open pdf file in c# : Add text to pdf in acrobat control Library system azure .net web page console 201307-full-issue10-part653

930    
N
otices
of
the
AMs 
V
oluMe
60, N
uMber
7
Mathematics People
Viazovska solved the spherical t-design conjecture by Ko-
revaar and Meyers concerning optimal approximation of 
integrals over the sphere by arithmetic means of values of 
the integrand. This result beautifully illustrates the power 
of the fixed-point method to approximation problems. 
Andriy Bondarenko has also advanced powerful new ideas 
in other areas of approximation theory, in particular, in 
monotone rational approximation, one of Vasil A. Popov’s 
favorite research areas.” The prize consists of a marble 
pyramid trophy and a cash award of US$2,000. 
—From a University of South Carolina press release
AWM Awards Inaugural 
Research Prizes
The Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM) has an-
nounced the awarding of two new major research prizes. 
The AWM-Microsoft Research Prize in Algebra and Number 
Theory has been awarded to Sophie Morel of Princeton 
University “in recognition of her exceptional research 
in number theory.” The prize recognizes exceptional 
research in algebra and number theory by a woman early 
in her career. 
The prize citation reads in part: “Morel is a powerful 
arithmetic algebraic geometer who has made fundamental 
contributions to the Langlands program. Her research has 
been called ‘spectacularly original, and technically very 
demanding’. Her research program has been favorably 
compared to that of several Fields medalists. She accom-
plished one of the main goals of the Langlands program 
by calculating the zeta functions of unitary and symplectic 
Shimura varieties in terms of the L-functions of the appro-
priate automorphic forms. To achieve this, she introduced 
an innovative t-structure on derived categories which had 
been missed by many experts. Her book On the Cohomol-
ogy of Certain Noncompact Shimura Varieties, published 
in the Annals of Mathematics Studies series, is described 
as a tour de force.
“Morel found another remarkable application of her 
results on weighted cohomology. She gave a new geometric 
interpretation and conceptual proof of Brenti’s celebrated 
but mysterious combinatorial formula for Kazhdan-
Lusztig polynomials, which are of central importance in 
representation theory.” 
Morel received her Ph.D. from the Université Paris-Sud. 
She has also held positions at the Institute for Advanced 
Study, the Clay Mathematics Institute, Harvard University, 
and the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Studies. 
Svitlana Mayboroda of the University of Minnesota 
has been awarded the 2012 AWM Sadosky Research Prize 
in Analysis in recognition of her fundamental contribu-
tions to harmonic analysis and PDEs. The award, named 
for Cora Sadosky, a former president of AWM, recognizes 
exceptional research in analysis by a woman early in her 
career.
The prize citation reads in part: “Mayboroda’s research 
has centered on boundary value problems for second 
and higher order elliptic equations in nonsmooth media. 
Elliptic equations in nonsmooth media model a variety of 
physical systems and thus play a central role in science 
and engineering. Her research addresses fundamental 
problems aimed at understanding how irregular geom-
etries or internal inhomogeneities of media affect the 
behavior of the physical system in question. Her talent 
and imagination, which have been praised by world lead-
ers in the field, is also evident in her recent work with 
Vladimir Maz’ya on regularity in all dimensions for the 
polyharmonic Green’s function in general domains and  
of the Wiener test for higher order elliptic equations, 
which in turn relies on a new notion of capacity in this 
case. This is the first result of its kind for higher order  
equations, showing remarkable creativity and deep insight. 
For higher order elliptic operators the situation on non- 
smooth domains is quite different than in the second-
order case, and much less is known. Mayboroda’s contri-
butions have opened up fundamental new paths in this 
uncharted territory and she has been a major driving 
force behind it.”
Mayboroda received her Ph.D. from the University of 
Missouri at Columbia. She has been the recipient of a 
Sloan Research Fellowship and an NSF CAREER grant, 
with which she ran a Workshop for Women in Analysis 
and PDE in 2012 designed to support early-career women 
in their passage from graduate school to postdoctoral or 
faculty positions.
–From AWM announcements
Lubetzky and Sly Awarded 
Rollo Davidson Prize
Eyal Lubetzky of Microsoft Research and the Univer-
sity of Washington and Allan Sly of the University of 
California Berkeley have been jointly awarded the 2013 
Rollo Davidson Prize “for their work on the dynamics of 
the Ising model, and especially their remarkable proof of 
the cut-off phenomenon.” The Rollo Davidson Trust was 
founded in 1975 and awards the annual prize to young 
mathematicians working in the field of probability.
—From a Rollo Davidson Trust announcement
Shoham and Tennenholtz 
Receive ACM/AAAI Newell 
Award
Yoav Shoham of Stanford University and Moshe Ten-
nenholtz of Technion-Israel Institute of Technology 
and Microsoft Research have been named the recipients 
of the 2012 Allen Newell Award of the Association for 
Computing Machinery (ACM) and the Association for 
the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI). They 
were recognized for contributions to multiagent systems 
spanning computer science, game theory, and economics. 
Add text to pdf in acrobat - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to insert text box on pdf; how to insert text box in pdf
Add text to pdf in acrobat - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text pdf file; add text to pdf document online
A
ugust
2013 
N
otices
of
the
AMs 
931
Mathematics People
According to the prize citation, “Shoham’s pioneering 
work provided a methodology for specifying distributed 
multiagent systems. His research on game theory includes 
advances in combinatorial auctions, where participants 
place bids on combinations of discrete items. He also ad-
vanced mechanism design, sometimes known as reverse 
game theory, which sets formal rules that design a game 
as well as predicting how a game will be played. 
“Tennenholtz pioneered several approaches to the de-
sign and analysis of interactions between decision-makers 
in computational settings. He also created RMax, a general 
efficient algorithm applicable to learning by interacting 
with an environment. In addition, he introduced the con-
cept of program equilibrium, an ingenious application of 
computer science to the analysis of Internet economies. 
He is acknowledged as a central contributor to many of 
Microsoft’s pricing algorithms for online advertising.”
—From an ACM announcement 
Ibragimov Awarded Anassilaos 
Prize
Zair Ibragimov of California State University, Fullerton, 
has been awarded the 2012 International Anassilaos 
Prize in Mathematics from the Associazione Culturale 
Anassilaos. He was honored for his “distinguished con-
tributions to analysis and geometry, including geometric 
function theory, metric geometry and hyperbolization of 
metric spaces.” The prize was instituted in honor of the 
twentieth-century Italian geometer Renato Calapso.
—From a Cal State Fullerton announcement
2013 Clay Research Awards 
Announced
The Clay Mathematics Institute (CMI) has awarded the 
2013 Clay Research Award to Rahul Pandharipande of 
ETH Zurich. He was honored “for his recent outstanding 
work in enumerative geometry, specifically for his proof 
in a large class of cases of the MNOP conjecture that he 
formulated with Maulik, Okounkov, and Nekrasov. The 
conjecture relates two methods of counting curves in an 
algebraic variety, one given by Gromov-Witten theory and 
the other by Donaldson-Thomas invariants. By building 
in particular on joint work with Thomas on stable pairs, 
Pandharipande and his student Aaron Pixton proved the 
conjecture for many (possibly most) Calabi-Yau three-
folds.” Aaron Pixton was awarded a 2013 Clay Research 
Fellowship.
—From a CMI announcement
Dick and Pillichshammer 
Awarded 2013 Information-
Based Complexity Prize
Josef Dick of the University of New South Wales and   
Friedrich Pillichshammer of Johannes Kepler Univer-
sity have been named recipients of the 2013 Prize for 
Achievement in Information-Based Complexity (IBC). The 
prize consists of US$3,000 and a plaque. This annual prize 
is given for outstanding contributions to information-
based complexity.
—Joseph Traub, Columbia University
Prizes of the Mathematical 
Society of Japan
The Mathematical Society of Japan (MSJ) has awarded 
several prizes for 2013.
The Algebra Prize has been awarded to Tomoyuki 
Arakawa of Kyoto University for work on representation 
theory of infinite dimensional Lie algebras and W-algebras 
and to Atsushi Ichino of Kyoto University for work in the 
theory of automorphic representations and periods. The 
Algebra Prize is awarded to researchers who have made 
significant contributions to the development of algebra in 
a broad sense by obtaining outstanding results.
The Spring Prize was awarded to Masayuki Asaoka 
of Kyoto University for his outstanding contributions to 
the study of hyperbolic dynamical systems and related 
geometry. The Spring Prize is awarded to researchers 
under the age of forty who have obtained outstanding 
mathematical results.
The Prize for Science and Technology in Research 
was awarded to Masafumi Akahira of the University of 
Tsukuba for his outstanding contributions to statistical 
higher order asymptotic theory. The Prizes in Research 
recognize researchers for highly original research or de-
velopments that contribute to the development of science 
and technology in Japan.
—From MSJ announcements
USA Math Olympiad
The 2013 USA Mathematical Olympiad (USAMO) was held 
April 30–May 1, 2013. The students who participated in the 
Olympiad were selected on the basis of their performances 
on the American High School and American Invitational 
Mathematics Examinations. The twelve highest scorers 
in this year’s USAMO, listed in alphabetical order, were: 
Calvin Deng, North Carolina School of Science and Math-
ematics, Durham; Andrew He, Monta Vista High School, 
Cupertino, California; Ravi Jagadeesan, Phillips Exeter 
Academy, Exeter, New Hampshire; Pakawut Jiradilok, 
Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, New Hampshire; Kevin Li, 
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Add, insert PDF native annotations to PDF file. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print
how to insert pdf into email text; how to insert text in pdf file
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
Allow users to convert PDF to Text (TXT) file. can manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
adding text to pdf online; add text in pdf file online
932    
N
otices
of
the
AMs 
V
oluMe
60, N
uMber
7
Mathematics People
West Windsor-Plainsboro High School South, West Wind-
sor, New Jersey; Ray Li, Phillips Exeter Academy, Exeter, 
New Hampshire; Mark Sellke, William Henry Harrison 
High School, Evansville, Indiana; Bobby Shen, Dulles 
High School, Sugar Land, Texas; Zhuoqun Song, Phillips 
Exeter Academy, Exeter, New Hampshire; David Stoner, 
South Aiken High School, Aiken, South Carolina; Thomas 
Swayze, Canyon Crest Academy, San Diego, California; 
and Victor Wang, Ladue Horton Watkins High School, 
Ladue, Missouri.
The twelve USAMO winners will attend the Mathemati-
cal Olympiad Summer Program (MOSP) at the University 
of Nebraska, Lincoln. Ten of the twelve will take the team 
selection test to qualify for the U. S. team. The six students 
with the highest combined scores from the test and the 
USAMO will become members of the U. S. team and will 
compete in the International Mathematical Olympiad (IMO) 
to be held in Santa Marta, Colombia, July 18–28, 2013.
—From Mathematical Association 
of America announcements
Moody’s Mega Math Challenge
The winners of the 2013 Mega Math Challenge for high 
school students have been announced. The topic for this 
year’s competition dealt with recycling. Each group had 
to quantify the plastic waste filling U.S. landfills, come 
up with the best recycling methods for U.S. cities to 
implement based on their demographics, and recommend 
guidelines for nationwide recycling standards.
A team from Wayzata High School in Plymouth, Min-
nesota, was awarded the Summa Cum Laude Team Prize 
of US$20,000 in scholarship money. The members of the 
team were Jenny Lai, Abram Sanderson, Amy Xiong, 
Lynn Zhang, and Roy Zhao. Their coach was Thomas 
Kilkelly.
The Magna Cum Laude Team Prize of US$15,000 in 
scholarship money was awarded to a team from North 
Carolina School of Science and Mathematics, Durham, 
North Carolina. The team members were Jeffrey An, 
Dayton Ellwanger, Christie Jiang, and Anne Kelley. 
They were coached by Daniel Teague.
The Cum Laude Team Prize of US$10,000 was awarded 
to a team from North Penn High School, Lansdale, Penn-
sylvania. The team members were Priya Kikani, Scott 
Landes, Patrick Nicodemus, Julianna Supplee, and 
Francis Walsh. Their coach was Dianne Wakefield.
The Meritorious Team Prize of US$7,500 was awarded 
to a team from T. R. Robinson High School, Tampa, Florida. 
The team members were Lauren Lopez, Ravi Patel, 
Chris Sipes, Dylan Wang, and Anna Yannakopoulos. 
They were coached by Judi Charley-Sale.
The Exemplary Team Prize of US$5,000 was awarded to 
a team from Evanston Township High School, Evanston, Il-
linois. The team members were Maggie Davies, Caroline 
Duke, Laura Goetz, Katie Latimer, and Dina Sinclair. 
Their coach was Mark Vondracek. 
The First Honorable Mention Team Prize of US$2,500 
was awarded to a team from Montgomery Blair High 
School, Silver Spring, Maryland. The team members were 
Alexander Bourzutschky, Alan Du, Tatyana Gubin, 
Lisha Ruan, and Audrey Shi. They were coached by 
David Stein.
The Mega Math Challenge invites teams of high school 
juniors and seniors to solve an open-ended, realistic, chal-
lenging modeling problem focused on real-world issues. 
The top five teams receive awards ranging from US$5,000 
to US$20,000 in scholarship money. The competition is 
sponsored by the Moody’s Foundation, a charitable foun-
dation established by Moody’s Corporation, and organized 
by the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics 
(SIAM). 
—From a Moody’s Foundation/SIAM announcement
Malloy and Rubillo Receive 
NCTM Lifetime Achievement 
Awards
The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) 
has presented Mathematics Education Trust (MET) Life-
time Achievement Awards for Distinguished Service to 
Mathematics Education to Carol E. Malloy, Wilmington, 
North Carolina, and James M. Rubillo, Bucks County Com-
munity College, Newtown, Pennsylvania. Malloy has been a 
voice and a leader in mathematics education. Throughout 
her career she has worked to address the inequities that 
African American, Latino, and Native American students 
face in learning mathematics. She has served on the NCTM 
Board of Directors, edited NCTM yearbooks, reviewed 
journal manuscripts, written journal articles, served on 
committees, given presentations, and been elected presi-
dent of the Benjamin Banneker Association, an NCTM af-
filiate. She served on the writing team for the publication   
Principles and Standards for School Mathematics. In 2010 
she was awarded the first annual UNC–Chapel Hill School 
of Education Black Alumni Impact Award. She is currently 
serving as a lead author for Glencoe/McGraw-Hill K–12 
school mathematics programs.
Rubillo has been an inspirational leader, communicator, 
and advocate for mathematics education for more than 
forty-five years. He has made numerous contributions to 
the mathematics education community, with a special 
emphasis on technology and teaching mathematics at the 
community college and high school levels. He participated 
in developing NCTM’s An Agenda for Action, released in 
1980, the first publication to focus on problem solving as 
a basic skill, which changed the direction of mathematics 
education in the United States. His vision for improving 
instruction extended to the use of technology to reach 
more educators through such initiatives as Math in the 
Media and Math Matters. He served as executive director 
of NCTM from 2001 to 2009. He received an honorary 
doctor of science degree from West Chester University 
in 2004, and in 2008 the National Council of Supervisors 
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
Using this VB.NET Imaging PDF Watermark Add-on, you simply create a watermark that consists of text or image And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no
add text to pdf acrobat; adding text to pdf file
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
how to add text to a pdf in acrobat; how to add text box in pdf file
A
ugust
2013 
N
otices
of
the
AMs 
933
Mathematics People
of Mathematics presented him with NCSM’s Ross Taylor/
Glenn Gilbert National Leadership Award.
—From NCTM announcements
National Academy of Sciences 
Elections
The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) has elected 
eighty-four new members and twenty-one foreign associ-
ates for 2013. Following are the new members whose work 
involves the mathematical sciences: Manjul Bhargava, 
Princeton University; S. James Gates Jr., University of 
Maryland, College Park; Juris Hartmanis, Cornell Uni-
versity; Victor Kac, Massachusetts Institute of Technol-
ogy; Gregory F. Lawler, University of Chicago; Juan 
Maldacena, Institute for Advanced Study; James A. 
Sethian, University of California Berkeley; Éva Tardos, 
Cornell University; David A. Vogan Jr., Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology; Avi Wigderson, Institute for Ad-
vanced Study; and Horng-Tzer Yau, Harvard University.  
Peter G. Hall, University of Melbourne, Australia, was 
elected as a foreign associate.
—From an NAS announcement
American Academy of Arts 
and Sciences Elections
The American Academy of Arts and Sciences (AAAS) has 
elected 186 new fellows and 12 foreign honorary mem-
bers for 2013. Following are the new fellows whose work 
involves the mathematical sciences.
Lawrence D. Brown, University of Pennsylvania, 
Wharton School; Philip J. Hanlon, University of Michigan/
Dartmouth College; Herve Jacquet, Columbia Univer-
sity; H. Blaine Lawson Jr., Stony Brook University, State 
University of New York; Duong H. Phong, Columbia 
University; Sorin Popa, University of California, Los An-
geles;  Walter A. Strauss, Brown University; Richard A. 
Tapia, Rice University; and Bin Yu, University of Califor-
nia, Berkeley. Elected as a foreign honorary member was 
Henri Berestycki, École des Hautes Études en Sciences 
Sociales, Paris.
—From an AAAS announcement
AWM Essay Contest Winners 
Announced
The Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM) has 
announced the winners of its 2013 essay contest, “Biog-
raphies of Contemporary Women in Mathematics”.
The grand prize was awarded to Rebecca Myers, High 
Tech High International, San Diego, California, for her 
essay “Sara Billey: The Most Famous ‘Sara in Math’”. The 
essay won first place in the high school category and will 
be published in the AWM Newsletter.
First place in the undergraduate-level category went to 
Joy Otobo, Benue State University, Kaduna, Nigeria, for 
her essay “Destined to Count”. First place in the middle 
school-level category went to Emmanuel Martinez, Ly-
ford Middle School, Lyford, Texas, for his essay “A Teacher 
of Miracles”. 
—From an AWM announcement
Royal Society Elections
The Royal Society of London has elected its new fellows 
for 2013. The new fellows whose work involves the math-
ematical sciences are: Keith Ball, University of Warwick; 
Raymond Goldstein, University of Cambridge; Gareth 
Roberts, University of Warwick; Alan Turnbull, National 
Physical Laboratory; and Julia Yeomans, University of 
Oxford. Elected as a foreign member was Elliott Lieb, 
Princeton University.
—From a Royal Society announcement
Department of Mathematics
Faculty Position(s)
The Department of Mathematics invites applications for tenure-track 
faculty position(s) at the rank of Assistant Professor in all areas of 
mathematics.  Other things being equal, preference will be given to 
areas consistent with the Department’s strategic planning.
Applicants  should  have  a  PhD  degree  and  strong  experience 
in  research  and  teaching.   Applicants with exceptionally  strong 
qualifi cations  and  experience in  research  and  teaching  may be 
considered for position(s) above the Assistant Professor rank.
Starting rank and salary will depend on qualifi cations and experience.  
Fringe benefi ts include medical/dental benefi ts and annual leave.  
Housing will also be provided where applicable. Initial appointment 
will be made on a three-year contract, renewable subject to mutual 
agreement. A gratuity will be payable upon successful completion 
of the contract.
Applications received on or before 31 December 2013 will be given 
full consideration for appointment in 2014.  Applications received 
afterwards will be considered subject to the availability of position(s).  
Applicants should send their curriculum vitae together with at least 
three research references and one teaching reference to the Human 
Resources Offi ce, HKUST, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong.  
Applicants for position(s) above the Assistant Professor rank should 
send their curriculum vitae and the names of at least three research 
referees to the Human Resources Offi ce.
More information about the University is available on the University’s 
homepage at http://www.ust.hk.
(Information provided by applicants will be used for recruitment and other employment-related  purposes.)
THE HONG KONG UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
how to insert text in pdf reader; add text field to pdf acrobat
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
adding text to a pdf in reader; add text boxes to pdf document
934    
N
otices
of
the
AMs 
V
oluMe
60, N
uMber
7
Mathematics Opportunities
AMS Travel Grants for ICM 
2014
The American Mathematical Society has applied to the 
National Science Foundation (NSF) for funds to permit 
partial travel support for U.S. mathematicians attending 
the 2014 International Congress of Mathematicians (ICM 
2014), August 13–21, 2014, in Seoul, Korea. Subject to 
the award decision by the NSF, the Society is preparing to 
administer the selection process, which would be similar 
to previous programs funded in 1990, 1994, 1998, 2002, 
2006, and 2010.
Instructions on how to apply for support will be 
available on the AMS website at http://www.ams.org/
programs/travel-grants/icm. The application period 
will be September 1–November 15, 2013. This travel 
grants program, if funded, will be administered by the 
Membership and Programs Department, AMS, 201 Charles 
Street, Providence, RI 02904-2294. You can contact us at 
ICM2014@ams.org; 800-321-4267, ext. 4113; or 401-455-
4113. 
This program is open to U.S. mathematicians (those who 
are currently affiliated with a U.S. institution). Early-career 
mathematicians (those within six years of their doctorate), 
women, and members of U.S. groups underrepresented in 
mathematics are especially encouraged to apply. ICM 2014 
Invited Speakers from U.S. institutions should submit ap-
plications if funding is desired. 
Applications will be evaluated by a panel of mathemati-
cal scientists under the terms of a proposal submitted to 
the National Science Foundation by the Society. 
Should the proposal to the NSF be funded, the following 
conditions will apply: mathematicians accepting grants for 
partial support of the travel to ICM 2014 may not supple-
ment them with any other NSF funds. Currently, it is the 
intention of the NSF’s Division of Mathematical Sciences to 
provide no additional funds on its other regular research 
grants for travel to ICM in 2014. However, an individual 
mathematician who does not receive a travel grant may use 
regular NSF grant funds, subject to the usual restrictions 
and prior approval requirements.
Visit http://www.ams.org/programs/travel-
grants/icm for more details. All information currently 
available about the ICM 2014 program, organization, and 
registration procedure is located on the ICM 2014 website, 
http://www.icm2014.org/.
—AMS Membership and Programs Department
Committee on Education 
Launches New Award
At its January 2013 meeting, the AMS Council gave final 
approval to a new award proposed by the Committee on 
Education. The award recognizes outstanding contribu-
tions by mathematicians to education in mathematics 
at the pre-college level and during the first two years of 
college.
Award for Impact on the Teaching and Learn-
ing of Mathematics
The Award for Impact on the Teaching and 
Learning of Mathematics was established by 
the AMS Committee on Education in 2013. The 
award is given annually to a mathematician 
(or group of mathematicians) who has made 
significant contributions of lasting value to 
mathematics education. Priorities of the award 
include recognition of (a) accomplished math-
ematicians who have worked directly with pre-
college teachers to enhance teachers’ impact on 
mathematics achievement for all students, or 
(b) sustainable and replicable contributions by 
mathematicians to improving the mathematics 
education of students in the first two years of 
college.
The endowment fund that supports the award was 
established by a contribution from Kenneth I. and Mary 
Lou Gross in honor of their daughters Laura and Karen.
The US$1,000 award is given annually. The recipient is 
selected by the Committee on Education.
Nominations for the first award are now open online 
at ams.org/profession/prizes-awards/prizes. The 
nomination deadline is September 15, 2013.
The Society gratefully acknowledges Professor and Mrs. 
Gross for their generosity in creating the endowed fund.  
Their gift demonstrates their steadfast commitment to 
mathematics and to preparing our nation’s educators to 
teach it. The Kenneth I. and Mary Lou Gross Fund will 
provide a perpetual source of support for the new award.   
—AMS Committee on Education
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS hand, free hand line, rectangle, text, hotspot, hotspot Users need to add following implementations to
how to enter text in pdf file; add text to pdf file
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
Excel documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
add text pdf acrobat; add text to a pdf document
A
ugust
2013 
N
otices
of
the
AMs 
935
Mathematics Opportunities
AMS Scholarships for “Math in 
Moscow”
The Math in Moscow program at the Independent Univer-
sity of Moscow (IUM) was created in 2001 to provide for-
eign students (primarily from the United States, Canada, 
and Europe) with a semester-long, mathematically inten-
sive program of study in the Russian tradition of teaching 
mathematics, the main feature of which has always been 
the development of a creative approach to studying math-
ematics from the outset—the emphasis being on problem 
solving rather than memorizing theorems. 
Indeed, discovering mathematics under the guidance of 
an experienced teacher is the central principle of the IUM, 
and the Math in Moscow program emphasizes in-depth 
understanding of carefully selected material rather than 
broad surveys of large quantities of material. Even in the 
treatment of the most traditional subjects, students are 
helped to explore significant connections with contempo-
rary research topics. The IUM is a small, elite institution 
of higher learning focusing primarily on mathematics and 
was founded in 1991 at the initiative of a group of well-
known Russian research mathematicians, who now make 
up the Academic Council of the university. Today, the IUM 
is one of the leading mathematical centers in Russia. Most 
of the Math in Moscow program’s teachers are internation-
ally recognized research mathematicians, and all of them 
have considerable teaching experience in English, typically 
in the United States or Canada. All instruction is in English. 
With funding from the National Science Foundation 
(NSF), the AMS awards five US$9,000 scholarships each 
semester to U.S. students to attend the Math in Moscow 
program. To be eligible for the scholarships, students 
must be either U.S. citizens or enrolled at a U.S. institu-
tion at the time they attend the Math in Moscow program. 
Students must apply separately to the IUM’s Math in 
Moscow program and to the AMS Math in Moscow Schol-
arship program. Undergraduate or graduate mathematics 
or computer science majors may apply. The deadlines 
for applications for the scholarship program are Septem-
ber 15, 2013, for the spring 2014 semester and April 15, 
2014, for the fall 2014 semester. 
Information and application forms for Math in Mos-
cow are available on the Web at http://www.mccme.
ru/mathinmoscow or by writing to: Math in Moscow, 
P.O. Box 524, Wynnewood, PA 19096; fax: +7095-291-
65-01; email: mim@mccme.ru. Information and applica-
tion forms for the AMS scholarships are available on 
the AMS website at http://www.ams.org/programs/
travel-grants/mimoscow or by writing to: Math in 
Moscow Program, Membership and Programs Department, 
American Mathematical Society, 201 Charles Street, Provi-
dence, RI 02904-2294; email: student-serv@ams.org. 
—AMS Membership and Programs Department
Call for Nominations for AWM-
Birman Research Prize in 
Topology and Geometry
The Executive Committee of the Association for Women 
in Mathematics (AWM) has established the AWM–Joan & 
Joseph Birman Research Prize in Topology and Geometry 
to highlight exceptional research in some area of topology/
geometry by a woman early in her career. The prize will be 
awarded every other year, with the first prize presented 
at the AWM reception at the Joint Mathematics Meetings 
in San Antonio, Texas, in January 2015.
The prize is made possible by a generous contribution 
from Joan Birman, whose work has been in low-dimen-
sional topology, and her husband, Joseph, who is a theo-
retical physicist whose specialty is applications of group 
theory to solid state physics. Dr. Birman says, “Mathemati-
cal research has played a central role in my own life and 
has been a source of deep personal satisfaction. In ad-
dition, some of my closest friendships have come about 
through joint work. Finally, as a teacher I felt privileged 
to be there when my students had their own ‘aha’ mo-
ments. From my own life I know that creative research in 
mathematics can present special difficulties when women 
have young children. I felt the conflict personally when my 
young children were pulling at my clothing to get my atten-
tion, but I was in ‘math mode’. Everything I know suggests 
that women have greater difficulty handling this particular 
conflict than men. I also know that children grow up and 
develop interests of their own, and when that happens the 
conflict slowly diminishes. Also, if you have experienced 
the rich satisfaction of creative research at an early career 
time, you never forget it. Moreover, the math community 
will almost certainly be welcoming if you have taken a 
break but then start to have good research ideas again. 
Those are the reasons why it was an easy decision for us 
to use money that we’d set aside to encourage research 
by talented young women through this AWM early career 
prize. What better use could we find for our money?”
When reviewing nominations for this award, the field 
will be broadly interpreted to include topology, geometry, 
geometric group theory, and related areas. Candidates 
should be women within ten years of receiving their Ph.D.’s 
or having not yet received tenure. Nominations should be 
submitted by February 15, 2014.
For further information on the AWM–Joan & Joseph 
Birman Research Prize and nomination materials, please 
visit http://www.awm-math.org.
—AWM announcement
Call for Nominations for Sloan 
Fellowships
Nominations for candidates for Sloan Research Fellow-
ships, sponsored by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, 
are due by September 16, 2013. A candidate must be a 
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
Also designed to be used add-on for .NET Image SDK, RasterEdge Bitmap Powerful image converter for Bitmap and PDF files; No need for Adobe Acrobat Reader &
how to insert text into a pdf using reader; adding text to pdf form
JPEG to PDF Converter | Convert JPEG to PDF, Convert PDF to JPEG
It can be used standalone. JPEG to PDF Converter is able to convert image files to PDF directly without the software Adobe Acrobat Reader for conversion.
add text to pdf without acrobat; add text pdf acrobat professional
936    
N
otices
of
the
AMs 
V
oluMe
60, N
uMber
7
Mathematics Opportunities
member of the regular faculty at a college or university 
in the United States or Canada and must have received 
the Ph.D. or equivalent within the six years prior to the 
nomination. For information write to: Sloan Research Fel-
lowships, Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, 630 Fifth Avenue, 
Suite 2550, New York, New York 10111-0242; or consult 
the foundation’s website: http://www.sloan.org/fel-
lowships.
—From a Sloan Foundation announcement
NSF Focused Research Groups
The Focused Research Groups (FRG) activity of the Division 
of Mathematical Sciences (DMS) of the National Science 
Foundation (NSF) supports small groups of researchers 
in the mathematical sciences.
The deadline date for full proposals is September 20, 
2013. The FRG solicitation may be found on the Web at 
http://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_
id=5671 .
—From an NSF announcement
NSF Mathematical Sciences 
Postdoctoral Research 
Fellowships
The Mathematical Sciences Postdoctoral Research Fellow-
ship program of the Division of Mathematical Sciences 
(DMS) of the National Science Foundation (NSF) awards fel-
lowships each year that are designed to permit awardees 
to choose research environments that will have maximal 
impact on their future scientific development. Awards of 
these fellowships are made for appropriate research in 
areas of the mathematical sciences, including applications 
to other disciplines. Fellows may opt to choose either 
a research fellowship or a research instructorship. The 
deadline for this year’s applications is October 16, 2013. 
Applications must be submitted via FastLane on the World 
Wide Web. For more information see the website http://
www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5301.
—From an NSF announcement
NSA Mathematical Sciences 
Grants and Sabbaticals 
Program
As the nation’s largest employer of mathematicians, the 
National Security Agency (NSA) is a strong supporter of the 
academic mathematics community in the United States. 
Through the Mathematical Sciences Program, the NSA 
provides research funding and sabbatical opportunities 
for eligible faculty members in the mathematical sciences. 
Grants for Research in Mathematics. The Mathematical 
Sciences Program (MSP) supports self-directed, unclassi-
fied research in the following areas of mathematics: alge-
bra, number theory, discrete mathematics, probability, and 
statistics. The Research Grants program offers three types 
of grants: the Young Investigators Grant, the Standard 
Grant, and the Senior Investigators Grant. The program 
also supports conferences and workshops (typically in 
the range of US$15,000–$20,000) in these five mathemati-
cal areas. The program does not entertain research or 
conference proposals that involve cryptology. A Special 
Situation Proposal category is for research experience 
for undergraduates or events that do not fall within the 
typical “research” conference format. In particular, MSP 
is interested in supporting efforts that increase broader 
participation in the mathematical sciences, promote wide 
dissemination of mathematics, and promote the education 
and training of undergraduates and graduate students. 
Principal investigators, graduate students, and all other 
personnel supported by NSA grants must be U.S. citizens 
or permanent residents of the United States at the time 
of proposal submission. Proposals should be submitted 
electronically by October 15, 2013, via the program web-
site: http://www.nsa.gov/research/math_research/
index.shtml.
Sabbatical Program. NSA’s Mathematics Sabbatical Pro-
gram offers mathematicians, statisticians, and computer 
scientists the unique opportunity to develop skills in di-
rections that would be nearly impossible anywhere else. 
Sabbatical employees work side by side with other NSA 
scientists on projects that involve cryptanalysis, coding 
theory, number theory, discrete mathematics, statistics 
and probability, and many other subjects. Visitors spend 
9–24 months at NSA, and most find that within a very 
short period of time they are able to make significant 
contributions. 
NSA pays 50 percent of salary and benefits during 
academic months and 100 percent of salary and benefits 
during summer months of the sabbatical detail. A hous-
ing supplement is available to help offset the cost of local 
lodging. 
Applicants must be U. S. citizens and must be able to ob-
tain a security clearance. A complete application includes 
a cover letter and curriculum vitae with list of significant 
publications. The cover letter should describe the appli-
cant’s research interests, programming experience and 
level of fluency, and how an NSA sabbatical would affect 
teaching and research upon return to academia. Additional 
information about the Sabbatical Program is available 
at  http://www.nsa.gov/research/math_research/ 
sabbaticals/index.shtml. 
For more information about the Grants or Sabbaticals 
Program, please contact the program office at 301-688-
0400. You may also send email to mspgrants@nsa.gov.
—Mathematical Sciences Program announcement
A
ugust
2013 
N
otices
of
the
AMs 
937
Mathematics Opportunities
Research Experiences for 
Undergraduates
The Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) 
program supports active research participation by under-
graduate students in any of the areas of research funded 
by the National Science Foundation (NSF). Student research 
may be supported in two forms: REU supplements and 
REU sites. 
REU supplements may be requested for ongoing NSF-
funded research projects or may be included in proposals 
for new or renewal NSF grants or cooperative agreements.
REU sites are based on independent proposals to initi-
ate and conduct undergraduate research participation 
projects for a number of students. REU site projects may 
be based in a single discipline or academic department 
or on interdisciplinary or multidepartment research op-
portunities with a strong intellectual focus. Proposals with 
an international dimension are welcomed. A partnership 
with the Department of Defense supports REU sites in 
research areas relevant to defense. Undergraduate student 
participants supported with NSF funds in either supple-
ments or sites must be citizens or permanent residents 
of the United States or its possessions.
Students may not apply to NSF to participate in REU 
activities. Students apply directly to REU sites and should 
consult the directory of active REU sites on the Web 
at http://www.nsf.gov/crssprgm/reu/reu_search.
cfm. The deadline for full proposals for REU sites is Au-
gust 28, 2013. Deadline dates for REU supplements vary 
with the research program; contact the program director 
for more information. The full program announcement 
can be found at the website http://www.nsf.gov/
pubs/2009/nsf09598/nsf09598.htm.
—From an NSF announcement
Call for Nominations for 2012 
Sacks Prize
The Association for Symbolic Logic (ASL) invites nomina-
tions for the 2012 Sacks Prize for the most outstanding 
doctoral dissertation in mathematical logic. The Sacks 
Prize consists of a cash award and five years’ free member-
ship in the ASL. Dissertations must have been defended 
by September 30, 2013.
General information about the prize is available at 
http://www.aslonline.org/info-prizes.html. For 
details about nomination procedures, see http://www.
aslonline.org/Sacks_nominations.html.
—From an ASL announcement
Call for Nominations for Otto 
Neugebauer Prize
The European Mathematical Society (EMS) is seeking nomi-
nations for the Otto Neugebauer Prize for the History of 
Mathematics. The prize will be awarded “for highly original 
and influential work in the field of history of mathematics 
that enhances our understanding of either the develop-
ment of mathematics or a particular mathematical subject 
in any period and in any geographical region.” The award 
comprises a certificate including the citation and a cash 
prize of 5,000 euros (approximately US$6,500). The dead-
line for nominations is December 31, 2013. For further 
information see the website http://www.euro-math-
soc.eu/otto_neugebauer_prize.html.
—From an EMS announcement
News from PIMS
The Pacific Institute for the Mathematical Sciences (PIMS) 
invites nominations of outstanding young researchers in 
the mathematical sciences for postdoctoral fellowships 
for the year 2014–2015. 
Nominees must have a Ph.D. or equivalent (or expect to 
receive a Ph.D. by December 31, 2014) and must be within 
three years of receipt of the Ph.D. at the time of the nomi-
nation (i.e., Ph.D. received on or after January 1, 2011).  
The fellowship may be taken up at any time between 
September 1, 2014, and January 1, 2015. The fellowship 
is for one year and is renewable, contingent on satisfac-
tory progress, for at most one additional year. PIMS post-
doctoral fellows are expected to participate in all PIMS 
activities related to their areas of expertise and will be 
encouraged to spend time at more than one site. 
Candidates must be nominated by at least one scientist 
or by a department (or departments) affiliated with PIMS. 
The fellowships are intended to supplement support pro-
vided by the sponsor and are tenable at any of the PIMS Ca-
nadian member universities: the University of Alberta, the 
University of British Columbia, the University of Calgary, 
the University of Lethbridge, the University of Regina, the 
University of Saskatchewan, Simon Fraser University, and 
the University of Victoria, as well as at the PIMS affiliate, 
the University of Northern British Columbia. 
Complete applications must be uploaded to MathJobs 
by December 1, 2013. For further information, see the  
website http://www.pims.math.ca/scientific/ 
postdoctoral or contact assistant.director@pims.
math.ca.
—From a PIMS announcement
938    
N
otices
of
the
AMs 
V
oluMe
60, N
uMber
7
Inside the AMS
Math in Moscow Scholarships 
Awarded
The AMS has made awards to six mathematics students 
to attend the Math in Moscow program in the fall of 2013. 
Following are the names of the undergraduate students 
and their institutions: Alexander Dunlap, University of 
Chicago; Vishesh Jain, Stanford University; Jonathan 
Lai, University of Texas at Austin; Quan Nguyen, Hen-
drix College; David Richman, Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology; and Forrest Thurman, University of Central 
Florida.
Math in Moscow is a program of the Independent 
University of Moscow that offers foreign students (under-
graduate or graduate students specializing in mathemat-
ics and/or computer science) the opportunity to spend a 
semester in Moscow studying mathematics. All instruction 
is given in English. The fifteen-week program is similar to 
the Research Experiences for Undergraduates programs 
that are held each summer across the United States.
The AMS awards several scholarships for U.S. students 
to attend the Math in Moscow program. The scholarships 
are made possible through a grant from the National Sci-
ence Foundation. For more information about Math in 
Moscow, consult http://www.mccme.ru/mathinmoscow 
and the article “Bringing Eastern European mathematical 
traditions to North American students,” Notices, November 
2003, pages 1250–4.
—Elaine Kehoe 
AMS Congressional Fellow 
Chosen
The American Mathematical Society is pleased to announce 
that Karen Saxe has been selected as its 2013–14 Con-
gressional Fellow. 
The fellowship provides a unique public policy learning 
experience, demonstrates the value of science-government 
interaction, and brings a technical background and 
external perspective to the decision-making process in 
Congress. 
Saxe is currently chair of the mathematics, statistics, 
and computer science department at Macalester College. 
She received her Ph.D. in mathematics from the University 
of Oregon. The AMS will sponsor her fellowship through 
the Congressional Fellowship program administered by 
the American Association for the Advancement of Science 
(AAAS).
Fellows spend a year on the staff of a member of Con-
gress or a congressional committee working as a special 
legislative assistant in legislative and policy areas requir-
ing scientific and technical input. The fellowship program 
includes an orientation on congressional and executive 
branch operations and a year-long seminar series on issues 
involving science, technology, and public policy. 
—AMS Washington Office
AMS Sponsors Exhibit on 
Capitol Hill
The AMS sponsored an exhibit at the nineteenth annual 
Coalition for National Science Funding (CNSF) exhibition 
and reception on Capitol Hill on May 7, 2013. Philip T. 
Gressman, University of Pennsylvania, presented work on 
“The Boltzmann Equation: Where Mathematics and Science 
Collide”. The exhibition drew more than 285 people, in-
cluding 10 members of Congress, to view thirty-five exhib-
its on research funded by the National Science Foundation.
Gressman and his colleague Robert M. Strain have 
found solutions to a 140-year-old, seven-dimensional 
equation that were not known to exist for more than a 
century despite its widespread use in modeling the be-
havior of gases. 
Professor Philip T. Gressman, University of 
Pennsylvania, with Representative Eddie Bernice 
Johnson (D-TX–30), Ranking Member of the House 
Science, Space & Technology Committee.
A
ugust
2013 
N
otices
of
the
AMs 
939
Inside the AMS
The Boltzmann equation was developed to predict how 
gaseous material distributes itself in space and how it 
responds to changes in things like temperature, pressure, 
or velocity. Using modern mathematical techniques from 
the fields of partial differential equations and harmonic 
analysis, Gressman and Strain proved the global existence 
of classical solutions and rapid time decay to equilibrium 
for the Boltzmann equation with long-range interactions. 
Global existence and rapid decay imply that the equation 
correctly predicts that the solutions will continue to fit 
the system’s behavior and not undergo any mathematical 
catastrophes such as a breakdown of the equation’s integ-
rity caused by a minor change within the equation. Rapid 
decay to equilibrium means that the effect of an initial 
small disturbance in the gas is short lived and quickly 
becomes unnoticeable.
The study also provides a new understanding of the 
effects due to grazing collisions, when neighboring mol-
ecules just glance off one another rather than collide head 
on. These glancing collisions turn out to be a dominant 
type of collision for the full Boltzmann equation with 
long-range interactions.
The Coalition for National Science Funding (CNSF) is an 
alliance of more than one hundred twenty-five scientific 
and professional societies and universities united by a 
concern for the future vitality of the national science, 
mathematics, and engineering enterprise. The coalition is 
chaired by Samuel M. Rankin III, associate executive direc-
tor of the AMS and the director of its Washington office.
—AMS Washington Office
From the Public Awareness 
Office
Blog on Math Blogs—Two mathematicians tour the math-
ematical blogosphere. Editors Brie Finegold (University 
of Arizona) and Evelyn Lamb (freelance math and science 
writer) blog on blogs related to math in the news, math-
ematics research, applied mathematics, mathematicians, 
mathematics education, math and the arts, and more. 
Finegold and Lamb, both past AAAS-AMS Mass Media 
Fellows and Ph.D. mathematicians, select and write their 
thoughts on interesting blogs from around the world, as 
well as invite reactions from readers. Among the topics: 
“This Week in Number Theory” and “Building the World 
Digital Mathematical Library”.
blogs.ams.org/blogonmathblogs
Mathematical Imagery. Recently added: Selected 
works from the 2013 Mathematical Art Exhibition held at 
the Joint Mathematics Meetings in San Diego, additional 
views of Carlo Séquin’s “125 tetrahedra in 25 projected 
5-cells”, commissioned work to celebrate the AMS 125th 
anniversary, and more origami works by Robert J. Lang. 
ams.org/mathimagery
—Annette Emerson and Mike Breen 
AMS Public Awareness Officers
paoffice@ams.org
Deaths of AMS Members
Yousef Alavi, of Western Michigan University, died on 
May 21, 2013. Born on March 19, 1928, he was a member 
of the Society for 57 years.
Anne H. Allen, of Bennington, VT, died on May 23,  
2012. Born on December 21, 1932, she was a member of 
the Society for 50 years.
Kenneth I. Appel of Dover, NH, died on April 19, 2013. 
Born on October 8, 1932, he was a member of the Society 
for 54 years.
Fariborz Asadian, of Warner Robins, Georgia, died on 
January 9, 2013. Born in August 1960, he was a member 
of the Society for 23 years.
S. Elwood Bohn, of Green Valley, Arizona, died on 
April 16, 2013. Born on March 11, 1927, he was a member 
of the Society for 54 years.
Don L. Burkholder, professor, University of Illinois, 
died on April 14, 2013. Born on January 19, 1927, he was 
a member of the Society for 56 years.
Maxon Buscher, of Cambridge, Massachusetts, died on 
February 8, 2013. Born on July 16, 1943, he was a member 
of the Society for 4 days.
Amos Joel Carpenter, of Indianapolis, Indiana, died 
on October 30, 2012. Born on May 12, 1939, he was a 
member of the Society for 20 years.
Robert W. Carroll, professor, University of Illinois, 
died on December 8, 2012. Born on May 10, 1930, he was 
a member of the Society for 54 years.
William R. Fuller, of Lafayette, Indiana, died on Janu-
ary 7, 2013. Born on October 27, 1920, he was a member 
of the Society for 62 years.
Wilfred Martin Greenlee, of Tucson, Arizona, died 
on March 11, 2013. Born on December 31, 1936, he was a 
member of the Society for 51 years.
Joan T. Hallett, of Reno, Nevada, died on Novem- 
ber 27, 2012. Born on April 21, 1936, she was a member 
of the Society for 35 years.
Seymour Kass, of Brookline, Massachusetts, died on  
April 12, 2013. Born on April 13, 1926, he was a member 
of the Society for 52 years.
John F. Kellaher, of Sherborn, Massachusetts, died 
on September 19, 2012. Born on March 11, 1930, he was 
a member of the Society for 52 years.
Shoshichi Kobayashi, professor, University of Cali-
fornia Berkeley, died on August 29, 2012. Born on Janu- 
ary 4, 1932, he was a member of the Society for 56 years.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested