open pdf file in c# : How to add text fields to pdf SDK control service wpf web page asp.net dnn 201307-full-issue2-part661

expansion of , which we denote 
n
,satisfies
(23)
jj
n
x
n
jj
X1
kn1
120k2 89k16
16k n512k4 1024k3712k2 206k21
1
64n 12
;
so that ,upon summing from someN to infinity,
weobtain the finite value
(24)
X1
nN
jj
n
x
n
jj
1
64N  1
:
Heuristically, let us assume that the
n
are inde-
pendent, uniformly distributed random variables
in 0;1, and let 
n
jj
n
x
n
jj. Note that t an
error (i.e., an instance wherex
n
lies inasubinterval
of the unit interval different from
n
so that the
corresponding hex digits don’t match) can only
occur when
n
is within
n
of one of the points
0;1=16;2=16;:::;15=16.Since x
n
<
n
for alln
(where< is interpretedin the wrapped sense when
x
n
is slightly less than one), this event has proba-
bility 16
n
.Then the fact that the sum(24) has a
finite value implies that, by the first Borel-Cantelli
lemma, there can only be finitely many errors.
Further, the small value of the sum(24), evenwhen
N 1,suggeststhatitisunlikelythatanyerrors
will be observed. If we setN 10;000;001 in(24),
since we know there are no errors in the first
10,000,000 elements, we obtain an upper bound
of 1:56310 9, which suggests it is truly unlikely
that errors will ever occur.
Asimilar correspondence can be seen between
iterates of(19) and the binary digits oflog 2. In
particular, letz
n
b2w
n
c,where w
n
isgiven in(19).
Then since the sum of the error terms forlog 2,
corresponding to(24), is infinite, it follows by the
second Borel-Cantelli lemma that discrepancies
between z
n
and the binary digits of log2 can be
expectedtoappearindefinitely but withdecreasing
frequency. Indeed, in computations that we have
done, we have found that the sequence z
n
disagrees with ten of thefirst twenty binary digits
oflog 2, but in only one position over the range
5,000to 8,000.
Computing Digits of 2 and Catalan’s
Constant
In illustration of this theory, we now present the
results of computations of high-indexbinarydigits
of2, ternary digits of2, and binary digits of
Catalan’s constant, based on formulas(13),(14),
and (18), respectively. These calculations were
performed ona 4-rack BlueGene/P system at IBM’s
Benchmarking Center in Rochester, Minnesota(see
Figure 4). This is a shared facility, so calculations
wereconductedover aseveral-monthperiodduring
Figure 4. Andrew Mattingly, Blue Gene/P, and
Glenn Wightwick.
which time, none, some, or all of the system
was available. It was programmed remotely from
Australia, which permitted the system to be used
off-hours. Sometimes it helps to be in a different
time zone!
(1) Base-64 digits of beginning at posi-
tion 10 trillion. The first run, which
produced base-64 digits starting from
position 10
12
1, required d an average
of 253,529 seconds per thread and was
subdivided into seven partitions of 2048
threads each, so the total cost was
72048253529 3:6109 CPU-seconds.
Each rack of the IBM system features 4096
cores, so the total cost is 10.3 “rack-days”.
August 2013
Notices of the AMS
851
How to add text fields to pdf - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
how to enter text in pdf file; how to insert text in pdf using preview
How to add text fields to pdf - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
adding text field to pdf; adding text fields to pdf
The second run, which produced base-64
digits starting from position 1012, com-
pleted in nearly the same run time (within
afew minutes). The two resulting base-8
digit strings appear in row A of Table X.
(Each pair of base-8 digits corresponds
to a base-64 digit.) Here the digits in
agreement are delimited byj. Note that 53
consecutive base-8 digits (or, equivalently,
159 consecutive binary digits) are in
perfect agreement.
(2) Base-729digitsofbeginningatposition
10 trillion. In this case the two runs each
required an average of 795,773 seconds
per thread, similarly subdivided as above,
so that the total cost was 6:5 10
9
CPU-
seconds, or 18.4 “rack-days”. The two
resulting base-9 digit strings are found in
row B of Table X. (Each triplet of base-9
digits corresponds to one base-729 digit.)
Note here that47 consecutive base-9 digits
(94 consecutive base-3 digits) are inperfect
agreement.
(3) Base-4096digitsofCatalan’sconstantbe-
ginning at position 10 trillion. These two
runs each required 707,857 seconds per
thread, but in this case they were subdi-
vided into eight partitions of 2048 threads
each, so that the total cost was 1:2 1010
CPU-seconds, or 32.8 “rack-days”. The two
resulting base-8 digit strings are found in
rowCofTableX.(Eachquadrupletofbase-8
digits corresponds to one base-4096 digit.)
Note that47 consecutive base-8 digits (141
consecutive binary digits) are in perfect
agreement.
These long strings of consecutively agreeing
digits, beginning with the target digit, provide a
compelling level of statistical confidence in the
results. In the first case, for instance, note that
the probability that thirty-two pairs of randomly
chosen base-8 digits are in perfect agreement is
roughly 1:2 10 29. Even if one discards, say, the
final six base-8digits as a 1-in-262,144 statistical
safeguard against numerical round-off error, one
would still have twenty-four consecutive base-8
digits in perfect agreement, with a corresponding
probability of 2:1 10 22. Now strictly speaking,
one cannot define a valid probability measure on
digits of 
2
, but nonetheless, from a practical
point of view, such analysis provides a very high
level of statistical confidence that the results have
been correctly computed.
For this reason, computations of  and the
like are a favorite tool for the integrity testing for
computer system hardwareand software. If either
run of a paired computation of succumbs to
evenasingle faultinthecourse ofthe computation,
Figure 5. A “random” walk on a million digits of
Catalan’s constant.
then typically the final results will disagree almost
completely. For example, in 1986 a similar pair
of computations of disclosed some subtle but
substantialhardware errorsinanearlymodelofthe
Cray-2 supercomputer. Indeed, the calculations we
have done arguably constitute the most strenuous
integrity test ever performed on the BlueGene/P
system. Table 4gives some sense of the scale ofthe
three record computations, which used more than
135 “rack-days”, 1378 serial CPU-years, and more
than 1:54910
19
floatingpoint operations. This is
comparable to the cost of the most sophisticated
animated movies as of the present time (2011).
For the sake of completeness, in Table 5 we
also record theone-, two-, and three-bit frequency
counts from our Catalan computation.
Future Directions
It is ironic that, in an age when even pillars
such as Fermat’s Last Theorem and the Poincaré
conjecture have succumbed to the brilliance of
modern mathematics, one of the most elementary
mathematical hypotheses, namely whether (and
why) the digits of  or other constants such
as log 2;
2
, or G (see Figure 5) are “random”,
remains unanswered. In particular, proving that
(or log2;2,or G)is b-normalinsomeinteger
baseb remains frustratingly elusive. Even much
weaker results, for instance the simple assertion
that aone appears inthe binary expansionof (or
log2;2,or G)withlimitingfrequency1 =2(which
assertion has been amply affirmed in numerous
computations over the years), remain unproven
and largely inaccessible at the present time.
Almost as much ignorance extends to simple
algebraic irrationals such as
p
2. In this case it
is now known that the number of ones in the
852
Notices of the AMS
Volume 60, Number 7
VB.NET PDF Form Data Read library: extract form data from PDF in
featured PDF software, it should have functions for processing text, image as Add necessary references Demo Code to Retrieve All Form Fields from a PDF File in
how to add text field to pdf form; how to add text to pdf file
C# PDF Form Data Read Library: extract form data from PDF in C#.
Able to retrieve all form fields from adobe PDF file in C# featured PDF software, it should have functions for processing text, image as Add necessary references
how to enter text in pdf form; add text pdf reader
Table 4. (A) base-4 digits of 2, (B) base-729 digits of 2, and (C) base-4096 digits of Catalan’s
constant, in each case beginning at position 10 trillion.
A
75|60114505303236475724500005743262754530363052416350634|573227604
|60114505303236475724500005743262754530363052416350634|220210566
B
001|12264485064548583177111135210162856048323453468|10565567635862
|12264485064548583177111135210162856048323453468|04744867134524
C
0176|34705053774777051122613371620125257327217324522|6000177545727
|34705053774777051122613371620125257327217324522|5703510516602
Table 5. The scale of our computations. We estimate 4.5 quad-double operations per iteration and
that each costs 266 single-precision operations. The total cost in single-precision operations is given
in the last column. This total includes overhead which is largely due to a rounding operation that we
implemented using bit-masking.
#iters
time/iter
time
with
total
o’head
flops
constant
n0
d
1015 (microsec)
(yr)
verify
(yr)
(%)
1018
2
base-2
6
5
10
13
2.16
1.424
97.43
194.87
230.35
18.2
2.58
2
base-3
6
9
10
13
3.89
1.424
175.38
350.76
413.16
17.8
4.65
Gbase-46
16 1013
6.91
1.424
311.79
623.58
735.02
17.9
8.26
Table 6. Base-4096 digits of G beginning at position 10 trillion: digit proportions.
Digit
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
base-2 (141)
0.454 0.546
-
-
-
-
-
-
base-4 (70)
0.171 0.329
0.229
0.271
-
-
-
-
base-8 (47)
0.085 0.128
0.213
0.128 0.064
0.128 0.043
0.213
first n binary digits of
p
must be at t least t of
the order of
p
n, with similar resultsfor other
algebraic irrationals [5, pp. 141–173]. But this is
a very weak result, given that this limiting ratio
is almost certainly 1=2, not only for
p
2butmore
generally for all algebraic irrationals.
Nor can we prove much about continued frac-
tions for various constants, except for a few
well-known results for special cases such as
quadratic irrationals, ratios of Bessel functions,
and certain expressions involving exponential
functions.
For these reasons there is continuing interest
in the theory of BBP-type constants, since, as men-
tioned, there is an intriguing connection between
BBP-type formulas and certain chaotic iterations
that are akin to pseudorandom number generators.
If these connections can be strengthened, then
perhaps normality proofs could be obtained for a
wide range of polylogarithmic constants, possibly
including ;log2;2, and G.
As settings change, so do questions. Until the
question of efficient single-digit extraction was
asked, our ignorance about such issues was not
exposed. The case of the exponential series
(25)
e
x
X1
n0
xn
n!
is illustrative. For present purposes, the conver-
gence rate in (25) is too good.
Conjecture 2. ThereisnoBBPformulafore.More-
over, there is no way to extract individual digits of
esignificantlymorerapidlythanbycomputingthe
first n digits.
The same could be conjectured about
other numbers, including Euler’s constant
 0:57721566490153:::.Inshort,untilvastly
stronger mathematical results are obtained in this
area, there will doubtless be continuing interest in
computing digits of these constants. Inthe present
vacuum, that is perhaps all that we can do.
Acknowledgments
Thanks are due to many colleagues, but most
explicitlyto Prof. Mary-Anne Williams of University
Technology Sydney, who conceived the idea of a
-relatedcomputationtoconcludeinconjunction
with a public lecture at UTS on 3.14.2011 (see
http://datasearch2.uts.edu.au/feit/news-
events/event-detail.cfm?ItemId=25541).We
also wish to thank Matthew Tam, who constructed
the database version of [1].
August 2013
Notices of the AMS
853
VB.NET PDF Convert to Text SDK: Convert PDF to txt files in vb.net
Convert PDF to text in .NET WinForms and ASP.NET project. Text in any PDF fields can be copied and pasted to .txt files by keeping original layout.
add text to pdf without acrobat; add text in pdf file online
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
add text pdf file acrobat; adding text fields to pdf acrobat
Clay Mathematics Institute:
Clay Research Conference
Mathematical Institute  
Opening Conference 
September 29 – October 4, 2013
University of Oxford
Mathematical Institute, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter 
Clay Research Conference
Wednesday, October 2
•  Peter Constantin (Princeton University)
•  Lance Fortnow (Georgia Institute of Technology)
•  Fernando Rodriguez Villegas (University of Texas at Austin)
•  Edward Witten (Institute for Advanced Study)
Associated workshops will be held throughout the week  
of the conference:
29 Sept – 1 Oct:  The Navier-Stokes Equations  
and Related Topics
30 Sept – 4 Oct:  New Insights into Computational  
Intractability
30 Sept – 4 Oct:  Number Theory and Physics
30 Sept – 4 Oct:  Quantum Mathematics and  
Computation
For more information and to register, visit  
www.claymath.org/CRC13/
Mathematical Institute Opening Conference
Thursday, October 3
To celebrate the opening of its new building, the  
Mathematical Institute of the University of Oxford is  
sponsoring a one-day conference.
•  Ingrid Daubechies (Duke University)
•  Raymond Goldstein (University of Cambridge)
•  Sir Andrew Wiles (University of Oxford) 
For more information and to register, visit  
www.maths.ox.ac.uk/opening
www.claymath.org    www.maths.ox.ac.uk
References
1. David H. Bailey, , BBP-type e formulas, , manuscript,
2011, available
at http://davidhbailey.com
/dhbpapers/bbp-formulas.pdf. A web b database
version is available at http://www.bbp. carma.
newcastle.edu.au.
2. David H. Bailey and Jonathan M. Borwein, An-
cient Indian square roots: An exercise in forensic
paleomathematics, American Mathematical Monthly
119, no. 8 (Oct. 2012),646–657.
3. David H. Bailey, Peter B. Borwein, and Simon
Plouffe, Ontherapid computationof various polylog-
arithmic constants, Mathematics of Computation66,
no. 218(1997), 903–913.
4. DavidH.BaileyandDavidJ.Broadhurst,Parallel
integerrelationdetection:Techniques andapplications,
Mathematics of Computation70,no. 236 (2000), 1719–
1736.
5. J.M.BorweinandD.H.Bailey,MathematicsbyEx-
periment: PlausibleReasoning in the21st Century, A K
Peters Ltd., 2004. Expanded Second Edition, 2008.
6. L.Berggren,J.M.Borwein,andP.B.Borwein,Pi:A
Source Book, Springer-Verlag,1997,2000, 2004. Fourth
editionin preparation, 2011.
7. BibhutibhusanDatta,TheBakhshalimathematics,
Bulletin of theCalcutta Mathematical Society21, no. 1
(1929), 1–60.
8. RudolfHoernle,OntheBakhshaliManuscript,Alfred
Holder, Vienna, 1887.
9. Georges Ifrah,The Universal Historyof Numbers:
From Prehistory to the Invention of the Computer,
translated by David Vellos, E. F. Harding,SophieWood,
and IanMonk, John Wiley and Sons, New York, 2000.
10. Alexander Yee, Large computations, 7 Mar
2011, available at http://www.numberworld.org/
nagisa_runs/computations.html.
11. Alexander Yee and Shigeru Kondo, 5 trillion
digits of pi—new world record, 7 Mar 2011, avail-
able athttp://www.numberworld.org/misc_runs/
pi-5t/details.html.
854
Notices of the AMS
Volume 60, Number 7
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
With this advanced PDF Add-On, developers are able to extract target text content from source PDF document and save extracted text to other file formats
adding text to a pdf in reader; adding text pdf
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
add text box to pdf; add text to pdf using preview
A
mericAn
m
AthemAticAl
S
ociety
AMS Grad Student Travel Grants
Check program announcements, eligibility requirements, and learn more at: 
www.ams.org/student-travel
Now providing support 
for doctoral student 
travel to the January 
Joint Mathematics 
Meetings or the AMS 
Sectional Meetings
•Listen to talks
•Meet active researchers
•Learn about 
professional issues and 
resources
•Make new professional 
connections
•Reconnect with 
colleagues
Advancing Mathematics Since 1888
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
VB: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied. This VB.NET example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
how to add text to a pdf file in acrobat; adding text to pdf in preview
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
How to C#: Extract Text Content from PDF File. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.Codec.dll.
how to enter text into a pdf; add text to pdf
Remembering Basil
Gordon, 1931–2012
Krishnaswami Alladi, Coordinating Editor
B
asil Gordon, who made major research
contributions to number theory, combi-
natorics, and algebra and who enhanced
our understanding of Ramanujan’s re-
markable identities, passed away on
January 12, 2012, at the age of eighty. Gordon,
who was a professor of mathematics at UCLA, was
an outstanding teacher at all levels. His legacy will
continue, owing to the impact of his fundamental
workandto the manystudentshe groomed, as well
as several other mathematicians he influenced. In
this article, five notedmathematiciansdescribe var-
ious contributions of Gordonand include personal
reflections as well. Krishnaswami Alladi discusses
Gordon’s research on partitions and extensions of
Ramanujan’s identities. George Andrews describes
Gordon’s work on plane partitions. Ken Ono’s
article is on Gordon’s work on modular forms,
whereas Robert Guralnick talks about Gordon’s
contributions to algebra. Finally, Bruce Rothschild
recalls howhe and Basil Gordon ran the Journalof
Combinatorial Theory, Ser. A, as managing editors.
Keith Kendig, a Ph.D. student of Professor Gor-
doninthe 1960s, conducteda detailedinterviewof
Gordonin2011 dealing with his life and mathemat-
ical career. The text of this interview with pictures
of Gordon from his childhood will appear in Fas-
cinating Mathematical People, to be published by
PrincetonUniversityPressin2014.Somepicturesof
Gordon,courtesyofKeithKendig,areincludedhere.
Krishnaswami Alladi is professor of mathematics at the
University of Florida, Gainesville. His email address is
alladik@ufl.edu.
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1090/noti1017
PhotocourtesyofKeithKendig.
Basil Gordon as a young faculty member at
UCLA. Photo taken by Paul Halmos.
Krishnaswami Alladi
The Great Guru
Professor Basil Gordon was a towering figure
in combinatorics and number theory. He made
fundamentalcontributionstoseveralareas,suchas
thetheoryofpartitions, modularforms, mocktheta
functions, and coding theory. He was one of the
very fewwho was at home with bothcombinatorial
and modular form techniques. He was one of the
856
Notices of the AMS
Volume 60, Number 7
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
C# Sample Code: Add Password to PDF with Permission Settings Applied in C#.NET. This example shows how to add PDF file password with access permission setting.
how to add text to a pdf file; acrobat add text to pdf
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image to PDF; C# Protect: Add Password to PDF; C# Form: extract value from fields; C# Annotate: PDF Markup
add text pdf acrobat professional; how to insert text into a pdf file
PhotocourtesyofKrishnaswamiAlladi.
The five mathematicians associated with the
Capparelli Conjecture, its resolution, and
generalizations all got together in Gainesville,
Florida, in 2004. Clockwise from bottom right:
Basil Gordon, Jim Lepowsky, Stefano Capparelli,
George Andrews, and Krishnaswami Alladi.
leaders in the world of Ramanujan’s mathematics.
As managing editors for over two decades, he and
hisUCLA colleague Bruce Rothschilddevelopedthe
Journal of Combinatorial Theory-A into a premier
journal. A few years ago, the JCT-A came up with a
special issue inhonor of Gordon andRothschildon
their retirement from that editorial board. George
Andrews, Ken Ono, Richard McIntosh, and I wrote
apaper [3] about Gordon’s work forthat volume.
The current article will be very different. I will
give samples of some of Gordon’s most appealing
theorems and provide some personal reflections.
One of the finest examples of Gordon’s fun-
damental research is his generalization of the
Rogers-Ramanujan identities to odd moduli [11].
In analytic form, the Rogers-Ramanujan (R-R)
identities provide product representations to two
q-hypergeometricseries(see[7]).Thecombinatorial
interpretation of these identities is:
TheoremR-R.Fori 1;2,thenumberofpartitions
of an integer n into parts that differ by at least 2,
with least parti, equals the number of partitions
of n into parts imod5.
In the 1960s Gordon [11] obtained the following
beautiful generalization of the Rogers-Ramanujan
partition theorem to all odd moduli  5:
Theorem 1. Foranypairofintegersiandksatisfy-
ing 1ikandk 2, the number ofpartitions of
an integer n of the formb
1
b
2
 b
,where
b
j
b
jk 1
 2,andwith atmosti  1ones, is
equal to the number of partitions of n into parts
6 0;imod2k 1.
In a partition we always write the partsb
i
in
descending order.
This result opened up a new direction of
research (see [7]) on R-R type identities, namely
identities which connect partitions with parts
satisfying difference conditions to partitions with
parts satisfying congruence conditions. George
Andrews has been the leaderin this field, and he
was inspired by Gordon’s generalization of the R-R
identities.
One reasonthatthe classical Rogers-Ramanujan
identities are so important is because the ratio of
the series in the two identities admits a continued
fraction expansion, and this continued fraction
has a lovely product representation:
(1)
Rq 1
q
1
q2
1
q3

Y1
m1
1 q5m 21  q5m 3
1 q5m 11  q5m 4
:
Inviewofthe product, the continued fractionplays
an important role in the theory of modular forms
in relation to the congruence subgroup
0
5of
the modular group.
AnothergemthatGordonfoundwasananalogue
of(1) to the modulus 8. More precisely, by working
with two q-hypergeometric identities that were
analogous to the Rogers-Ramanujan identities but
for the modulus 8 instead of the modulus 5 and by
considering their ratio, Gordon [12] showed that
(2)
Gq  1q 
q2
1q3 
q4
1 q5 
q6

Y1
m1
1 q8m 31 q8m 5
1 q8m 11 q8m 7
:
LikeRq, the fractionGqalso has an important
role in the theory of modular forms but to
the congruence subgroup
0
8. This continued
fraction identity was independently discovered
by H. Göllnitz [10], and so this is now called the
Göllnitz-Gordon continued fraction. The partition
theorem that underlies the continued fraction in
(2) is:
Theorem 2 (Göllnitz-Gordon)For i   1;2, the
number of partitions of an integer n into parts
that differ by at least 2, with least part 2 1,
and with no consecutive even numbers as parts,
equals the number of partitions of n into parts
4or  2i   1mod8.
Gordon told me that hewas led to this fraction
and Theorem 2 by his meta theorem: “What works
for5 works also for 8.”
August 2013
Notices of the AMS
857
I always called Gordon “the great guru”. His
knowledge of mathematics was vast and deep and
he shared his ideas generously. His contributions
can not only be seen from his seminal papers but
also in the work of his students whose careers
he molded. During the Rademacher Centenary
Conference at Penn State University in 1992
there were four of Gordon’s Ph.D. students—Doug
Bowman, Ken Ono, Richard McIntosh, and Sinai
Robins—each presenting significant work on very
different topics in number theory. That showed
the breadth of Gordon’s expertise.
Besides his Ph.D. students, there were several
others like me who were influenced by his math-
ematical ideas and philosophy. In particular, it
was due to his guidance that I was able to make
the transition in the early nineties from classical
analytic number theory to the theory of partitions
andq-hypergeometric series, an area in which I
continue to work today.
In December 1987 the Ramanujan Centennial
wasbeingcelebrated,and severalconferences were
being conducted in India. I was asked to organize
one such conference in Madras, and I invited
Gordon to give a plenary talk. At that time I was
working on classical analytic number theory, but I
was charmed by the lectures of Gordon, Andrews,
and others on partitions and q-hypergeometric
series which I heard during the centennial. But I
was in awe of the tantalizing q-hypergeometric
identities and transformations being presented
and a bit scared to enter this domain.
In 1989 I received a message from Gordon
saying that he had a fully paid sabbatical and that
he would like to spend a good part of it at the
University of Florida. This was like a gift from
heaven for me, because I realized that I could
benefit from hisvisitby gettingintroduced into the
world of partitions andq-hypergeometric series.
And that is exactly what happened, and for this I
am most grateful.
During that visit Gordon and I investigated
ageneral continued fraction of Ramanujan, and
through its study we obtained several results
related to a number of classical identities in
the theory of partitions and q-series from a
unified perspective. This was my first paper [4]
on partitions and q-series, and it appeared in
the JCT-A. It was also during this visit that we
started considering a very general approach to the
celebrated 1926 partition theorem of Schur, which
is:
Theorem S. ThenumberofpartitionsA(n)ofan
integer n into parts1mod 6 is equal to the
number of partitions B(n) of n into distinct parts
1 mod3,andthisisequaltothenumberof
partitions C(n) of n into parts that differ by at least
3but without consecutive multiples of 3 as parts.
The condition “no consecutive multiples of
3 as parts” in Theorem S is analogous to the
condition “no consecutive even numbers as parts”
in Theorem 2. The equalityAnCnin Schur’s
theorem can be considered as the next level result
beyond the Rogers-Ramanujan partition theorem,
because the gap 2 in Theorem R-R is replaced by
3in Theorem S, and the modulus 5 in Theorem
R-R is replaced by 6 in Theorem S. But Gordon
told me that it is the equality BnCn that
is more fundamental and capable of a significant
generalization. He thus initiated me into his
philosophy of “the method of weighted words,”
which is describedin[3]. Guided bythisphilosophy
of his, we found a generalization of Theorem S
that involved words formed by colored integers
satisfying certain gapconditions, andwe were able
to encapsulate it in the form of an elegant analytic
key identity in two free parameters, a;b (see [5]).
Gordon’s visit to the University of Florida in
1989started our substantialcollaboration. I visited
him in Los Angeles over the next few years and
worked on extensions of the method of weighted
words to the deep partition theorem of Göllnitz
[10]. We found a remarkable “key identity” in
three free parameters,a;b;c, which contained our
two-parameter identity for Schur’s theorem as a
special case. But we could not prove this three-
parameter identity. In 1990, whenGeorge Andrews
visited the University of Florida, I showed him the
three-parameter identity Gordon and I had found.
During that stayAndrews proved our identity, and
that resulted in our triple joint paper [1]. Andrews
told me that, in some sense as a pure partition
result, Schur’s theorem was more fundamental
than the Rogers-Ramanujan partition theorem.
Gordon and I worked out several ramifications of
Schur’s theorem [6] using the method of weighted
words, and this confirmed Andrews’s view of its
importance.
I have already mentioned the Rademacher
Centenary Conference of 1992 at Penn State and
Gordon’s presence at the conference with his
students. I now state an interesting development
that took place during that conference.
At the start of the Rademacher conference,
Jim Lepowsky gave a talk on the connections
between Lie algebras and partitions and stated
a partition theorem as a conjecture made by
his student Capparelli from a study of vertex
operators in Lie algebras. Andrews went into
hiding for the remainder ofthe conference to work
on this conjecture, emerging from his hideout
just to attend the talks. On the last day of
the conference, Andrews outlined a generating
function proof of Capparelli’s conjecture and
published it in the Proceedings of the Rademacher
Centenary Conference [8]. Basil Gordon, who heard
858
Notices of the AMS
Volume 60, Number 7
Lepowsky’s lecture, had noticed right away that
the Capparelli conjecture could be generalized in
the framework of the method of weighted words.
He informed me about this a few weeks later as
Iwas about to visit Penn State for my sabbatical
in 1992–93 to work with Andrews. Gordon and I
found a key identity for a generalized Capparelli
theorem and provided a combinatorial bijective
proof as well. This resulted in another triple
paper [2], which we submitted to the Journal of
Algebra, since Capparelli’s work appeared there [9].
Neither Capparelli nor I were at the Rademacher
Centenary Conference, but in fall 2004, Gordon,
Andrews, Lepowsky, Capparelli, and I were all at
aconference at the University of Florida. At that
Floridaconference, Gordongave abeautifullecture
entitled “The return of the mock theta functions”,
in which he described among other things the
work with his former student Richard McIntosh
[14] on some new mock theta functions of order 8.
Ramanujan, as is well known, had communicated
his discovery of the mock theta functions in his
last letter to Hardy in January 1920 just weeks
before he died and in that letter gave examples
of mock theta functions of orders 3, 5, and 7.
Gordon and McIntosh investigated mock theta
functions and their asymptotics in great detail.
Many oftheir important resultscanbe foundinthe
survey paper [15]. There is also a good description
of the Gordon-McIntosh work in [3], and all of
this relates to the classical theory of mock theta
functions. In the last few years dramatic advances
have been made in a modern approach to mock
theta functions which connects them to harmonic
Maass forms, but I will not discuss that here.
Professor Gordon was very supportive of my
effortto launchthe Ramanujan Journal devoted to
allareas of mathematics influencedbyRamanujan,
andservedontheeditorialboardsince itsinception
in 1997. He contributed a fine paper to the very
first issue, and I will describe this briefly.
The celebrated Euler’s Pentagonal Numbers
theorem has the combinatorial interpretation that
if the set of partitions on an integern into distinct
parts is split into two subsets based on the parity
of the number of parts, then the two subsets are
equal in size except at the pentagonal numbers, in
which case the difference is 1 between the sizes
of the two subsets. Thus Qn, the number of
partitions ofn into distinct parts, is odd precisely
at the pentagonal numbers. In 1995 I proved that
(3)
Qn 
X
k0
p
3
n;k2
k
;
where p
3
n;kisthenumber ofpartitions b
1
b
2
 b
ofn into parts that differ by at least
3and have preciselyk gapsb
i
b
i1
whichare> 3,
with b
1
 1.ItoldGordon that thisidentity
seems to indicate that, for each integer k ,
(4)
Qn 0mod2
k
 almost always;
and one could prove (4) for smallk using (3). But
Idid not know how to establish (4) for allk 1.
Gordon told me that such a congruence result is
best approached through the theory of modular
forms. Indeed he and Ken Ono established this
conjecture using modular forms and contributed
an important paper to the first issue of The
Ramanujan Journal [13].
I had the pleasure of hosting Gordon at the
University of Florida as well as in India. Whenever
Ivisited UCLA to work with him, he would have
me stay at his home or at least have me spend a
substantial partof my stayworkingwithhim athis
statelyhome inSanta Monica. In our ancientHindu
culture, we have the practice of gurukula. That is,
the student lives with the guru and observes the
guru in close quarters as he is practicing his art.
By being so close to the guru, the student learns
the nuances of whatever art form is being taught.
Mystay in Gordon’s home was in some sense like a
gurukula. I am sure his Ph.D. students must have
had similar gurukula experiences.
Owing to his visits to Florida and to India,
Gordonbecame close to myfamily. More than once
when my parents passed through Los Angeles,
he hosted them magnificently, and we were all
touched by his gracious hospitality.
GordonhadgreatknowledgeofWesternclassical
music andknew much about art and world history.
During his visits to India, when we took him
around for sightseeing, he knew more about the
history than most of us and would educate us
by making comparisons with similar things in
Europe. In 2004, before my visit to Italy with
my wife and daughters, he instructed me that
in Florence, in addition to the well-known sights
such as Michelangelo’s David, we should see the
four statues at the Capelle Medicee sculpted by
Michelangelo representing Dawn, Dusk, Day, and
Night. Gordon said that, when G. N. Watson spoke
about the mock theta functions of Ramanujan, he
compared the grandeur of Ramanujan’s identities
to the beauty of these statues, and thus our visit
to Florencewould be incomplete if we did not see
them. I am glad we followed the instructions of
the guru!
References
[1] K.Alladi,G.E.Andrews,andB.Gordon,General-
izations and refinements of a partition theorem of
Göllnitz, J. ReineAngew. Math. 460 (1995), 165–188.
[2]
, Refinements and generalizations of Cappa-
relli’s conjectureonpartitions, J. Algebra174 (1995),
636–658.
August 2013
Notices of the AMS
859
[3] K.Alladi,G.E.Andrews,K.Ono,andR.McIntosh,
Onthework of Basil Gordon, J. Comb. Th. Ser.A113
(2006), 21–38.
[4] K.AlladiandB.Gordon,Partitionidentitiesanda
continued fraction of Ramanujan, J. Comb. Th.Ser. A
63 (1993), 275–300.
[5]
,Generalizations of Schur’s partition theorem,
Manus. Math. 79 (1993), 113–126.
[6]
,Schur’s partitiontheorem, companions, refine-
ments and generalizations, Trans. Amer. Math. Soc.
347(1995), 1591–1608.
[7] G.E.Andrews,Thetheoryofpartitions,inEncyclo-
pediaof Math., vol. 2, Addison-Wesley, Reading, MA,
1976.
[8]
,Schur’s theorem, Capparelli’s conjecture, and
theq-trinomial coefficients, Contemp. Math., vol. 166,
1994,Amer. Math. Soc., Providence, RI, pp. 141–154.
[9] S.Capparelli,Onsomerepresentationsoftwisted
affine Lie algebras and combinatorial identities, J.
Algebra 154(1993), 335–355.
[10] H.Göllnitz,PartitionenmitDifferenzenbedingungen,
J. ReineAngew. Math.225 (1967), 154–190.
[11] B. Gordon,A combinatorial l generalization n of f the
Rogers-Ramanujanidentities,Amer.J.Math.83(1961),
393–399.
[12]
, Some continued fractions of the Rogers-
Ramanujan type, Duke Math. J. 32(1965), 741–748.
[13] B.GordonandK.Ono,Divisibilityofcertainpartition
functions bypowersof primes,RamanujanJ.1(1997),
25–34.
[14] B.Gordon andR.J.McIntosh,Someeighthorder
mock theta functions, J. London Math. Soc. (2) 62
(2000), 321–335.
[15]
,Asurveyof the classical mock theta functions,
in Partitions,q-Series and Modular Forms (K. Alladi
and F. Garvan, eds.), Developmentsin Math., vol. 23,
Springer, New York, 2010, pp. 95–144.
George E. Andrews
Basil Gordon was a reclusive, brilliant mathemati-
cian who proved some wonderful theorems on
partitions which greatly inspired many, including
me.
In the 1960s he published a number of in-
novative papers on the theory of partitions.
Krishna Alladi has devoted much of his ar-
ticle to some of Basil’s most prescient and
spectacular achievements, including the gener-
alization of the Rogers-Ramanujan identities, the
Göllnitz-Gordon identities, and the method of
weighted words. Gordon’s later work on mock
theta functions is one of the topics in Ken Ono’s
contribution.
Basil was a delightful and kind man but not a
great correspondent. He directly answered very
few of my letters to him. At first I feared that I
might have offended him in some way. However,
Iwas assured by others that his treatment of me
George E. Andrews is Evan Pugh Professor of Mathematics
at The Pennsylvania State University. His email address is
andrews@math.psu.edu.
was not unique. The late Marco Schützenberger
toldme that he had offered Basila visiting position
at Paris VII and received no response.
However, lack of letters was made up for in
personal interactions. In the late1960s I attended
an AMS meeting at Cornell University for the
sole purpose of meeting Gordon and asking for
clarification of some of his papers. He was open,
gracious, and immensely helpful.
My most extended contact with Basil came in
1987 in India duringthe RamanujanCentenary. We
had several long car rides together connecting to
the several conferences. During one such venture
Basil entertained me and the other passengers
with one of his hobbies. The object was to take
aword or phrase, use its letters as an anagram,
and produce anew word or phrase directly related
to the original. The only one I remember was
“Mosquitoes” morphing into “O, Moses quit!” This
was long before computers dominatedsuchgames.
Basil had a wonderful sense of humor. Small
absurdities delighted him. I recall one example (at
myexpense). This is from arare letter to me, dated
October21, 1981:
Thefollowingfiller appearedinthe L.A. Times
of Oct. 18.
Ramanujan, Mathematics Giant, Created
Formulas
State College, Pa. (AP) Srinivasa Ramanujan
who died about60 years ago, when he was 32,
is considered to beone of the giants of 20th
centurymathematics,saidGeorge E.Andrews
of Penn State University. Ramanujan, a poor
Indian, created his own math formulas.”
As to Basil’s mathematics, I shall restrict my
comments tohis work on plane partitions, much
of it done with his students (Lorne Houten and
others). The majority of this work is primarily
contained in a sequence of papers titled “Notes on
plane partitions” [8], [9], [10], [5], [6], [11]. There
are four other papers [3], [4], [7], [12]. Of these,
[4] is an early but interesting contribution on two-
rowed partitions. The proof of the Bender-Knuth
conjecture is given in [7].
The story of plane partitions dates back to
P. A. MacMahon [13, p. 673]. There we find his first
inkling that there might be appealing generating
functions for plane partitions. More than twenty
years later, MacMahon [14] effectively proved that
Y1
n1
1
1 qnn
1q 3q
2
6q
3
 ;
where the coefficient ofq
n
is the number of plane
partitionsofn.Forexample,the sixplane partitions
860
Notices of the AMS
Volume 60, Number 7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested