open pdf file in c# : Adding text to pdf online application software tool html windows wpf online 201307-full-issue7-part666

decompose as the sum of a given quantityc and
an infinitesimal :
(22)
q c :
In his 1821 text [22], Cauchy worked with a
hierarchy of infinitesimals defined by polynomials
in a base infinitesimal. Each such infinitesimal
decomposes as
(23)
n
c "
for asuitableintegernandinfinitesimal". Cauchy’s
expression(23) can be viewed as a generalization
of (22).
In Leibniz’s terminology, c is an assigna-
ble quantity, while  and " are inassignable.
Leibniz’s transcendental law of homogeneity (see
the subsection “Lex homogeneorum transcen-
dentalis”) authorized the replacement of the
inassignableqc by the assignablec, since
is negligible compared to c:
(24)
q
[\
c
(see the subsection “Relation
[\
”). Leibniz empha-
sized that he worked with a generalized notion of
equality where expressions were declared “equal”
if they differed by a negligible term. Leibniz’s pro-
cedure was formalized in Robinson’s B-approach
by the standard part function (see the subsection
“Standard Part Principle”), which assigns to each
finite hyperreal number the unique real number to
which it is infinitely close. As such, the standard
part allows one to work “internally” (not in the
technical NSA sense but) in the sense of exploiting
concepts already available in the toolkit of the
historical infinitesimal calculus, such as Fermat’s
adequality (see the subsection “Adequality”), Leib-
niz’s transcendental law of homogeneity (see the
subsection“Lexhomogeneorumtranscendentalis”),
and Euler’s principle of cancellation (see Bair et
al.[5]). Meanwhile, intheA-approachas formalized
by Weierstrass, one is forced to work with “exter-
nal” concepts such as the multiple-quantifier;
definitions (see the subsection “Continuity”) which
have no counterpart in the historical infinitesimal
calculus of Leibniz and Cauchy.
Thus, thenotions ofstandard part andepsilontic
limit, while logically equivalent (see the subsec-
tion “Standard Part Principle”), have the following
differencebetween them: the standard part princi-
ple corresponds to an “internal” development of
the historical infinitesimal calculus, whereas the
epsilontic limit is “external” to it.
Zeno’s Paradox of Extension
Zeno of Elea (who lived about 2,500 years ago)
raised a puzzle (the paradox of extension, which
is distinct from his better-known paradoxes of
motion) inconnectionwithtreating anycontinuous
magnitude as though it consists of infinitely many
indivisibles; see (Sherry1988 [99]), (Kirk et al. 1983
[71]). If the indivisibles have no magnitude, then
an extension (such as space or time) composed
of them has no magnitude; but if the indivisibles
have some (finite) magnitude, then an extension
composedof themwillbeinfinite. Thereisafurther
puzzle: If a magnitude is composed of indivisibles,
then we ought to be able to add or concatenate
them in order to produceor increase a magnitude.
But indivisibles are not next to one another: as
limits or boundaries, any pair of indivisibles is
separated by what they limit. Thus, the concept of
addition or concatenation seems not to apply to
indivisibles.
The paradox need not apply to infinitesimals
in Leibniz’s sense however (see the subsection
“Indivisibles versus Infinitesimals”) for, having
neither zero nor finitemagnitude, infinitely many
of them may be just what is needed to produce
afinite magnitude. And in any case, the addition
or concatenation of infinitesimals (of the same
dimension) is no more difficult to conceiveof than
adding or concatenating finite magnitudes. This
is especially important, because it allows one to
apply arithmetic operations to infinitesimals (see
the subsection “Lex continuitatis” on the law of
continuity). See also(Reeder 2012 [93]).
Acknowledgments
The work of Vladimir Kanovei was partially sup-
ported by RFBR grant 13-01-00006. M. Katz was
partially funded by the Israel Science Foundation,
grant No. 1517/12. We are grateful to Reuben
Hersh and Martin Davis for helpful discussions
and to the anonymous referees for a number
of helpful suggestions. The influence of Hilton
Kramer (1928–2012) is obvious.
References
[1] K. Andersen, , One e of f Berkeley’s arguments on
compensating errors in the calculus, Historia
Mathematica 38 (2011),no. 2, 219–231.
[2] Archimedes,DeSphaeraetCylindro,inArchimedis
Opera Omnia cum Commentariis Eutocii, vol. I, ed.
J. L. Heiberg, B. G. Teubner, Leipzig, 1880.
[3] R. Arthur, Leibniz’s s Syncategorematic c Infinitesi-
mals, Smooth Infinitesimal Analysis, and Newton’s
Proposition 6(2007). Seehttp://www.humanities.
mcmaster.ca/rarthur/papers/LsiSiaNp6.rev.
pdf
[4] Bachet, Diophanti i Alexandrini, Arithmeticorum
Liber V (Bachet’s Latintranslation).
[5] J.Bair,P.Błaszczyk,R.Ely,V.Henry,V.Kanovei,
K. Katz, M. Katz, S. Kutateladze, T. McGaffey,
D. Schaps, D. Sherry, and S. Shnider, Interpreting
Euler’s infinitesimal mathematics (in preparation).
[6] J. Bair r and V. Henry, From Newton’s s fluxions
to virtualmicroscopes, Teaching Mathematics and
Computer Science V(2007), 377–384.
August 2013
Notices of the AMS
901
Adding text to pdf online - insert text into PDF content in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
XDoc.PDF for .NET, providing C# demo code for inserting text to PDF file
add text box to pdf file; how to insert text box on pdf
Adding text to pdf online - VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Providing Demo Code for Adding and Inserting Text to PDF File Page in VB.NET Program
how to insert text into a pdf file; adding text to pdf in acrobat
[7]
,From mixed angles to infinitesimals, The
College Mathematics Journal 39 (2008), no. 3,
230–233.
[8]
,Analyseinfinitésimale- Lecalculus redécou-
vert, Editions Academia Bruylant Louvain-la-Neuve
(Belgium) 2008, 189pages. D/2008/4910/33.
[9] J. L.Bell,Continuityandinfinitesimals,Stanford
Encyclopediaof Philosophy, revised 20 July 2009.
[10] E.Bishop, Mathematics s as aNumerical Language,
1970 Intuitionism and Proof Theory (Proc. Conf.,
Buffalo, NY, 1968), pp. 53–71. North-Holland,
Amsterdam.
[11]
,Thecrisis incontemporarymathematics. Pro-
ceedings of the American Academy Workshop on
the Evolutionof ModernMathematics (Boston,Mass.,
1974), Historia Mathematica2(1975), no.4,507–517.
[12] E. Bishop,Review: H.Jerome Keisler,Elementary
Calculus, Bull. Amer. Math. Soc. 83(1977), 205–208.
[13]
,Schizophreniaincontemporarymathematics.
In ErrettBishop: ReflectionsonHim and His Research
(San Diego, Calif., 1983),1–32, Contemp. Math., vol.
39,Amer.Math.Soc.,Providence,RI,1985[originally
distributed in 1973].
[14] P. Błaszczyk, M. Katz, , and
D. Sherry,
Ten
misconceptions
from
the
history
of
analysis
and
their debunking, Foundations
of Science 18
(2013), no. 1, 43–74. See
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10699-012-9285
-8 andhttp://arxiv.org/abs/1202.4153
[15] P.BłaszczykandK.Mrówka,Euklides,Elementy,
Ksiegi V–VI, Tłumaczenie i komentarz [Euclid, Ele-
ments, Books V–VI, Translation and commentary],
Copernicus Center Press, Kraków, 2013.
[16] A. Borovik and M. . Katz, , Who o gave e you
the Cauchy–Weierstrass tale? The dual his-
tory
of rigorous
calculus, Foundations of
Science
17
(2012), no. 3, 245–276. See
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10699-011-9235
-x andhttp://arxiv.org/abs/1108.2885
[17] H.J.M.Bos,Differentials,higher-orderdifferentials
andthe derivativeintheLeibniziancalculus,Archive
for History of ExactSciences 14 (1974), 1–90.
[18] H.Bos,R.Bunn,J.Dauben,I.Grattan-Guinness,
T. Hawkins, and K. Pedersen, From the Calculus
to Set Theory, 1630–1910. An Introductory History,
editedbyI.Grattan-Guinness,GeraldDuckworthand
Co. Ltd., London, 1980.
[19] N.Bourbaki,Théoriedelamesureetdel’intégration,
Introduction,UniversitéHenri Poincaré, Nancy, 1947.
[20] K. Bråting, Anew w look at E.G.Björling andthe
Cauchy sum theorem.Arch.Hist.Exact Sci.61(2007),
no. 5, 519–535.
[21] H.Breger,Themysteriesofadaequare:avindication
of Fermat, Archive for History of Exact Sciences46
(1994), no. 3, 193–219.
[22] A. L. . Cauchy, Cours s d’Analyse de L’École Roy-
ale
Polytechnique. Première Partie. Analyse
algébrique. Paris: Imprimérie Royale, 1821. On-
line at http://books.google.com/books?id=
_mYVAAAAQAAJ&dq=cauchy&lr=&source=gbs_
navlinks_s
[23]
,Théorie dela propagationdesondesà la sur-
face d’un fluide pesant d’une profondeur indéfinie,
(published 1827, with additional Notes), Oeuvres,
Series 1, Vol. 1, 1815, pp. 4–318.
[24] C.Cerroni,ThecontributionsofHilbertandDehnto
non-Archimedeangeometries andtheirimpactonthe
Italian school, Revue d’Histoiredes Mathématiques
13 (2007), no. 2, 259–299.
[25] G. Cifoletti, La méthode de Fermat: son statut
et sa diffusion, Algèbre et comparaison de figures
dans l’histoire de la méthode de Fermat, Cahiers
d’Histoire et de Philosophie des Sciences, Nouvelle
Série33, SociétéFrançaised’Histoire des Sciences et
des Techniques, Paris, 1990.
[26] A.Connes,NoncommutativeGeometry,Academic
Press, Inc., San Diego, CA, 1994.
[27] J.Dauben,ThedevelopmentoftheCantorianset
theory. In(Bos et al. 1980[18]), pp. 181–219.
[28]
,Abraham Robinson.1918–1974,Biographical
Memoirs of the National Academy of Sciences
82 (2003), 243-284. Available at the addresses
http://www.nap.edu/html/biomems/arobinson.
pdf and http://www.nap.edu/catalog/10683.
html
[29] A. De Morgan, On the early y history of
infinitesimals in England, Philosophical Mag-
azine, Ser. 4
(1852), no. . 26, 321–330.
See
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/
10.1080/14786445208647134
[30] P.Dirac,ThePrinciplesofQuantumMechanics,4th
edition, Oxford, TheClarendon Press, 1958.
[31] R.DossenaandL.Magnani,Mathematicsthrough
diagrams: Microscopes in non-standardand smooth
analysis, Studies in Computational Intelligence(SCI)
64 (2007),193–213.
[32] P. Ehrlich, Therise of non-Archimedean mathe-
matics and the roots of a misconception. I. The
emergence of non-Archimedean systemsofmagni-
tudes, ArchiveforHistoryof ExactSciences60(2006),
no. 1, 1–121.
[33] R. Ely, , Loss of f dimension in n the history y of cal-
culus and in student reasoning, The Mathematics
Enthusiast 9 (2012), no. 3, 303–326.
[34] Euclid, Euclid’s s Elements of Geometry, , edited
and provided with a modern English transla-
tion by Richard Fitzpatrick, 2007. See http://
farside.ph.utexas.edu/euclid.html
[35] L.Euler,IntroductioinAnalysinInfinitorum,Tomus
primus, SPb and Lausana, 1748.
[36]
,Introductionto Analysisof theInfinite. Book I,
translated from theLatin and withan introduction
by JohnD. Blanton, Springer-Verlag, New York, 1988
[translation of (Euler 1748 [35])].
[37]
,InstitutionesCalculi Differentialis, SPb, 1755.
[38]
,Foundations of Differential Calculus,English
translation of Chapters 1–9 of (Euler 1755 [37]) by
D.Blanton, Springer, New York, 2000.
[39] G.Ferraro,Differentialsanddifferentialcoefficients
in the Eulerian foundations of thecalculus, Historia
Mathematica 31(2004), no. 1, 34–61.
[40] H.Freudenthal,Cauchy,Augustin-Louis,inDictio-
nary of Scientific Biography, ed. by C. C. Gillispie,
vol. 3, CharlesScribner’sSons, New York, 1971, pp.
131–148.
[41] C. I. Gerhardt (ed.), , Historia et t Origo calculi dif-
ferentialis a G. G. Leibnitio conscripta, Hannover,
1846.
[42]
(ed.), Leibnizens mathematische Schriften,
Berlinand Halle: Eidmann,1850–1863.
902
Notices of the AMS
Volume 60, Number 7
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET Create new page to PDF document in both ASP.NET web server Support adding PDF page number.
how to add text fields to a pdf document; add text pdf professional
VB.NET PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box
NET Document Viewer, C# Online Dicom Viewer, C# Online Jpeg images VB.NET PDF - Add Text Box to PDF Page in VB VB.NET Users with Solution of Adding Text Box to
how to add text boxes to pdf; adding text to pdf file
[43] G.Granger,Philosophieetmathématiqueleibnizi-
ennes, Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 86e
Année, No. 1(Janvier-Mars 1981), 1–37.
[44] Hermann Grassmann, , Lehrbuch h der Arithmetik,
Enslin, Berlin, 1861.
[45] RupertHallandMarieBoasHall,eds.,Unpublished
Scientific Papers of Isaac Newton, Cambridge Uni-
versity Press, 1962, pp. 15–19, 31–37; quoted in I.
BernardCohen, RichardS. Westfall, Newton,Norton
CriticalEdition, 1995, pp. 377–386.
[46] HermannHankel,ZurGeschichtederMathematik
inAlterthum und Mittelalter, Teubner,Leipzig, 1876.
[47] T.Heath(ed.),TheWorksofArchimedes,Cambridge
University Press, Cambridge,1897.
[48] E.Hewitt,Ringsofreal-valuedcontinuousfunctions.
I, Trans. Amer.Math. Soc. 64 (1948),45–99.
[49] J. Heiberg (ed.), Archimedis s Opera a Omnia cum
CommentariisEutocii, Vol. I.Teubner, Leipzig, 1880.
[50] A. Heijting, Address s to o Professor r A. . Robin-
son, at the occasion of the Brouwer memorial
lecture given by Professor A. Robinson on
the 26th April 1973, Nieuw Arch. Wisk. (3)
21
(1973), 134–137. MathSciNet Review
at
http://www.ams.org/mathscinet-getitem?mr
=434756
[51] D.Hilbert,GrundlagenderGeometrie,Festschrift
zurEnthüllung desGauss-Weber Denkmals, Göttin-
gen, Leipzig, 1899.
[52]
,Les principes fondamentaux delagéométrie,
Annales scientifiques de l’E.N.S. 3
e
série 17 (1900),
103–209.
[53] O. Hölder, Die e Axiome e der r Quantität t und d die
Lehre vom Mass, Berichte über die Verhandlungen
der Königlich Sächsischen Gesellschaft der Wis-
senschaften zu Leipzig, Mathematisch-Physische
Classe, 53, Leipzig, 1901, pp. 1–63.
[54] H.Ishiguro,Leibniz’sPhilosophyofLogicandLan-
guage, secondedition, Cambridge University Press,
Cambridge, 1990.
[55] D.Jesseph,Leibnizontheeliminationofinfinitesi-
mals: Strategies for findingtruth infiction, 27 pages.
In Leibniz on theInterrelations between Mathematics
and Philosophy,editedbyNormaB.Goethe,PhilipBee-
leyand David Rabouin, Archimedes Series, Springer
Verlag, 2013.
[56] V.Kanovei,ThecorrectnessofEuler’smethodfor
the factorizationof thesinefunction into an infinite
product, Russian Mathematical Surveys43 (1988),
65–94.
[57] V.Kanovei,M.Katz,andT.Mormann,Tools,ob-
jects,andchimeras:Connes ontheroleof hyperreals
in mathematics, Foundations of Science(onlinefirst).
See
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10699-012-
9316-5 and http://arxiv.org/abs/1211.0244
[58] V.KanoveiandM.Reeken,NonstandardAnalysis,
Axiomatically, Springer Monographs in Mathematics,
Springer, Berlin, 2004.
[59] V.KanoveiandS.Shelah,Adefinablenonstandard
model of the reals, Journal of Symbolic Logic 69
(2004), no. 1, 159–164.
[60] K. Katz z and M. . Katz, Zooming in n on infinitesi-
mal 1 :9:: in a post-triumvirate era, Educational
Studies in Mathematics 74 (2010), no. 3, 259–273.
See http://rxiv.org/abs/arXiv:1003.1501
[61]
,When is:999::: less than 1? The Montana
Mathematics Enthusiast 7 (2010), no. 1, 3–30.
[62]
,
Cauchy’s
continuum.
Perspectives
on Science 19 (2011), no. 4, 426–452. See
http://www.mitpressjournals.org/toc/posc/
19/4 andhttp://arxiv.org/abs/1108.4201
[63]
,Meaning in classical mathematics: Is it at
odds with intuitionism? Intellectica56(2011), no. 2,
223-302. Seehttp://arxiv.org/abs/1110.5456
[64]
, A Burgessian critique of nominalistic
tendencies in contemporary mathematics and
its historiography, Foundations of Science 17
(2012), no. 1, 51–89. See http://dx.doi.org/
10.1007/s10699-011-9223-1and http://arxiv.
org/abs/1104.0375
[65] M. Katz and E. Leichtnam, Commuting and
noncommuting infinitesimals, American Mathemat-
ical Monthly 120 (2013), no. 7, 631–641. See
http://arxiv.org/abs/1304.0583
[66] M.Katz,D.Schaps,andS.Shnider,Almostequal:
ThemethodofadequalityfromDiophantustoFermat
andbeyond,PerspectivesonScience21 (2013), no. 3,
283–324. Seehttp://arxiv.org/abs/1210.7750
[67] M. Katz and D. Sherry, Leibniz’s infinitesimals:
Their fictionality, their modern implementations,
and theirfoes from Berkeley to Russell andbeyond,
Erkenntnis78 (2013), no. 3, 571–625; seehttp://
dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10670-012-9370-y
and
http://arxiv.org/abs/1205.0174
[68]
,Leibniz’s lawsofcontinuity and homogene-
ity, Notices of the American Mathematical Society
59 (2012), no. . 11, 1550–1558. See http://www.
ams.org/notices/201211/ and http://arxiv.
org/abs/1211.7188
[69] M.KatzandD.Tall,ACauchy-Diracdeltafunction.
Foundations of Science 18 (2013), no. 1, 107–123.
See
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10699-012-
9289-4 and http://arxiv.org/abs/1206.0119
[70] H.J.Keisler,Theultraproductconstruction.Ultrafil-
ters acrossmathematics, Contemp. Math., vol. 530,
pp. 163–179, Amer. Math.Soc., Providence, RI, 2010.
[71] G.S.Kirk,J.E.Raven,andM.Schofield,Presocratic
Philosophers, CambridgeUniv. Press, 1983, §316.
[72] F.Klein,ElementaryMathematicsfromanAdvanced
Standpoint. Vol. I, Arithmetic, Algebra, Analysis.
Translation by E. R. Hedrick andC. A. Noble [Macmil-
lan, New York, 1932]from the thirdGerman edition
[Springer, Berlin, 1924]. Originally published as El-
ementarmathematik vom höheren Standpunkteaus
(Leipzig, 1908).
[73] D.Laugwitz,Hiddenlemmasintheearlyhistoryof
infiniteseries, AequationesMathematicae34 (1987),
264–276.
[74]
,Definite valuesofinfinitesums: Aspects of
the foundations of infinitesimal analysis around
1820, ArchiveforHistoryof ExactSciences39(1989),
no. 3, 195–245.
[75]
,Early deltafunctions andthe use of infinites-
imals in research, Revue d’histoire des sciences 45
(1992), no. 1, 115–128.
[76] G.Leibniz Cum Prodiisset…mss “Cumprodiisset
atque increbuisset Analysismea infinitesimalis:::
in Gerhardt [41,pp. 39–50].
[77]
,Letterto Varignon, 2 Feb 1702, in Gerhardt
[42, vol. IV, pp. 91–95].
[78]
,Symbolismus memorabilis calculi algebraici
et infinitesimalis in comparatione potentiarum
August 2013
Notices of the AMS
903
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Support adding protection features to PDF file by adding password, digital signatures and redaction feature. Various of PDF text and images processing features
adding text to a pdf in preview; add editable text box to pdf
VB.NET PDF Text Add Library: add, delete, edit PDF text in vb.net
Viewer, C# Online Dicom Viewer, C# Online Jpeg images VB.NET PDF - Annotate Text on PDF Page in Professional VB.NET Solution for Adding Text Annotation to PDF
add text pdf; add text to pdf in acrobat
et differentiarum, et de lege homogeneorum
transcendentali, inGerhardt [42,vol.V, pp.377-382].
[79]
,Lanaissanceducalcul différentiel,26 articles
des Acta Eruditorum. Translated from theLatin and
with an introductionand notesby Marc Parmentier.
Witha preface by MichelSerres. Mathesis, Librairie
PhilosophiqueJ.Vrin, Paris, 1989.
[80]
,De quadratura arithmetica circuli ellipseos
et hyperbolae cujus corollarium est trigonome-
tria sine tabulis. Edited, annotated, and with a
foreword in German by Eberhard Knobloch, Ab-
handlungen der Akademie der Wissenschaften in
Göttingen, Mathematisch-Physikalische Klasse, Folge
3 [Papers of the Academy of Sciences in Göt-
tingen, Mathematical-Physical Class. Series 3], 43,
Vandenhoeck and Ruprecht, Göttingen, 1993.
[81] J.Ło´s,Quelquesremarques,théorèmesetproblèmes
sur les classes définissablesd’algèbres, inMathemat-
ical Interpretation of Formal Systems, pp. 98–113,
North-Holland Publishing Co.,Amsterdam, 1955.
[82] W.Luxemburg,Whatisnonstandardanalysis?Pa-
persinthe foundationsof mathematics, American
Mathematical Monthly 80(1973),no.6,partII,38–67.
[83] L.MagnaniandR.Dossena,Perceivingtheinfinite
and the infinitesimal world: Unveiling and optical
diagrams in mathematics, Foundations of Science10
(2005), no. 1, 7–23.
[84] P.Mancosu,PhilosophyofMathematicsandMath-
ematical Practice in the Seventeenth Century, The
ClarendonPress, Oxford University Press, New York,
1996.
[85] R.McClenon,AcontributionofLeibniztothehis-
tory ofcomplex numbers, American Mathematical
Monthly 30(1923), no. 7, 369–374.
[86] M.McKinzieandC.Tuckey,HiddenlemmasinEu-
ler’s summation of the reciprocals of the squares,
ArchiveforHistoryofExactSciences51(1997),29–57.
[87] H. Meschkowski, Aus den Briefbuchern Georg Can-
tors, Archive for History of Exact Sciences2 (1965),
503–519.
[88] T.MormannandM.Katz,Infinitesimalsasanissue
of neo-Kantian philosophy of science, HOPOS: The
Journal of the International Society for theHistory of
Philosophy of Science, to appear.
[89] D. Mumford, Intuition and rigor and Enriques’s
quest, Notices Amer. Math. Soc. 58 (2011), no. 2,
250–260.
[90] I.Newton,MethodusFluxionum(1671);Englishver-
sion, The Method of Fluxions and Infinite Series
(1736).
[91] W.ParkhurstandW.Kingsland,Infinityandthe
infinitesimal,TheMonist 35 (1925), 633–666.
[92] C.Proietti,Naturalnumbersandinfinitesimals:a
discussion between BennoKerry and Georg Cantor,
Historyand PhilosophyofLogic29(2008),no. 4,343–
359.
[93] P. Reeder, Infinitesimals s for r Metaphysics: : Conse-
quences for the Ontologies of Space andTime, Ph.D.
thesis,Ohio StateUniversity, 2012.
[94] A.Robinson,Non-standardanalysis,Nederl.Akad.
Wetensch. Proc. Ser. A64 =Indag. Math.23 (1961),
432–440 [reprinted inSelected Works;see(Robinson
1979[96, pp. 3–11]).
[95]
,Reviews: Foundations of ConstructiveAnaly-
sis,American Mathematical Monthly 75 (1968),no.8,
920–921.
[96]
,Selected Papersof AbrahamRobinson, Vol. II.
Nonstandard Analysis and Philosophy, edited and
with introductions by W. A. J. Luxemburg and S.
Körner, Yale UniversityPress, New Haven, CT, 1979.
[97] B. Russell, The e Principles s of Mathematics, Vol. I,
Cambridge Univ. Press,Cambridge, 1903.
[98] D.Sherry, Thewakeof Berkeley’s s analyst:Rigor
mathematicae?Stud. Hist. Philos.Sci.18(1987),no.4,
455–480.
[99]
,Zeno’smetricalparadoxrevisited, Philosophy
of Science 55 (1988), no. 1, 58–73.
[100] D.SherryandM.Katz,Infinitesimals,imaginaries,
ideals,andfictions, Studia Leibnitiana, toappear.See
http://arxiv.org/abs/1304.2137
[101] R.Simson,TheElementsofEuclid:Viz.theFirstSix
Books, together with the Eleventh and Twelfth. The
Errors by which Theon and others have long ago
vitiated these Books are corrected and someofEu-
clid’sDemonstrations arerestored.Robert & Andrew
Foulis, Glasgow, 1762.
[102] T.Skolem,ÜberdieUnmöglichkeiteinervollständi-
gen Charakterisierung der Zahlenreihemittels eines
endlichen Axiomensystems, Norsk Mat. Forenings
Skr., II.Ser. No. 1/12(1933), 73–82.
[103]
, Über die Nicht-charakterisierbarkeit der
Zahlenreihe mittels endlich oder abzählbar un-
endlichvieler Aussagen mit ausschliesslich Zahlen-
variablen, Fundamenta Mathematicae 23 (1934),
150–161.
[104]
,Peano’s axioms and models of arithmetic,
in Mathematical Interpretation of Formal Systems,
pp. 1–14, North-Holland Publishing Co.,Amsterdam,
1955.
[105] R. Solovay, A model of f set-theory in which ev-
ery set of reals is Lebesgue measurable, Annals of
Mathematics (2) 92(1970), 1–56.
[106] O.Stolz,VorlesungenüberAllgemeineArithmetik,
Teubner, Leipzig, 1885.
[107] D.TallandM.Katz,AcognitiveanalysisofCauchy’s
conceptions of function, continuity, limit, andinfini-
tesimal, withimplications for teaching thecalculus,
Educational Studiesin Mathematics, to appear.
[108] P. Vickers, , Understanding Inconsistent t Science,
OxfordUniversityPress, Oxford, 2013.
[109] J.Wallis,TheArithmetic ofInfinitesimals(1656).
Translated from the Latin and with an introduc-
tion by Jacqueline A. Stedall, Sources and Studies
in the History of Mathematics and Physical Sciences,
Springer-Verlag,New York, 2004.
[110] FrederikS.Herzberg,Stochasticcalculuswithin-
finitesimals, Lecture Notes in Mathematics, 2067,
Springer, Heidelberg, 2013.
904
Notices of the AMS
Volume 60, Number 7
C# PDF Text Box Edit Library: add, delete, update PDF text box in
for adding text box to PDF document in .NET WinForms application. A web based PDF annotation application able to add text box comments to adobe PDF file online
how to add text field to pdf form; how to add text to a pdf in preview
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
C# source code for adding or removing annotation from PDF Support to take notes on adobe PDF file without Support to add text, text box, text field and crop
add text to a pdf document; acrobat add text to pdf
A
MERICAN 
M
ATHEMATICAL 
S
OCIETY
Advancing Mathematics Since 1888
Applications are invited for the position of Associate Executive 
Director for Meetings and Professional Services.
The Associate Executive Director heads the division of Meetings
and Professional Services in the AMS, which includes
approximately 20 staff in the Providence headquarters.
Departments in the division work on meetings, surveys,
professional development, educational outreach, public awareness, 
and membership development. The Associate Executive Director 
has high visibility, interacting with every part of the Society, and 
therefore has a profound effect on the way in which the AMS 
serves the mathematical community. It is an exciting position with 
much opportunity in the coming years.
Responsibilities of the Associate Executive Director include:
•  Direction of all staff in the three departments comprising
the division
•  Development and implementation of long-range plans for all 
parts of the division
•  Budgetary planning and control for the division
•  Leadership in creating, planning, and implementing new
programs for the Society
Candidates should have an earned Ph.D. in one of the
mathematical sciences and some administrative experience. A 
strong interest in professional programs and services is essential.
The appointment will be for three to fi ve years, with possible
renewal, and will commence in January 2014. The starting date 
and length of term are negotiable. The Associate Executive
Director position is full time, but applications are welcome from 
individuals taking leaves of absence from another position. Salary is 
negotiable and will be commensurate with experience.
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Support adding and inserting one or multiple pages to Offer PDF page break inserting function. Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+.
adding text to a pdf document acrobat; adding text pdf
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
Access to freeware download and online C#.NET class source code. you solve this technical problem, we provide this C#.NET PDF image adding control, XDoc
add text pdf file acrobat; add text pdf acrobat
906    
N
otices
of
the
AMs 
V
oluMe
60, N
uMber
7
Getting Evidence-Based 
Teaching Practices into 
Mathematics Departments: 
Blueprint or Fantasy?
Robert Reys
H
ow do you teach mathematics in your 
college classes? Are undergraduate 
classes taught the same as graduate 
classes? Do you teach mathematics 
as you were taught? Are your instruc-
tional practices aligned with what research says 
about how students learn mathematics? Do you 
use evidence-based instructional practices? That 
is, does evidence exist that your instructional 
practices help students learn the mathematics you 
are teaching? How often do you exchange ideas 
about teaching mathematics with colleagues? The 
purpose of this paper is to encourage discussion 
among college faculty about effective instructional 
practices with the intent of improving the teaching 
and student learning of mathematics. 
The Need to Improve Mathematics 
Teaching 
Since the days of E. H. Moore and his 1902 presi-
dential address to the AMS there have been 
many calls for improved teaching of mathemat-
ics [1]. More recently David Bressoud in the MAA 
Launchings [2] shares some ways that physicists 
have worked to utilize evidence-based teaching 
methods in their classes. Bressoud also provides 
resources that represent multiple perspectives 
from mathematicians engaged in the scholarship 
of teaching. Yet, despite the desire to promote 
better mathematics learning in STEM courses and 
the growing body of evidence-based research that 
has implications for teaching practices, changing 
collegiate instructional practices has been slow 
and does not happen easily [3]. 
In September 2011 the Association of American 
Universities announced a five-year initiative to im-
prove the quality of undergraduate teaching and 
learning in science, technology, engineering, and 
mathematics (STEM) at its member institutions. 
In February 2012 the President’s Council of Advi-
sors on Science and Technology (PCAST) issued 
a report [4] that forecast the need for producing 
“1 million more college graduates in STEM fields” 
during the next decade. Among other things, the 
report noted the important role that college math-
ematics courses play in either opening or closing 
the doors to different STEM fields. To address this 
issue, the PCAST report called for more research 
into the best ways to teach and learn mathematics 
and urged “widespread adoption of empirically 
validated teaching practices” by STEM faculty in 
higher education. It also recommended the launch 
of “a national experiment in postsecondary math-
ematics education to address the mathematics-
preparation gap.”
In June 2012 the National Science Founda-
tion issued a Dear Colleague Letter for Widening 
Implementation and Demonstration of Evidence-
based Reforms (WIDER) calling for proposals. The 
program is intended to promote improvement in 
undergraduate STEM instructional practices and 
bring to scale successful instructional practices 
within and across departments. This is just one of 
the initiatives designed to stimulate greater knowl-
edge of and widespread use of evidence-based 
instructional practices. This initiative provides 
mathematics departments an opportunity to focus 
on teaching practices. The visual image of most 
collegiate-level mathematics courses (regardless 
Robert Reys is Curators’ Professor Emeritus of Mathemat-
ics Education at the University of Missouri-Columbia. His 
email address is reysr@missouri.edu.
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1090/noti1018
A
ugust
2013 
N
otices
of
the
AMs 
907
of its accuracy) is a professor writing on a black/
whiteboard with his/her back to the class while stu-
dents are copying feverishly and others have their 
hand raised but their questions going unanswered 
[5]. There are many factors that influence the in-
structional methods faculty members employ in 
their teaching practices. Probably the single most 
influential factor impacting how teachers teach is 
their prior experience as a student [6]. Stigler and 
Hiebert claim that breaking away from the cultural 
model of mathematics teaching that is so prevalent 
in the United States, typically lecture and note  
taking, is a major challenge. In the research related 
to evidence-based teaching in STEM undergradu-
ate courses, it is worth noting that the focus has 
been almost exclusively on science-related courses 
[7], [8]. Despite the work of R. L. Moore and the 
legacy of the Moore method, it can be argued that 
inquiry-based learning is much more prevalent in 
science courses than in mathematics courses at 
the undergraduate level [9], [10], [11]. Perhaps op-
portunities to engage in laboratory environments 
provides experiences that engage learners and 
promotes more inquiry-based practices in science 
and engineering, whereas mathematics is too often 
viewed as a spectator sport; i.e., show me what to 
do or tell me how to do it, and I will memorize and 
practice the procedures. Even though there have 
been many calls by professional organizations to 
make the learning of mathematics a sense-making 
activity (National Council of Teachers of Math-
ematics, Mathematical Association of America, 
American Mathematical Society), for many college 
students mathematics learning is viewed as assum-
ing a passive rather than an active role in learning. 
Challenges Related to Changing 
Instructional Approaches
What are some of the hurdles to be cleared in 
promoting evidence-based change in teaching 
practices in collegiate mathematics classes? Here 
are a few broad challenges:
We tend to teach as we have been taught. If 
lecture is the primary model experienced for learn-
ing mathematics, as Stigler and Hiebert suggest, 
it is difficult to break this cycle. Since professors 
teaching mathematics courses were successful in 
learning mathematics via a lecture method, it is 
difficult for them to relate to learning difficulties 
of their students. A frequently voiced sentiment 
is, “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” However, other 
people, particularly those outside mathematics, 
who cite the high rate of attrition in college math-
ematics courses argue that “actually it is broke” 
and there are some fundamental problems regard-
ing the learning and teaching of mathematics that 
need to be addressed.
Doctoral programs in mathematics are heavily 
weighted toward research, with limited systematic 
attention to teaching. In order to do original re-
search in mathematics, one needs to delve deeply 
into a topic within a discipline. Completion of a 
Ph.D. in mathematics requires extensive research 
that focuses on mathematics, and thus few doc-
toral programs in mathematics have specific 
requirements regarding competence in teaching.1 
The goal of covering many chapters each semester 
still exists, and fixed pacing requirements often 
make it difficult for instructors to break away 
from lectures and engage their students in open 
discussions about the mathematical concepts 
being examined. Furthermore, heavy emphasis on 
mathematics research leaves little time for TAs to 
focus on evidenced-based instructional practices. 
In fact, Project NExT2 was established in part to 
help provide some support for further develop-
ment of teaching skills by new faculty members 
in mathematics departments. 
The climate and environment of the department/
college/institution provides a powerful context to 
either support or discourage emphasis on good 
teaching. Some research suggests this is the single 
most important factor inhibiting change in teach-
ing practices [12], [13]. For example, does schedul-
ing of large classes with several hundred students 
limit the use of evidence-based instructional op-
tions? Are specific service courses, such as busi-
ness calculus or linear algebra, viewed as service 
courses? If so, it may discourage a focus on inquiry 
when a course is supposed to help students learn 
specific skills. Does the chair/dean/chancellor en-
courage and value good teaching? Are their values 
made clear? Are there support systems for help-
ing faculty learn about evidence-based research 
related to effective teaching practices? Is there 
motivation/incentive to engage in learning about 
different instructional models? 
The reward system in comprehensive research- 
oriented institutions favors faculty members who 
gain national visibility via their research and schol-
arship rather than based on the quality of their 
teaching. An average or below-average teacher 
may be promoted because of a sterling record 
of scholarship. However, it is rare (virtually 
1
Nearly fifty years ago while I was a doctoral student, 
I taught college algebra and calculus for two years as 
a teaching assistant in a mathematics department at a 
research university.  During that time the extent of instruc-
tional support was limited to giving the TAs a book and 
specific expectations about what chapters to cover.  We 
did not know what classes we were assigned to teach until 
the night before classes started!  Thank goodness progress 
has been made and support for TAs has improved in 
mathematics departments since I was a TA.
2
Project NExT (New Experiences in Teaching) is a program 
founded over twenty years ago and is sponsored by the 
Mathematical Association of America.  For more informa-
tion see http://archives.math.utk.edu/projnext/.
908    
N
otices
of
the
AMs 
V
oluMe
60, N
uMber
7
impossible) for a faculty member who is a great 
teacher but has done little research in mathemat-
ics to be promoted in a research-oriented institu-
tion. Thus, the argument offered by Earnest Boyer 
[14] more than twenty years ago for rewarding 
the scholarship of teaching has not made much 
headway.
Faculty members face pressures throughout their 
careers but may react differently depending on the 
stage of their career. While publication pressure is 
usually the heaviest early in their careers, once that 
hurdle is cleared faculty members may focus at-
tention elsewhere, including teaching [15]. So while 
posttenured faculty members may be interested in 
teaching, their instructional approaches may have 
become so entrenched that significant change is 
very difficult [16]. On the other hand, some senior 
faculty members choose to give more attention 
to improving teaching practices. This has been 
sparked in some cases by calls for collaboration 
between higher-education faculty and K–12 school 
systems (e.g., NSF Math Science Partnerships).
Institutions of higher education have created new 
types of faculty appointments to address teaching. 
This may be viewed as a blessing or a curse. New 
faculty tracks have been created for specialized 
roles (e.g., adjunct, clinical, visiting, fixed-term, 
nonregular, and postdocs). Many of these appoint-
ments are designed to address the teaching needs 
of institutions, so it seems reasonable that these 
people would be highly motivated to learn about 
and use evidence-based teaching practices [17],  
[7]. However, hiring “others” to focus on teaching, 
may in fact decrease interest by faculty in tenure-
track positions to explore ways to improve their 
teaching.
In an effort to gain information about what 
some institutions know about the teaching prac-
tices employed in their mathematics classes, I 
contacted a department chair and a provost at 
two research-oriented institutions. I know both of 
these people well. I felt I could be honest with them 
and that they would be honest in their responses.
Questions Asked and What Was Learned from 
Two Institutions 
Here is how I situated the discussion: I am trying to 
learn about the instructional practices being used 
in undergraduate mathematics classes at your uni-
versities. I want to identify issues and challenges 
that would most likely be encountered in gather-
ing information about instructional practices used 
by your mathematics faculty members teaching 
undergraduate courses. I then asked:
Do you regularly collect information about 
instructional practices used in teaching your 
undergraduate mathematics courses at your in-
stitution? (This would include teachers who are 
graduate students as well as adjunct and regular 
faculty members.)
Neither institution collected any data on teach-
ing practices. The provost said their institution 
collects information to support a state man-
date to provide an “Institution Effectiveness 
Plan”, but this amounted to collecting course syl-
labi that highlight content. While some of these 
syllabi provide clues about instructional practices, 
there is no specific requirement or expectation 
that instructional practices be addressed. While 
each institution gathers course evaluations from 
students, they have no current structure that 
systematically collects information about teach-
ing practices nor do they have any mechanism in 
place that communicates information about best 
or effective teaching practices to their faculty 
members. 
More specifically, the mathematics department 
chair said: “No, we currently do not have such 
information. The department is initiating ways to 
collect such information in a more formal manner 
than ‘coffee room’ chatter about what somebody 
did in class. We are planning to have a depart-
ment ‘retreat’ (a couple of hours) this year where 
interested faculty will share their encouraging 
teaching practices, and this is actually a pretty 
big step for us.”
What do you think would be the most sig-
nificant barriers in getting faculty members to 
participate in efforts to learn about evidence-based 
instructional practices? 
Each of the administrators mentioned lack 
of time and uncertainty of the perceived value/ 
importance of the activity. The mathematics de-
partment chair went on to say:
“Many mathematicians are so ‘involved in their 
research’ that their teaching is something they 
do; there is a belief that teaching is inherently 
good (they teach the way they were taught and 
that IS GOOD, by definition)—the students are 
ill-prepared and that causes the problem. The 
department culture about teaching is the most 
significant barrier as I see it. Promotion requires 
publications/grants, etc.; teaching is regarded 
as good unless there is some major issue that 
surfaces…good teaching practices rarely have an 
important role in the process. So, the culture has 
to change; it must respect more than traditional 
thinking about research contributions.
“I have also found that many research math-
ematicians have really good ideas about teaching 
and learning—and they practice these regularly,  
but they really don’t share them with colleagues 
in part because they don’t have an opportunity 
to do so. As the culture changes and instruction 
is understood to become part of the equation for 
advancement, faculty will want to be better teach-
ers and share what they do.”
A
ugust
2013 
N
otices
of
the
AMs 
909
Are there incentives to systematically collect 
information about teaching practices used by 
mathematics faculty members? 
The provost suggested an appeal to professional 
responsibility. She also addressed the importance 
of selling this need to top-level administrators 
and convincing them how this information would 
be useful to them in making policy decisions. She 
said the data collection would need to include all 
STEM disciplines and not be limited to a single 
department. Furthermore, any such survey would 
need to be free of implied or stated value judg-
ments regarding particular instructional practices. 
The need to avoid any bias with regard to teach-
ing practices was reiterated by the mathematics 
department chair. In addition, the mathematics 
chair said:
“In reality, there are probably not any incen-
tives. The culture has to change. It is rare that a 
person will get a good raise because they were a 
good teacher. We give a lot of lip service to good 
teaching, but there is no concerted effort to en-
courage or reward it in the department.”
This quote prompted a reviewer of this paper 
to say, “We need a culture that encourages faculty 
to think about the effectiveness of their teaching, 
to share their personal insights, and to provide 
support that enables faculty to adopt easily 
implementable ideas and helps faculty monitor 
the effectiveness of what they are doing.” I say, 
Amen! Although, I don’t think we should limit 
ourselves to “easily implementable ideas”, as some 
of the evidence-based practices may not be easy 
to implement.
Where to from Here?
This discussion provides a limited glimpse about 
mathematics teaching, including perspectives 
from administrators from a Carnegie doctoral/
research university and the other from a research 
university (high research activity). Yet these 
perspectives represent only two of more than 
3,000 four-year institutions of higher education 
and none of the nearly 2,000 two-year institu-
tions. This discussion suggests that structuring 
a framework that will provide accurate profiles 
of the current teaching practices in mathematics 
courses in various institutions is a big challenge. 
Using that information to inform faculty members 
in institutions of higher education about evidence-
based teaching practices and helping to stimulate 
systematic change in teaching practices are likely 
to pose a far more demanding challenge. 
The stakes of not doing everything possible to 
improve mathematics teaching and learning are 
high. Millions of students are taking courses in 
mathematics at institutions of higher education 
this year. Whether the courses are remedial, satis-
fying a general education requirement, calculus or 
beyond, there is increasing interest and pressure 
to make learning of mathematics meaningful and 
to help students make sense of whatever math-
ematics is being learned. While students have a 
responsibility to seek understanding of the math-
ematics, faculty members have a responsibility to 
utilize evidence-based teaching practices to help 
facilitate mathematics learning. 
So what might a mathematics department 
do? One valuable first step would be to have an 
open and frank discussion about teaching among 
members of the department. This might include: 
addressing some of the opening questions, sharing 
teaching approaches and techniques that profes-
sors use, visiting and observing other professors 
as they teach, learning more about how people 
learn, and examining evidence-based instructional 
practices that have been shown to be successful. 
Any or all of the above might be eye opening and 
intellectually stimulating and perhaps most im-
portantly be recognition that the department is 
serious about improving the teaching and learning 
of mathematics at its institution. 
As the department chair interviewed said, “The 
culture has to change.” The big question is how 
and whether his statement reflects a blueprint or 
fantasy for his institution and thousands of other 
mathematics departments throughout the U.S. 
My hope is that this article will stimulate some 
discussion about your departmental culture and 
help bring teaching and learning of mathematics 
to the forefront.
References
1. A. H. Schoenfeld, When good teaching leads to bad 
results: The disasters of “well taught” mathematics 
courses, Educational Psychologist 23 (1988), 145–166.
2. D. Bressoud, MAA Launchings (September 17, 2012). 
See http://launchings.blogspot.com/2012/07/
learning-from-physicists.html;  http://
launchings.blogspot.com/2012/08/barriers-
to-change.html
3. A. E. Austin, M. Connolly, C. Pfund, D. L. Gillian-
Daniel, and R. Mathieu, Preparing STEM doc-
toral students for future faculty careers, in R. G.  
Baldwin (ed.), Improving the Climate for Undergradu-
ate Teaching and Learning in STEM Fields, Jossey-Bass, 
San Francisco, CA, 2009.
4. President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Tech-
nology-PCAST (August 29, 2012), Engage to excel: 
Producing one million additional college graduates 
with degrees in science, technology, engineering, and 
mathematics. See http://www.whitehouse.gov/
sites/default/files/microsites/ostp/pcast-
engage-to-excel-final_2-25- 12.pdf.
5. M. Cirillo and B. Herbel-Eisenmann, “Mathemati-
cians would say it this way.” An investigation of 
teachers’ framing of mathematicians, School Science 
and Mathematics 111 (2011), 68–77.
6. J. Stigler and J. Hiebert, The Teaching Gap, Simon & 
Schuster, New York, 2000.
7. A. E. Austin, Promoting evidence-based change in un-
dergraduate science education, paper commissioned 
by the National Academies National Research Council 
910    
N
otices
of
the
AMs 
V
oluMe
60, N
uMber
7
Useful Information for Deans and Department Chairs, 
Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA, 1995, pp. 47–63.
13. 
———
, Institutional and departmental cultures and 
the relationship between teaching and research, in  
J. Braxton (ed.), Faculty Teaching and Research: Is 
There a Conflict? Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, 1996, 
pp. 57–66.
14. E. L. Boyer, Scholarship Reconsidered: Priorities of the 
Professoriate, Carnegie Foundation for the Advance-
ment of Teaching, Princeton, NJ, 1990.
15. A. Neumann, Professing to Learn: Creating Tenured 
Lives and Careers in the American Research Univer-
sity, The Johns Hopkins Press, Baltimore, MD, 2009.
16. A. E. Austin and R. G. Baldwin, Faculty motivation 
for teaching, in P. Seldin (ed.), Improving College 
Teaching, Anker Publishing Co., Boston, MA, 1995, 
pp. 37–47.
17. A. E. Austin, Creating a bridge to the future: Pre-
paring new faculty to face changing expectations in 
a shifting context, Review of Higher Education 26 
(2003), 119–144.
the public sphere are perfectly represented by 
these trials. Thus they serve as ideal illustrations of 
these errors and of the drastic consequences that 
faulty reasoning has on real lives” (p. x). The au-
thors’ strategy is to identify common mathematical 
errors and then illustrate how those errors arose 
in trials. They seek to accomplish two goals: first, 
to impress upon the general public the importance 
of being able to “distinguish whether the numbers 
brandished in our faces are legitimately providing 
information or being misused for dangerous ends”; 
second, “to identify the most important errors that 
have actually occurred” so that such mistakes can 
be eliminated in the future.
These are worthy if anodyne goals, and I would 
not dare argue against them. But the claims that 
Schneps and Colmez make are strong ones and 
prompt many questions. Do they adequately 
support their contention that mathematics has a 
“disastrous record of causing judicial error?” How 
influential are mathematical arguments, anyway? 
Are mathematical arguments more problematic 
Board on Science Education, National Academy Press, 
Washington, DC, 2011.
8. L. Deslauriers, E. Schelew, and C. Wieman, Improv-
ing learning in a large enrollment physics class, Sci-
ence 332 (2011), 862–864. 
9. L. B. Flick, P. Sadri, P. D. Morrell, C. Wainwright, 
and A. Schepige, A cross discipline study of reform 
teaching by university science and mathematics 
faculty, School Science and Mathematics 109 (2009),  
197–211. 
10. C. Rasmussen, K. Marrongelle, and O. N. Kwon, 
A framework for interpreting inquiry oriented teach-
ing, paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the 
American Educational Research Association, San 
Diego, CA, 2009.
11. C. Wainwright, P. D. Morrell, L. B. Flick, and 
A. Schepige, Observation of reform teaching in un-
dergraduate level mathematics and science courses, 
School Science and Mathematics 104 (2004), 322–335.
12. A. E. Austin, Understanding and assessing faculty 
cultures and climates, in M. K. Kinnick (ed.), Providing 
Math on Trial 
Leila Schneps and Coralie Colmez 
Basic Books, 2013 
US$26.99, 272 pages 
ISBN-13: 978-0465032921
In Math on Trial, Leila Schneps and Coralie Col-
mez write about the abuse of mathematical argu-
ments in criminal trials and how these flawed 
arguments “have sent innocent people to prison”  
(p. ix). Indeed, people “saw their lives ripped apart 
by simple mathematical errors.” The purpose of 
focusing on these errors, despite mathematics’ 
“relatively rare use in trials” (p. x), is “that many of 
the common mathematical fallacies that pervade 
Burden of Proof: A Review of 
Math on Trial
Reviewed by Paul H. Edelman
Book Review
Paul H. Edelman is professor of mathematics and law 
at Vanderbilt University. His email address is paul. 
edelman@vanderbilt.edu.
The author thanks Ed Cheng, Chris Slobogin, and Suzanna 
Sherry for helpful comments.
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1090/noti1024
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested