
ing theplot and providing comicrelief. At theend, Curly was
credited as “JEROME HOWARD…Curly”. Nobody really
knows why Curly was billed this way; but at that point in the
Stooges’ career,it couldn’t havebeen astudio mistake. It had
to have been his choice. One theory advanced by fans is that
hesuspected thismightbehisfinalfull-lengthfeaturefilm ap-
pearance (it was), and he wanted to see his real name “up in
lights”just once.Ofcourse, hecouldn’thaveknown that he’d
soon suffer adebilitating stroke.However, in his last few Co-
lumbiashorts,hewas obviously not up to hisusual standards.
So it’s quite possible he knew that something wasn’t right.
Here’s some pure speculation on my part: Changing an ac-
tor’s name for show-business involved more than just ethnic
prejudice(although that certainly played a big role).Prioruse
wasalsoamajorconsideration;andtherewereotherfactorsto
dealwith.Maybe,for somegood orbad reason,thestudio that
released his initial film appearance decided that Jerome
Howard wasn’t acceptable, and changed it to Jerry Howard
(possibly without even asking his permission first). It’s also
possible the blame goes back even further. The culprit could
have been whatever authority oversaw performer identifica-
tion for his stage appearances with Ted Healy. However it
happened,hewould havebeen stuck with that billing until he
becamewell enough known as Curly Howard. As far asI can
tell,henever thoughtof himselfasJerry. HewasBabe,Curly,
or Jerome.
That finally answers the trivia question, but I’m not going to
shut up and go away just yet. Instead, I’ll keep right on talk-
ing, about the Three Stooges movie that wasn’t. The Three
Stooges Official Website (
www.threestooges.com
)is strangely
reticent aboutthefilm Moe,“Harry”and CurlyJoeplannedto
make in 1975. The Emil Sitka Memorial Website
(
www.emilsitka.com
)justmentions thatshooting wasscheduled,
butgivesno furtherdetails.When Iread that lastsentence,the
first thought that occurred to me was; “What happened to the
working script?” (If shooting was scheduled, there had to
have been one). I found the embarrassing answer at
Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (
www.wikipedia.org
), which
completely explains the silence on those Stooge sites. It
seemsthat filmingwentonwithout theStooges, and theresult
turned out to be R-Rated soft-core porn.
Thepreviousyear,theproducerand director had collaborated
on afairly successfulT&Aflick calledTheNaughty Steward-
esses. In 1975, they wanted to do something different; a good
old-fashioned slapstick comedy. It was planned to be a fond
throwback to thekiddy matinee westerns of the1930s, and to
the B-pictures of the 1940s. In addition to the reconstituted
Three Stooges, they assembled a cast of screen veterans, in-
cluding Yvonne DeCarlo, Don “Red” Barry, and the two
surviving members of the Ritz Brothers.
Perhaps,if Moehadn’t died, the film might havecome out as
originally conceived; but when the Stooges suddenly dis-
banded, the Ritz Brothers were promoted as replacement
leads. Unfortunately, to put it as kindly as possible, they just
weren’t up to the task; and with production already started,
thebudget wouldn’t haveallowed thetimeneeded to stop and
search foralternate actors.So,to takeup the slack,T&Acon-
tent was added to the vintage Western theme. After going
through several working titles, including The Jet Set, Texas
Layover and The Great Truck Robbery; the film was ulti-
mately released asBlazing Stewardesses (to capitalizeon the
Mel Brooks box-office hit Blazing Saddles).
Now we’re done.
Continued
Further Adventures in Time Travel,
continued
December 2007
ACGNJ News
Page 9
AntiS
that you can “re-key” the lock yourself in about 15 seconds,
and without any disassembly. That worked great. It also re-
sists criminal “bump key” methods known to defeat many
locks. Many people aren’t aware that a clever thief can
quickly and easily defeat most door locks using the “bump
key”technique.Check:
http://www.toool.nl/bumping.pdf
forinfo.
If thelock would work as advertised, wewould love it for its
simplicity, but that hasn’t been the case. Often my finger
works thefirst time, but not alwaysand I must rescan several
times. My wife has less successand often has to scan her fin-
ger several times, sometimes resorting to her key (and a few
unkind words). Telephone tech support was little help, al-
thoughwecouldn’t get my wife’sfingertounlockitat alluntil
afterthey walkedmethroughasettingchange.Herfingernow
works, but not consistently. Their on-line tech support feels
wearen’tscanning correctly,butwehavetried thevideo’sap-
proach and some other techniques with no improvement. We
purchased it at Home Depot, but it appears they will get this
very unreliable item back. Their Web site tech support was a
joke and the English part didn’t work for me. I asked them to
send a new sensor, but they said that would take at least a
month.Thisproduct really triesyour patience. There isan in-
stallation and programming video on the Kwikset Web site
http://www.kwikset.com
thatmakesit seem easy,butwe’regiving
up. The price at Home Depot is $199.95.
*And A Good Time Was Had By All!
Iattended the fall conference for FACUG (Florida Associa-
tion of Computer User Groups) and it was nice to see
everyone. Attendance was about average for their one-day
fall event with 80 attendees from 29 user groups. Central
Florida Computer Society (CFCS) was host and the FACUG
conference coincided with the CFCS 2nd annual Tech Fair, a
two-day event featuring many great seminars and products
with a host of local vendors selling their wares. The confer-
enceincluded breakfast and lunch and they kept you busy for
theentireevent, ending with adrawing fortheFACUGevent,
and another drawing the next day at the Tech Fair. Unfortu-
nately, the CFCS event was not well attended by their
membership.
Ialsomet APCUGpresident Jay Ferron and got someupdated
information from him. Nobody could be more positive about
APCUG’s future then Jay.
*Help For Cut & Paste
Flashpaste Professional by Softvoile is a utility that lets you
type aboilerplatetext, save it to amini-database,and pasteit
automatically into any document, e-mail, Word document,
Web page, chat, etc. Just click “CTRL-U” to pop up a dialog
box where you pick the auto text you need and paste it into a
document. Click the“NewItem” button and typein the name
of the item, and then set its type to RTF or simple text. Just
typetheboilerplatetextinto Flashpasteandfill inallthefields
without having to step out of the submission page several
times. The record is then added to the tree of items in the
Flashpaste main window."
The standard Windows clipboard keeps only the last copied
text, but Flashpaste records all recently copied words, num-
bers and phrases allowing easy reuse and eliminating
repeated copying and pasting. Flashpaste Professional helps
perform avariety of tasks such as automatically inserting fre-
quently used addresses, e-mail text blocks, HTML code
snippets, words,phrases and paragraphs. Flashpaste can also
createmacrosand stringsthat areeitherreplaced orprocessed
by an application. Using macros, you can paste current time
and date, insert commands that emulate pressing the Tab or
Enter keys, and more.
Download Flashpaste Professional using this link
http://softvoile.com/download/flashpastepro.exe?s=ng9
(1.1Mb).Use
the discount coupon (bcddc) for a 25% discount from the
$29.95list price.Offervalid till Feb.01,2008.A30-dayeval-
uation copycanalso bedownloaded.I’mnotsureifit willbea
fully-working version or if they will send you a key for the
trial version
http://softvoile.com/
.Visit their Web site for more
information
http://softvoile.com/flashpaste/?s=ng9
.
*An Interesting Freeware!
DVDVideoSoft Limited
http://www.dvdvideosoft.com
has up-
dated itsfreesoftware,FreeYouTubeto iPod Conversion and
Free YouTube to iPhone Conversion. The software enables
users to download a video from YouTube and convert it to
MP4 video and MP3 audio format to play on an Apple iPod,
iPhone, Sony PSP or cell phone. With a few simple steps, us-
erscan enjoytheir favoriteonlinevideoswithouthaving to sit
in front of the computer. Users enable Free YouTube to iPod
Conversion and Free YouTube to iPhone Conversion by in-
serting a link into the program interface and clicking the
“download and convert” button. The software downloads a
video in MP4 format or audio in MP3, which can then beup-
loaded to aportableplayerormobilephone.Theprogram also
converts a Flash video file to MP4 video format.
DVDVideoSofthascreated alineof freetools: FreeYouTube
to iPod Converter, Free YouTube to MP3 Converter, Free
YouTubeto iPhoneConverter,Free Video to iPodConverter,
Free Video to iPhone Converter, Free Video to MP3 Con-
verter, Free YouTube Uploader, Free Fast MPEG Cut, Free
3GP Video Converter and FreeVideo to Flash Converter.All
programs areabsolutely freeandrun under Windows,includ-
ing Vista.Theysay they respect theusers’privacy and thereis
no spyware or adware. Programs are available in different
languages, ie: English, German, French and Japanese.
Besides free downloads, the siteprovides many tutorials and
guides. For more information visit DVDVideoSoft at
http://www.dvdvideosoft.com/free-dvd-video-software.htm
.In addition
toitssoftwaresite,DVDVideoSoftrunsafreeOn-LineVideo
Conversion resource VIDOKY,
http://www.vidoky.com
, a
popular video download site.
That’sit forthismonth.I’llhavemorenewproduct announce-
mentson my Web site(mostnotofferingadiscount).Meetme
here again next month if your editor permits. This column is
written to make user group members aware of special offers
or freebies I have found or arranged, and my comments
should notbeinterpretedto encourage,or discourage,thepur-
DealsGuy,
continued
Page 10
ACGNJ News
December 2007
Specifications
Published monthlyexcept July and
August
Closingdate: 1st of preceding
month. Ex: Apr 1for May
Black &white onlyonwhiteun-
coated offset stock
Non-bleed
Printed bysheet fedoffset
Halftone screen: 120
Negatives rightreading, emulsion
sidedown.
Halftones/photos $10extra
Ads must be camera ready
Send checkwithcopy, payable to
ACGNJ Inc.
Material should be sent to ACGNJ,
PO Box135, Scotch Plains NJ
07076
For further information contact
Frank Warren,(908) 756-1681,
kb4cyc@webwarren.com.
Advertising Rates
Rates
Full page
7" x10"
$150
2/3 page
4½ x 10
115
1/2 page
7x5
85
3½ x 10
1/3 page
2¼ x 10
57
4½ x 7¼
1/4 page
3¼ x 5
50
2¼ x 7
1/6 page
2¼ x 5
35
4½ x 2½
1/8 page
3¼ x 2½
30
Business card
25
10% discount for3 or more
consecutive insertions
Dufferdom: Tales from the Kingdom of the Ordinary User
Of Avery, CDs, Squaring the Circle, Selected Greek Classics, Plus a Resolution
David D. Uffer (daviduffer(at)sbcglobal.net), Chicago Computer Society
www.ccs.org
We haveall heard of the name Avery, theglobal leader in as-
sorted office supplies, self-adhesive labels (but probably not
yet the US Postal stamps), dividers, markers, and such. You
may nothaveheard ofPaxar,whoseMonarch Divisionseems
to betheculprit behind thosewonderfulpriceand info tagsat-
tached to clothing andothergoodsand hanging by tough,tiny
plasticstringsyou cannotbreak or pull loosebut mustcut and
then seek theremaining portion which is often inserted out of
signt, waiting to annoy you further by scratching your skin if
not removed. Well, Avery just acquired Paxar in a deal worth
1.3 billion bucks. Such is theprice of the right annoyance. So
Avery deserves respect, maybe even reverence if judged by
revenue. It is after all the standard index referred to by more
reasonably priced packs ofblank labelsforusein PC printers.
But this user may have lost some respect for this global
leader(as if they care) because of a wild, redundant search
they placed in my path.
In an efforttoavoid losing sight ofmostotherusersprogress,I
triedtocatch up to acommon practicein thisageofproliferat-
ing digital photos. I collected some pictures taken in Greece
onto some CDs,learning howto do it by trial,error,and read-
ing instructions when desperate. Results were impressive.
Buoyed up by approaching the League of the Big Guys, I
wondered why their handwritten CD content titles were so
curt and scruffy when labels were available to display more
readable and detailed information. A single label might con-
ceivably cause imbalance problems as a CD revved up its
speed as the drive’s internal laser moved to the outer tracks.
But apairofproperly placed labelscould offset eachotherfor
asmoother spin. OK, two labels could also display more in-
formation than one,fine. But Avery makes thesedisk-shaped
labels with the core hole to cover the entire disk and display
anything the user wants to fit in the still larger space, even
graphics. Finer, better. Big league catchup.
Beset by pride and hope of grandeur, I bought a set of holey
Avery disk labels. Swallowing my pride, I looked at the in-
structions. Those that came with the labels explained the
technique for correctly applying the label to the disk, center
holes exactly aligned. Neat. The package and online direc-
tions, showing an imprinted disk, said to use an indexed
template, Avery’s # 8931 or 5931,in Word or WordPerfect.
Each had 2 variants,CDfaceand CDcase.AlII wanted at the
time was the round disk face, maybe later for the almost
squaredisk caselabelif Iwantedto venturefurther.But,inac-
tual use, all the templates allowed was an image without a
central hole. Worse still, all the patterns for the circular disk
were square.
OK,somaybeAvery wantsusersto useAvery’sprinting soft-
ware. It is available online, for free. So they claimed. A
slightly larger version with more graphics is also offered for
sale. Both would do at least some graphics as well as a blank
face for imprinting just text. So they claimed. I’ll spare you
the details of repeated and finally successful attempts to se-
curethesoftware.Guesswhat.Itwasthesameaswhat Ifound
earlier online. I could print text all over a solid square to go
onto a holey disk. A square on top of a circle. Not right. No
help.
Continued
Back Issues Needed
Theeditor isattempting to build aCD containing all
issuesof ACGNJNewsinpdfformat,butourcollec-
tion is incomplete. We’re hoping some faithful
readerhasbeen hoarding them and will bewilling to
lend them to us just long enough to scan them. We
promise to return them quickly. Thanks Joseph
Gaffney, who loaned his collection for scanning.
Below is a list of what we still need.
1985: June, July, August, September
1984: August
1976: January, February, March, April (pam-
phlet-size booklets)
1975: All issues except #1 (June). These are also
pamphlet-size booklets.
If you can supply any of these missing issues (or
scannedimagesorgoodclearcopies),pleasecontact
the Editor by email (
bdegroot@ptd.net
). Those who
supply missing issues will receive a freecopy of the
resulting CD as our thanks for your help.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested