open pdf file in c# : Add text to pdf in preview control application platform web page html azure web browser 201307-full-issue3-part662

of 3 are
3
2 1
2
1
1 1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
Although T. W. Chaundy wrote some papers on
plane partitions inthe 1930s, it fellto Basil (jointly
with his student LorneHouten) to develop serious
methods that really opened up the subject. The
first hintthat something newwas afootcame from
their proof that
Y1
n1
1
1 qn
n1
2
1q 2q
2
4q
3

is the generating function for plane partitions with
strictly decreasing parts along rows. Thus the four
plane partitions of 3 subjectto this description are
3
2 1
2
1
1
1
1
These papers illustrate the tremendous insights
that Gordon developed in advancing from [4] to
[7]. Indeed, it should be emphasized that there
is much food for thought and many questions
still to be answered arising from these papers. For
example, in “Notes on plane partitions, IV” Gordon
shows that C
k
q, the generating function n for
k-rowedplanepartitionswithstrictlydecreasing
parts along columns, can be evaluated in terms
of certain classical infinite products and the false
theta series
X1
n0
 1
n
q
nn1=2
:
Although Gordon promises [5, p. 98] that a more
thorough investigation “will be undertaken else-
where,” unfortunately neither he nor anyone else
has followed up onthis unique appearance of false
theta series in the world of plane partitions.
This wonderful, brilliant man illuminated many
aspects of the theory of partitions. It was a joy to
collaborate with him on two papers [1], [2] (also
joint with Alladi). He gave the subject I love many
new ideas and path-breaking insights. I and many
others owe him a great debt.
References
[1] K.Alladi,G.E.Andrews,andB.Gordon,General-
izations and refinements of a partition theorem of
Göllnitz, J. ReineAngew. Math. 460 (1995), 165–188.
[2]
, Refinements and generalizations of Cappa-
relli’s conjectureonpartitions, J. Algebra174 (1995),
636–658.
[3] M.S.CheemaandB.Gordon,Someremarksontwo-
andthree-linepartitions,DukeMath.J.31(1964),267–
273.
[4] B.Gordon,Twonewrepresentationsofthepartition
function, Proc.Amer. Math. Soc.13(1962), 869–873.
[5]
, Multirowed partitions with strict decrease
along columns (Notes on plane partitions, IV), Sym-
posia Amer. Math. Soc., vol. 19, Amer. Math. Soc.,
Providence, RI,1971,pp. 91–100.
[6]
,Notesonplanepartitions V,J.Combin.Theory
B-11(1971), 157–168.
[7]
,AproofoftheBender-Knuthconjecture,Pacific
J. Math. 108(1983), 999–1013.
[8] B.GordonandL.Houten,Notesonplanepartitions,
I, J. Combin.Theory 4(1968), 72–89.
[9]
,Notes onplanepartitions,II,J.Combin.Theory
4(1968), 118–120.
[10]
,Notes onplanepartitions,III, Duke Math. J.36
(1969), 801–824.
[11] B.Gordon,Notes onplanepartitions,VI,Discrete
Math. 26 (1979), 41–45.
[12] B.GordonandL.Houten, Multi-rowedpartitions
withtotallydistinctparts,J.NumberTheory12(1980),
439–444.
[13] P.A.MacMahon,Memoironthetheoryofthepar-
tition of numbers—Part I, Phil. Trans. 187 (1897),
619–673. (Reprinted in Percy Alexander MacMahon,
Collected Papers, MIT Press, Cambridge, 1978.)
[14]
, Memoir on the theory of the partition of
numbers—Part VI, Phil. Trans.211 (1912), 345–373.
(Reprinted in Percy Alexander MacMahon, Collected
Papers, MIT Press, Cambridge,1978.)
Robert Guralnick
Basil Gordon’s Work in Algebra
Basil Gordon was a major figure in combinatorial
number theory and especially in the theory of
partition identities. This work is discussed by
Alladi, Andrews, and Ono. I will focus on his work
in algebra and group theory.
Gordon grew up in Baltimore and was a student
atJohns Hopkins, spending ayear asanundergrad-
uate in Germany, where he studied with Ernst Witt
and Emil Artin. He was advised to go to Caltech
and work with Tom Apostol. Apostol has said that,
as a graduate student, Gordon already knew as
much as Apostol did. He graduated from Caltech
in 1956 and spent one year there as a postdoc. He
then accepted a job at UCLA but spent some time
in the army before arriving there.
It is also important to note that Gordon was
an outstanding teacher at all levels and was one
of the most successful Ph.D. advisors at UCLA.
He had twenty-six Ph.D. students, starting with
David Cantor in 1960 and ending with Ken Ono in
1993. Atthe moment he has a total of seventy-four
descendants, including forty-two grandstudents
and six great-grandstudents. I was right in the
middle. He was an outstanding advisor, giving
precisely the right amount of guidance for each
student. In particular, Ono (and Alladi, who was
Robert Guralnick is professor of mathematics at the
University of Southern California. His email address is
guralnic@usc.edu.
August 2013
Notices of the AMS
861
Add text to pdf in preview - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text field to pdf acrobat; how to add text to a pdf in acrobat
Add text to pdf in preview - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to insert text box in pdf; how to enter text in pdf
PhotocourtesyofKeithKendig.
Gordon as an undergraduate student at Johns
Hopkins University.
not a Gordon student but quite influenced by
him) says how influential he was in their lives
and careers. Although most of Gordon’s students
wrote theses in number theory, he did produce
about ten students whose theses were in algebra
and group theory.
Ihad a different sort of relationship with him. I
met another of Gordon’s students, Michael Miller,
while I was an undergraduate at UCLA (he was my
TA in an undergraduate abstract algebra course).
Mike suggested some problems to me, and he
and I and Basil started working on them (with
Mike communicating between us). We wrote a joint
paper before I ever met Basil. I wrote a second
paper on my own, took it to him, and asked him to
be my advisor. He encouraged my independence.
Hewas alsoawonderfulteacher.He gavecrystal-
clear, beautiful lectures with no notes. Al Hales
tells the story of being absolutely mesmerized
watching him during office hours at Caltech. He
ran the UCLA Putnam team for decades. The team
usually didextremely well (most especially in 1968
with a third place finish). Gordon usually worked
the solutions out within an hour or two. Mike
Miller recalls that in 1969 Gordon finished all
the problems in what seemed to be a matter of
minutes.
While Gordon’s work in algebra and group
theory was not as significant as his other work,
there were some gems. Below we discuss a few of
these.
OneofGordon’s earliestpapers wasajointpaper
with Sol Golomb and Lloyd Welch on comma-free
codes [2]. The motivation for this was the genetic
code. At one point it was thought that nature gave
an optimal solution to a coding theory problem. A
setD ofk-letter words from ann-letter alphabet
is called a comma-free dictionary if when two
such words are adjoined, no set ofk consecutive
letters, other than those inthe chosenwords, form
aword inD. In the paper, various results about
the number of words in a comma-free dictionary
are obtained. Further results were obtained in the
famous paper [7]. (Note that Jiggs is notthe author;
the authors of that paper were Baumert, Golomb,
Gordon, Hales, Jewett, and Selfridge. As far as I
know this is the first public acknowledgment of
the true authors of that paper.)Gordonhad several
other interesting papers in coding theory.
In [6] Gordon and Straus consider the lattice
of finite Galois extensions in an infinite Galois
extensionL=K. They elegantly describe the set of
all possible degrees of finite Galois extensions of
K0=K with K < K0 < L.
In [3] Gordon andMotzkingeneralize a result of
Herstein about zeroes of polynomials of division
algebrasD. They prove that any degreen polyno-
mialfx in Dxeither has at most n roots in
Dorhasinfinitelymanyroots(Hersteinassumed
the polynomials had central coefficients). They
also consider polynomials where the variable is
not assumed to commute with coefficients (and
so evaluation maps are homomorphisms from the
ring of such polynomials to D).
In [1] Fein and Gordon study a global Schur
index for finite groups. Let G be a finite group
and letKGdenote the field generated by all the
entries in the character table of G. It is shown
thatKGis an abelian extension ofQ such that
all residue fields are splitting fields. A splitting
field in characteristic 0 contains a copy ofKG,
butKGneed not be a splitting field forG. They
definemGto be the minimum ofK :KGas
Krangesoverallpossiblesplittingfieldsfor G.
They raise the question as to whether any abelian
extension of Q is of the form KG for someG.
In [4] Gordon and Schacher answer a question
from Schacher’s thesis. LetK be a number field
andL=K be a cubic extension. The authors show
that there exists a degree 4 polynomial over K
that is irreducible for at least two completions
ofK, has Galois groupA
4
,and whose resolvent
cubic polynomial definesL. A corollary shows the
existence of adivision algebraoverK of dimension
144 containing a maximal subfield whose Galois
group is A
4
. In [5] the existence of a division
algebraoverQ witha maximal subfieldGalois with
Galois groupA
5
was constructed. (Schacher in his
thesis observed that A
n
;n >7,cannot occur in
this way.)
862
Notices of the AMS
Volume 60, Number 7
C# WinForms Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
Highlight PDF text. • Add text to PDF document in preview. • Add text box to PDF file in preview. • Draw PDF markups. PDF Protection.
how to insert a text box in pdf; add text to pdf acrobat
C# WPF Viewer: Load, View, Convert, Annotate and Edit PDF
PDF Annotation. • Add sticky notes to PDF document. • Highlight PDF text in preview. • Add text to PDF document. • Insert text box to PDF file.
adding text to pdf in acrobat; how to insert text box in pdf document
References
[1] BurtonFeinandBasilGordon,Fieldsgeneratedby
charactersof finitegroups,J.LondonMath.Soc.4(1972),
735–740.
[2] S.W.Golomb,BasilGordon,andL.R.Welch,Comma-
freecodes, Canad. J.Math. 10 (1958), 202–209.
[3] B.GordonandT.S.Motzkin,Onthezerosofpolyno-
mials overdivisionrings, Trans. Amer. Math. Soc. 116
(1965), 218–226.
[4] BasilGordonandMurraySchacher,Quarticcover-
ings of a cubic.Number theory and algebra, Academic
Press, New York, 1977, pp. 97–101.
[5]
,Theadmissibility ofA
5
,J. Number Theory11
(1979), 498–504.
[6] Basil Gordon and d E.G.Straus,Onthe e degreesof
the finite extensions of a field,1965 Proc. Sympos. Pure
Math.,Vol.VIII,pp.56–65,Amer.Math.Soc.,Providence,
RI.
[7] B.H.Jiggs,Recentresultsincomma-freecodes,Canad.
J. Math. 15 (1963), 178–187.
Ken Ono
Personal Reflections, and Gordon’s Work on
Modular Forms and Mock Theta Functions
BasilGordonchanged mylife. After completing my
undergraduate degree at the University of Chicago
in 1989, I moved to Westwood to begin the Ph.D.
program in mathematics at UCLA. I started the
program with no vision. My passion up to that
point had been bicycle racing. I certainly was not
committed to the idea of pursuing a career in
mathematics. Indeed, I almost dropped out of the
program several times during my first year.
Basil Gordon’s 1990 graduate course in number
theory changed my life. His passionate lectures
were beautiful and inspiring. Basil, my image
of a great nineteenth-century scholar, saw the
world through special lenses. I was mesmerized
by his ability to make mathematics beautiful by
making analogies with classical art, literature, and
music. His encyclopedic knowledge of everything,
combinedwithhisobviouslove ofmathematicsand
his role in the subject, drew meinto mathematics.
Basiltaught me howto findbeautyinmathematical
research, and he helped me find self-confidence
and a genuine passion for mathematical research.
He taught me these lessons in the idyllic setting
of Santa Monica, in the reading room of his home
(two blocks from the beach), inthe Bagel Nosh, and
in a cute Italian bistro that still serves delicious
gnocchi.
Basil steered me in the direction of modular
forms, aprescient choice, consideringthatAndrew
Wiles would go on to use the subject in his proof
of Fermat’s Last Theorem, which he announced a
KenOnoisthe AsaGriggsCandlerProfessorofMathematics
andComputerScienceatEmoryUniversity.Hisemailaddress
is ono@mathcs.emory.edu.
PhotocourtesyofKeithKendig.
Basil Gordon with two of his Ph.D.
students—Ken Ono (on the left) and Doug
Bowman (on the right)—at UCLA in spring 1993.
few weeks after I defendedmy thesis in 1993. Basil
encouraged me to think about congruences for the
coefficients of modular forms, and he suggested
deep works ofDeligne, Serre, andSwinnerton-Dyer.
Basil understood that these deep works would
shed light onclassical questions on partitions that
date back to seminal works of Euler, Jacobi, and
Ramanujan.
Basil was enamored with Ramanujan’s work
on the partition function pn, and he liked to
say that he wanted “to do forQn, the number
of partitions of an integern into distinct parts,
everything that Ramanujan had done forpn.”
Basil succeeded. I am particularly fond of his work
with Kim Hughes [1], which established analogs
of Ramanujan’s celebrated partition congruences
modulo powers of 5. Ifk 0 is aninteger, then for
every integern with 24n mod 52k1 they
proved that
Qn  0 mod 5
k
:
The partition functions pn and Qn are
examples of coefficients of modular forms that
can be represented as infinite products. Basil
understood the importance of developing general
theorems about such infinite products, which
he referred to as eta-quotients and generalized
eta-quotients
1
because of their connection to
Dedekind’s eta-function (note: q : e
2iz
)
z : q
1=24
Y1
n1
1 q
n
:
In addition to proving general theorems about
the modularity properties of such products, Basil
was interested in the problem of classifying those
1
Sinai Robinsstudiedgeneralizedeta-productsin his Ph.D.
thesis.
August 2013
Notices of the AMS
863
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.Word
With the SDK, you can preview the document content according to the preview thumbnail by the ways as following. C# DLLs for Word File Preview. Add references:
adding text to a pdf form; add text boxes to pdf document
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.PowerPoint
C# DLLs: Preview PowerPoint Document. Add necessary XDoc.PowerPoint DLL libraries into your created C# application as references. RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
add text box to pdf file; add text pdf professional
products which resemble Jacobi’s classical identity
Y1
n1
1  q
n
3
X1
k0
 1
k
2k 1q
k
2
k=2
:
This series is lacunary: it has the property that
almost all of its coefficients are zero. Carrying out
ageneralization of an elegant paper [6] of Serre,
Basil and his student Sinai Robins [4] classified all
of the lacunary eta-products in certain families of
modular forms.
Basil was also very interested in Ramanujan’s
mock theta functions, an enigmatic collection of
q-serieswhichRamanujandescribedinhis“death
bed” letter to G. H. Hardy. Until the recent work of
Zwegers[8], where these functions are describedas
holomorphic parts of weight 1/2harmonic Maass
forms, very little was known about the analytic
properties of these series, which included such
functions as
fq : 1
X1
n1
qn
2
1q21q22 1qn2
:
In important work with his student Richard
McIntosh, Basil defined a “universal” mock theta
function:
F;r;q :
X1
n 1
 1
n
q
nn1
 qnr
:
They observed that most of Ramanujan’s mock
theta functions are related to specializations of
this series, and they proceeded to determine the
modular transformation laws for certain special-
izations [2], [3]. These results fit nicely into the
comprehensive framework later discovered by
Zwegers in his transformational work [8] in the
subject (also see [5], [7]).
Basil Gordon was a great man. He taught me
how to love mathematics. He taught me how to
find the confidence to do mathematics. He is my
image of the perfect advisor. I owe him so many
debts, and I miss him terribly.
References
[1] B.GordonandK.Hughes,Ramanujancongruences
forqn, Analytic Number Theory (Philadelphia, Pa.,
1980),Springer Lecture Notes in Math.,vol. 899, 1981,
pp. 333–359.
[2] B.GordonandR.J.McIntosh,Modulartransforma-
tions of Ramanujan’s fifth and seventh order mock
theta functions, RamanujanJournal7(2003), 193–222.
[3]
,A survey of mock-theta functions. I, preprint.
[4] B.GordonandS.Robins,LacunarityofDedekind -
products, GlasgowMath. J. 37 (1995), 1–14.
[5] K.Ono,Unearthingthevisionsofamaster:Harmonic
Maass forms and number theory, Harvard-MIT Cur-
rent Developments in Mathematics, 2008, Int. Press,
Somerville, MA, 2009, pp. 347–454.
[6] J-P. Serre, Sur la lacunarité des puissances de ,
GlasgowMath. J. 27 (1985), 203–221.
[7] D. Zagier, Ramanujan’s mock k theta a functions s and
theirapplications (afterZwegers andOno-Bringmann),
Astérisque326 (2010), 143–164.
[8] S.Zwegers,Mockthetafunctions,Ph.D.thesis(Advisor:
D. Zagier), Universiteit Utrecht, 2002.
Bruce Rothschild
Working with Basil Gordon
When I was just about to move to UCLA in 1969,
Ted Motzkin was briefly visiting MIT from UCLA
(I was there as a postdoc). Gian-Carlo Rota was
involved at that time in reorganizing the Journal
of Combinatorial Theory (JCT) into two series,
JCT-A and JCT-B. He asked Motzkin if he would be
interestedin becoming the editor-in-chief of Series
A. As Motzkin explained it, he knew that Basil
Gordon would be available to support the effort,
so he agreed to take the job. The decision took
him about thirty seconds according to Rota. He
also enlisted me, so Basil and I became managing
editors for JCT-A.
Ihad met Basil briefly, but didn’t know much
about him except for his fearsome reputation
amongsome of my friends in the graduate student
body at UCLA. He was known as one who could
solve almost any problem, especially the Putnam
problems, in real time. As I got to know him, it
became immediately obvious to me why Motzkin
had been so confident.
Although Motzkin died unexpectedly shortly
after I gottoUCLA, BasilandI continuedtomanage
JCT-A, first for several years with Marshall Hall
at Caltech as editor-in-chief, and then without a
“chief”.We workedtogetheronthe journal for more
than thirty years. This was surely, in a unique way,
my most satisfying and rewarding collaboration.
Although we never actually wrote a joint paper,
the amount of mathematics we discussed was
enormous. Mostly this meant I would learn about
allkinds ofthings fromhim. Basilwas anincredible
scholar (in many things, not just mathematics),
and when we had to figure out what to do with a
paper submitted to JCT-A, I could always count on
learning a great deal.
JCT-A operated in the usual way at the time,
receiving papers, finding referees willing and able
to review them, corresponding with all concerned
about revisions, and ultimately making a decision
whether to publish. Atypically for me, Iwas the one
who kept things organized and moving along (with
the essential support of our long-time secretary
and assistant, Elaine Barth).
Bruce Rothschild is professor of mathematics at the Uni-
versity of California, Los Angeles. His email address is
blr@math.ucla.edu.
864
Notices of the AMS
Volume 60, Number 7
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. Also a preview component enables compressing and
how to insert text box on pdf; add text to pdf in acrobat
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
viewer component supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe Insert images into PDF form field. How to insert and add image, picture, digital photo
adding text fields to a pdf; adding text to pdf
Both of us had our dilatory episodes, not
infrequently—but not always—due to a large
number of papers recently submitted. Like many
of our reviewers, Basil needed reminders about
papers I doled out to him for reviewor for steering
to reviewers, and more often than I’d admit under
quantitative scrutiny, I failed to remind him in
a timely manner. What was striking—as was so
much about Basil—was that when I’d call, he’d
immediately know the paper I was referring to,
what it was about, and what its editorial problems
and strengths were. In the next day or so those
previously unrecorded comments would be in my
hands. His comments would be written in his
amazingly neat and legible handwriting between
the lines and inthe margins andwhen necessaryin
amanuscript on separate pages. His handwriting
was so unique that it was essentially a signature.
Finding an appropriate referee could also be quite
difficult on occasion. At these times an appeal to
Basil’s familiarity with the area in question and,
even more, with related areas in algebra or number
theory made it possible to find theright reviewer.
Although Basil had extremely high standards,
broad knowledge, and impeccable taste, his com-
ments about papers that he thought were not
strong enough would never be anything but con-
structive. He would neversimply dismiss a paper,
no matter how weak. His comments were kind
and encouraging in such cases. He took all the
mathematics seriously and responded accordingly.
It was just apleasure to work with him. Sometimes
Iwould first see a paper that seemed perhaps too
elementary or even trivial, but when I showed it to
Basil he would see in it an example of a number
theory issue and a connection to deep problems.
Even though he might agree that the paper was
not appropriate for JCT-A, he would himself be
quite interested.
Basil and I stepped down from managing JCT-A
in 2002, and the management moved, first to
Arizona and then to Australia, and the publisher
from Academic Press to Elsevier. Basil was retired
by then, but I saw him fairly regularly right
up to his last days. He was actively engaged in
mathematics until the very end, and it continued
to be enlightening, entertaining, and rewarding in
general to talk to him.
Ways to participate:
Propose a:
• semester program
• topical workshop
• summer undergrad or early 
career researcher program
Apply for a:
• semester program or workshop 
• postdoctoral fellowship
Become an: 
• academic or corporate sponsor 
About ICERM:  The Institute 
for Computational and 
Experimental Research in 
Mathematics is a National 
Science Foundation 
Mathematics Institute at Brown 
University in Providence, Rhode 
Island. Its mission is to broaden 
the relationship between 
mathematics and computation.
121 S. Main Street, 11th Floor
Providence, RI  02903
401-863-5030
info@icerm.brown.edu
To learn more about ICERM programs, organizers,  
program participants, to submit a proposal, or to submit  
an application, please visit our website: 
http://icerm.brown.edu
Institute for Computational and Experimental Research in Mathematics
CALL  FOR  PROPOSALS
The Institute for Computational and Experimental 
Research in Mathematics (ICERM) invites semester 
program proposals that support its mission to foster and 
broaden the relationship between mathematics and 
computation.
Semester Programs:
ICERM hosts two semester programs per year. Each has 
4-7 organizers and typically incorporates three weeklong 
associated workshops. 
On average, the institute provides partial or full support 
for 5 postdoctoral fellows and 6-10 graduate students per 
program. There is support for housing and travel support 
for long-term visitors (including organizers), who stay 
for 3-4 months, as well as short-term visitors, who stay 
for 2-6 weeks. In addition, there is support for workshop 
attendees and applicants. 
Faculty interested in organizing a semester research 
program should begin the process by submitting a 
pre-proposal: a 2-3 page document which describes the 
scientific goals, lists the organizers of the program, and 
identifies the key participants.
All pre-proposals should be submitted by September 1st to:
director@icerm.brown.edu 
Proposers will receive feedback from an ICERM director 
within a few weeks of their submission or by September 15th
  
 
   More details can be found at:
http://tinyurl.com/ICERMproposals
August 2013
Notices of the AMS
865
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
try with this sample VB.NET code to add an image As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" Dim doc New PDFDocument(inputFilePath) ' Get a text manager from
how to insert text into a pdf; adding text to a pdf in preview
How to C#: Preview Document Content Using XDoc.excel
following. C# DLLs: Preview Excel Document without Microsoft Office Installed. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
adding text box to pdf; how to add a text box in a pdf file
Meijer G–Functions:
AGentle Introduction
Richard Beals and Jacek Szmigielski
T
he MeijerG–functions are a remarkable
family G of functions of one variable,
each of them determined by finitely
many indices. Although each such func-
tion is a linear combination of certain
special functions of standard type, they seem not
to be well known in the mathematical community
generally. Indeed they are not even mentioned
in most books on special functions, e.g., [1], [18].
Even the new comprehensive treatise [15] devotes
ascant 2 of its 900+ pages to them. (The situation
is different in some of the literature oriented more
toward applications, e.g., the extensive coverage in
[6] and [9].)
The present authors were ignorant of all but
the name of the G–functions until the second
author found them relevant to his research [3].
As we became acquainted with them, we became
convinced that they deserved a wider audience.
Some reasons for this conviction are the following:
TheG–functionsplayacrucialroleinacertain
useful mathematical enterprise.
 Whenlookedatconceptually,theyareboth
natural and attractive.
Mostspecialfunctions,andmanyproductsof
special functions, areG–functions or are express-
ible as products ofG–functions with elementary
functions. There are seventy-five such formulas in
[4, sec. 5.6]; see also [6, sec. 6.2], [9, chap. 2], and
[20]. Examples are the exponential function, Bessel
functions, and products of Bessel functions (the
notation will be explained below):
RichardBeals isemeritus professorof mathematicsatYale
University.Hisemailaddressisrichard.beals@yale.edu.
Jacek Szmigielski isprofessor ofmathematicsat theUniver-
sityofSaskatchewan.Hisemailaddress isszmigiel@math.
usask.ca.
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1090/notimanid1016
e
x
G
10
01
1
x
!
;
J
2x  x
G
10
02
0
x
2
!
;
J
2
xJ
2
x 
1
p
G
12
24
1
2
0

  
 
  
x
2
!
:
ThefamilyGofG–functionshasremarkable
closure properties:itisclosedunder thereflections
x!  xand x !1=x, multiplication by powers,
differentiation, integration, the Laplace transform,
the Euler transform, and the multiplicative con-
volution. Thus, if GG
1
, and G
2
belong to G
and the various transforms and the multiplicative
convolutionG
1
G
2
exist, then the following also
belong to G:
G x; G1=x; x
a
Gx; G
0
x;
(1)
Z
x
c
Gydy (for some choice of c);
(2)
LGx
Z
1
0
e
xy
Gydy;
(3)
E
a;b
Gx 
Z
1
0
t
a 1
1 t
b 1
Gtydt;
(4)
G
1
G
2
x
Z
1
0
G
1
x
y
!
G
2
y
dy
y
:
(5)
ThefamilyGisminimalwithrespecttothese
properties. For example, the onlynonzero multiple
of e
x
that belongs to G is e
x
itself.
Closure under convolution, (5), is of particu-
lar importance for the mathematical enterprise
alluded to above. It lies at the heart of the most
comprehensive tables of integrals inprint [16] and
online, as well as the Mathematica integrator; see
[19], [6], and [8].
866
Notices of the AMS
Volume 60, Number 7
In our view, the key to aconceptual understand-
ing of a G–function is the differential equation
that it satisfies: the generalized hypergeometric
equation. We begin by noting what special prop-
erty singles out precisely these equations among
general linearhomogeneous ODEs.
The Generalized Hypergeometric Equation
It is convenient here to replace the operator
d=dxwiththescale–invariantoperatorD x d=dx,
which is diagonalized by powers of x:
(6)
Dx
s
s x
s
:
The general homogeneous linear ODE
a
N
x
dnu
dxn
xa
N 1
x
dN 1u
dxN 1
x
a
0
xux  0
can, after multiplication byxN, be rewritten in the
form
(7)
b
N
xD
N
ux b
N 1
xD
N 1
ux
 b
0
xux  0:
Suppose that the coefficients are analytic near
x 0 and consider the standard power series
method: determine the coefficients of a formal
power series solution
P
1
n0
u
n
xbyexpanding(7)
and collecting the coefficients of like powers ofx.
Carrying this out by hand can be quite tedious. For
example, what are the coefficientsu
5
andu
10
in
the series expansion of the solution of
u
00
xe
x
ux  0;
given thatu
0
1,u
1
0?Thismightleadoneto
ask the following question:
When do the linear equations for the coefficients
fu
n
gintheseriesexpansionreducetoatwo-term
recursion of the form c
n
u
n
d
n
u
n 1
?
It is not difficult to show that the necessary and
sufficient condition on the coefficientsb
n
is that
each has the form
n
x
n
xforsomefixed k.
It follows that (7) can be reduced to the form
QDux  xPDux  0;
whereQ andP are monic polynomials. In view of
(6), the recursion for the coefficients of a formal
series solution is
(8)
Qnu
n
Pn 1u
n 1
:
If 0, this trivializes: e.g., if theb
j
are distinct,
any solution is a linear combination of powers
x1 b
j
.If6 0, we may take advantage of the scale
invariance of the operator D to take x as the
independent variable and reduce to the case 1.
Finally, the solution is trivial unlessQ0 0.
Thus, excluding trivial cases and up to normaliza-
tion, the answer to the question above is that (7)
must be a generalized hypergeometric equation
(GHGE), first version:
(9)
2
4
D
q 1
Y
j1
D b
j
1 x
p
Y
j1
D a
j
3
5
ux  0:
Generalized Hypergeometric Functions
For equation (9), the recursion (8) is
(10) n
qY 1
j1
b
j
n  1u
n
Yp
j1
a
j
n  1u
n 1
:
(Here and subsequently we shall assume, usually
without explicit statement, various conditions,
such as the condition that nob
j
1beanegative
integer.) The formal power series solution with
constant term 1 is
(11)
X1
n0
a
1
n
a
2
n
a
p
n
b
1
n
b
2
n
b
q 1
n
n!
x
n
;
where the extended factorial a
n
is defined by
a
0
1;
a
n
aa 1a n 1 
—n a
—a
; n  1:
The series (11) diverges for allx6 0 ifp>q, has
radius of convergence 1 ifpq, and converges
everywhere if p < q.
Forpq the function defined by the series is
the generalized hypergeometric function usually
denoted
p
F
q 1
a
1
;:::;a
p
b
1
;:::;b
q 1
x
!
:
Sincethe equationhere hasorderq, there shouldbe
an additional 1 linearly independent solutions.
We shall come back to this point later.
AMore Conceptual Route to a Solution
Westartfromasecond,slightlygeneralized,version
of (9). The factorD is replaced by D b
q
1:
(12)
2
4
Yq
j1
D b
j
1 x
Yp
j1
D a
j
3
5
ux  0:
Let us note two features of equation (12). First,
Disinvariantunder x ! x,sothissignchange
converts (12) to
(13)
2
4
Yq
j1
D b
j
1x
Yp
j1
D a
j
3
5
ux  0:
Second, under the change of variablesy 1=x,D
goes to D. Therefore equation (12)is transformed
into one having the same form or else the form
(13) (depending on the sign of  1
q p
), but with
theq parametersb
j
replaced by thep parameters
a
j
,and thep parametersa
j
replaced by the
August 2013
Notices of the AMS
867
qparameters1  b
j
.This allows one to assume
always that p q.
SinceD diagonalizesover powersofx,whilemul-
tiplication byx simply raises the power, we might
try to find solutions in the form of (continuous)
sums of powers:
(14)
ux 
1
2i
Z
L
Øsx
s
ds;
whereL is asuitable closed contour inthe complex
plane (or the Riemann sphere). We note in passing
that integral representations of solutions have a
clear advantage over series representations if one
wants to determine behavior for large values ofx
or of the parameters.
Plugging the expression (14) into (12) and
assuming that we may differentiate under the
integral sign, we want
0
1
2i
Z
L
Øs
2
4
Yq
j1
b
j
1sx
s
Yp
j1
a
j
sx
s1
3
5
ds
1
2i
Z
L
Øs
Yq
j1
b
j
1sx
s
ds
1
2i
Z
L1
Øs  1
Yp
j1
a
j
1sx
s
ds:
If the contourL has the property thatL 1 can
bedeformedtoLwithoutcrossinganysingularities
of the integrand, then we are led to the continuous
version of the recursion (10):
(15) Øs
Yq
j1
b
j
1s  Øs 1
Yp
j1
a
j
1s:
We shall refer to this condition on L as the
translation condition.
The various issues that arise in carrying out
the construction of solutions of (12), by solving
(15) and choosing a contour, arise already in the
simplest examples.
Example: q 1; p 0Wefollowtheusualcon-
ventionthatthe emptyproduct equals1. Therefore,
with q  1 and p  0, equation (12) reduces to
(16)
D b 1ux xux 0;
and the recursion equation (15) can be written
Øs
Øs  1
1
b s  1
—bs  1
—bs
:
Therefore we may takeØsto be the entire func-
tion 1=—b s and set
(17)
ux 
1
2i
Z
L
x
s
ds
—b s
:
Now if, as we shall assume, the contourL is closed
and does not cross a branch cut ofxs, then, by
Cauchy’s theorem,ux 0. This leads us to look
for another solution of (15).
The product’sØsis a second solution of
(15) if and only if’s 1’s. In order to
remain in the context of gammafunctions, we may
use Euler’s reflection formula,
(18)
—z—1 z 
sinz
;
and multiply the kernel 1=—bsin the integral
(17) by
(19) ’s 
sinb s
—bs—1 b s;
leading to the function
(20)
ux 
1
2i
Z
L
—1 b sx
s
ds:
Note that the factor (19) is antiperiodic rather
than periodic with period 1, i.e.,’s 1 ’s.
This corresponds to changing the sign of x in
equation (16). We take as L the loop shown in
Figure 1. In fact, the translation condition implies
that the poles must lie on one side of L, and for a
nontrivial result we wantL to enclose the poles of
the integrand, say in the negative direction. The
residue of—b sats 1 bnis  1
n
=n!,
so (20) is easily calculated:
ux 
X1
n0
 1
n
x1 bn
n!
x
1 b
e
x
:
Res  0
Ims  0
1
1
1 b
L
2 b
3 b
4 b
Figure 1. The contour L for (20).
Example: q  p  1. Here equation (12) becomes
(21)
D b 1ux xD aux 0:
Equation (15) becomes
Øs
Øs  1
as  1
bs  1
—a s
—a s  1
—b s  1
—b s
;
so one solution is Øs —a s=—b s:
(22)
ux 
1
2i
Z
L
—as
—bs
x
s
ds:
This function is meromorphic with poles at a,
1, a  2,….Ithasatmostalgebraicgrowth
ass!1 (see the discussion below). Therefore, for
0<jxj< 1 we may takeL to be a loop to the right,
as in Figure 1. Again, the translation condition
requires that the poles lie on one side of this loop,
and therefore outside it. Therefore, by Cauchy’s
theorem, ux 0 for 0 < jxj < 1.
868
Notices of the AMS
Volume 60, Number 7
Ifjxj> 1 we may takeL to be the loop shown
in Figure 2, enclosing the poles.
The residue of the integrand at the poles 
 n is
 1
n
n!
1
—b a  n
x
a n
:
By (18),
1
—b  a  n
—1a  b n
 1
n
sinb a
(23)
 1
n
—1a b n
—b  a—1a  b
 1
n
1 a b
n
—b  a
:
Therefore, for jxj> 1 our solution is
ux
a
—b  a
X1
n0
1 a b
n
n!
1
x
n
(24)
x
a
—b  a
1
x
b a 1
:
Res  0
Ims  0
1
1
a
L
a 1
a 2
Figure 2. The contour L for (22) when jxj > 1.
As in the case p  0, we may change the
integrand, leading, for example, to
ux 
1
2i
Z
L
—1 b s
—1 a s
x
s
ds:
Again for 0<jxj< 1, we may integrate over a
contour that encloses the poles going to the right,
as in Figure 1. For jxj> 1 we choose a contour
going to the left, as in Figure 2, but enclosing no
poles. A calculation as in (23), (24), together with
Cauchy’s theorem, gives
ux 
8
>
>
<
>
>
:
x
1 b
1  x
b a 1
—b a
;
0< jxj < 1;
0;
jxj > 1:
An interesting special case isa 0,b 1, which
gives a step function:
ux  H1 jxj; x 6 0;
where H is the Heavisidefunction.
We leave it to the reader toconsider two more
possibilities, with respective kernels—as—1
b s and 1=—1 a  s—bs.
Representation by Generalized Hyper-
geometric Functions
Before proceeding to a discussion of the general
case, we look briefly at the second order equation
D b
1
1D b
2
1
xD  auxux 0:
One possibility for a solution is
(25)
ux
1
2i
Z
L
—as—1 b
1
s—1 b
2
sx
s
ds:
Another way to construct a solution is to look for
u
1
x  x
1 b
1
v
1
x.The correspondingequation
forv
1
is
DD b
2
b
1
 xD a 1 b
1
v
1
x  0;
which has a solution in standard form:
(26)
v
1
x 
1
F
1
a1 b
1
b
2
1 b
1
x
!
;
and similarly with b
1
andb
2
interchanged. The
solution (25) must be a linear combination of
these two. The coefficients can be determined
by looking at the residues of the integrand at
the pole s  1 b
1
and at the pole s  1 b
2
:
—a1 b
1
—b
1
b
2
and —a1 b
2
—b
2
b
1
respectively. The result is
ux  —a1  b
1
—b
1
b
2
x
1 b
1
1
F
1
a1 b
1
b
2
1 b
1
x
!
(27)
—a 1 b
2
—b
2
b
1
x
1 b
2
1
F
1
a1 b
2
b
1
1 b
2
x
!
:
There is one notable feature of this particular
combination of the two standard solutionsv
1
,v
2
.
Each of thev
j
has exponential growth asx!1 ,
but (27) does not. In fact, the integrand decays
exponentially in both directions on vertical lines,
so we may deform the contour L into one that
consists of a small circle aroundsa, together
with a vertical line Res c<Rea. The leading
term canbecomputedfrom the residueatsa 0:
(28)
ux  —a1 b
1
—a1 b
2
x
a
as x !1:
Thus this integral form singles out the unique (up
to a multiplicative constant) linear combination
of the two standard solutions that has algebraic
behavior at 1.
General Considerations about Kernels and
Contours
For each case of equation (12), the functionØ that
satisfies the recursion equation (15) can and will
be taken to be a quotient of products of gamma
functions in the form — c
j
s or —d
j
s.
August 2013
Notices of the AMS
869
Therefore the poles ofØ, if any, will consist of
finitely many sequences of points:
a c
j
;c
j
1; c
j
2; ::: or b d
j
;d
j
1; d
j
2; ::: :
The translation condition requires that any such
sequence must lie on one side of the contour
L. The contour L is always chosen n to separate
the sequences (a) of poles that go to the left
from the sequences(b) that go to the right. (A
technical remark: We do not actually need the
translationconditiontodeducethatthese solutions
of (15) give rise to solutions of the generalized
hypergeometric equation; the condition that L
separate the sequences of poles in this way is
sufficient.)
We consider three types of contours L:
L L
I
:beginning at  i1, ending at i1;
L L
1
:beginning and ending at1, oriented
clockwise;
L L
1
:beginning and ending at 1, oriented
counterclockwise.
In order to see whichcontours are available in a
given case, we note here some basic facts about
asymptotics.
First, Stirling’s formula,
(29)
—z 
s
2
z
z
e
z
1O
1
z

as z ! 1;
is valid uniformly in the right half-planeRez 0.
It implies that grows faster than exponentially
to the right along any horizontal line and decays
exponentially in both directions along any vertical
line in the right half-plane.
Second, the reflection formula (18), combined
with (29), gives the asymptotic behavior in the
left half-plane Rez  0:  decays faster than
exponentially to the left along any horizontal
ray other than the negative real axis and decays
exponentially in either direction along any vertical
line in the left half-plane as well. These facts imply
that, for any fixed a, b,
(30)
—a s
—b s
s
a b
as s !1
along any ray that avoids the zeros and poles of
the quotient.
Meijer G–functions
Here we consider the general hypergeometric
equation (12) but with a difference from the
standard notation: the indices fb
j
g, fa
j
are
replaced by the reflections f1 b
j
g, f1 a
j
g:
(31)
2
4
Yq
j1
D   b
j
 x
Yp
j1
D 1 a
j
3
5
ux  0:
We assume again thatpq. The previous consid-
erations lead us to a solution which, in Meijer’s
notation, is G
0;p
p;q
:
(32)
G
0;p
p;q
a
1
;:::;a
p
b
1
;:::;b
q
x
!
1
2i
Z
L
Q
p
j1
—1 a
j
s
Q
q
j1
—1 b
j
s
x
s
ds:
Meijer [10] introduced a family of solutions of
equation (31), denoted by
G
m;n
p;q
a
0
1
;:::;a0
p
b
0
1
;:::;b
0
q
 1
mnp
x
!
;
0 m  q; 0 n  p;
where thefa
0
j
gand fb
0
j
garepermutationsofthe
original indicesfa
j
gand fb
j
grespectively.The
upper indexm indicates that the firstm factors
in the denominator of the integrand have been
changed to factors—b
j
sinthenumeratorand
the lastp n factors in the numerator have been
changed to factors—a
j
sinthedenominator.
This results in a total of mn factors in the
numerator.
Taking into account the invariance of the
integrand under permutations of the indicesa
j
andb
j
(separately) in the numerator and also in
the denominator, one can obtain 2
pq
solutions
of (31). However they are not necessarily distinct.
Ifp<q, then the 2p solutions withm0 vanish
identically, as in our first solution (17) in the case
q 1, p  0. If p  q, only y the solution with
m n  0 vanishes identically.
The choice of contours depends first onp andq.
Ifp<q (resp.p>q), the gamma functionkernelØ
has faster thanexponentialdecayto the right(resp.
left) on horizontal lines. Thus, forp<q, one can
take a contourLL
1
as in Figure 1, and forp>q
acontourLL
1
as in Figure 2. In either case
the contour is chosento separate the sequences of
poles going to 1 from those going to  1.
Ifthere aremoregammafactorsinthenumerator
than in the denominator, i.e.,mn>pq=2,
thenØ decays exponentially along vertical lines
and the contour can be deformed into L
I
from
i1to i1.If m n  p q=2,Øhasalgebraic
behavior at1 by (30), and again the contour can
be deformed, but this may require interpreting the
integral in the sense of distributions.
Whenp q, the kernelØ itself has algebraic
behavior ass!1 , just as in the casepq 1
above, so the choice of contourdiffers according
to whether 0 < jxj < 1 or jxj > 1.
Astrikingadvantageofthismethodofproducing
solutions is the ease of finding solutions with
prescribed behavior asx! 0 orx!1 . Assuming
again that pq, the standard solutions of the
formxb
j
p
F
q 1
that arexb
j
1 Oxasx !0are
870
Notices of the AMS
Volume 60, Number 7
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested