open pdf file in c# : How to insert text in pdf using preview Library SDK component .net asp.net azure mvc 201307-full-issue0-part651

ISSN 0002-9920 (print)
ISSN 1088-9477 (online)
Volume 60, Number 7
of the American Mathematical Society
August 2013
No surprises from Catalan’s constant (see page 948)
The Computation of Previously 
Inaccessible Digits of 
π
2
and Catalan’s 
Constant
page 844
Remembering Basil Gordon, 1931–2012
page 856
Meijer 
G
–Functions: A Gentle 
Introduction
page 866
Is Mathematical History Written by the 
Victors?
page 886
Getting Evidence-Based Teaching 
Practices into Mathematics 
Departments: Blueprint or Fantasy?
page 906
How to insert text in pdf using preview - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to insert text in pdf reader; acrobat add text to pdf
How to insert text in pdf using preview - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
add text to pdf acrobat; add text pdf acrobat
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word. Overview for How to Use XDoc.Word to preview document content without loading
add text to pdf without acrobat; how to add text box to pdf document
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint. Overview for How to Use XDoc.PowerPoint to preview document content without
how to enter text into a pdf; adding text to a pdf
A
MERICAN
M
ATHEMATICAL
S
OCIETY
Math in Moscow
Study mathematics the Russian way in English
The American Mathematical Society invites undergraduate 
mathematics and computer science majors in the U.S. to 
apply for a special scholarship to attend a semester in the 
Math in Moscow program, run by the Independent
University of Moscow.
Features of the Math in Moscow program:
•  15-week semester-long study at an elite institution
•  Study with internationally recognized research
mathematicians
•  Courses are taught in English
Application deadlines for scholarships:  September 15 for 
spring semesters and April 15 for fall semesters.
For more information about the Math in Moscow
program, visit:  mccme.ru/mathinmoscow
For more information about the scholarship program, visit 
ams.org/programs/travel-grants/mimoscow
Scholarship Program
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
toolkit allows developers to specify where they want to insert (blank) PDF last page or after any desired page of current PDF document) using C# .NET
adding a text field to a pdf; add text fields to pdf
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Supported PDF Processing Features by Using RasterEdge WinForms Viewer for C#.NET. Overview. Highlight PDF text. • Add text to PDF document in preview.
add text field pdf; how to add text field to pdf
Who has the #1 homeWork  
system for calculus?
the ansWer is in the questions.
When it comes to online calculus, you need a solution that can grade 
the toughest open-ended questions. And for that there is one answer: 
WebAssign.
WebAssign’s patent pending grading engine can recognize multiple 
correct answers to the same complex question. Competitive systems, on 
the other hand, are forced to use multiple choice answers because, well 
they have no choice. And speaking of choice, only WebAssign supports 
every major textbook from every major publisher. With new interactive 
tutorials and videos offered to every student, it’s not hard to see why 
WebAssign is the perfect answer to your online homework needs.
It’s all part of the WebAssign commitment to excellence in 
education. Learn all about it now at webassign.net/math.
800.955.8275
webassign.net/math
Solve the differential equation.
Solve the differential equation.
t ln t
+ r = 7te
t
7e
t
+ C
dr
dt
r =
ln t
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Features about PDF Processing Features by Using RasterEdge WPF Viewer for C#.NET. Overview. Add text to PDF document. • Insert text box to PDF file.
how to insert text into a pdf; add text to pdf in preview
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Excel. Overview for How to Use XDoc.Excel to preview document content without loading
how to add text to pdf; how to insert text box in pdf document
Communications
874
Report on 2011–2012 New 
Doctoral Recipients
Richard Cleary, James W. 
Maxwell, Colleen Rose
920
Simplicity, in Mathematics 
and in Art
Allyn Jackson
924
Doceamus:  Revisiting an 
Outreach Mathematician
J
erry Dwyer and Lawrence 
Schovanec
927
Scripta Manent:  What We Are 
Doing about the High Cost of 
Textbooks
The AIM Editorial Board
Commentary
837
Opinion: Two Views: How 
Much Math Do Scientists 
Need?
E. O. Wilson and Edward 
Frenkel
839
Letters to the Editor
910
Burden of Proof: A Review of 
Math on Trial
Reviewed by Paul H. Edelman
916
The Evolution of an Idea: 
A Review of  The Noether 
Theorems
Reviewed by Robyn Arianrhod
Notices
of the American Mathematical Society
This month features an article about Meijer G –functions and 
another about computing Catalan’s constant‮ We feature a 
piece about evidence-based teaching and one that considers 
whether mathematical history is written by the victors‮ 
Finally, there is a memorial article for the algebraist Basil 
Gordon‮
—Steven G. Krantz, Editor
Features
844 The Computation of Previously 
Inaccessible Digits of π
2
and Catalan’s 
Constant
David H. Bailey, Jonathan M. Borwein, Andrew 
Mattingly, and Glenn Wightwick 
856 Remembering Basil Gordon, 1931–2012
Krishnaswami Alladi, Coordinating Editor
866  Meijer G –Functions: A Gentle 
Introduction
Richard Beals and Jacek Szmigielski
886  Is Mathematical History Written by the 
Victors?
Jacques Bair, Piotr Błaszczyk, Robert Ely, Valérie 
Henry, Vladimir Kanovei, Karin U. Katz, Mikhail G. 
Katz, Semen S. Kutateladze, Thomas McGaffey, David 
M. Schaps, David Sherry, and Steven Shnider
906  Getting Evidence-Based Teaching 
Practices into Mathematics 
Departments: Blueprint or Fantasy?
Robert Reys
August 2013
910
844
856
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo from RasterEdge.com, this C#.NET PDF image adding Using this C# .NET image adding library control for PDF
how to add text fields to a pdf; how to add text to a pdf file in reader
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
Insert Image to PDF Page Using VB. inputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
add text box in pdf; adding text to pdf in acrobat
Notices
of the American Mathematical Society
Departments
About the Cover ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ 948 
Mathematics People  ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ 929
Smith Awarded Adams Prize, Goldblatt Awarded Jones Medal, 
Bondarenko Awarded Popov Prize 2013, AWM Awards Inaugural 
Research Prizes, Lubetsky and Sly Awarded Rollo Davidson Prize, 
Shoham and Tennenholtz Receive ACM/AAAI Newell Award, Ibragimov 
Awarded Anassilaos Prize, 2013 Clay Research Awards Announced, 
Dick and Pillichshammer Awarded 2013 Information-Based Complexity 
Prize, Prizes of the Mathematical Society of Japan, USA Math Olympiad, 
Moody’s Mega Math Challenge, Malloy and Rubillo Receive NCTM 
Lifetime Achievement Awards, National Academy of Sciences Elections, 
American Academy of Arts and Sciences Elections, AWM Essay Contest 
Winners Announced, Royal Society Elections.
Mathematics Opportunities ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ 934
AMS Travel Grants for ICM 2014, Committee on Education Launches 
New Award, AMS Scholarships for “Math in Moscow”, Call for 
Nominations for AWM–Birman Research Prize in Topology and 
Geometry, Call for Nominations for Sloan Fellowships, NSF Focused 
Research Groups, NSF Mathematical Sciences Postdoctoral Research 
Fellowships, NSA Mathematical Sciences Grants and Sabbaticals 
Program, Research Experiences for Undergraduates, Call for 
Nominations for 2012 Sacks Prize, Call for Nominations for Otto 
Neugebauer Prize, News from PIMS.
Inside the AMS ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ 938
Math in Moscow Scholarships Awarded, AMS Congressional Fellow 
Chosen, AMS Sponsors Exhibit on Capitol Hill, From the AMS Public 
Awareness Office, Deaths of AMS Members. 
For Your Information ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ 940
Museum of Mathematics Awards Rosenthal Prize.
AMS Publications News  ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ 941 
Reference and Book List ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ 942 
Doctoral Degrees Conferred 2011–2012 ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ 949 
Mathematics Calendar  ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ 980
New Publications Offered by the AMS ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ 984
Classified Advertisements ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ 990 
Meetings and Conferences of the AMS ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ 991
Meetings and Conferences Table of Contents ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮1008
From the   
AMS Secretary
Voting Information for 2013 AMS Elections ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ ‮ 979
EDITOR:  Steven G‮ Krantz
ASSOCIATE EDITORS:   
Krishnaswami Alladi, David Bailey, Eric Bedford, 
Jonathan Borwein, Susanne C‮ Brenner, Danny 
Calegari, Bill Casselman (Graphics Editor), Jennifer 
Chayes, Gerald Folland, Susan Friedlander, Robion 
Kirby, Rafe Mazzeo, Harold Parks, Mark Saul, Carla D‮ 
Savage, Steven Strogatz, James Walker
SENIOR WRITER and DEPUTY EDITOR:   
Allyn Jackson
MANAGING EDITOR:  Sandra Frost
CONTRIBUTING WRITER:  Elaine Kehoe
CONTRIBUTING EDITOR:  Randi D‮ Ruden
EDITORIAL ASSISTANT:  David M‮ Collins
PRODUCTION:  Kyle Antonevich, Anna Hattoy, Teresa 
Levy, Mary Medeiros, Stephen Moye, Lori Nero, Arlene 
O’Sean, Karen Ouellette, Courtney Rose, Donna Salter, 
Deborah Smith, Peter Sykes, Patricia Zinni
ADVERTISING SALES:  Anne Newcomb
SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION:  Subscription prices 
for  Volume  60  (2013)  are  US$547  list;  US$437‮60 
institutional  member;  US$328‮20  individual  mem-
ber; US$492‮30 corporate member‮ (The subscription 
price for members is included in the annual dues‮) A 
late charge  of  10% of  the subscription  price will  be 
imposed  upon  orders  received  from  nonmembers 
after  January  1  of  the  subscription  year‮  Add  for 
postage:  Surface  delivery  outside  the  United  States 
and  India—US$27;  in  India—US$40;  expedited  deliv-
ery  to  destinations  in  North  America—US$35;  else-
where—US$120‮  Subscriptions  and  orders  for  AMS 
publications  should  be  addressed  to  the  American 
Mathematical  Society,  P‮O‮  Box  845904,  Boston,  MA 
02284-5904 USA‮  All orders must be prepaid‮
ADVERTISING:  Notices publishes  situations  wanted 
and classified advertising, and display advertising for 
publishers and academic  or  scientific organizations‮ 
Advertising  material  or  questions  may  be  sent  to 
classads@ams.org (classified ads) or notices-ads@
ams.org (display ads)‮
SUBMISSIONS:   Articles and  letters  may  be  sent  to 
the editor by email at notices@math.wustl.edu, by 
fax at 314-935-6839, or by postal mail at Department 
of  Mathematics,  Washington  University  in  St‮  Louis, 
Campus Box 1146, One Brookings Drive, St‮ Louis, MO 
63130‮ Email  is  preferred‮  Correspondence  with  the 
managing editor may  be  sent  to  notices@ams.org‮ 
For more information, see the section “Reference and 
Book List”‮
NOTICES ON THE AMS WEBSITE:  Supported by the 
AMS  membership,  most of  this  publication  is  freely 
available electronically through the AMS website, the 
Society’s  resource  for  delivering  electronic  prod-
ucts  and  services‮  Use  the  URL  http://www.ams. 
org/notices/ to access the Notices on the website‮
[Notices of the American Mathematical Society  (ISSN 0002-
9920) is published monthly except bimonthly in June/July 
by the American Mathemati cal Society at 201 Charles Street, 
Providence, RI 02904-2294 USA, GST No‮ 12189 2046 RT****‮ 
Periodicals postage paid at Providence, RI, and additional 
mailing offices‮ POSTMASTER: Send address change notices 
to Notices of the American Mathematical Society, P‮O‮ Box 
6248, Providence, RI 02940-6248 USA‮] Publication here of the 
Society’s street address and the other information in brackets 
above is a technical requirement of the U‮S‮ Postal Service‮ Tel: 
401-455-4000, email: notices@ams.org‮
© Copyright 2013 by the American Mathematical Society‮
All rights reserved‮
Printed in the United States of America‮ The paper used in 
this journal is acid-free and falls within the guidelines es-
tablished to ensure permanence and durability‮
Notices
of the American Mathematical Society
Opinions expressed in signed Notices articles are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect 
opinions of the editors or policies of the American Mathematical Society‮
A
ugust
2013 
N
otices
of
the
AMs 
837
Opinion
Two Views: How Much 
Math Do Scientists 
Need?
On April 5, 2013, The Wall Street Journal published an essay 
by the  Harvard biologist  E. O.  Wilson, “Great Scientist ≠  
Good at Math”. Berkeley mathematician Edward Frenkel 
responded to it in Slate on April 9, 2013. We reprint the 
two essays below,  with  permission from The Wall Street 
Journal and Slate.
Great Scientist ≠ Good at Math
E. O. Wilson Shares a Secret: Discoveries Emerge 
from Ideas, Not Number-Crunching
For many young people who aspire to be scientists, the 
great bugbear is mathematics. Without advanced math, 
how can you do serious work in the sciences? Well, I have 
a professional secret to share: Many of the most successful 
scientists in the world today are mathematically no more 
than semiliterate.
During my decades of teaching biology at Harvard, I 
watched sadly as bright undergraduates turned away from 
the possibility of a scientific career, fearing that, without 
strong math skills, they would fail. This mistaken assump-
tion has deprived science of an immeasurable amount of 
sorely needed talent. It has created a hemorrhage of brain 
power we need to stanch.
I speak as an authority on this subject because I myself 
am an extreme case. Having spent my precollege years in 
relatively poor Southern schools, I didn’t take algebra until 
my freshman year at the University of Alabama. I finally 
got around to  calculus as a  thirty-two-year-old  tenured 
professor at Harvard, where I sat uncomfortably in classes 
with undergraduate students only a bit  more than half 
my age. A couple of them were students in a course on 
evolutionary biology I was teaching. I swallowed my pride 
and learned calculus.
I was never more than a C student while catching up, 
but I was reassured by the discovery that superior math-
ematical ability is similar to fluency in foreign languages. 
I might have become fluent with more effort and sessions 
talking with the natives, but being swept up with field and 
laboratory research, I advanced only by a small amount.
Fortunately, exceptional mathematical fluency  is re-
quired in only a few disciplines, such as particle physics, 
astrophysics and information theory. Far more important 
throughout the rest of science is the ability to form con-
cepts, during which the researcher conjures images and 
processes by intuition.
Everyone sometimes daydreams like a scientist. Ramped 
up and disciplined, fantasies are the fountainhead of all 
creative thinking. Newton dreamed, Darwin dreamed, you 
dream. The images evoked are at first vague. They may 
shift in form and fade in and out. They grow a bit firmer 
when sketched as diagrams on pads of paper, and they 
take on life as real examples are sought and found.
Pioneers in science  only  rarely make discoveries  by 
extracting  ideas  from pure  mathematics.  Most of the 
stereotypical photographs  of  scientists  studying rows 
of equations on a blackboard are instructors explaining 
discoveries  already  made. Real  progress comes in the 
field writing notes, at the office amid a litter of doodled 
paper, in the hallway struggling to explain something to 
a friend, or eating lunch alone. Eureka moments require 
hard work. And focus.
Ideas in science emerge most readily when some part 
of the world is studied for its own sake. They follow from 
thorough, well-organized knowledge of all that is known or 
can be imagined of real entities and processes within that 
fragment of existence. When something new is encoun-
tered, the follow-up steps usually require mathematical 
and statistical methods to move the analysis forward. If 
that step proves too technically difficult for the person 
who made the discovery, a mathematician or statistician 
can be added as a collaborator.
In  the  late 1970s, I sat  down with the  mathematical 
theorist George Oster to work out the principles of caste 
and the division of labor in the social insects. I supplied 
the details of what had been discovered in nature and the 
lab, and he used theorems and hypotheses from his tool 
kit to capture these phenomena. Without such informa-
tion, Mr. Oster might have developed a general theory, but 
he would not have had any way to deduce which of the 
possible permutations actually exist on earth.
Over the  years, I  have  co-written  many papers  with 
mathematicians and statisticians, so I can offer the fol-
lowing principle with confidence. Call it Wilson’s Principle 
No. 1: It is far easier for scientists to acquire needed col-
laboration from mathematicians and statisticians than it 
is for mathematicians and statisticians to find scientists 
able to make use of their equations.
This imbalance is especially the case in biology, where 
factors in a real-life phenomenon are often misunderstood 
or never noticed in the first place. The annals of theoretical 
biology are clogged with mathematical models that either 
can be safely  ignored  or, when  tested, fail. Possibly no 
more than 10 percent have any lasting value. Only those 
linked solidly to knowledge of real  living systems have 
much chance of being used.
If your level of mathematical competence is low, plan to 
raise it, but meanwhile, know that you can do outstanding 
scientific work with what you have. Think twice, though, 
about specializing in fields that require a close alternation 
of  experiment and quantitative  analysis.  These  include 
most of physics and chemistry, as well as a few specialties 
in molecular biology.
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1090/noti1032
838    
N
otices
of
the
AMs 
V
oluMe
60, N
uMber
7
Opinion
Newton invented calculus  in order to  give substance 
to  his  imagination.  Darwin  had little or no  mathemati-
cal ability, but  with  the  masses  of information  he had 
accumulated, he was able to conceive a process to which 
mathematics was later applied.
For aspiring scientists, a key first step is to find a sub-
ject that interests them deeply and focus on it. In doing 
so, they should keep in mind Wilson’s Principle No. 2: For 
every scientist, there exists a discipline for which his or 
her level of mathematical competence is enough to achieve 
excellence.
—E. O. Wilson 
Harvard University, Emeritus
ewilson@oeb.harvard.edu
(Reprinted with permission from The Wall Street Journal)
Don’t Listen to E. O. Wilson
Math Can Help You in Almost Any Career. There’s 
No Reason to Fear It
E.  O.  Wilson  is  an eminent Harvard  biologist  and  best-
selling author. I salute  him  for his  accomplishments. 
But he couldn’t be more wrong in his recent piece in The 
Wall Street Journal (adapted from his new book Letters 
to a Young Scientist), in which he tells aspiring scientists 
that  they don’t  need  mathematics  to thrive.  He starts 
out by saying: “Many of the most successful scientists in 
the world today are mathematically no more than semi- 
literate … I speak as an authority on this subject because 
I myself am an extreme case.” This would have been fine 
if he had followed with: “But you, young scientists, don’t 
have to be like me, so let’s see if I can help you overcome 
your fear of math.” Alas, the octogenarian authority on 
social insects takes the opposite tack. Turns out he actu-
ally believes not only that the fear is justified, but that 
most scientists don’t need math.  “I  got  by, and so can 
you” is his attitude. Sadly, it’s clear from the article that 
the reason Wilson makes these errors is that, based on 
his own limited experience, he does not understand what 
mathematics is and how it is used in science.
If  mathematics were fine  art, then Wilson’s view of 
it would be that it’s all  about  painting a fence  in your 
backyard. Why learn how to do it yourself when you can 
hire someone to do it for you? But fine art isn’t a painted 
fence, it’s the paintings of the great masters. And likewise, 
mathematics is not about “number-crunching”, as Wilson’s 
article suggests. It’s about concepts and ideas that  em-
power us to describe reality and figure out how the world 
really works. Galileo famously said, “The laws of Nature 
are written in the language of mathematics.” Mathematics 
represents objective knowledge, which allows us to break 
free of dogmas and prejudices. It is through math that 
we learned Earth isn’t flat and that it revolves around the 
sun, that our universe is curved, expanding, full of dark 
energy, and quite possibly has  more than  three spatial 
dimensions.  But since  we  can’t really imagine curved 
spaces of dimension greater than two, how can we even 
begin a conversation about the universe without using the 
language of math?
Charles Darwin rightfully spoke of math endowing us 
“with something like a new sense.” History teaches that 
mathematical  ideas  that  looked  abstract and esoteric 
yesterday led to spectacular scientific advances of today. 
Scientific progress would be diminished if young scientists 
were to heed Wilson’s advice.
It is interesting to note that Wilson’s recent article in 
Nature and  his book  claiming  to show  support  for so-
called  group  selection have  been sharply criticized, by 
Richard Dawkins and  many  others.  Some of  the  critics 
pointed out that one source of error was in Wilson’s math. 
Since I’m not an expert in evolutionary theory, I can’t offer 
an opinion, but I find this controversy interesting given 
Wilson’s thesis that “great scientists don’t need math.”
One thing should be clear: While our perception of the 
physical world  can always be distorted,  our perception 
of the mathematical truths can’t be. They are objective, 
persistent, necessary  truths.  A  mathematical  formula 
means the same  thing to  anyone anywhere—no  matter 
what gender, religion, or skin color; it will mean the same 
thing to anyone a thousand years from now. And that’s 
why mathematics is going to play an increasingly impor-
tant role in science and technology.
One of the key functions of mathematics is the ordering 
of information. With the advent of the 3-D printing and 
other new technology, the reality we are used to is under-
going  a  radical transformation:  Everything  will migrate 
from the layer of physical reality to the layer of informa-
tion and data. We will soon be able to convert information 
into matter on demand by using 3-D printers just as easily 
as we now convert a PDF file into a book or an MP3 file 
into a piece of music. In this brave new world, math will 
be king: It will be used to organize and order information 
and facilitate the conversion of information into matter.
It might still be possible to be “bad in math” (though I 
believe that anyone can be good at math if it is explained 
in the right way) and be a good scientist—in some areas 
and probably not for too long. But this is a handicap and 
nothing to be proud of. Granted, some areas of science 
currently use less math than others. But then practitioners 
in those fields stand to benefit even more from learning 
mathematics.
It would be fine if Wilson restricted the article to his 
personal experience, a career path that is obsolete for a 
modern  student  of biology.  We  could then discuss  the 
real question, which is how to improve our math educa-
tion and to eradicate the fear of mathematics that he is 
talking about. Instead, trading on that fear, Wilson gives 
a misinformed advice to the next generation, and in par-
ticular to future scientists, to eschew mathematics. This is 
not just misguided and counterproductive; coming from 
a leading scientist like him, it is a disgrace. Don’t follow 
this advice—it’s a self-extinguishing strategy.
—Edward Frenkel
University of California at Berkeley
frenkel@math.berkeley.edu
(Reprinted with permission from Slate)
Letters to the Editor
A
ugust
2013 
N
otices
of
the
AMs 
839
The Common Intellectual 
Property of Humankind
With respect  to David  A. Edwards’s 
article  “Platonism  is  the law of the 
land” (Notices, April 2013), in which 
he advocates that mathematical re-
sults should be patentable: Can one 
really imagine a world in which some-
one  must obtain a license and  pay 
royalties  every time (s)he uses the 
Fundamental Theorem of Calculus or, 
for that matter, negative numbers?
—Steven H. Weintraub 
Lehigh University 
shw2@lehigh.edu
(Received March 19, 2013) 
Sustainability or Collapse?
It appears to many  observers  that 
humanity  is  already  moving  into 
“ecological overshoot and collapse”. 
If they are right, then Simon Levin’s 
nice overview in “The mathematics of 
sustainability”  (Notices, April 2013) 
needs a much more ambitious, inter-
disciplinary agenda.
The most outstanding application 
of mathematics to the ecological tra-
jectory of modern  civilization  may 
still be the famous Limits-to-Growth 
study of the 1970s. This  study (see 
Limits to Growth—The  30-Year  Up-
date, 2004) uses nonlinear dynamical 
systems that encode critical feedback 
and feedforward loops among a hand-
ful  of  global variables  (population, 
resources,  food,  industrial  output, 
pollution). It uses  the methodology 
of scenarios that has been applied to 
great effect in climate modeling.
The Limits-to-Growth business-
as-usual scenario, which has held up 
remarkably  well, suggests that  not 
only are we well into ecological over-
shoot but that some form of collapse 
could be imminent—starting within a 
decade or two. If so, mathematicians 
could make a major contribution by 
studying the chaotic aspects of these 
nonlinear systems, especially  how 
they could be controlled to achieve a 
soft landing (= sustainability).
Mathematicians,  especially those 
with  expertise  in  complexity  and 
scientific computing, could be part 
of interdisciplinary teams, similar to 
inherits  the disciplinary  culture  of 
computer science, not of mathemat-
ics—causes me to doubt the validity 
of this premise.
There  are two  reasons  why  the 
computer science literature is more 
prone to errors,  including  serious 
errors in  important papers, than is 
mathematics.  First, the  tradition  is 
to publish mainly in conference pro-
ceedings, not in  journals. Authors 
write  under deadline  pressure  and 
often  submit  their papers  within 
hours (literally) of the deadline. Re-
viewers are also hurried—they each 
have to  read  and evaluate a couple 
dozen papers in the course of a few 
weeks.
In the second place, in computer 
science and related  fields it  is  ex-
pected  that successful  researchers 
write papers  at  a  frenetic  pace, au-
thoring or (more often) coauthoring 
a large number of papers each year. 
As I wrote in my article “The uneasy 
relationship  between  mathematics 
and cryptography” (Notices, Septem-
ber  2007),  “Top  researchers  expect 
that  practically  every  conference 
should include one or more quickie 
papers by  them  or  their students.” 
The  heightened  publish-or-perish 
pressures,  which  are  much  worse 
than in mathematics, contribute  to 
quality control  problems.  Some  ex-
amples  of these  problems  can  be 
found at http://anotherlook.ca.
Cryptography and  computer  sci-
ence  are  not  the  only  fields  that 
seem to  have more problems  than 
mathematics  with  major  errors in 
important papers. Grcar states that 
“biomedical  and  multidisciplinary 
journals  are recognized  for exem-
plary  corrective  policies.”  This  is 
questionable.  The  reader  will find 
a much  less  sanguine viewpoint in 
the  article “Lies, damned lies,  and 
medical science”, by David H. Freed-
man (The Atlantic, November 2010). 
—Neal Koblitz
University of Washington 
koblitz@uw.edu
(Received March 29, 2013) 
On “A Revolutionary Material”
The history of the discovery of quasi- 
crystals  is  not  stated correctly  in 
Radin’s article [“A revolutionary ma-
terial”,  by  Charles  Radin,  Notices, 
March 2013]. Actually the mathemati-
cal  theory  came before  the  experi-
mental discovery of quasicrystals.
The  mathematical  model  for  a 
3-dimensional quasicrystal with ico-
sahedral  symmetry was  first  pub-
lished by my father, P. Kramer, and 
his student R. Neri in the article “On 
periodic and nonperiodic space fill-
ings of Em obtained  by  projection”, 
Acta Cryst. Sect. A 40 (1984), no. 5, 
580–587.  This  paper  was submit-
ted  on  November  5,  1983,  before 
Shechtman’s  experimental  result, 
which  earned  him the  Nobel Prize, 
was published.
In contrast, the paper by D. Levine 
and  P. Steinhardt mentioned  in the 
article was  written and  submitted 
afterwards. The review by M. Senechal 
(MR0768042)  of  the  Kramer-Neri 
paper states this very clearly.
I  want  to make  two  points here. 
Firstly, the  mathematical theory of 
quasicrystals  predated  the  experi-
ment. Secondly, the paper by Levine 
and Steinhardt is not at all the “initial 
report”  on the theory of quasicrys-
tals. It is unfortunate that the official 
press release of the Nobel Prize Com-
mittee contains  the same  historical 
and scientific inaccuracies.
—Linus Kramer
Universität Münster
linus.kramer@uni-muenster.de
(Received March 14, 2013) 
Errors in Papers: Math vs. 
Computer Science
In “Errors and corrections  in math-
ematics  literature”  (Notices,  April 
2013), Joseph Grcar  accepts as  an 
axiom that “There  is  no reason  to 
think…mathematicians  make mis-
takes less often” in their  published 
work  than  researchers  in  other 
branches of science. My experience in 
my own field, cryptography—which, 
although  it  involves  a lot  of math, 
840    
N
otices
of
the
AMs 
V
oluMe
60, N
uMber
7
Letters to the Editor
Flim-Flam in the Name of 
Science
Concerning the Notices article “Math-
ematical methods in the study of his-
torical chronology,” by Florin Diacu, 
April 2013 issue:
The Notices has disgraced itself by 
allowing its good name to be used in 
connection with the crackpot histori-
cal theories of Anatoly Fomenko. The 
fact that Fomenko is a mathematician 
does not in any way lend credibility 
to his pseudoscientific publications, 
which  should  interest  the  scientific 
community only insofar as they pro-
vide a cautionary illustration of the 
manner  in  which membership in a 
national  scientific  academy can  be 
misused to  promulgate  pure non-
sense.  Suffice  it  to  point  out  that 
Fomenko  asserts  that the entirety 
of Chinese history is a fabrication of 
eighteenth-century  Jesuits, that all 
ancient Roman and  Greek  artifacts 
are actually forgeries produced dur-
ing  the  Renaissance, and  that the 
New Testament  was  written  before 
the Old. Needless to say, such asser-
tions are so thoroughly incompatible 
with vast  troves  of historical  and 
archaeological evidence that they are 
not taken seriously by any competent 
experts in the relevant fields.
Of  course,  Fomenko  has  every 
right to  pursue his bizarre hobbies 
and is free to make a public fool of 
himself  to  his heart’s content.  But 
the Notices of the AMS is not an ap-
propriate forum for such pseudosci-
entific tomfoolery. The danger is that 
publication here could lend an air of 
legitimacy to work which would never 
be  published in  a  scholarly journal 
refereed by competent experts in the 
fields in question.
Could  the  Notices please confine 
itself  to  articles with  actual  math-
ematical content? That way, we might 
reasonably hope to see more articles 
that have been refereed by scholars 
whose knowledge and training qual-
ify them to accurately judge whether 
or not an article is substantially cor-
rect and interesting.
—Claude LeBrun
Stony Brook University
claude@math.sunysb.edu
(Received March 20, 2013) 
American territories of the dissolved 
Moscow Tartary.
And now we ask the question: when 
and how did the United States come 
into  existence?  Let  us  pay  special  
attention to the time of formation of 
the USA. The Encyclopedic Dictionary 
tells us that “in the process of the wars 
for  independence in North America 
in 1775–1783…an independent state 
was created, the USA  (1776).”  And 
now  we  realize unexpectedly  that 
formation of  the  USA  surprisingly 
EXACTLY COINCIDES WITH THE END 
OF THE WAR WITH “PUGACHEV” IN 
RUSSIA. Let us recall that “Pugachev” 
was defeated in 1775. Now everything 
is in its place. Apparently, the “Inde-
pendence war” in North America was 
a war with the weakening American 
Russian  Horde.  The  Romanovs  at-
tacked the Horde from the East, and 
Americans “struggling for  indepen-
dence”  attacked it  from  the  West. 
Now  they  teach  us that  Americans 
were fighting for “independence from 
England”. In reality this was a war for 
the partition of enormous American 
lands of the Moscow Tartary, which 
found themselves without the central 
Russian-Horde  governance.…  It  is 
clear that the very fact of the war with 
the “Mongolian” Horde  in America 
was carefully erased from the pages 
of textbooks of American history. As 
well as the very fact of the existence 
of the huge Moscow Tartary.”
(Translated from G.  V. Nosovskii 
and A. T. Fomenko, “Reconstruction 
of world history (New chronology)”, 
Business  Express,  Moscow,  2001, 
p. 451 of 726 pp.)
In our opinion, the above  quota-
tion  gives  an  adequate  impression 
of  the  methods and conclusions  of 
Fomenko  and  Nosovskii.  We leave 
it to the readers to decide  whether 
an account of this research deserves 
publication in the Notices.
Alex Eremenko
Purdue University
eremenko@math.purdue.edu
—Victor Grinberg 
Independent scholar, 
Pittsburgh, PA 
victor_grinberg@yahoo.com
(Received April 2, 2013)
those  assembled  to  model  climate 
change.  Unfortunately,  though  one 
might expect economists to be taking 
the  lead when it comes  to growth, 
they  seem to be missing  in  action. 
However,  Europe  is  starting  to see 
conferences  on  “de-growth”  as  it 
deals  with  high fuel  costs and  one 
debt crisis after another.
—Richard H. Burkhart, Ph.D.
Mathematics independent 
researcher, Seattle, WA
dickburkhart@comcast.net
(Received April 2, 2013) 
“New Chronology’’ of Nosovskii 
and Fomenko in the Notices
The  April  2013  issue  of  the  No-
tices  contains  an  article  by  Florin 
Diacu,  “Mathematical  methods  in 
the study of historical chronology”. 
Most of this article is an exposition 
of the “research” of A. Fomenko and  
G. Nosovskii on mathematical meth-
ods  in  chronology.  According  to  
F. Diacu, this research is “published 
in a mathematical  journal  that  has 
reasonably  good ranking.” F.  Diacu 
laments that “So far, historians have 
ignored  these  studies…”  and  “So 
far, biblical scholars  seem  to  have 
ignored Fomenko’s conclusions ….”
T
he reason  scholars ignore  this 
research is simple: it is the same rea-
son physicists would ignore research 
concluding that the earth is flat.
We  assume that  most  Western 
readers are not familiar with the “re-
search” of Fomenko and Nosovskii on 
chronology, since most of the enor-
mous output of these authors is pub-
lished in Russian. So let us explain. 
Since the 1970s Fomenko has applied 
“mathematical methods”  to  revise 
the established historical chronology 
and historical events themselves. He 
comes to the remarkable conclusion 
that almost all history that we learn 
in school has been intentionally fal-
sified, forged by some international 
conspiracy.
The following is our literal transla-
tion from Russian of a passage from 
a book  by Fomenko and  Nosovskii, 
preserving punctuation and capital-
ization of the original:
Section 2.7. Formation in 1776 of 
the  United States of America on the 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested